This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

elis

elis

elis Sentence Examples

  • From this it is easy to pass to the most widely spread Greek form, the ordinary In Corinth, however, and its colony Corcyra, in Ozolian Locris and Elis, a form < inclined at a different angle is found.

    2
    0
  • Practically all Peloponnese, except Achaea and Elis, was " Dorian," together with Megara, Aegina, Crete, Melos, Thera, the Sporades Islands and the S.W.

    2
    0
  • There is more than one meaning of Elis discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

    1
    0
  • According to Philochorus, as quoted by a scholiast on Aristophanes, he fled to Elis, where he made the great statue of Zeus for the Eleans, and was afterwards put to death by them.

    1
    0
  • Of the Zeus we have unfortunately lost all trace save small copies on coins of Elis, which give us but a general notion of the pose, and the character of the head.

    1
    0
  • ARETHUSA, in Greek mythology, a nymph who gave her name to a spring in Elis and to another in the island of Ortygia near Syracuse.

    1
    0
  • He was subsequently a pupil first of Stilpo and then of Phaedo of Elis, whose school he transferred to Eretria, by which name it was afterwards known.

    1
    0
  • of Elis, whose women, according to the legend, she had blessed with abundance of children, seems at variance with the generallyrecognized conception of her as 7rapOEvo; but µ17T17P may bear the same meaning as taw pmpochos, the fosterer of the young, in harmony with her aspect as protectress of civic and family life.

    1
    0
  • 25, 6, Satrapes is mentioned as the name of a god who had a statue and a cult in Elis and is identified with Korybas.

    1
    0
  • Elis, but the name has been given to the whole river.

    1
    0
  • The northern Doris, for example, spoke Aeolic, while Elis, Phocis, and many non-Dorian districts of north-west Greece spoke dialects akin to Doric. Many Dorian states had additional " nonDorian tribes "; Sparta, which claimed to be of pure and typical Dorian origin, maintained institutions and a mode of life which were without parallel in Peloponnese, in the Parnassian and in the Asiatic Doris, and were partially reflected in Crete only.

    1
    0
  • The last of these attempts resulted in the " Dorian conquest " of the "Achaeans " and " Ionians " of Peloponnese, and in the assignment of Argolis, Laconia and Messenia to the Heracleid leaders, Temenus, Aristodemus and Cresphontes respectively; of Elis to their Aetolian allies; and of the north coast to the remnants of the conquered Achaeans.

    1
    0
  • The invasion was commonly believed to have proceeded by way of Aetolia and Elis, and the name Naupactus was interpreted as an allusion to the needful " shipbuilding " on the Corinthian Gulf.

    1
    0
  • One legend made Dorus himself originally an Aetolian prince; the participation of Oxylus, and the Aetolian claim to Elis, appear first in Ephorus (4th century).

    1
    0
  • The legend of an organized apportionment of Peloponnese amongst the Heracleid leaders appears first in the 5th-century tragedians, - not earlier, that is, than the rise of the Peloponnesian League, - and was amplified in the 4th century; the Aetolians' aid, and claim to Elis, appear first in Ephorus.

    1
    0
  • But these have also some forms in common with the " Aeolic " dialect of Boeotia and Thessaly, which in historic times was spoken also in Doris; Locris and Elis present similar northern " Achaean-Doric " dialects.

    1
    0
  • The Olympic games, so famous in Greek history, were celebrated once every four years, between the new and full moon first following the summer solstice, on the small plain named Olympia in Elis, which was bounded on one side by the river Alpheus, on another by the small tributary stream the Cladeus, and on the other two sides by mountains.

    1
    0
  • According to a tradition, possibly more authentic, they were re-established by Iphitus, king of Elis, in concert with the Spartan Lycurgus and Cleosthenes of Pisa.

    1
    0
  • In the time following the peace of Nicias the Mantineians, whose attempts at expansion beyond Mount Maenalus were being foiled by Sparta, formed a powerful alliance with Argos, Elis and Athens (420), which the Spartans, assisted by Tegea, broke up after a pitched battle in the city's territory (418).

    1
    0
  • The agora is of unsymmetrical form; its sides are bordered by porticoes, interrupted by streets, like the primitive agora of Elis as described by Pausanias, and unlike the regular agoras of Ionic type.

    1
    0
  • He was worshipped in many places: at Leuke, where he was honoured with offerings and games; in Sparta, Elis, and especially Sigeum on the Hellespont, where his famous tumulus was erected.

    1
    0
  • According to Proclus, a man named Hippias, probably Hippias of Elis (c. 460 B.C.), trisected an angle with a mechanical curve, named the quadratrix.

    1
    0
  • At Cyllene in Elis a mere phallus served as his emblem, and was highly venerated in the time of Pausanias (vi.

    1
    0
  • Though scepticism as a definite school may be said to date only from the time of Pyrrho (q.v.) of Elis, the main currents of Sophistic thought were sceptical in the wider sense of that term.

    1
    0
  • Scepticism, as a distinct school, begins with Pyrrho of Elis, who maintained that knowledge of things is impossible and that we must assume an attitude of reserve (iroXii).

    1
    0
  • He removed to Elis, where he built the town of Salmone, and became ruler of the country.

    1
    0
  • as supplying a method of doubling the cube), and the curve discovered most probably by Hippias of Elis about 420 B.C., and known by the name rerpaywqouva, or quadratrix.

    1
    0
  • The religious associations of the place date from the prehistoric age, when, before the states of Elis and Pisa had been founded, there was a centre of worship in this valley which is attested by early votive offerings found beneath the Heraeum and an altar near it.

    1
    0
  • The control of the festival belonged in early times to Pisa, but Elis seems to have claimed association with it.

    1
    0
  • Sixteen women, representing eight towns of Elis and eight of Pisatis, wove the festal robe for the Olympian Hera.

    1
    0
  • Elis and Sparta, making common cause, had no difficulty in excluding the Pisatans from their proper share in the management of the Olympian sanctuary.

    1
    0
  • The destruction of Pisa (before 572 B.e.) by the combined forces of Sparta and Elis put an end to the long rivalry.

    1
    0
  • It was at Elis, in the gymnasium, that candidates from all parts of Greece were tested, before they were admitted to the athletic competitions at Olympia.

    1
    0
  • To have passed through the training (usually of ten months) at Elis was regarded as the most valuable preparation.

    1
    0
  • The list of Olympian victors, which begins in 776 B.C. with Coroebus of Elis, closes with the name of an Armenian, Varastad, who is said to have belonged to the race of the Arsacidae.

    1
    0
  • Endeavouring next to expand into Peloponnesus, they allied themselves with Antigonus Gonatas of Macedonia against the Achaean league, and besides becoming protectors of Elis and Messenia won several Arcadian cities.

    1
    0
  • in the mountains of Pholoe on the borders of Elis and Arcadia.

    1
    0
  • The Peloponnesian malcontents turned to Argos as a new leader, and an alliance was formed between Argos, Corinth, Elis, Mantinea and the Thraceward towns (420).

    1
    0
  • Elis, Mantinea, Sicyon, Achaea.

    1
    0
  • The leaders of the Achaean invasion were Pelops, who took possession of Elis, and Aeacus, who became master of Aegina and was said to have introduced there the worship of Zeus Panhellenius, whose cult was also set up at Olympia.

    1
    0
  • ELIS This school was founded by Phaedo, a pupil of Socrates.

    1
    0
  • OENOMAUS, in Greek legend, son of Ares and Harpinna, king of Pisa in Elis and father of Hippodameia.

    1
    0
  • The sophist of whom the Platonic Protagoras is here thinking was Hippias of Elis, who gave popular lectures, not only upon the four subjects just mentioned, but also upon grammar, mythology, family history, archaeology, Homerology and the education of youth.

    1
    0
  • The fertile district of Elis had been reserved by agreement for Oxylus.

    1
    0
  • PYRGOS, a town of Greece, in the province of Elis and Achaea, 43 m.

    1
    0
  • Thus the unions of individual villages, known as synoecisms, such as took place in Attica and Elis in early times were partly of a federal character: they resulted in the establishment of a common administration, and no doubt in some degree of commercial and military unity.

    1
    0
  • The demiurgi among other officials represent Elis and Mantineia at the treaty of peace between Athens, Argos, Elis and Mantineia in 420 B.C. (Thuc. v.

    1
    0
  • Bernhard Elis Malmstrom (1816-1865), who was a professor of aesthetics at the university of Upsala, was the author of many important books on artistic and literary history, notably a monograph on Franzen.

    1
    0
  • He went to Pisa in Elis as suitor of Hippodameia, daughter of king Oenomaus, who had already vanquished in the chariot-race and slain many suitors for his daughter's hand.

    1
    0
  • by the territory of Elis, on the E.

    1
    0
  • Patrai), the chief fortified seaport town on the west coast of Greece, and chief town of the province of Achaea and Elis, on a gulf of the same name, 70 m.

    1
    0
  • The Aetolians settled in Elis the Dorians pushed up to the headwaters of the Alpheus, where they divided into two forces, one of which under Cresphontes invaded and later subdued Messenia, while the other, led by Aristodemus or, according to another version, by his twin sons Eurysthenes and Procles, made its way down the Eurotas valley and gained Sparta, which became the Dorian capital of Laconia.

    1
    0
  • Sometimes 0 is lozenge-shaped 0 and rarely (in Arcadia and Elis) rectangular ?.

    1
    0
  • The base of a statue erected to him by Elis was found at Olym p ia in 1877.

    1
    0
  • PYRRHO OF ELIS (c. 360-270 B.C.), a Greek sceptic philosopher and founder of the school known as Pyrrhonism.

    1
    0
  • Returning to Elis, he lived in poor circumstances, but highly honoured by the Elians and also by the Athenians, who gave him the rights of citizenship. His doctrines are known mainly through the satiric writings (EtXXot) of his pupil Timon of, Phlius (the Sillographer).

    1
    0
  • Elis, but the name has been given to the whole river.

    1
    0
  • The invasion was commonly believed to have proceeded by way of Aetolia and Elis, and the name Naupactus was interpreted as an allusion to the needful " shipbuilding " on the Corinthian Gulf.

    1
    0
  • The legend of an organized apportionment of Peloponnese amongst the Heracleid leaders appears first in the 5th-century tragedians, - not earlier, that is, than the rise of the Peloponnesian League, - and was amplified in the 4th century; the Aetolians' aid, and claim to Elis, appear first in Ephorus.

    1
    0
  • in the mountains of Pholoe on the borders of Elis and Arcadia.

    1
    0
  • In Achaea, this central hall was called the Lefton (town-hall), and a similar building is known to have existed at Elis.

    0
    0
  • At Pellene in Achaea, and at Plataea he made two other statues of Athena, also a statue of Aphrodite in ivory and gold for the people of Elis.

    0
    0
  • TIMON (c. 320-230), of Phlius, Greek sceptic philosopher and satirical poet, a pupil of Stilpo the Megarian and Pyrrho of Elis.

    0
    0
  • The quadratrix of Dinostratus was well known to the ancient Greek geometers, and is mentioned by Proclus, who ascribes the invention of the curve to a contemporary of Socrates, probably Hippias of Elis.

    0
    0
  • The foundation of Pisae is by tradition ascribed to a very remote period, and it was often (possibly only owing to the similarity of name) believed to have been founded from Pisae in Elis.

    0
    0
  • It seems that all the states adopted this policy with the exception of Sparta (probably) and Elis.

    0
    0
  • The fifth labour seems to symbolize some great improvement in the drainage of Elis.

    0
    0
  • porticus) given to a building, the roof of which is supported by one or more rows of columns, the stoai at Elis described by Pausanias being important examples.

    0
    0
  • It suited the interests of Sparta to join this amphictyony; and, before the regular catalogue of Olympic victors begins in 77 6 B.C., Sparta had formed an alliance with Elis.

    0
    0
  • Aristotle saw in the temple of Hera at Olympia a bronze disk, recording the traditional laws of the festival, on which the name of Lycurgus stood next to that of Iphitus, king of Elis.

    0
    0
  • Not only Pisatis, but also the district of Triphylia to the south of it, became dependent on Elis.

    0
    0
  • AUGEAS, or Augeias, in Greek legend, a son of Helios, the sun-god, and king of the Epeians in Elis.

    0
    0
  • 61), quoting from Apollodorus, says that he was at first a painter, and that pictures by him were in existence in the gymnasium at Elis.

    0
    0
  • There is more than one meaning of Elis discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

    0
    0
  • In Achaea, this central hall was called the Lefton (town-hall), and a similar building is known to have existed at Elis.

    0
    0
  • According to Philochorus, as quoted by a scholiast on Aristophanes, he fled to Elis, where he made the great statue of Zeus for the Eleans, and was afterwards put to death by them.

    0
    0
  • At Pellene in Achaea, and at Plataea he made two other statues of Athena, also a statue of Aphrodite in ivory and gold for the people of Elis.

    0
    0
  • Of the Zeus we have unfortunately lost all trace save small copies on coins of Elis, which give us but a general notion of the pose, and the character of the head.

    0
    0
  • ARETHUSA, in Greek mythology, a nymph who gave her name to a spring in Elis and to another in the island of Ortygia near Syracuse.

    0
    0
  • TIMON (c. 320-230), of Phlius, Greek sceptic philosopher and satirical poet, a pupil of Stilpo the Megarian and Pyrrho of Elis.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently he invaded and ravaged Elis, forcing the Eleans to acknowledge the freedom of their perioeci and to allow Spartans to take part in the Olympic games and sacrifices.

    0
    0
  • In the Peloponnese he routed a force under Corragus and, although Athens held aloof, he was joined by [[Elis (disambiguation)|Elis, Achaea (except Pellene]]) and Arcadia, with the exception of Megalopolis, which the allies besieged.

    0
    0
  • He was subsequently a pupil first of Stilpo and then of Phaedo of Elis, whose school he transferred to Eretria, by which name it was afterwards known.

    0
    0
  • of Elis, whose women, according to the legend, she had blessed with abundance of children, seems at variance with the generallyrecognized conception of her as 7rapOEvo; but µ17T17P may bear the same meaning as taw pmpochos, the fosterer of the young, in harmony with her aspect as protectress of civic and family life.

    0
    0
  • 25, 6, Satrapes is mentioned as the name of a god who had a statue and a cult in Elis and is identified with Korybas.

    0
    0
  • The quadratrix of Dinostratus was well known to the ancient Greek geometers, and is mentioned by Proclus, who ascribes the invention of the curve to a contemporary of Socrates, probably Hippias of Elis.

    0
    0
  • The foundation of Pisae is by tradition ascribed to a very remote period, and it was often (possibly only owing to the similarity of name) believed to have been founded from Pisae in Elis.

    0
    0
  • From this it is easy to pass to the most widely spread Greek form, the ordinary In Corinth, however, and its colony Corcyra, in Ozolian Locris and Elis, a form < inclined at a different angle is found.

    0
    0
  • It seems that all the states adopted this policy with the exception of Sparta (probably) and Elis.

    0
    0
  • Practically all Peloponnese, except Achaea and Elis, was " Dorian," together with Megara, Aegina, Crete, Melos, Thera, the Sporades Islands and the S.W.

    0
    0
  • The northern Doris, for example, spoke Aeolic, while Elis, Phocis, and many non-Dorian districts of north-west Greece spoke dialects akin to Doric. Many Dorian states had additional " nonDorian tribes "; Sparta, which claimed to be of pure and typical Dorian origin, maintained institutions and a mode of life which were without parallel in Peloponnese, in the Parnassian and in the Asiatic Doris, and were partially reflected in Crete only.

    0
    0
  • The last of these attempts resulted in the " Dorian conquest " of the "Achaeans " and " Ionians " of Peloponnese, and in the assignment of Argolis, Laconia and Messenia to the Heracleid leaders, Temenus, Aristodemus and Cresphontes respectively; of Elis to their Aetolian allies; and of the north coast to the remnants of the conquered Achaeans.

    0
    0
  • One legend made Dorus himself originally an Aetolian prince; the participation of Oxylus, and the Aetolian claim to Elis, appear first in Ephorus (4th century).

    0
    0
  • But these have also some forms in common with the " Aeolic " dialect of Boeotia and Thessaly, which in historic times was spoken also in Doris; Locris and Elis present similar northern " Achaean-Doric " dialects.

    0
    0
  • The Olympic games, so famous in Greek history, were celebrated once every four years, between the new and full moon first following the summer solstice, on the small plain named Olympia in Elis, which was bounded on one side by the river Alpheus, on another by the small tributary stream the Cladeus, and on the other two sides by mountains.

    0
    0
  • According to a tradition, possibly more authentic, they were re-established by Iphitus, king of Elis, in concert with the Spartan Lycurgus and Cleosthenes of Pisa.

    0
    0
  • In the time following the peace of Nicias the Mantineians, whose attempts at expansion beyond Mount Maenalus were being foiled by Sparta, formed a powerful alliance with Argos, Elis and Athens (420), which the Spartans, assisted by Tegea, broke up after a pitched battle in the city's territory (418).

    0
    0
  • The agora is of unsymmetrical form; its sides are bordered by porticoes, interrupted by streets, like the primitive agora of Elis as described by Pausanias, and unlike the regular agoras of Ionic type.

    0
    0
  • He was worshipped in many places: at Leuke, where he was honoured with offerings and games; in Sparta, Elis, and especially Sigeum on the Hellespont, where his famous tumulus was erected.

    0
    0
  • The fifth labour seems to symbolize some great improvement in the drainage of Elis.

    0
    0
  • According to Proclus, a man named Hippias, probably Hippias of Elis (c. 460 B.C.), trisected an angle with a mechanical curve, named the quadratrix.

    0
    0
  • At Cyllene in Elis a mere phallus served as his emblem, and was highly venerated in the time of Pausanias (vi.

    0
    0
  • Though scepticism as a definite school may be said to date only from the time of Pyrrho (q.v.) of Elis, the main currents of Sophistic thought were sceptical in the wider sense of that term.

    0
    0
  • Scepticism, as a distinct school, begins with Pyrrho of Elis, who maintained that knowledge of things is impossible and that we must assume an attitude of reserve (iroXii).

    0
    0
  • He removed to Elis, where he built the town of Salmone, and became ruler of the country.

    0
    0
  • porticus) given to a building, the roof of which is supported by one or more rows of columns, the stoai at Elis described by Pausanias being important examples.

    0
    0
  • as supplying a method of doubling the cube), and the curve discovered most probably by Hippias of Elis about 420 B.C., and known by the name rerpaywqouva, or quadratrix.

    0
    0
  • The religious associations of the place date from the prehistoric age, when, before the states of Elis and Pisa had been founded, there was a centre of worship in this valley which is attested by early votive offerings found beneath the Heraeum and an altar near it.

    0
    0
  • The control of the festival belonged in early times to Pisa, but Elis seems to have claimed association with it.

    0
    0
  • Sixteen women, representing eight towns of Elis and eight of Pisatis, wove the festal robe for the Olympian Hera.

    0
    0
  • It suited the interests of Sparta to join this amphictyony; and, before the regular catalogue of Olympic victors begins in 77 6 B.C., Sparta had formed an alliance with Elis.

    0
    0
  • Aristotle saw in the temple of Hera at Olympia a bronze disk, recording the traditional laws of the festival, on which the name of Lycurgus stood next to that of Iphitus, king of Elis.

    0
    0
  • Elis and Sparta, making common cause, had no difficulty in excluding the Pisatans from their proper share in the management of the Olympian sanctuary.

    0
    0
  • The destruction of Pisa (before 572 B.e.) by the combined forces of Sparta and Elis put an end to the long rivalry.

    0
    0
  • Not only Pisatis, but also the district of Triphylia to the south of it, became dependent on Elis.

    0
    0
  • It was at Elis, in the gymnasium, that candidates from all parts of Greece were tested, before they were admitted to the athletic competitions at Olympia.

    0
    0
  • To have passed through the training (usually of ten months) at Elis was regarded as the most valuable preparation.

    0
    0
  • The list of Olympian victors, which begins in 776 B.C. with Coroebus of Elis, closes with the name of an Armenian, Varastad, who is said to have belonged to the race of the Arsacidae.

    0
    0
  • Endeavouring next to expand into Peloponnesus, they allied themselves with Antigonus Gonatas of Macedonia against the Achaean league, and besides becoming protectors of Elis and Messenia won several Arcadian cities.

    0
    0
  • The Peloponnesian malcontents turned to Argos as a new leader, and an alliance was formed between Argos, Corinth, Elis, Mantinea and the Thraceward towns (420).

    0
    0
  • Elis, Mantinea, Sicyon, Achaea.

    0
    0
  • The leaders of the Achaean invasion were Pelops, who took possession of Elis, and Aeacus, who became master of Aegina and was said to have introduced there the worship of Zeus Panhellenius, whose cult was also set up at Olympia.

    0
    0
  • ELIS This school was founded by Phaedo, a pupil of Socrates.

    0
    0
  • OENOMAUS, in Greek legend, son of Ares and Harpinna, king of Pisa in Elis and father of Hippodameia.

    0
    0
  • The sophist of whom the Platonic Protagoras is here thinking was Hippias of Elis, who gave popular lectures, not only upon the four subjects just mentioned, but also upon grammar, mythology, family history, archaeology, Homerology and the education of youth.

    0
    0
  • The fertile district of Elis had been reserved by agreement for Oxylus.

    0
    0
  • PYRGOS, a town of Greece, in the province of Elis and Achaea, 43 m.

    0
    0
  • AUGEAS, or Augeias, in Greek legend, a son of Helios, the sun-god, and king of the Epeians in Elis.

    0
    0
  • Thus the unions of individual villages, known as synoecisms, such as took place in Attica and Elis in early times were partly of a federal character: they resulted in the establishment of a common administration, and no doubt in some degree of commercial and military unity.

    0
    0
  • The demiurgi among other officials represent Elis and Mantineia at the treaty of peace between Athens, Argos, Elis and Mantineia in 420 B.C. (Thuc. v.

    0
    0
  • Bernhard Elis Malmstrom (1816-1865), who was a professor of aesthetics at the university of Upsala, was the author of many important books on artistic and literary history, notably a monograph on Franzen.

    0
    0
  • He went to Pisa in Elis as suitor of Hippodameia, daughter of king Oenomaus, who had already vanquished in the chariot-race and slain many suitors for his daughter's hand.

    0
    0
  • by the territory of Elis, on the E.

    0
    0
  • Patrai), the chief fortified seaport town on the west coast of Greece, and chief town of the province of Achaea and Elis, on a gulf of the same name, 70 m.

    0
    0
  • The Aetolians settled in Elis the Dorians pushed up to the headwaters of the Alpheus, where they divided into two forces, one of which under Cresphontes invaded and later subdued Messenia, while the other, led by Aristodemus or, according to another version, by his twin sons Eurysthenes and Procles, made its way down the Eurotas valley and gained Sparta, which became the Dorian capital of Laconia.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes 0 is lozenge-shaped 0 and rarely (in Arcadia and Elis) rectangular ?.

    0
    0
  • The base of a statue erected to him by Elis was found at Olym p ia in 1877.

    0
    0
  • PYRRHO OF ELIS (c. 360-270 B.C.), a Greek sceptic philosopher and founder of the school known as Pyrrhonism.

    0
    0
  • 61), quoting from Apollodorus, says that he was at first a painter, and that pictures by him were in existence in the gymnasium at Elis.

    0
    0
  • Returning to Elis, he lived in poor circumstances, but highly honoured by the Elians and also by the Athenians, who gave him the rights of citizenship. His doctrines are known mainly through the satiric writings (EtXXot) of his pupil Timon of, Phlius (the Sillographer).

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →