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eliot

eliot

eliot Sentence Examples

  • George Eliot by her very name invites and challenges comparison with George Sand.

  • Both passed through phases of faith, but while even Positivism did not cool George Eliot's innate religious fervour, with George Sand religion was a passing experience, no deeper than her republicanism and less lasting than her socialism, and she lived and died a gentle savage.

  • This conception is expressed in George Eliot's lines: ", O, may I join the choir invisible Of those immortal dead who live again In minds made better by their presence: live In pulses stirred to generosity, In deeds of daring rectitude, in scorn For miserable aims that end with self, In thoughts sublime that pierce the night like stars, And with their mild persistence urge man's search To vaster issues."

  • He was also one of the members who refused to adjourn at the king's command till Sir John Eliot's resolutions had been passed.

  • Eliot Hodgkin), and are seen to have been considerably garbled by Danby for the purposes of publication, several passages being obliterated and others altered by his own hand.

  • Eliot Hodgkin; and Calendars of State Papers Dom.

  • If George Eliot is guilty of a platitude when she says that " consequences are unpitying," then Butler's argument is empty: but not otherwise.

  • The result of deliberation, aided by the advice and experience of Lord Eliot, was that it was almost immediately decided to fix Gibbon for some years abroad under the roof of M.

  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.

  • This attack is followed up in his most important work, Das Wesen des Christentums (1841), which was translated into English (The Essence of Religion, by George Eliot, 1853, 2nd ed.

  • The camp-meetings went steadily on, and their influence is reflected in the writings of George Eliot, George Borrow and William Howitt.

  • Charles William Eliot >>

  • Fiennes married (1), Elizabeth, daughter of the famous parliamentarian Sir John Eliot, by whom he had one son, afterwards 3rd Viscount Saye and Sele; and (2), Frances, daughter of Richard Whitehead of Tuderley, Hants, by whom he had three daughters.

  • Natick is the Indian name, signifying " our land," or " hilly land," of the site (originally part of Dedham) granted in 1650 to John Eliot, for the praying " Indians.

  • In 1735 the few Indians remaining were put under guardianship. The township owns a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible.

  • An Eliot monument was erected in 1847 on the Indian burying-ground near the site of the Indian church, now occupied by a Unitarian church.

  • Of the Eliot oaks, made famous by Longfellow's sonnet, one was cut down in 1842, the other still stands.

  • As an illustrator in black and white he also deserves to be remembered, especially for the cuts to Dalziel's Bible, already mentioned, and his illustrations to George Eliot's Romola, which appeared in the Cornhill Magazine.

  • The very intensity of that phase of modern thought which declaims fervently against all creeds, and would maintain what George Eliot called " the right of the individual to general haziness," is likely to draw all Christian thinkers nearer to one another in sympathy through acceptance of the Apostles' Creed as the common basis of Christian thought.

  • Of these it is enough to name John Cotton, able both as a divine and as a statesman, potent in England by his expositions and apologies of the " New England way," potent in America for his organizing and administrative power; Thomas Hooker, famed as an exponent and apologist of the " New England way "; John Eliot, famous as the " apostle of the Indians," first of Protestant missionaries to the heathen; Richard Mather, whose influence and work were carried on by his distinguished son, and his still more distinguished grandson, Cotton Mather.

  • Ten years after the foundation of Harvard, missionary work among the Indians was undertaken by John Eliot and Thomas Mayhew.

  • Eliot produced his Indian translation of the Scriptures in 1661-1663, and by about 1675 there were six Indian churches with some 4 000 converts.

  • It was from this book that George Eliot translated the following opening of a chapter of Daniel Deronda: " If there are ranks in suffering, Israel takes precedence of all the nations".

  • The Corporation for the Promoting and Propagating of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in New England (founded in 1649) bore the expense of printing both the New Testament and the Bible as a whole (Cambridge, Mass., 1663 - the earliest Bible printed in.America), which John Eliot, one of the Pilgrim Fathers, translated into "the language of the Massachusetts Indians," whom he evangelized.

  • The younger Mayhew, soon after removing to Martha's Vineyard, devoted himself to missionary work among the Indians, his work beginning at about the same time as that of John Eliot; he was lost at sea in 1657 while on his way to secure financial assistance in England, and his work was continued successfully by his father.

  • Amongst the most eminent of its missionaries was the celebrated John Eliot, the Puritan minister of Roxbury, Massachusetts, who, encouraged and financially assisted by Boyle, brought out the Bible in the Indian language in 1661-1664.

  • The first workers were Thomas Mayhew, junior and John Eliot at Martha's Vineyard (1643) and Roxbury (1646).

  • George Eliot stayed for a considerable period at Shotter mill, a neighbouring village.

  • John Eliot, the "apostle to the Indians," visited it soon after 1651, and organized the third of his bands of "praying Indians" there; in 1671 he established a church for them, the second of the kind in New England, and also a school.

  • Letters occasionally passed between them in later years, which were edited by Professor Charles Eliot Norton in 1887.

  • On the 7th or 9th of October, Mary went to Jedburgh on the affairs of Border justice, and a week later she rode with Murray to Hermitage castle, where for several days Bothwell had lain, wounded nearly to death by Eliot, a border reiver.

  • He held this position only till the spring of 1861, but he continued to make the magazine the vehicle of his poetry and of some prose for the rest of his life; his prose, however, was more abundantly presented in the pages of The North American Review during the years 1862-1872, when he was associated with Mr Charles Eliot Norton in its conduct.

  • After his death his literary executor, Charles Eliot Norton, published a brief collection of his poems, and two volumes of added prose, besides editing his letters.

  • Letters of James Russell Lowell, edited by Charles Eliot Norton, in two volumes (New York, Harper & Brothers, 1899); Life of James Russell Lowell (2 vols.), by Horace E.

  • His other writings include A Poem Dedicated to the Memory of the Reverend and Excellent Mr Urian Oakes (1682); The Present State of New England (1690); The Life of the Renowned John Eliot (1691), later included in Book III.

  • In the third edition of the work (1839), and in Zwei friedliche Bleitter, he made important concessions to his critics, which he withdrew, however, in the fourth edition (1840; translated into English by George Eliot, with Latin preface by Strauss, 1846).

  • Sampson, in Bohn's "Libraries"; The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, edited by Charles Eliot Norton (Boston, 1883); George Willis Cooke, Ralph Waldo Emerson: His Life, Writings and Philosophy (Boston, 1881); Alexander Ireland, Ralph Waldo Emerson: His Life, Genius and Writings (London, 1882); A.

  • He had no sympathy with the tendency represented by George Eliot, or with any attempt to be analytic in art.

  • Eliot, Zacchary Macaulay and James Stephen.

  • Essays by Leslie Stephen, Stopford Brooke, Whitwell Elwin, George Eliot and Walter Bagehot deserve attention.

  • In Newton, the most prominent of these villages, is a stone terrace monument to John Eliot, erected on the site of Waban's wigwam near Nonantum Hill, where Eliot founded the first Indian Church on the 28th of October 1646 - the Nonantum Indians, under their chief Waban, removed to Natick in 1651.

  • conjugal affection, Sir Eliot Howard, we do not like the character of his sisters.

  • Eliot spitzer 's light of illegal you in with.

  • Eliot spitzer auto california insurance online quote a policy his to enhance their.

  • footsteps of poets like TS Eliot, using obscure historical and literary references.

  • Heaney may be using it comically - it comes from the bleak opening of T.S. Eliot's modernist poetic manifesto, The Waste Land.

  • Eliot uses the parallelism to good effect, such that subject and theme are related but divergent at the same time.

  • It's hard to know what to do now there's no Eliot daring to preach about eating a peach.

  • Last year's winner of the T S Eliot Prize was Carol Ann Duffy, for her collection rapture (2005 ).

  • Eliot himself contributed financially and personally superintended the whole enterprise, despite being then in his eighties.

  • Eliot's father, a prosperous yeoman (then living at Nazeing, Essex ), was able to provide him with adequate support.

  • George Eliot by her very name invites and challenges comparison with George Sand.

  • Both women broke with social conventions, but while George Sand (if the expression may be allowed) kicked over the traces, George Eliot was impelled all the more emphatically, because of her exceptional circumstances, to put duty before inclination and to uphold the reign of law and order.

  • Both passed through phases of faith, but while even Positivism did not cool George Eliot's innate religious fervour, with George Sand religion was a passing experience, no deeper than her republicanism and less lasting than her socialism, and she lived and died a gentle savage.

  • Rousseau's Confessions was the favourite book of both (as it was of Emerson), but George Eliot was never converted by the high priest of sentimentalism into a belief in human perfectibility and a return to nature.

  • As a thinker George Eliot is vastly superior; her knowledge is more profound and her psychological analysis subtler and more scientific. But as an artist, in unity of design, in harmony of treatment, in purity and simplicity of language, so felicitous and yet so unstudied, in those qualities which make the best of George Sand's novels masterpieces of art, she is as much her inferior.

  • This conception is expressed in George Eliot's lines: ", O, may I join the choir invisible Of those immortal dead who live again In minds made better by their presence: live In pulses stirred to generosity, In deeds of daring rectitude, in scorn For miserable aims that end with self, In thoughts sublime that pierce the night like stars, And with their mild persistence urge man's search To vaster issues."

  • He was also one of the members who refused to adjourn at the king's command till Sir John Eliot's resolutions had been passed.

  • Eliot Hodgkin), and are seen to have been considerably garbled by Danby for the purposes of publication, several passages being obliterated and others altered by his own hand.

  • Eliot Hodgkin; and Calendars of State Papers Dom.

  • If George Eliot is guilty of a platitude when she says that " consequences are unpitying," then Butler's argument is empty: but not otherwise.

  • The result of deliberation, aided by the advice and experience of Lord Eliot, was that it was almost immediately decided to fix Gibbon for some years abroad under the roof of M.

  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.

  • This attack is followed up in his most important work, Das Wesen des Christentums (1841), which was translated into English (The Essence of Religion, by George Eliot, 1853, 2nd ed.

  • The camp-meetings went steadily on, and their influence is reflected in the writings of George Eliot, George Borrow and William Howitt.

  • Charles William Eliot >>

  • Fiennes married (1), Elizabeth, daughter of the famous parliamentarian Sir John Eliot, by whom he had one son, afterwards 3rd Viscount Saye and Sele; and (2), Frances, daughter of Richard Whitehead of Tuderley, Hants, by whom he had three daughters.

  • Natick is the Indian name, signifying " our land," or " hilly land," of the site (originally part of Dedham) granted in 1650 to John Eliot, for the praying " Indians.

  • In 1735 the few Indians remaining were put under guardianship. The township owns a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible.

  • An Eliot monument was erected in 1847 on the Indian burying-ground near the site of the Indian church, now occupied by a Unitarian church.

  • Of the Eliot oaks, made famous by Longfellow's sonnet, one was cut down in 1842, the other still stands.

  • As an illustrator in black and white he also deserves to be remembered, especially for the cuts to Dalziel's Bible, already mentioned, and his illustrations to George Eliot's Romola, which appeared in the Cornhill Magazine.

  • The very intensity of that phase of modern thought which declaims fervently against all creeds, and would maintain what George Eliot called " the right of the individual to general haziness," is likely to draw all Christian thinkers nearer to one another in sympathy through acceptance of the Apostles' Creed as the common basis of Christian thought.

  • Of these it is enough to name John Cotton, able both as a divine and as a statesman, potent in England by his expositions and apologies of the " New England way," potent in America for his organizing and administrative power; Thomas Hooker, famed as an exponent and apologist of the " New England way "; John Eliot, famous as the " apostle of the Indians," first of Protestant missionaries to the heathen; Richard Mather, whose influence and work were carried on by his distinguished son, and his still more distinguished grandson, Cotton Mather.

  • Ten years after the foundation of Harvard, missionary work among the Indians was undertaken by John Eliot and Thomas Mayhew.

  • Eliot produced his Indian translation of the Scriptures in 1661-1663, and by about 1675 there were six Indian churches with some 4 000 converts.

  • It was from this book that George Eliot translated the following opening of a chapter of Daniel Deronda: " If there are ranks in suffering, Israel takes precedence of all the nations".

  • The Corporation for the Promoting and Propagating of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in New England (founded in 1649) bore the expense of printing both the New Testament and the Bible as a whole (Cambridge, Mass., 1663 - the earliest Bible printed in.America), which John Eliot, one of the Pilgrim Fathers, translated into "the language of the Massachusetts Indians," whom he evangelized.

  • The younger Mayhew, soon after removing to Martha's Vineyard, devoted himself to missionary work among the Indians, his work beginning at about the same time as that of John Eliot; he was lost at sea in 1657 while on his way to secure financial assistance in England, and his work was continued successfully by his father.

  • Amongst the most eminent of its missionaries was the celebrated John Eliot, the Puritan minister of Roxbury, Massachusetts, who, encouraged and financially assisted by Boyle, brought out the Bible in the Indian language in 1661-1664.

  • What Ulfilas was to the Gothic tribes, what Columba and his disciples were to the early Celtic missions, what Augustine or Aidan was to the British Isles, what Boniface was to the churches of Germany and Anskar to those of Denmark and Sweden, that, on the discovery of a new world of missionary enterprise, was Xavier to India, Hans Egede to Greenland, Eliot to the Red Indians, Martyn to the church of Cawnpore, Marsden to the Maoris, Carey, Heber, Wilson, Duff and Edwin Lewis to India, Morrison, Gilmour, Legge, Hill, Griffith John to China, Gray, Livingstone, Mackenzie, Moffat, Hannington, Mackay to Africa, Broughton to Australia, Patteson to Melanesia, Crowther to the Niger Territory, Chalmers to New Guinea, Brown to Fiji.

  • The first workers were Thomas Mayhew, junior and John Eliot at Martha's Vineyard (1643) and Roxbury (1646).

  • George Eliot stayed for a considerable period at Shotter mill, a neighbouring village.

  • John Eliot, the "apostle to the Indians," visited it soon after 1651, and organized the third of his bands of "praying Indians" there; in 1671 he established a church for them, the second of the kind in New England, and also a school.

  • Letters occasionally passed between them in later years, which were edited by Professor Charles Eliot Norton in 1887.

  • On the 7th or 9th of October, Mary went to Jedburgh on the affairs of Border justice, and a week later she rode with Murray to Hermitage castle, where for several days Bothwell had lain, wounded nearly to death by Eliot, a border reiver.

  • He held this position only till the spring of 1861, but he continued to make the magazine the vehicle of his poetry and of some prose for the rest of his life; his prose, however, was more abundantly presented in the pages of The North American Review during the years 1862-1872, when he was associated with Mr Charles Eliot Norton in its conduct.

  • After his death his literary executor, Charles Eliot Norton, published a brief collection of his poems, and two volumes of added prose, besides editing his letters.

  • Letters of James Russell Lowell, edited by Charles Eliot Norton, in two volumes (New York, Harper & Brothers, 1899); Life of James Russell Lowell (2 vols.), by Horace E.

  • His other writings include A Poem Dedicated to the Memory of the Reverend and Excellent Mr Urian Oakes (1682); The Present State of New England (1690); The Life of the Renowned John Eliot (1691), later included in Book III.

  • In the third edition of the work (1839), and in Zwei friedliche Bleitter, he made important concessions to his critics, which he withdrew, however, in the fourth edition (1840; translated into English by George Eliot, with Latin preface by Strauss, 1846).

  • Sampson, in Bohn's "Libraries"; The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, edited by Charles Eliot Norton (Boston, 1883); George Willis Cooke, Ralph Waldo Emerson: His Life, Writings and Philosophy (Boston, 1881); Alexander Ireland, Ralph Waldo Emerson: His Life, Genius and Writings (London, 1882); A.

  • He had no sympathy with the tendency represented by George Eliot, or with any attempt to be analytic in art.

  • Eliot, Zacchary Macaulay and James Stephen.

  • Essays by Leslie Stephen, Stopford Brooke, Whitwell Elwin, George Eliot and Walter Bagehot deserve attention.

  • In Newton, the most prominent of these villages, is a stone terrace monument to John Eliot, erected on the site of Waban's wigwam near Nonantum Hill, where Eliot founded the first Indian Church on the 28th of October 1646 - the Nonantum Indians, under their chief Waban, removed to Natick in 1651.

  • Last year 's winner of the T S Eliot Prize was Carol Ann Duffy, for her collection Rapture (2005).

  • Eliot himself contributed financially and personally superintended the whole enterprise, despite being then in his eighties.

  • With Eliot, verse and syntax co-operate to secure a basic significance and coherent transfiguration of individual meanings.

  • George Eliot Blessed is the person who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving wordy evidence of the fact.

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