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elephant

elephant

elephant Sentence Examples

  • You went down like an elephant.

  • It is covered with numerous large papillae, and forms, like the trunk of the elephant, an admirable organ for the examination and prehension of food.

  • ELEPHANT, the designation of the two existing representatives of the Proboscidea, a sub-order of ungulate mammals, and also extended to include their more immediate extinct relatives.

  • The Asiatic elephant inhabits the forest-lands of India, Burma, the Malay Peninsula, Cochin China, Ceylon and Sumatra.

  • The appearance of the Asiatic elephant is familiar to all.

  • In addition to various sounds produced at other times, an elephant when about to charge gives vent to a shrill loud 'trumpet'.

  • Unlike the African species, the Indian elephant charges with its trunk curled up, and consequently in silence.

  • Of the largest pair in the possession of the British Museum, which belonged to an elephant killed in 1866 by Colonel G.

  • The African elephant is a very different animal from its Asiatic cousin, both as regards structure and habits; and were it not for the existence of intermediate extinct species, might well be regarded as the representative of a distinct genus.

  • In size the male African elephant often surpasses the Asiatic species, reaching nearly 12 ft.

  • According to Hagenbeck's estimate, this elephant, which came from the French Congo, was about six years old at the time it came under scientific notice.

  • In height it stood about the same as a young individual of the ordinary African elephant when about a year and a half old, the vertical measurement at the shoulder being only 4 ft., or merely a foot higher than a new-born Indian elephant.

  • Nothing was stated as to the probability of an increase in the stature of the French Congo animal as it grows older; but even if we allow another foot, its height would be considerably less than half that of a large Central African bull of the ordinary elephant.

  • By Dr Paul Matschie several races of the African elephant have been described, mainly, as already mentioned, on certain differences in the shape of the ear.

  • Further, the skin is stated to be much less rough, with fewer cracks, while a more important difference occurs in the trunk, which lacks the transverse ridges so distinctive of the ordinary African elephant, and thereby approximates to the Asiatic species.

  • The great interest in connexion with a dwarf West African race of elephant is in relation to the fossil pigmy elephants of the limestone fissures and caves of Malta and Cyprus.

  • cypriotes; but since their molar teeth are essentially miniatures of those of the African elephant, it has been suggested by later observers that these animals are nothing more than dwarf races of the latter.

  • If, on the other hand, the dwarf Congo elephant be regarded as a species, then the Maltese and Cyprian elephants may have to be classed as races of Elephas pumilio; or, rather, E.

  • Still, the close relationship of the existing Liberian pigmy hippopotamus to the fossil Mediterranean species is significant, in relation to the foregoing observations on the elephant.

  • It may be added that fossil remains of the African elephant have been obtained from Spain, Sicily, Algeria and Egypt, in strata of the Pleistocene age.

  • Some of the main differences in the habits of the African as distinct from those of the Asiatic elephant have been mentioned under the heading of the latter species.

  • The story that Pyrrhus attempted to frighten Fabricius by the sight of an elephant is probably a fiction.

  • The forest regions of Cochin-China harbour the tiger, panther, leopard, tiger-cat, ichneumon, wild boar, deer, buffalo, rhinoceros and elephant, as well as many varieties of monkeys and rats.

  • The Asiatic elephant; the seladang, a bison of a larger type than the Indian gaur; two varieties of rhinoceros; the honey bear (bruang), the tapir, the sambhur (rusa); the speckled deer (kijang), three varieties of mouse-deer (napoh, plandok and kanchil); the gibbon (ungka or wawa'), the siamang, another species of anthropoid ape, the brok or coco-nut monkey, so called because it is trained by the Malays to gather the nuts from the coco-nut trees, the lotong, kra, and at least twenty other kinds of monkey; the binturong (arctictis binturong), the lemur; the Asiatic tiger, the black panther, the leopard, the large wild cat (harimau akar), several varieties of jungle cat; the wild boar, the wild dog; the flying squirrel,.

  • The valley between Incisa and Arezzo contains accumulations of fossil bones of the deer, elephant, rhinoceros, mastodon, hippopotamus, bear, tiger, and more.

  • But if the epithet is intended to designate an animal that takes an interest in its rider so far as a beast can, that in some way understands his intentions, or shares them in a subordinate fashion, that obeys from a sort of submissive or halffellow-feeling' with his master, like the horse or elephant, then I say that the camel is by no means docile - very much the contrary.

  • In these forests are found the two-horned rhinoceros, the elephant, lion, panther, numerous apes and antelopes, while the crocodile and hippopotamus frequent the rivers.

  • It has, moreover, been remarked that almost all the animals mentioned were at home in the Egypt of those days, or at least, like the elephant, were to be seen there occasionally, whereas the structure of the hedgehog, for instance, is explained by a reference to the sea-porcupine, better known to fish-buyers on the Mediterranean.

  • See the Icelandic account of the elephant, also a decidedly Alexandrian fragment upon the 7.iapyos, founded upon 4 Macc. i.

  • Of the fauna of the lower slopes, tracks of elephant, leopard and buffalo have been seen, between 11,500 and 14,500 ft.

  • The Indian region is the home of the Indian elephant - one of the two sole remaining representatives of the order Proboscidea.

  • Of the domesticated animals of Asia may first be mentioned the elephant.

  • The borough is connected with the City of London by Blackfriars, Southwark and London bridges; the thoroughfares leading from these and the other road-bridges as far up as Lambeth converge at St George's Circus; another important junction is the "Elephant and Castle."

  • Near the "Elephant and Castle" is the Metropolitan Tabernacle, the original building of which, burnt down in 1898, became famous under the Baptist preacher, Charles Spurgeon.

  • Mahmud ordered Hasan Maimandi to take the poet as much gold as an elephant could carry, but the jealous treasurer persuaded the monarch that it was too generous a reward, and that an elephant's load of silver would be sufficient.

  • The bones of the bear, horse, rhinoceros, lion, elephant, hyena and of many birds and small rodents were unearthed.

  • Among them are the lion (Somali name libah) and elephant, though these have been to a large extent driven from the northern coast districts;.

  • country by an elephant.

  • The wild animals of Cambodia include the elephant, which is also domesticated, the rhinoceros, buffalo and some species of wild ox; also the tiger, panther, leopard and honey-bear.

  • Among the wild animals found in the mountains are elephant, rhinoceros, bison and various kinds of feathered game.

  • When first entered by white men the Transvaal abounded in big game, the lion, leopard, elephant, giraffe, zebra and rhinoceros being very numerous, while the hippopotamus and crocodile were found in all the rivers.

  • Hallett, A Thousand Miles on an Elephant in the Shan States (1890); A.

  • South of the Thames the thoroughfares crossing the river between Lambeth and Bermondsey converge upon two circuses, St George's and the Elephant and Castle.

  • The former company combined with the Great Western Company as regards the electrification of, and provision of stock for, the lines which they had previously worked jointly, from Edgware Road by Bishop's Road to Hammersmith, &c. The Baker Street & Waterloo railway (known as the " Bakerloo ") was opened in 1906 and subsequently extended in one direction to Paddington and in the other to the Elephant and Castle.

  • But this control does not meet the problem of actually lessening the number of vehicles in the main arteries of traffic. At such crossings as that of the Strand and Wellington Street, Ludgate Circus and south of the Thames, the Elephant and Castle, as also in the narrow streets of the City, congestion is often exceedingly severe, and is aggravated when any main street is under repair, and diversion of traffic through narrow side streets becomes necessary.

  • wide, one running west and east, from Bayswater Road to Whitechapel, and passing through the city in the neighbourhood of London Wall, and another from Holloway to the Elephant and Castle, to cross the Thames by a new bridge above Blackfriars.

  • This delta, which includes the districts of Bassein, Myaungmya, Thongwa, Henzada, Hantha waddy, Tharrawaddy, Pegu and Rangoon town, consists almost entirely of a rich alluvial deposit, and the whole area, which between Cape Negrais and Elephant Point is 137 m.

  • The food of the people consists as a rule of boiled rice with salted fresh or dried fish, salt, sessamum-oil, chillies, onions, turmeric, boiled vegetables, and occasionally meat of some sort from elephant flesh down to smaller animals, fowls and almost everything except snakes, by way of condiment.

  • Except, indeed, for its relatively shorter limbs Megatherium americanum rivalled an elephant in bulk, the total length of the skeleton being 18 feet, five of which are taken up by the tail.

  • In the alluvium which covers all, the remains have been discovered of several species of elephant, which, according to Dr Edmund Naumann, are of Indian origin.

  • Kinloch, it is hunted by "tracking the animal on a single elephant until he is at last found in his lair, or perhaps standing quite unconscious PIG.

  • mamant; the Tatar word mama, earth, from which it is supposed to be derived, is not known to exist), a name given to an extinct elephant, Elephas primigenius of Blumenbach.

  • It is chiefly by the characters of the molar teeth that the various extinct modifications of the elephant type are distinguished.

  • The bones of the skeleton generally more resemble those of the Indian elephant than of any other species, but the skull differs in the narrower summit, narrower temporal fossae, and more prolonged incisive sheaths, supporting the roots of the enormous tusks.

  • Among the external characters by which the mammoth was distinguished from either of the existing species of elephant was the dense clothing, not only of long, coarse outer hair, but also of close under woolly hair of a reddish-brown colour, evidently in adaptation to the cold climate it inhabited.

  • The average height does not appear to have exceeded that of either of the existing species of elephant.

  • Among the more remarkable forms are a species of hippopotamus, the elephant (including a pigmy variety), and a gigantic dormouse.

  • In the typical Ungulata or Diplarthra, the feet are never plantigrade, and the functional toes do not exceed four - the inner digit being suppressed, Right Fore Foot of Indian at all events in all forms which Elephant.

  • East Africa is rich in all kinds of antelope, and the elephant, rhinoceros and hippopotamus are still plentiful in parts.

  • Dicuil's knowledge of the islands north and west of Britain is evidently intimate; his references to Irish exploration and colonization, and to (more recent) Scandinavian devastation of the same, as far as the Faeroes, are noteworthy, like his notice of the elephant sent by Harun al-Rashid (in 801) to Charles the Great, the most curious item in a political and diplomatic intercourse of high importance.

  • Though certainly Irish by birth, it has been conjectured (from his references to Sedulius and the caliph's elephant) that he was in later life in an Irish monastery in the Frankish empire.

  • The phosphate beds contain Eocene fossils derived from the underlying strata and many fragments of Pleistocene vertebrata such as mastodon, elephant, stag, horse, pig, &c. The phosphate occurs as lumps varying greatly in size, scattered through a sand or clay; they often contain phosphatized Eocene fossils (Mollusca, &c.).

  • The elephant, giraffe, lion, leopard, hyena, zebra, buffalo, gnu, quagga, kudu, eland and many other kinds of antelope roamed the plains; the rhinoceros, hippopotamus and crocodile lived in or frequented the rivers, and ostriches and baboons were numerous.

  • In May 1670 he received the titles of excellency and privy councillor; in July of the same year he was ennobled under the name of Griffenfeldt, deriving his title from the gold griffin with outspread wings which surmounted his escutcheon; in November 1673 he was created a count, a knight of the Elephant and, finally, imperial chancellor.

  • Chief of animals is the elephant, which roams wild in large numbers, and is extensively caught and tamed by the people for transport.

  • Hallet, A Thousand Miles on an Elephant (London, 1890); Captain Hamilton, A New Account of the East Indies (1688-1723); Prince Henri d'Orleans, Around Tonquin and Siam (London, 1894); Professor A.

  • Vincent, Land of the White Elephant; E.

  • Similarly, in the Asiatic islands are found the great mammals of the continent - the elephant, tiger, rhinoceros, anthropoid ape, &c., which are wanting in the Australian region, with which the eastern part of the archipelago is associated.

  • had a small collection, which included an elephant.

  • All these writers attacked the problem of descent, and published preliminary phylogenies of such animals as the horse, rhinoceros and elephant, which time has proved to be of only general value and not at all comparable to the exact phylogenetic series which were being established by invertebrate palaeontologists.

  • ==Elephant== In Siam it is believed that a white elephant may contain the soul of a dead person, perhaps a Buddha; when one is taken the capturer is rewarded and the animal brought to the king to be kept ever afterwards; it cannot be bought or sold.

  • In some parts of Indo-China the belief is that the soul of the elephant may injure people after death; it is therefore feted by a whole village.

  • In Sumatra the elephant is regarded as a tutelary spirit.

  • The cult of the white elephant is also found at Ennarea, southern Abyssinia.

  • Mill) equivalent to Intension, which is used to describe the sum of the qualities regarded as belonging to any given thing and involved in the name by which it is known; thus the term "elephant" connotes the having a trunk, a certain shape of body, texture of skin, and so on.

  • Examination will, however, show that a modification similar to that which has transformed the comparatively simple molar tooth of the mastodon into the extremely complex grinder of the Indian elephant has served to change the tooth of the common pig into that of Phacochoerus.

  • The tubercles which cluster over the surface of the crown of the common pig are elongated and drawn out into the columns of the wart-hog, as the low transverse ridges of the mastodon's tooth become the leaf-like plates of the elephant's molar.

  • The country inland belonged in the middle ages to the Beja, but the trading places seem to have been always in the hands of foreigners since Ptolemais Theron was established by Ptolemy Philadelphus for intercourse with the elephant hunters.

  • Here belong, inter alia, the well-known orders of the Garter (England), Golden Fleece (Austria and Spain), Annunziata (Italy), Black Eagle (Prussia), St Andrew (Russia), Elephant (Denmark) and Seraphim (Sweden).

  • The Order of the Elephant, one of the chief European orders of knighthood, was, it is said, founded by Christian I.

  • (iv.) THE Tower And Sword (Portugal.) (v.) THE Elephant (Denmark).

  • The Order of the White Elephant, founded in 1861, is in five classes.

  • in breadth, and indicates an animal exceeding the elephant in size.

  • sumatranus), the Sus vittatus, and the tapir common, but the elephant, altogether absent from Java, is represented in Sumatra by a species considered by some to be peculiar.

  • The range of the elephant does not extend above 4900 ft.

  • Among the wild animals are the elephant (comparatively rare), the leopard, varieties of antelope, many kinds of monkeys and numerous venomous snakes.

  • He had transferred his flag from his own ship the "St George" (98) to the "Elephant" (74), commanded by Captain Foley, because the water was too shallow for a threedecker.

  • The "Elephant" anchored almost in the middle of the line.

  • Before Ottway, who had to go in a row-boat, reached the "Elephant," Sir Hyde Parker had reflected that it would be more magnanimous in him to take the responsibility of ordering the retreat.

  • The fauna includes the elephant, rhinoceros, buffalo, giraffe, lion, leopard, cheetah, roan-antelope, hartebeeste, kudu and many other kinds of antelope, wart-hog, hares, quail, partridge, jungle-fowl, bustard and guinea-fowl.

  • Palaeoljthjc Transition Period (Solutr) More highly developed forms are found when the mammoth has succeeded the elephant.

  • The animals of Nigeria include the elephant, lion, leopard, giraffe, hyena, West-African buffalo, many kinds of antelope and gazelle and smaller game.

  • The fauna includes the elephant, hippopotamus, lion and several species of antelope.

  • The elephant (Elephas indicus) is found in many parts of India, though not in the north-west.

  • Contrary to what might be anticipated from its size and from the habits of its African cousin, the Indian elephant is now, at any rate, an inhabitant, not of the plains, but of the hills; and even on the hills it is usually found among the higher ridges and plateaus, and not in the valleys.

  • From the peninsula of India the elephant has been gradually exterminated, being only found now in the primeval forests of Coorg, Mysore and Travancore, and in the tributary state of Orissa.

  • The reports of the height of the elephant, like those of its intelligence,.

  • If hunted, the elephant must be attacked on foot, and the sport is therefore dangerous, especially as the animal has but few parts vulnerable to a bullet.

  • Whoever kills, captures or injures an elephant, or attempts to do so,, without a licence, is punishable by a fine of 500 rupees for the first offence; and a similar fine, together with six months imprisonment, for a second offence.

  • The traditional antipathy of the rhinoceros to the elephant seems to be mythical.

  • From the difficult nature of its habitat, and from the ferocity with which it charges an enemy, the pursuit of the bison is no less dangerous and no less exciting than that of the tiger or the elephant.

  • They fight from chariots, and freely use the horse, although not yet the elephant, in war.

  • The fauna includes the lion, leopard, cheetah, elephant, giraffe, rhinoceros, hippopotamus, buffalo, zebra, kudu and many other kinds of antelope, wild pig, ostrich and crocodile.

  • The three boats safely reached Elephant I.

  • Sir Ernest Shackleton made strenuous efforts to rescue the Elephant I.

  • The fauna includes, in the low country, the lion, panther, elephant, camel, and antelope of numerous species.

  • The ambassadors brought presents with them; on one of these occasions the first elephant reached the land of the Franks.

  • He was carried to Samarra, led through the city on the back of an elephant, and then delivered to the executioners, who cut off his arms and legs.

  • The fauna comprises most of the animals and birds common to the Gangetic plain; but the wild elephant is now practically unknown, except when a stray specimen loses its way at the foot of the hills.

  • The elephant is rare save in the Niger regions.

  • The rhinoceros and the elephant both occur in the northern part of the island, though both are somewhat rare, and in this connexion it should be noted that the distribution of quadrupeds as between Borneo, Sumatra and the Malayan Peninsula is somewhat peculiar and seemingly somewhat capricious.

  • Many quadrupeds, such as the honey-bear and the rhinoceros, are common to all, but while the tiger is common both in the Malayan Peninsula and in Sumatra, it does not occur in Borneo; the elephant, so common in the peninsula, and found in Borneo, is unknown in Sumatra; and the orang-utan, so plentiful in parts of Borneo and parts of Sumatra, has never been discovered in the Malay Peninsula.

  • It got its name from the resemblance of the promontory at the confluence of the two Niles to an elephant's trunk, the meaning of khartum in the dialect of Arabic spoken in the locality.

  • The wild animals include the elephant, still found in large numbers, the leopard, panther, chimpanzee, grey monkeys, antelope of various kinds, the buffalo, wild hog, bush goat, bush pig, sloth, civet and squirrel.

  • The native fauna was formerly very rich in big game, a fact sufficiently testified by the names given by the early European settlers to mountains and streams. The lion, elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus, giraffe, buffalo, quagga, zebra and other large animals were, however, during the 18th and 19th centuries driven out of the more southern regions (though a few elephants and buffaloes,.

  • Among other Dutch words frequently used in place-names may be instanced: rhenoster (rhinoceros) olifant (elephant), mooi (pretty), modder (mud), klip (cliff), berg (mountain), burg or stad (town), zwart (black), klein (little), groote (great), breede (broad), nieuw (new), zuur (sour), bokke (buck).

  • The elephant is found in the outer forests as far as the Jumna, and the rhinoceros as far as the Sarda; the spread of both of these animals as far as the Indus and into the plains of India, far beyond their present limits, is authenticated by historical records; they have probably retreated before the advance of cultivation and fire-arms. Wild pigs are common in the lower ranges, and one peculiar species of pigmy-hog (Sus salvanius) of very small size inhabits the forests at the base of the mountains in Nepal and Sikim.

  • The town arms are the elephant and castle, with the motto Fortitudo et fidelitas.

  • The forests are the home of several kinds of monkeys, including the chimpanzee in the Aruwimi region; the lion, leopard, wild hog, wolf, hyena, jackal, the python and other snakes, and particularly of the elephant.

  • Among animals peculiar to the forest regions are a tiger-cat about the size of a leopard, the honey badger or black Ituri ratel and the elephant shrew.

  • When the state was founded elephant and hippopotamus ivory formed for some years the most important article of export.

  • Human bones and objects of human manufacture have been found in such geological relation to the remains of fossil species of elephant, rhinoceros, hyena, bear, &c., as to lead to the distinct inference that man already existed at a remote period in localities where these mammalia are now and have long been extinct.

  • p. 286), that the human bones and worked flints had been deposited indiscriminately together with the remains of fossil elephant, rhinoceros, &c. Certain caves and rock-shelters in the province of Dordogne, in central France, were examined by a French and an English archaeologist, Edouard Lartet and Henry Christy, the remains discovered showing the former prevalence of the reindeer in this region, at that time inhabited by savages, whose bone and stone implements indicate a habit of life similar to that of the Eskimos.

  • Moreover, the co-existence of man with a fauna now extinct or confined to other districts was brought to yet clearer demonstration by the discovery in these caves of certain drawings and carvings of the animals done by the ancient inhabitants themselves, such as a group of reindeer on a piece of reindeer horn, and a sketch of a mammoth, showing the elephant's long hair, on a piece of a mammoth's tusk from La Madeleine (Lartet and Christy, Reliquiae Aquitanicae, ed.

  • Elephant and rhinoceros are numerous in certain low-lying districts, especially in the Sobat valley.

  • GANESA, or Ganesh, in Hindu mythology, the god of wisdom and prudence, always represented with an elephant's head possibly to indicate his sagacity.

  • The limbs are very strong, and the feet short and broad, resembling externally those of an elephant or tortois Glyptodonts constitute a family, the Glyptodontidae, whose position is next to the armadillos (Dasypodidae); the group being represented by a number of generic types.

  • This class includes the elephant (now found only in the Knysna and neighbouring forest regions), buffalo and zebra (strictly preserved, and confined to much the same regions as the elephant), eland, oribi, koodoo, haartebeest and other kinds of antelope and gnu.

  • Among plants remarkable in their appearance and structure may be noted the cactus-like Euphorbiae or spurge plants, the Stapelia or carrion flower, and the elephant's foot or Hottentots' bread, a plant of the same order as the yam.

  • In point of bodily size mammals present a greater range of variation than is exhibited by any other living terrestrial animals, the extremes in this respect being displayed by the African elephant on the one hand and certain species of shrewmice (whose head and body scarcely exceed an inch and a half in length) on the other.

  • The latter dictum must not, however, be pushed to an extreme, since the African elephant, which is the largest living land mammal, attaining in exceptional cases a height approaching 12 ft., was largely exceeded in this respect by an extinct Indian species, whose height has been estimated at between 15 and 16 ft.

  • Accordingly, it was at this epoch that the small ancestral insectivorous mammals first forsook their arboreal habitat to try a life on the open plains, where their descendants developed on the one hand into the carnivorous and other groups, in which the toes are armed with nails or claws, and on the other into the hoofed group, inclusive of such monsters as the elephant and the giraffe.

  • Possibly, however, its birthplace may prove to be Africa; if so, we shall have a case analogous to that of the African elephant, namely that while giraffes flourished during the Pliocene in Asia (where they may have originated), they survive only in Africa.

  • About this mission, one 1 One of the most famous of these mounds is the so-called Elephant Mound, 4 m.

  • corner of the state, near the Mississippi river; it is an effigy mound, and a drifting of earth changed its original shape, that of a bear, so that it roughly resembled an elephant; see pp. 91-93 of the Twelfth Annual Report (1894), Bureau of American Ethnology.

  • and between 53° and 63° W., and separated by Bransfield Strait from the region composed of Danco Land, Palmer Land, Louis Philippe Land, &c. The more considerable islands from west to east are Smith (or James), Low (or Jameson), Snow, Deception, Livingstone, Greenwich, Robert, Nelson, King George I., Elephant, and Clarence.

  • If one were to ask him what the substance is in which this colour and that taste or smell inhere, " he would find himself in a difficulty like that of the Indian, who, after saying that the world rested on an elephant, and the elephant on a broad-backed tortoise, could only suppose the tortoise to rest on ` Something, I know not what.'

  • Like Heracles when he leaped into the belly of the monster which was about to swallow Hesione, the Mantis once jumped down the throat of a hostile elephant, and so destroyed him.

  • The elephant (though its range has become restricted through the attacks of hunters) is found both in the savannas and forest regions, the latter being otherwise poor in large game, though the special habitat of the chimpanzee and gorilla.

  • Petherick sought for ivory only, but those who followed him soon found that slave-raiding was more profitable than elephant hunting.

  • 10 The best frankincense, as we learn from Arrian," was formerly exported from the neighbourhood of Cape Elephant in Africa (the modern Ras Fiel); and A.

  • There are no large beasts of prey, and neither the elephant, the rhinoceros nor the tapir is represented.

  • You went down like an elephant.

  • In appropriately alliterative tabloid style, the crucial component that made the tale a mass-circulation must was the elephant.

  • Powerful sable and roan antelope roam the forests, while a growing elephant population is becoming more visible.

  • Several seemed quite anxious at having just been redirected away from where the Elephant had been cordoned off.

  • These include an armadillo, an elephant, a squid, as well as mermaids and other imaginary creatures.

  • CLOCKWORK CATCHING ELEPHANT The long-running motor spins the propeller on the elephant's head and turns the augur which carries the balls upward.

  • When the elephant finally arose & let out a mighty bellow, every single person either cheered or let out an aaah of delight.

  • biography of novelist B S Johnson Like a Fiery Elephant won the Samuel Johnson award for non-fiction.

  • bull elephant is also set to join the two females.

  • captive elephant.

  • many conservationists think that reopening the international ivory trade would set off a new wave of illegal elephant killing.

  • cushy number given he's up against Charlie the Elephant.

  • The railroad will no longer go through the Maputo elephant reserve, but around it, in an area that is already deforested.

  • As much as for the extinct dodo, or for the fate of the elephant now going.

  • Fact: Did you know that a single elephant dung pat can attract 4,000 dung beetles in 30 minutes?

  • You ca n't dunk an elephant in your cup of tea!

  • This was in response to the untimely death of Pole Pole, a young captive elephant.

  • Do you really want the mating call of an African elephant blaring out at you at two o'clock in the morning without warning?

  • A herd of wild elephant can do a great deal of damage to a farmer's crops.

  • Wanted: Treadmill for an elephant Maggie, the 22 year-old African elephant, has been a resident of the Alaska Zoo since 1983.

  • elephant tusks at his feet.

  • elephant dung pat can attract 4,000 dung beetles in 30 minutes?

  • elephant orphanage in Kandy after easter.

  • elephant ivory that has been seized in Hong Kong.

  • elephant seals weigh 50 kg at birth in October.

  • elephant safari into the surrounding jungle, before lunch in a local restaurant.

  • He stepped onto the stage and light a joint which would have wasted a bull elephant.

  • elephant's trunk.

  • elephant grass that borders the Mae Kok River.

  • Thaton The target here is Jerdon's Bushchat found in what remains of the native elephant grass that borders the Mae Kok River.

  • Carvings of elephant ivory were first brought back from the West African coast by Portuguese explorers in the 15 th century.

  • The Elephant & Castle is best known for its pink concrete eyesore.

  • We will visit enormous penguin rookeries, land on beaches ruled by Antarctic fur seals and observe southern elephant seals wallowing in mud pools.

  • Muybridge (1899) is the oldest known source on the classification of quadrupedal gaits in general, including elephant gaits.

  • Animals include giant panda, elephant, lion, horse, cow, lamb, pig, monkey and teddy bears.

  • South through Tanzania, our route takes us through Mikumi National Park where we may well see giraffe or elephant grazing along the roadside.

  • South through Tanzania, our route takes us through Mikumi National Park where we may well see giraffe or elephant grazing along the roadside.

  • The goad is an elephant goad, used to produce movement from inertia.

  • guzzle down sweets, Eating as much as an elephant eats?

  • Moths such as the bright pink and lime green elephant hawk moth.

  • A perfect combination for elephant hawk moths, night-scented flowers with nectar for the adults, willowherb foodplant for the caterpillars.

  • herd of wild elephant can do a great deal of damage to a farmer's crops.

  • He considers pictographic languages ranging from the natural Mayan hieroglyphics and Sumerian cuneiform, to recent experiments such as Elephant's Memory.

  • These forests are home to the forest elephant and the Pygmy hippopotamus.

  • Made from elephant ivory, an image of a snake or reptile resides at the base.

  • jeering audience challenged him to levitate an elephant.

  • Let's untie that knot in the elephant's trunk together!

  • These images can then be analyzed to ascertain what normal elephant locomotion is like.

  • lumbering elephant - snatching at thin air where Ollie coiling body had been just a second before.

  • The Elephant Man you see at once is in monochrome.

  • Indian nightjar Several of these small, delicate nightjars seen pre-dawn at Bundala together with one spotlighted elephant which gave us rather a start.

  • nursery rhyme wallpaper, diaper bag, stuffed elephant, a teddy bear and lot of designer baby clothes.

  • You will see the baby elephants being washed in river at the elephant orphanage (you may even take part!

  • Just under 2 fluid ounces of its venom is enough to kill an elephant or twenty people within minutes.

  • We also visit a nearby elephant camp and get to know these playful pachyderms!

  • patchwork elephant has a busy day ahead of him.

  • We saw elephant seals and chinstrap penguins that were totally unfazed by our presence.

  • Possibly land at Hannah Point, whose wildlife showcase features elephant seals, cape pigeons, southern giant petrels, macaroni and gentoo penguins.

  • However, elephant polo in Thailand is not just about the sport.

  • He's trying to open his eyelids, but he'd have better luck trying to bench press a small elephant with them.

  • Animals present included red deer, roe deer, horse, boar, bear, wolf, elephant, rhinoceros, lion and hyena!

  • Atop an elephant in the jungle, go in search of the elusive Royal Bengal tiger and the one-horned rhinoceros.

  • Asian elephant, Sumatran rhinoceros, orangutan, and tiger populations are all declining because palm oil plantations are encroaching on their habitats.

  • roan antelope roam the forests, while a growing elephant population is becoming more visible.

  • rookerythere are Weddell and elephant seals, skuas, giant petrels, Antarctic terns and rookeries of chinstrap, gentoo and macaroni penguins.

  • rookerybly visit vast penguin rookeries, land on beaches ruled by Antarctic fur seals or observe wallowing southern elephant seals.

  • rookeryll visit enormous penguin rookeries, land on beaches ruled by Antarctic fur seals and observe southern elephant seals wallowing in mud pools.

  • rookerybly visit vast penguin rookeries, land on beaches ruled by Antarctic fur seals or observe wallowing southern elephant seals.

  • Now, like the rest of the facility, the elephant's foot is under the thick concrete sarcophagus.

  • scurrying mouse could easily startle an elephant and may cause it to rear up.

  • We will visit enormous penguin rookeries, land on beaches ruled by antarctic fur seals and observe southern elephant seals wallowing in mud pools.

  • In season you can spot various species of penguins, occasionally fur seals, sea lions and elephant seals.

  • In season you can spot various species of penguins, occasionally fur seals, sea lions and elephant seals.

  • Born Free were shocked to learn of a huge illegal shipment of elephant ivory that has been seized in Hong Kong.

  • Have competition with Rob for silliest animal: elephant shrew wins.

  • RE: the recent spate of clean elephant jokes.

  • Dodging a charging cheetah or causing an elephant stampede is just a typical afternoon for tiny Tarzan!

  • stirred in several extra spoonfuls of sugar into her coffee that was strong enough to knock out a bull elephant.

  • subantarctic fur seals Arctocephalus tropicalis and southern elephant seals Mirounga leonina.

  • subspecies of the Asian elephant are E. m. sumatranus on Sumatra and E. m. maximus on Sri Lanka.

  • swim with dolphins #9: Go on safari #22: Bathing an elephant.

  • The symbol of the Zoo, which was an elephant, will now be the Sumatran tiger.

  • Be careful not to buy poached ivory souvenirs in Thailand and watch out for elephant ivory trinkets in Hong Kong and China.

  • Use an arm for an elephant trunk, jump like a kangaroo.

  • The little mouse hopped on the elephant's big long trunk.

  • elephant's tusks are large teeth growing from the upper jaw.

  • Ivory Strictly speaking, the word ivory only applies to the material from which elephant tusks are comprised.

  • Possibly visit vast penguin rookeries, land on beaches ruled by Antarctic fur seals or observe wallowing southern elephant seals.

  • Matt's birdwatching buddy, Daffyd, takes a closer look at an elephant seal, and the seals have a good wallow!

  • It is a parade of wild animals Our world is now a pitiful weakling It groans with the burden of an elephant corpse!

  • Since we have no way of knowing the future submission rate and it might fall, investment might become a white elephant.

  • In addition people saw millions squandered by an incompetent Government or the biggest white elephant ever the Dome.

  • This is proof positive of all the lies we've ever been told about the great nuclear white elephant.

  • Back to top of Page Hungry Elephant - making shopping worthwhile Like to shop on-line?

  • There is no way of telling the detail of what sporting events they held you can only imagine, perhaps elephant mud wrestling.

  • zoo elephant facility hits $ 13 million " .

  • It is covered with numerous large papillae, and forms, like the trunk of the elephant, an admirable organ for the examination and prehension of food.

  • ELEPHANT, the designation of the two existing representatives of the Proboscidea, a sub-order of ungulate mammals, and also extended to include their more immediate extinct relatives.

  • The more specialized of the two species is the Indian or Asiatic elephant, Elephas maximus, specially characterized by the extreme complexity of the structure of its molar teeth, which are composed of a great number of tall and thin plates of enamel and dentine, with the intervals filled by cement (see Proboscidea, fig.

  • The Asiatic elephant inhabits the forest-lands of India, Burma, the Malay Peninsula, Cochin China, Ceylon and Sumatra.

  • The appearance of the Asiatic elephant is familiar to all.

  • In addition to various sounds produced at other times, an elephant when about to charge gives vent to a shrill loud ` trumpet'; and on such occasions rushes on its FIG.

  • Asiatic Elephant (Elephas maximus).

  • Unlike the African species, the Indian elephant charges with its trunk curled up, and consequently in silence.

  • - Immature African Elephant (Elephas africanus).

  • Of the largest pair in the possession of the British Museum, which belonged to an elephant killed in 1866 by Colonel G.

  • The African elephant is a very different animal from its Asiatic cousin, both as regards structure and habits; and were it not for the existence of intermediate extinct species, might well be regarded as the representative of a distinct genus.

  • Except where exterminated by human agency (and this has been accomplished to a deplorable extent), the African elephant is a native of the wooded districts of the whole of Africa south of the Sahara.

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