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elegiac

elegiac

elegiac Sentence Examples

  • The poems of Propertius, as they have come down to us, consist of four books containing 4046 lines of elegiac verse.

  • His handling of the elegiac couplet, and especially of its second line, deserves especial recognition.

  • Besides the ELXXoi we have some lines preserved from the 'IvaaXyoi, a poem in elegiac verse, which appears to have inculcated the tenets of scepticism, and one or two fragments which cannot be with certainty assigned to either poem.

  • About a hundred epigrams by him in various metres (the elegiac predominating) have been preserved.

  • As a didactic and elegiac poet Stephen Kohari is much esteemed.

  • According to Sostratus, author of an elegiac poem called Teiresias, he was originally a girl, but had been changed into a boy by Apollo at the age of seven; after undergoing several more transformations from one sex to the other, she (for the final sex was feminine) was turned into a mouse and her lover Arachnus into a weasel (Eustathius on Odyssey, p. 1665).

  • Catulus in the preceding generation, was a kind of dilettante poet and a precursor of the poetry of pleasure, which attained such prominence in the elegiac poets of the Augustan age.

  • The greatest masters of this kind of poetry are the elegiac poets of the Augustan age - Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid.

  • The most facile and brilliant of the elegiac poets and the least serious in tone and spirit is P. Ovidius Naso or Ovid (43 B.C. - A.D.

  • The composition of didactic, lyrical and elegiac poetry also was the accomplishment and pastime of an educated dilettante class, the only extant specimens of any interest being some of the Silvae of Statius.

  • The idealizing poetry of passion, which found a genuine voice in Catullus and the elegiac poets, could not prolong itself through the exhausting licence of successive generations.

  • A 12th-century version of the first three books of Romulus in elegiac verse enjoyed a wide popularity, even into the Renaissance.

  • The forms of poetical composition chiefly cultivated by the Alexandrians were epic and lyric, or elegiac. Great epics are wanting; but in their place, as might almost have been expected, are found the historical and the didactic or expository epics.

  • In their lyric and elegiac poetry there is much worthy of admiration.

  • The earliest of the elegiac poets was Philetas, the sweet singer of Cos.

  • TYRTAEUS, Greek elegiac poet, lived at Sparta about the middle of the 7th century B.C. According to the older tradition he was a native of the Attic deme of Aphidnae, and was invited to Sparta at the suggestion of the Delphic oracle to assist the Spartans in the second Messenian war.

  • A fanciful explanation of his lameness is that it alludes to the elegiac couplet, one verse of which is shorter than the other.

  • They are mainly elegiac and in the Ionic dialect, written partly in praise of the Spartan constitution an King Theopompus (Ebvoµia), partly to stimulate the Spartan soldiers to deeds of heroism in the field (`T7roOi icacthe title is, however, later than Tyrtaeus).

  • According to Diogenes Laertius, who credits him with an undoubtedly spurious letter to Croesus (with whom his connexion was probably legendary), Pittacus was a writer of elegiac poems, from which he quotes five lines.

  • He also put into elegiac metre, in 106 epigrams, some of Augustine's theological dicta.

  • Elegiac poets (4): Callinus, Mimnermus, Philetas, Callimachus.

  • Next appeared an edition in elegiac verse, often cited by Suidas, but the author's name is unknown.

  • The Hebrew word mashal, commonly rendered " proverb," is a general term for didactic and elegiac poetry (as distinguished from the descriptive and the liturgical),.

  • It will be enough to observe that in the earliest elegiac poets, such as Archilochus, Tyrtaeus and Theognis, reminiscences of Homeric language and thought meet us on every page.

  • His most original compositions in verse, however, are elegiac and hendecasyllabic pieces on personal topics - the De conjugali amore, Eridanus, Tumuli, Naeniae, Baiae, &c. - in which he uttered his vehemently passionate emotions with a warmth of southern colouring, an evident sincerity, and a truth of painting from reality which excuse their erotic freedom.

  • Some anomalies, both of metre and of sense, may be removed by judicious emendation; and many lines become smooth enough, if we assume a crasis of open vowels of the same class, or a diphthongal pronunciation of others, or contraction or silence of certain suffixes as in Syriac. The oldest elegiac utterances are not couched in this metre; e.g.

  • From very early times the Homeric poems found a home and admirers there; and to Ephesus belong the earliest elegiac poems of Greece, the war songs of Callinus, who flourished in the 7th century B.C. and was the model of Tyrtaeus.

  • He was the author of a Latin poem, De Reditu Suo, in elegiac metre, describing a coast voyage from Rome to Gaul in A.D.

  • With regard to the form of the poem, Rutilius handles the elegiac couplet with great metrical purity and freedom, and betrays many signs of long study in the elegiac poetry of the Augustan era.

  • His study of the Alexandrine theology, as well as of profane literature, brought him under the suspicions of the orthodox, and a former pupil of his, by name Constantine, accused him in an elegiac poem of having abandoned Christianity.

  • Simylus, a Greek elegiac poet, makes Tarpeia betray the Capitol to a king of the Gauls.

  • That their author was one of the greatest elegiac and lyric poets ever born into the world, any one of these volumes would amply suffice to prove.

  • In form all these poems belong to two or three classes: - kvioa, an epic " cantilena "; tal, a genealogical poem; drapa, songs of praise, &c., written in modifications of the old Teutonic metre which we know in Beowulf; galdr and lokkr, spell and charm songs in a more lyric measure; and mal, a dialogue poem, and liod, a lay, in elegiac measure suited to the subject.

  • What are the limits on Ovid's boldness in using Latin and deploying the elegiac couplet?

  • elegiac tone.

  • elegiac verse.

  • elegiac poem in her memory.

  • elegiac quality often inspires in directors, with mixed results.

  • elegiac liner notes to Billy Mackenzie's beautiful farewell LP Beyond the Sun with that great phrase.

  • elegiac couplet?

  • On the brilliant June evenings which seemed so frequent in these early years the whole atmosphere had an almost elegiac quality.

  • 30-15 B.C.), the greatest of the elegiac poets of Rome, was born of a well-to-do Umbrian family at or near Asisium (Assisi), the birthplace also of the famous St Francis.

  • We learn from Ovid that Propertius was his senior, but also his friend and companion; and that he was third in the sequence of elegiac poets, following Gallus, who was born in 69 B.C., and Tibullus, and immediately preceding Ovid himself, who was born in 43 B.C. We shall not then be far wrong in supposing that he was born about 50 B.C. His early life was full of misfortune.

  • The poems of Propertius, as they have come down to us, consist of four books containing 4046 lines of elegiac verse.

  • His handling of the elegiac couplet, and especially of its second line, deserves especial recognition.

  • He was the author of a collection of epigrams called Cicuta (" hemlock") 1 from their bitter sarcasm, and of a beautiful epitaph on the death of Tibullus; of elegiac poems, probably of an erotic character; of an epic poem Amazonis; and of a prose work on wit (De urbanitate).

  • Besides the ELXXoi we have some lines preserved from the 'IvaaXyoi, a poem in elegiac verse, which appears to have inculcated the tenets of scepticism, and one or two fragments which cannot be with certainty assigned to either poem.

  • About a hundred epigrams by him in various metres (the elegiac predominating) have been preserved.

  • As a didactic and elegiac poet Stephen Kohari is much esteemed.

  • In the more considerable of the elegiac fragments which have survived, he ridicules the doctrine of the migration of souls (xviii.), asserts the claims of wisdom against the prevalent athleticism, which seemed to him to conduce neither to the good government of states nor to their material prosperity (xix), reprobates the introduction of Lydian luxury into Colophon (xx.), and recommends the reasonable enjoyment of social pleasures (xxi.).

  • According to Sostratus, author of an elegiac poem called Teiresias, he was originally a girl, but had been changed into a boy by Apollo at the age of seven; after undergoing several more transformations from one sex to the other, she (for the final sex was feminine) was turned into a mouse and her lover Arachnus into a weasel (Eustathius on Odyssey, p. 1665).

  • Catulus in the preceding generation, was a kind of dilettante poet and a precursor of the poetry of pleasure, which attained such prominence in the elegiac poets of the Augustan age.

  • The greatest masters of this kind of poetry are the elegiac poets of the Augustan age - Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid.

  • The most facile and brilliant of the elegiac poets and the least serious in tone and spirit is P. Ovidius Naso or Ovid (43 B.C. - A.D.

  • The composition of didactic, lyrical and elegiac poetry also was the accomplishment and pastime of an educated dilettante class, the only extant specimens of any interest being some of the Silvae of Statius.

  • The idealizing poetry of passion, which found a genuine voice in Catullus and the elegiac poets, could not prolong itself through the exhausting licence of successive generations.

  • Horace and the Elegiac Poets (Oxford, 1892), pp. 213 and 221 to 258; the spurious poem ed.

  • A 12th-century version of the first three books of Romulus in elegiac verse enjoyed a wide popularity, even into the Renaissance.

  • The forms of poetical composition chiefly cultivated by the Alexandrians were epic and lyric, or elegiac. Great epics are wanting; but in their place, as might almost have been expected, are found the historical and the didactic or expository epics.

  • In their lyric and elegiac poetry there is much worthy of admiration.

  • The earliest of the elegiac poets was Philetas, the sweet singer of Cos.

  • TYRTAEUS, Greek elegiac poet, lived at Sparta about the middle of the 7th century B.C. According to the older tradition he was a native of the Attic deme of Aphidnae, and was invited to Sparta at the suggestion of the Delphic oracle to assist the Spartans in the second Messenian war.

  • A fanciful explanation of his lameness is that it alludes to the elegiac couplet, one verse of which is shorter than the other.

  • They are mainly elegiac and in the Ionic dialect, written partly in praise of the Spartan constitution an King Theopompus (Ebvoµia), partly to stimulate the Spartan soldiers to deeds of heroism in the field (`T7roOi icacthe title is, however, later than Tyrtaeus).

  • According to Diogenes Laertius, who credits him with an undoubtedly spurious letter to Croesus (with whom his connexion was probably legendary), Pittacus was a writer of elegiac poems, from which he quotes five lines.

  • He also put into elegiac metre, in 106 epigrams, some of Augustine's theological dicta.

  • Elegiac poets (4): Callinus, Mimnermus, Philetas, Callimachus.

  • Next appeared an edition in elegiac verse, often cited by Suidas, but the author's name is unknown.

  • Her verses, which were preserved with those of Tibullus and were for long attributed to him, are elegiac poems addressed to a lover called Cerinthus, possibly the Cornutus addressed by Tibullus in two of his Elegies (bk.

  • The Hebrew word mashal, commonly rendered " proverb," is a general term for didactic and elegiac poetry (as distinguished from the descriptive and the liturgical),.

  • It will be enough to observe that in the earliest elegiac poets, such as Archilochus, Tyrtaeus and Theognis, reminiscences of Homeric language and thought meet us on every page.

  • His most original compositions in verse, however, are elegiac and hendecasyllabic pieces on personal topics - the De conjugali amore, Eridanus, Tumuli, Naeniae, Baiae, &c. - in which he uttered his vehemently passionate emotions with a warmth of southern colouring, an evident sincerity, and a truth of painting from reality which excuse their erotic freedom.

  • Some anomalies, both of metre and of sense, may be removed by judicious emendation; and many lines become smooth enough, if we assume a crasis of open vowels of the same class, or a diphthongal pronunciation of others, or contraction or silence of certain suffixes as in Syriac. The oldest elegiac utterances are not couched in this metre; e.g.

  • (i.) The language and style of Lamentations are in general very unlike those of Jeremiah (see the details in Nagelsbach and Lohr); whatever allowance may be made for conventional differences in the phraseology of elegiac poetry and prophetic prose, even of a more or less lyrical cast.

  • Of less importance were Karl Herman Satherberg (1812-1897), a romantic poet who was also a practising physician of distinction; the elegiac poet Johan Nybom (1815-1889); and the poet, novelist, and dramatist Frans Hedberg (d.

  • Arabic language and literature had gained too firm a footing to be supplanted at once by a new literary idiom still in its infancy; nevertheless the few poets who arose under the Tahirids and Saffgrids show already the germs of the characteristic tendency of all later Persian literature, which aims at amalgamating the enforced spirit of Islamism with their own Aryan feelings, and reconciling the strict deism of the Mahommedan religion with their inborn loftier and more or less pantheistic ideas; and we can easily trace in the few fragmentary verses of men like Iianzala, I~akim FirUz and Abu Salik those principal forms of poetry now used in common by Forms of all Mahommedan nationsthe forms of the qa~ida Eastern (the encomiastic, elegiac or satirical poem), the Poeti~.

  • From very early times the Homeric poems found a home and admirers there; and to Ephesus belong the earliest elegiac poems of Greece, the war songs of Callinus, who flourished in the 7th century B.C. and was the model of Tyrtaeus.

  • He was the author of a Latin poem, De Reditu Suo, in elegiac metre, describing a coast voyage from Rome to Gaul in A.D.

  • With regard to the form of the poem, Rutilius handles the elegiac couplet with great metrical purity and freedom, and betrays many signs of long study in the elegiac poetry of the Augustan era.

  • His study of the Alexandrine theology, as well as of profane literature, brought him under the suspicions of the orthodox, and a former pupil of his, by name Constantine, accused him in an elegiac poem of having abandoned Christianity.

  • Simylus, a Greek elegiac poet, makes Tarpeia betray the Capitol to a king of the Gauls.

  • That their author was one of the greatest elegiac and lyric poets ever born into the world, any one of these volumes would amply suffice to prove.

  • In form all these poems belong to two or three classes: - kvioa, an epic " cantilena "; tal, a genealogical poem; drapa, songs of praise, &c., written in modifications of the old Teutonic metre which we know in Beowulf; galdr and lokkr, spell and charm songs in a more lyric measure; and mal, a dialogue poem, and liod, a lay, in elegiac measure suited to the subject.

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