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electing

electing Sentence Examples

  • God knows they need it if they're considering electing you for their sheriff.

  • The population of Buenos Aires assembled in armed bodies with the avowed intention of ejecting the governor from office, and electing in his stead a man who would give them a just administration.

  • Its members had the power of electing a new king, although the area of their choice was strictly limited by custom and also the right of deposing a king, although this seems to have been infrequently exercised.

  • The authority of the cardinals, who were the only persons judicially invested with the right of electing the pope, emerged from the crisis through which the church had just passed in far too feeble and contested a condition to carry by its own weight the general assent.

  • He fixed the sum to be paid by each group of inhabitants, who then had to see that it was assessed, collected, and paid to the lord, electing commissaries (preud hommes) from among themselves for this purpose.

  • The seaport of Leith, though a distinct burgh, governed by its own magistrates, and electing its own representative to parliament, has also on its southern side become practically united to its great neighbour.

  • The Democrats had despaired of electing a candidate of their own, and hoped to achieve success by adopting the Cincinnati nominee, should he prove to be an eligible person.

  • The elections are, however, indirect; the citizens nominating the Wahlmonner (deputy electors) and the latter electing the representatives.

  • 1 A strong sense of the unique privileges of the children of Jacob, the objects of electing love (i.

  • The result of these interviews was a series of projects of reform, including a constitutional system based on a series of dumas, the cantonal assembly (volost) electing the duma of the district, the dumas of the districts electing that of the province or government, and these electing the Duma of the empire.

  • Bossiney acquired the right of electing two members of parliament in 1553, the franchise being originally vested in the freeholders within the borough.

  • Under the constitution of united Sweden and Norway, in the event of the necessity of electing a Regent and the disagreement of the parliaments of the two countries, Karlstad was indicated as the meeting-place of a delegacy for the purpose.

  • " Church privileges " meant to many only the sacred duty of electing their own ministry and a formal right of veto on the proposals of pastor and deacons.

  • Scrutiny is also a term applied to a method of electing a pope in the Roman Catholic church, in contradistinction to two other methods, acclamation and accession.

  • Civil war was happily averted at the last moment, and a national convention, composed of senators and deputies from all parts of the country, assembled at Warsaw, in April 1573, for the purpose of electing a new king.

  • 1 The Cossack kosh, or commonwealth, had the privilege of electing its hetman, or chief, and his chief officers, the starshins.

  • All publicity was suppressed, and one whole district was disfranchised because it persisted in electing candidates who were disapproved of at court.

  • In 1810 he was about to enter upon his new post of governor of Rome when he was, unexpectedly, elected successor to the Swedish throne, partly because a large part of the Swedish army, in view of future complications with Russia, were in favour of electing a soldier, and partly because Bernadotte was very popular in Sweden, owing to the kindness he had shown to the Swedish prisoners during the late war with Denmark.

  • The armistice having been arranged, and the opportunity having been thus obtained of electing a National Assembly, Thiers was chosen deputy by more than twenty constituencies (of which he preferred Paris), and was at once elected by the Assembly itself practically president, nominally chef du pouvoir executif.

  • By a statute of 1535 Brecon was made the county town of the new shire of Brecknock, and was granted the right of electing one burgess to represent it in parliament, a right which it retained till it was merged in the county representation in 1885.

  • In 1874, however, the power of the Radicals was finally broken, the Conservative Democrats electing all state officials.

  • The functions of the council have been much discussed, and it has been claimed that they had the right of electing and deposing kings.

  • Ultimately, however, they asserted their independence by electing a grand master of their own, the first holder of the office being Don Diego Sanche.

  • Although the pope forgave him, the German princes, resolved not to miss the chance which-fortune had given them, met in March 1077, and deposed him, electing Rudolph, duke of Swabia, as his successor.

  • At last, in September 1122, the investiture question was settled by the concordat of Worms. By this compromise, which exhaustion forced upon both parties, the tight of electing prelates was granted to the clergy, and the emperor surrendered the privilege of investing of Worms. them with the ring and the staff.

  • The measure transferred the right of electing members of the Reichsrath from the diets to the direct vote of the people, the result being to deprive the Federalists of their chief weapon; it was no longer possible to take a formal vote of the legal representatives in any territory refusing to appoint deputies, and if a Czech or Slovene member did not take his seat the only result was that a single constituency was unrepresented, and the opposition weakened.

  • Otto Bodrugan in 1320 granted the burgesses the privilege of electing their own portreeve and controlling the trade of the town.

  • On his return he resumed his office as commissioner of the Great Seal, was appointed a commissioner of the treasury with a salary of 1000, and was returned to the parliament of 1654 for each of the four constituencies of Bedford, Exeter, Oxford and Buckinghamshire, electing to sit for the latter constituency.

  • Two of the elected members represent St Louis, the 8 rural districts into which the island is divided electing each one member.

  • Meanwhile in Spain, after the death of the Gothic king Witiza in the year 90 (708-709), anarchy arose, which was terminated by the council of noblemen at Toledo electing Roderic, the powerful duke of Baetica, to be his successor in the fifth year of Walid.

  • In the presidential campaign of 1792 Madison seems to have lent his influence to the determined efforts of the Jeffersonians to defeat John Adams by electing George Clinton vice-president.

  • By and by these crafts or "offices" claimed the right of electing their master and of assisting him in examining the goods, and even of framing by-laws regulating the quality of the wares and the process of their manufacture.

  • also granted the burgesses the privilege of electing a mayor and bailiffs every year.

  • By the new constitution the grand-duchy was to be divided into not less than twelve and not more than eighteen constituencies, electing members in proportion to population.

  • He founded in 1868 a weekly democratic journal, L'Electeur libre, and in 1869 was elected both for Herault and Paris, electing to sit for the former.

  • The request was granted, and the right of electing parish ministers was conferred by the Patronage Act 1874 on the congregation; thus a grievance of old standing, from which all the ecclesiastical troubles of a century and a half had sprung, was removed and the church placed on a thoroughly democratic basis.

  • In 1774, the corporation being in danger of extinction, burgesses were added, but it was not until 1886 that the ratepayers acquired the right of electing representatives to the council, the right up to that time having been exercised by the members of the corporation.

  • This singular way of electing members for the principal city in the kingdom could not fail further to irritate the parties.

  • (5) No inhabitant of England (except persons contracting, or, after conviction for felony, electing to be transported) shall be sent prisoner to Scotland, Ireland, Jersey, &c., or any place beyond the seas.

  • The mode of electing officers, and the system of management generally, was challenged by three members who called themselves "artificers, poor men of the craft of goldsmiths."

  • The liverymen of the companies, being freemen of the city, have still, however, the exclusive power of electing the lord mayor, sheriffs, chamberlain and other corporate officers.

  • And first as to the mode of electing successors to the two Great Lamas.

  • On the 7th of September 1159 he was chosen the successor of Adrian IV., a minority of the cardinals, however, electing the cardinal priest Octavian, who assumed the name of Victor IV.

  • Though the Habsburg princes at this period already claimed a hereditary right to the Bohemian throne, the Bohemians determined to maintain their right of electing their sovereign, and they chose Henry, duke of Carinthia, who had married a daughter of King Wenceslas II.

  • The Bohemian throne was now again vacant, for, when electing Ladislas the estates had reaffirmed the elective character of the monarchy.

  • As early as the first half of the 13th century the young city obtained the right of electing its own magistracy, and enlarged the walls erected during Albert's time.

  • The state's own constitution, which had been adopted in 1776 and amended in 1777, retained, like other state constitutions framed during the War of Independence, many features of colonial government ill-adapted to a state increasingly democratic. The basis of representation, each county electing three members to the assembly and one member to the legislative council, soon became antiquated.

  • Finally, in the 13th century, seven of the most powerful of these separated themselves into a college which obtained the sole right of electing the emperor.

  • 19 repealed any act of parliament, law or custom whereby the bishops, clergy or laity of the said church were prohibited from holding synods or electing representatives thereto for the purpose of making rules for the well-being and ordering of the said church, and enacted that no such law, &c., should hinder the said bishops, clergy and laity, by such representatives, lay and clerical, and so elected as they shall appoint, from meeting in general synod or convention and in such general synod or convention forming constitutions and providing for future representation of the members of the church in diocesan synods, general convention or otherwise.

  • The public oratorship fell vacant, and a contest arose between the heads of the colleges and the members of the senate as to the mode of electing to the office.

  • An assembly when convened by the Bruigh-fer for the special purpose of electing a tanist or successor to the king was called a Tocomra.

  • Lincoln was also given the right of electing its own magistrates in 1194, and many smaller places owe grants of more or less of municipal privilege to Hubert Walter acting in the name of the absent king.

  • When it met, it acknowledged him as king, but made no pretence of creating or electing him to be sovereign.

  • A notable instance is his doctrine of the Church - the community (Gemeinde); the sole object of God's electing love, according to Ritschl's interpretation of St Paul.

  • The men who raised Pelayo on the shield believed themselves to be electing a successor to Roderic, and indeed they were.

  • Behetrias, called plebeian lordships, were districts and townships of peasants who were bound to have a lord, and to make him payments in money or in kind, but who had a varying freedom of choice in electing their lord.

  • Modcrados made a law which deprived the towns oi the right of electing their councils.

  • wrote to Leo blaming his interference in religious matters, though he dissuaded the rebels in Venetia, the Exarchate and the Pentapolis from electing a new emperor and marching against Leo.

  • God knows they need it if they're considering electing you for their sheriff.

  • electing a new co-chair BOND asked for DEG members to nominate themselves if they wanted to stand for co-chair of DEG.

  • Far from being necessary for the fulfillment of Godâs electing decree, the Fall was a departure from Godâs purpose for humanity.

  • We also question the applicability of the maturity mismatch formula to firms electing to use maturity mismatch formula to firms electing to use maturity adjustments.

  • We also question the applicability of the maturity mismatch formula to firms electing to use maturity adjustments.

  • Electing into GWR and then terminating the trust Para 22 of Sch 15 allows the settlor to make a GWR election.

  • Malone appears to have thought that it was a mere subterfuge to instance the death of Garrick as a reason for not electing him.

  • Firstly, the rather unseemly mess concerning the means of electing a leader.

  • We will be electing our Church wardens and deputy wardens, four members of the PCC and one Deanery Synod member.

  • At Perugia on the 5th of June 1305 he was chosen to succeed Benedict XI.; the cardinals by a vote of ten to five electing one neither an Italian nor a cardinal, in order to end a conclave which had lasted eleven months.

  • The population of Buenos Aires assembled in armed bodies with the avowed intention of ejecting the governor from office, and electing in his stead a man who would give them a just administration.

  • In addition to Algeria, which sends three senators and six deputies to Paris and is treated in many respects not as a colony but as part of France, the colonies represented in the legislature are: Martinique, Guadeloupe and Reunion (each electing one senator and two deputies), French India (one senator and one deputy),Guiana, Senegal and Cochin-China (one deputy each).

  • After Baldwin's death the prosperity of Trier was checked by wars and disputes between rival claimants to the see, and in 1456 the estates united for the purpose of restoring order, and secured the right of electing their archbishops.

  • Its members had the power of electing a new king, although the area of their choice was strictly limited by custom and also the right of deposing a king, although this seems to have been infrequently exercised.

  • Under a charter of 1899, as amended afterwards, the city government, which has almost entirely superseded the town government, is in the hands of a mayor, who holds office for two years and appoints most of the administrative officers, except a board of aldermen (of whom each has a two-year term, six are chosen from the city at large and the others one each from each ward, the even-numbered wards electing their representatives one year and the odd-numbered the next), a city clerk, controller, sheriff, treasurer and tax collector, all chosen by popular vote, and an assistant clerk, appointed by the board of aldermen.

  • On the 24th of January 1438 it suspended Eugenius IV., and went on in spite of the intervention of most of the powers to pronounce his deposition (25th June 1439), finally giving rise to a new schism by electing on the 4th of November Amadeus VIII., duke of Savoy, as pope, who took the name of Felix V.

  • In 1859 the Danubian principalities, deliberately left separate by the Congress of Paris, carried out their long-cherished design of union by electing Prince Cuza both in Moldavia and in Walachia, a contingency which the powers had not taken into account, and to which in the end they gave a grudging assent (see Rumania).

  • The authority of the cardinals, who were the only persons judicially invested with the right of electing the pope, emerged from the crisis through which the church had just passed in far too feeble and contested a condition to carry by its own weight the general assent.

  • He fixed the sum to be paid by each group of inhabitants, who then had to see that it was assessed, collected, and paid to the lord, electing commissaries (preud hommes) from among themselves for this purpose.

  • The seaport of Leith, though a distinct burgh, governed by its own magistrates, and electing its own representative to parliament, has also on its southern side become practically united to its great neighbour.

  • The Democrats had despaired of electing a candidate of their own, and hoped to achieve success by adopting the Cincinnati nominee, should he prove to be an eligible person.

  • The majority has occasionally protested by electing a Democratic governor, but he has not been able to accomplish a great deal, because until 1909 he did not have veto power nor effectual means to induce the Senate to ratify his appointments.

  • The elections are, however, indirect; the citizens nominating the Wahlmonner (deputy electors) and the latter electing the representatives.

  • 1 A strong sense of the unique privileges of the children of Jacob, the objects of electing love (i.

  • The result of these interviews was a series of projects of reform, including a constitutional system based on a series of dumas, the cantonal assembly (volost) electing the duma of the district, the dumas of the districts electing that of the province or government, and these electing the Duma of the empire.

  • Bossiney acquired the right of electing two members of parliament in 1553, the franchise being originally vested in the freeholders within the borough.

  • Under the constitution of united Sweden and Norway, in the event of the necessity of electing a Regent and the disagreement of the parliaments of the two countries, Karlstad was indicated as the meeting-place of a delegacy for the purpose.

  • " Church privileges " meant to many only the sacred duty of electing their own ministry and a formal right of veto on the proposals of pastor and deacons.

  • Scrutiny is also a term applied to a method of electing a pope in the Roman Catholic church, in contradistinction to two other methods, acclamation and accession.

  • Civil war was happily averted at the last moment, and a national convention, composed of senators and deputies from all parts of the country, assembled at Warsaw, in April 1573, for the purpose of electing a new king.

  • 1 The Cossack kosh, or commonwealth, had the privilege of electing its hetman, or chief, and his chief officers, the starshins.

  • All publicity was suppressed, and one whole district was disfranchised because it persisted in electing candidates who were disapproved of at court.

  • In 1810 he was about to enter upon his new post of governor of Rome when he was, unexpectedly, elected successor to the Swedish throne, partly because a large part of the Swedish army, in view of future complications with Russia, were in favour of electing a soldier, and partly because Bernadotte was very popular in Sweden, owing to the kindness he had shown to the Swedish prisoners during the late war with Denmark.

  • The armistice having been arranged, and the opportunity having been thus obtained of electing a National Assembly, Thiers was chosen deputy by more than twenty constituencies (of which he preferred Paris), and was at once elected by the Assembly itself practically president, nominally chef du pouvoir executif.

  • By a statute of 1535 Brecon was made the county town of the new shire of Brecknock, and was granted the right of electing one burgess to represent it in parliament, a right which it retained till it was merged in the county representation in 1885.

  • In 1874, however, the power of the Radicals was finally broken, the Conservative Democrats electing all state officials.

  • The functions of the council have been much discussed, and it has been claimed that they had the right of electing and deposing kings.

  • Ultimately, however, they asserted their independence by electing a grand master of their own, the first holder of the office being Don Diego Sanche.

  • Although the pope forgave him, the German princes, resolved not to miss the chance which-fortune had given them, met in March 1077, and deposed him, electing Rudolph, duke of Swabia, as his successor.

  • At last, in September 1122, the investiture question was settled by the concordat of Worms. By this compromise, which exhaustion forced upon both parties, the tight of electing prelates was granted to the clergy, and the emperor surrendered the privilege of investing of Worms. them with the ring and the staff.

  • In the elections which followed in Bohemia the influence of the government was sufficient to secure a German majority among the landed proprietors; the Czechs, who were therefore in a minority, declared the elections invalid, refused to take any part in electing deputies for the Reichsrath, and seceded altogether from the diet.

  • The measure transferred the right of electing members of the Reichsrath from the diets to the direct vote of the people, the result being to deprive the Federalists of their chief weapon; it was no longer possible to take a formal vote of the legal representatives in any territory refusing to appoint deputies, and if a Czech or Slovene member did not take his seat the only result was that a single constituency was unrepresented, and the opposition weakened.

  • Otto Bodrugan in 1320 granted the burgesses the privilege of electing their own portreeve and controlling the trade of the town.

  • On his return he resumed his office as commissioner of the Great Seal, was appointed a commissioner of the treasury with a salary of 1000, and was returned to the parliament of 1654 for each of the four constituencies of Bedford, Exeter, Oxford and Buckinghamshire, electing to sit for the latter constituency.

  • Two of the elected members represent St Louis, the 8 rural districts into which the island is divided electing each one member.

  • Meanwhile in Spain, after the death of the Gothic king Witiza in the year 90 (708-709), anarchy arose, which was terminated by the council of noblemen at Toledo electing Roderic, the powerful duke of Baetica, to be his successor in the fifth year of Walid.

  • He considered as a practical middle ground changing the basis of representation in Congress from states to population; giving the national government "positive and complete authority in all cases which require uniformity"; giving it a negative on all state laws, a power which might best be vested in the Senate, a comparatively permanent body; electing the lower house, and the more numerous, for a short term; providing for a national executive, for extending the national supremacy over the judiciary and the militia, for a council to revise all laws, and for an express statement of the right of coercion; and finally, obtaining the ratification of a new constitutional instrument from the people, and not merely from the legislatures.

  • In the presidential campaign of 1792 Madison seems to have lent his influence to the determined efforts of the Jeffersonians to defeat John Adams by electing George Clinton vice-president.

  • By and by these crafts or "offices" claimed the right of electing their master and of assisting him in examining the goods, and even of framing by-laws regulating the quality of the wares and the process of their manufacture.

  • also granted the burgesses the privilege of electing a mayor and bailiffs every year.

  • By the new constitution the grand-duchy was to be divided into not less than twelve and not more than eighteen constituencies, electing members in proportion to population.

  • He founded in 1868 a weekly democratic journal, L'Electeur libre, and in 1869 was elected both for Herault and Paris, electing to sit for the former.

  • The request was granted, and the right of electing parish ministers was conferred by the Patronage Act 1874 on the congregation; thus a grievance of old standing, from which all the ecclesiastical troubles of a century and a half had sprung, was removed and the church placed on a thoroughly democratic basis.

  • In 1774, the corporation being in danger of extinction, burgesses were added, but it was not until 1886 that the ratepayers acquired the right of electing representatives to the council, the right up to that time having been exercised by the members of the corporation.

  • This singular way of electing members for the principal city in the kingdom could not fail further to irritate the parties.

  • (5) No inhabitant of England (except persons contracting, or, after conviction for felony, electing to be transported) shall be sent prisoner to Scotland, Ireland, Jersey, &c., or any place beyond the seas.

  • The mode of electing officers, and the system of management generally, was challenged by three members who called themselves "artificers, poor men of the craft of goldsmiths."

  • The liverymen of the companies, being freemen of the city, have still, however, the exclusive power of electing the lord mayor, sheriffs, chamberlain and other corporate officers.

  • And first as to the mode of electing successors to the two Great Lamas.

  • On the 7th of September 1159 he was chosen the successor of Adrian IV., a minority of the cardinals, however, electing the cardinal priest Octavian, who assumed the name of Victor IV.

  • Though the Habsburg princes at this period already claimed a hereditary right to the Bohemian throne, the Bohemians determined to maintain their right of electing their sovereign, and they chose Henry, duke of Carinthia, who had married a daughter of King Wenceslas II.

  • The Bohemian throne was now again vacant, for, when electing Ladislas the estates had reaffirmed the elective character of the monarchy.

  • As early as the first half of the 13th century the young city obtained the right of electing its own magistracy, and enlarged the walls erected during Albert's time.

  • The state's own constitution, which had been adopted in 1776 and amended in 1777, retained, like other state constitutions framed during the War of Independence, many features of colonial government ill-adapted to a state increasingly democratic. The basis of representation, each county electing three members to the assembly and one member to the legislative council, soon became antiquated.

  • Finally, in the 13th century, seven of the most powerful of these separated themselves into a college which obtained the sole right of electing the emperor.

  • 19 repealed any act of parliament, law or custom whereby the bishops, clergy or laity of the said church were prohibited from holding synods or electing representatives thereto for the purpose of making rules for the well-being and ordering of the said church, and enacted that no such law, &c., should hinder the said bishops, clergy and laity, by such representatives, lay and clerical, and so elected as they shall appoint, from meeting in general synod or convention and in such general synod or convention forming constitutions and providing for future representation of the members of the church in diocesan synods, general convention or otherwise.

  • It was necessary that an abbot should be at least 25 years of age, of legitimate birth, a monk of the house, unless it furnished no suitable candidate, when a liberty was allowed of electing from another convent, well instructed himself, and able to instruct others, one also who had learned how to command by having practised obedience.

  • The public oratorship fell vacant, and a contest arose between the heads of the colleges and the members of the senate as to the mode of electing to the office.

  • An assembly when convened by the Bruigh-fer for the special purpose of electing a tanist or successor to the king was called a Tocomra.

  • Lincoln was also given the right of electing its own magistrates in 1194, and many smaller places owe grants of more or less of municipal privilege to Hubert Walter acting in the name of the absent king.

  • When it met, it acknowledged him as king, but made no pretence of creating or electing him to be sovereign.

  • A notable instance is his doctrine of the Church - the community (Gemeinde); the sole object of God's electing love, according to Ritschl's interpretation of St Paul.

  • The men who raised Pelayo on the shield believed themselves to be electing a successor to Roderic, and indeed they were.

  • Behetrias, called plebeian lordships, were districts and townships of peasants who were bound to have a lord, and to make him payments in money or in kind, but who had a varying freedom of choice in electing their lord.

  • Modcrados made a law which deprived the towns oi the right of electing their councils.

  • wrote to Leo blaming his interference in religious matters, though he dissuaded the rebels in Venetia, the Exarchate and the Pentapolis from electing a new emperor and marching against Leo.

  • Electing into GWR and then terminating the trust Para 22 of Sch 15 allows the settlor to make a GWR election.

  • Malone appears to have thought that it was a mere subterfuge to instance the death of Garrick as a reason for not electing him.

  • Firstly, the rather unseemly mess concerning the means of electing a leader.

  • We will be electing our Church Wardens and deputy wardens, four members of the PCC and one Deanery Synod member.

  • If your account defaulted after January 2010, then read the arbitration clause carefully before electing it.

  • Road maps are generally the directional resource of choice for those electing to travel by car or recreational vehicle.

  • If your high school is big enough, consider electing at least three different people to play the part of the school mascot.

  • Keep in mind that electing COBRA coverage will cover you and your family starting from the date that you are terminated.

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