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eleanor

eleanor

eleanor Sentence Examples

  • In 1914 he married Miss Eleanor Wilson, a daughter of the President.

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  • and of his wife Eleanor of Albuquerque, born on the 29th of June 1 397, was one of the most stirring and most unscrupulous kings of the 15th century.

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  • By the marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine with Henry Plantagenet, the countship passed under the suzerainty of the kings of England, but at the same time it was divided, William VII., called the Young (1145-1168), having been despoiled of a portion of his domain by his uncle William VIII.,called the Old,who was supported by Henry II.

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  • of France and of Eleanor of Aquitaine, subsequently wife of Henry II.

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  • ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE (c. 1122-1204), wife of the English king Henry II., was the daughter and heiress of Duke William X.

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  • Eleanor bore Louis two daughters but no sons.

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  • It was alleged that, while accompanying her husband on the Second Crusade (1146-1149) Eleanor had been unduly familiar with her uncle, Raymond of Antioch.

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  • Eleanor bore to her second husband five sons and three daughters; John, the youngest of their children, was born in 1166.

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  • Henry was an unfaithful husband, and Eleanor supported her sons in their great rebellion of 1173.

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  • Eleanor was about 30.

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  • Blue eyes in Eleanor's modern portrait come from a contemporary writer's description.

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  • The body of Queen Eleanor rested here for a night on its journey to Westminster, and a cross, of which there is now no trace, was subsequently erected in the market-place.

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  • His son, Humphrey VIII., who succeeded him in the same year, was allowed to marry one of the king's daughters, Eleanor, the widowed countess of Holland (1302).

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  • The elder, Eleanor, was given in 1374 to Thomas of Woodstock, seventh son of Edward III.; the younger, Mary, to Henry, earl of Derby, son of John of Gaunt and afterwards Henry IV., in 1380 or 1381.

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  • and his third wife Eleanor of Sicily.

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  • of England by Eleanor of Provence.

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  • There is a Queen Eleanor cross commemorating the countess of Loudoun, by Sir Gilbert Scott.

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  • (1443) and by that of the emperor Frederick III., who came there to receive his bride, Eleanor of Portugal, from the hands of Bishop Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini, his secretary and historian (1452).

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  • There was a Queen Eleanor cross here, and conduits supplied the city with water.

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  • After the marriage at Canterbury of the king with Eleanor of Provence the royal personages came to London, and were met by the mayor, aldermen and principal citizens to the number of 360, sumptuously apparelled in silken robes embroidered, riding upon stately horses.

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  • by Eleanor of Aquitaine.

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  • and his queen Eleanor, were removed in the 17th century from their tombs to another part of the church.

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  • In 1530 he married Eleanor, the sister of the emperor Charles V.

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  • The marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine with Henry Plantagenet in 1152 brought it under the sway of England; but when Richard Cceur-de-Lion married his sister Joan to Raymund VI., count of Toulouse, in 1196, Agenais formed part of the princess's dowry; and with the other estates of the last independent count of Toulouse it lapsed to the crown of France in 1271.

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  • Peter visited England several times, one of his nieces, Eleanor of Provence, being the wife of the English king Henry III., and another, Sancha, wife of Richard, earl of Cornwall.

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  • From this date, by a succession of royal charters and private gifts, the nunnery amassed vast wealth and privileges, and became a fashionable retreat for ladies of high rank, among whose number were Eleanor, widow of Henry III., and Mary, daughter of Edward I.

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  • of France, third daughter of Alphonso VIII., king of Castile, and of Eleanor of England, daughter of Henry II., was born at Valencia.

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  • In consequence of a treaty between Philip Augustus and John of England, she was betrothed to the former's son, Louis, and was brought to France, in the spring of 1200, by John's mother Eleanor.

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  • Thus, on the death of Geoffrey the Handsome (7th of September 1151), his son Henry found himself heir to a great empire, strong and consolidated, to which his marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine (May 1152) further added Aquitaine.

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  • Malvezin (Michel de Montaigne, son origine et sa famille, 1875) proved the existence of a family of Eyquems or Ayquems before the marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine to Henry II.

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  • NELL GWYN [ELEANOR] (1650-1687), English actress, and mistress of Charles II., was born on the 2nd of February 1650/I, probably in an alley off Drury Lane, London, although Hereford also claims to have been her birthplace.

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  • Hutt (1872); Memoirs of the Life of Eleanor Gwinn (1752); Burnet, History of My Own Time, part i., edited by Osmund Airy (Oxford, 1897); Louise de Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth, by H.

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  • The first subject of dispute was the inheritance of the count of Provence, Raymond-Berenger IV., father of Margaret and of Eleanor, wife of Henry III.

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  • 1270), archbishop of Canterbury, became primate in 1243, through the favour of Henry III., of whose queen, Eleanor of Provence, he was an uncle.

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  • of Castile by his wife Eleanor, daughter of the third marriage of Peter IV.

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  • by Eleanor of Aquitaine, was born at Oxford on the 24th of December 1167.

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  • of England, of his wife Eleanor of Guienne, of Richard I.

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  • of England and of Isabella of Angoulbme, wife of John of England - Eleanor's being of oak and the rest of stone.

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  • Mary Eleanor Wilkins >>

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  • These plans were artfully fostered by the Savoyard kinsmen of Eleanor, daughter of Raymond Berenger, count of Provence, whom he married at Canterbury in January 1236, and by his half-brothers, the sons of Queen Isabella and Hugo, count of la Marche.

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  • Among the lay barons, the first place naturally belonged to Richard of Cornwall who, as the king's brother, was unwilling to take any steps which might impair the royal prerogative; while Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, the ablest man of his order, was regarded with suspicion as a foreigner, and linked to Henry's cause by his marriage with the princess Eleanor.

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  • Henry died at Westminster on the 16th of November 1272; his widow, Eleanor, took the veil in 1276 and died at Amesbury on the 25th of June 1291.

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  • In 1152 by a marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine, the divorced wife of the French king Louis VII., he acquired Poitou, Guienne and Gascony; but in doing so incurred the ill-will of his suzerain from which he suffered not a little in the future.

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  • Queen Eleanor, whom he alienated by his faithlessness, stirred up her sons to rebellion; and they had grievances enough to be easily persuaded.

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  • By Eleanor of Aquitaine the king had five sons and three daughters.

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  • His daughters were: Matilda (1156-1189), who became the wife of Henry the Lion, duke of Saxony; Eleanor (1162-1214), who married Alphonso III., king of Castile; and Joanna, who, after the death of William of Sicily in 1189, became the wife of Raymund VI., count of Toulouse, having previously accompanied her brother, Richard, to Palestine.

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  • The church of St Michael, standing high, was founded by Eleanor, queen of Edward I., in 1278, and in 1740 was partly rebuilt and greatly enlarged.

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  • Arthur's fate is well known, and Eleanor, the daughter, was kept captive till her death in 1241.

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  • The Anglican church of St Collen, Norman and Early English, has a monument in the churchyard to the "Ladies of Llangollen," Lady Eleanor Butler and Hon.

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  • The LancelotGuenevere romance took form and shape in the artificial atmosphere encouraged by such patronesses of literature as Eleanor of Aquitaine and her daughter Marie, Comtesse de Champagne (for whom Chretien de Troyes wrote his Chevalier de la Charrette), and reflects the low social morality of a time when love between husband and wife was declared impossible.

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  • Adams, Village Communities of Cape Ann and Salem (Baltimore, 1883); Eleanor Putnam (the pen-name of Mrs Arlo Bates), Old Salem (Boston, 1886); C. H.

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  • 127 9), daughter of Simon, of Dammartin, count of Ponthieu, by right of his wife Marie, Ferdinand was the father of Eleanor, the wife of Edward I.

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  • of Amiens, which came into the Conde family by the marriage of Louis of Bourbon, first prince of Conde, with Eleanor de Roye in 1551.

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  • He married (1) Sophia, heiress of Mechlin, and (2) in 1331 Eleanor, sister of Edward III.

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  • He died in 1343, leaving three daughters by his first marriage, and two sons, Reinald and Edward, both minors, by Eleanor of England.

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  • His elder son was ten years of age, and succeeded to the duchy under the guardianship of his mother Eleanor.

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  • He married, in 1901, Margaret Eleanor, daughter of the Rev. Henry Furneaux, a well-known Oxford scholar, his family consisting of a son and two daughters.

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  • - Part of the "Eleanor Grill."

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  • and Queen Eleanor at Westminster, cast in bronze by the "cire perdue" process, and thickly gilt, are equal, if not superior, in artistic beauty to any sculptor's work of the same period (end of the 13th century) that was produced in Italy or elsewhere.

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  • The honour was granted by him to Peter of Savoy, through whom it passed to his niece Queen Eleanor.

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  • of England, who had married her other sister Eleanor.

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  • Llewelyn was, however, foolish enough to lose the results of this very favourable treaty by intriguing with the de Montfort family, and in 1273 he became betrothed to Eleanor de Montfort, the old Earl's only daughter, a piece of political folly which may possibly in some degree account for Edward's harsh treatment of the Welsh prince.

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  • Llewelyn, utterly humbled, now behaved with such prudence that Edward at last sanctioned his marriage with Eleanor de Montfort (although such an alliance must originally have been highly distasteful to the English king), and the ceremony was performed with much pomp in Worcester Cathedral in 1278.

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  • His open adultery with his mistress, Eleanor Cobham, also made him unpopular.

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  • His position was further damaged by his connexion with Eleanor Cobham, whom he had now married.

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  • In 1441 Eleanor was charged with practising sorcery against the king, and Humphrey had to submit to see her condemned, and her accomplices executed.

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  • Before his marriage he had been contracted to Lady Eleanor Butler, and this was alleged by Richard III.

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  • married to Eleanor, daughter of Edward I.

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  • In 1537 Lord Thomas Fitzgerald and his five uncles were executed for rebellion in Munster, and the English government made every effort to lay hands also on Gerald, the youthful heir to the earldom of Kildare, a boy of twelve years of age who was in the secret custody of his aunt Lady Eleanor McCarthy.

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  • Flitt was parcel of the manor of Luton, and formed part of the marriage portion of Eleanor, sister of Henry III.

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  • At this date a new arrangement gave Eleanor (d.

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  • and his queen Eleanor in August 1274, he took little part in business of state, but was energetic in discharging the spiritual duties of his office.

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  • In 1899 a school of medicine was established, in connexion with which the Eleanor Taylor Bell memorial hospital was erected in 1905.

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  • But it was his marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, two years before his accession to the English throne, which gave him the right to dream of greatness such as his Norman forbears had never enjoyed.

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  • Flis wife Eleanor of Aquitaine had borne him many children.

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  • Their grudge against their father was sedulously fostered by~ their mother Eleanor, a clever and revengeful woman, who could never forgive her husband for keeping her in the background in political matters and insulting her by his frequent amours.

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  • Queen Eleanor, whom her husband regarded as responsible for the whole rebellion, was placed in a sort of honorable captivity, or retirement, and denied her royal state.

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  • There would have been trouble in Aquitaine also, if the aged Queen Eleanor had not asserted her own primary and indefeasible right to her ancestral duchy, and then declared that she transferred it to her best loved son John.

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  • He surprised his nephew while he was besieging the castle of Mirebeau in Poitou, where the old Queen Eleanor was residing.

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  • Even more numerous and no less expensive to the realm were the Provenal and Savoyard relatives of Henrys queen, Eleanor of Provence.

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  • He not only obtained it, but to the great indignation of the English baronage married the kings sister Eleanor in 1238.

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  • Edward IV., as he asserted, had been privately contracted to Lady Eleanor Talbot before he ever met Queen Elizabeth.

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  • TOBIAS MATTHEW, or ToBIE (1546-1628), archbishop of York, was the son of Sir John Matthew of Ross in Herefordshire, and of his wife Eleanor Crofton of Ludlow.

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  • Of these the earlier in date is the Roman de Brut, completed in 1155, which is said to have been dedicated to Eleanor of Aquitaine (ed.

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  • THOMAS ARUNDEL (1353-1414), archbishop of Canterbury, was the third son of Richard Fitzalan, earl of Arundel and Warenne, by his second wife, Eleanor, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, earl of Lancaster.

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  • It was at his suggestion and with his help that Miss Clough opened a house of residence for students; and when this had developed into Newnham College, and in 1880 the North Hall was added, Mr Sidgwick, who had in 1876 married Eleanor Mildred Balfour (sister of A.

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  • Returning suddenly to England in 1450, Richard left the government to James, earl of Ormonde and Wiltshire, who later married Eleanor, daughter of Edmund Beaufort, duke of Somerset, and was deeply engaged on the Lancastrian side.

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  • On the (1137 other hand, thanks to his marriage with Eleanor 1180).

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  • The Crusade ended in the double disaster of military defeat and martial dishonour (1147-1149); and Sugers death in 1151 deprived Louis of a counsellor who had exercised the regency skilfully and with success, just at the very moment when his divorce from Eleanor was to jeopardize the fortunes of the Capets.

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  • For the proud and passionate Eleanor married, two months later (May 1152), the young Henry, count of Anjou and duke of Normandy, who held, besides these great fiefs, the whole of the south-west of France, and in two Rivafryof years time the crown of England as well.

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  • These houses were at Alvingham, Catley, Holland Brigg, Lincoln, before the gate of which the first Eleanor Cross was erected by Edward I.

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  • of England, who, as duke of Aquitaine, by right of his marriage with the duchess Eleanor, had a strong direct interest in Spanish politics.

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  • The judges finally decided in favor of Ferdinand, on the ground that his mother, Eleanor, was the daughter of Peter IV., and that though a woman could not reign as a proprietary queen in Aragon, she could convey the right to her husband or transmit it to her son.

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  • with his cousin Eleanor of the Sicilian line.

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  • of Eleanor, sister of Martin, and wife of John I.

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  • On his death Navarre passed to his daughter by Blanche, Eleanor, widow of Gaston IV., count of Foix.

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  • We append the pedigree of Blair Athol, winner of the Derby and St Leger in 1864, who, when subsequently sold by auction, fetched the then unprecedented sum of 12,000 guineas, as it contains, not only Stockwell (the emperor of stallions, as he has been termed), but Blink Bonny and Eleanor - in which latter animal are combined the blood of Eclipse, Herod, Matchem and Snap, - the mares that won the Derby in 1801 and 1857 respectively, as well as those queens of the stud, Eleanor's greatgranddaughter Pocahontas and Blink Bonny's dam Queen Mary.

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  • Both Eleanor and Blink Bonny won the Oaks as well as the Derby.

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  • of Castile, and his wife Eleanor, daughter of Henry II.

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  • of England (after whom he was named), and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine.

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  • Queen Eleanor was a Provençal, and belonged to a family in which the patronage of poetry was a tradition.

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  • Eleanor Scott said: âOver the past 20 years the number of red meat abattoirs in Scotland has reduced from 79 to only 44.

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  • A charter - possibly spurious - contradicts the accepted chronology of the marriages of his wife, Eleanor de Vitré .

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  • They had no children of their own but adopted a daughter who was named Eleanor.

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  • Queen Eleanor's Bower The most well known earthwork is Queen Eleanor's Bower.

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  • The queen, Eleanor of Aragon, whom he had left in Cyprus during his long visits to the West, had proved faithless.

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  • Eleanor, you take care of yourself too, sounds frightful.

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  • Emily Fozard: selected for the North of England A lacrosse squad Eleanor Sayers: selected for the North of England B lacrosse squad Eleanor Sayers: selected for the North of England B lacrosse squad.

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  • A year before, on 12 February 1989, Eleanor McKerr's lawyer, Pat Finucane was murdered by loyalists in Belfast.

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  • Eleanor Bold appeared before him, no longer as a beautiful woman, but as a new profession called matrimony.

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  • She shrugs her shoulders and tells Miss Thorne that she supposes Eleanor will have an oratory in the deanery before she has done.

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  • I walked up to Bermondsey and thought phew, I couldn't feel as bad as Eleanor looked.

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  • portrait in pastel of Eleanor.

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  • In 1902 Byam Shaw painted a full-length portrait in pastel of Eleanor.

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  • Abstract/Extract: Eleanor Roosevelt is probably the most famous polio spouse of this century.

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  • And so Eleanor's bosom became tranquil, and she set about her new duties eagerly and gratefully.

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  • weariness of spirit, and Eleanor's spirit was indeed weary.

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  • widow Mrs Eleanor Hopkins (nee Tilbury ), at Hampstead, London.

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  • and of his wife Eleanor of Albuquerque, born on the 29th of June 1 397, was one of the most stirring and most unscrupulous kings of the 15th century.

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  • By the marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine with Henry Plantagenet, the countship passed under the suzerainty of the kings of England, but at the same time it was divided, William VII., called the Young (1145-1168), having been despoiled of a portion of his domain by his uncle William VIII.,called the Old,who was supported by Henry II.

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  • of France and of Eleanor of Aquitaine, subsequently wife of Henry II.

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  • ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE (c. 1122-1204), wife of the English king Henry II., was the daughter and heiress of Duke William X.

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  • Eleanor bore Louis two daughters but no sons.

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  • It was alleged that, while accompanying her husband on the Second Crusade (1146-1149) Eleanor had been unduly familiar with her uncle, Raymond of Antioch.

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  • Eleanor bore to her second husband five sons and three daughters; John, the youngest of their children, was born in 1166.

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  • Henry was an unfaithful husband, and Eleanor supported her sons in their great rebellion of 1173.

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  • Eleanor, therefore, can hardly have been responsible for the death of this rival, and the romance of the poisoned bowl appears to be an invention of the next century.

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  • A comprehensive Timeline and a modern Portrait of Eleanor of Aquitaine are available.

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  • Eleanor's Timeline (http://robertfripp.ca/index.cfm?Fuseaction=ArticleDisplay&ArticleID=483&SectionID=152) lists nearly 300 events between 1099 and her death in 1204.

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  • Her modern Portrait (http://robertfripp.ca/index.cfm?fuseaction=ArticleList&SectionID=152) takes as its model a stonemason's carving of Eleanor's and Henry's twinned heads, sculpted just months after their marriage in 1152.

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  • Eleanor was about 30.

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  • Blue eyes in Eleanor's modern portrait come from a contemporary writer's description.

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  • The body of Queen Eleanor rested here for a night on its journey to Westminster, and a cross, of which there is now no trace, was subsequently erected in the market-place.

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  • His son, Humphrey VIII., who succeeded him in the same year, was allowed to marry one of the king's daughters, Eleanor, the widowed countess of Holland (1302).

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  • The elder, Eleanor, was given in 1374 to Thomas of Woodstock, seventh son of Edward III.; the younger, Mary, to Henry, earl of Derby, son of John of Gaunt and afterwards Henry IV., in 1380 or 1381.

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  • and his third wife Eleanor of Sicily.

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  • of England by Eleanor of Provence.

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  • There is a Queen Eleanor cross commemorating the countess of Loudoun, by Sir Gilbert Scott.

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  • (1443) and by that of the emperor Frederick III., who came there to receive his bride, Eleanor of Portugal, from the hands of Bishop Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini, his secretary and historian (1452).

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  • There was a Queen Eleanor cross here, and conduits supplied the city with water.

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  • After the marriage at Canterbury of the king with Eleanor of Provence the royal personages came to London, and were met by the mayor, aldermen and principal citizens to the number of 360, sumptuously apparelled in silken robes embroidered, riding upon stately horses.

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  • by Eleanor of Aquitaine.

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  • and his queen Eleanor, were removed in the 17th century from their tombs to another part of the church.

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  • In 1530 he married Eleanor, the sister of the emperor Charles V.

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  • The marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine with Henry Plantagenet in 1152 brought it under the sway of England; but when Richard Cceur-de-Lion married his sister Joan to Raymund VI., count of Toulouse, in 1196, Agenais formed part of the princess's dowry; and with the other estates of the last independent count of Toulouse it lapsed to the crown of France in 1271.

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  • Peter visited England several times, one of his nieces, Eleanor of Provence, being the wife of the English king Henry III., and another, Sancha, wife of Richard, earl of Cornwall.

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  • From this date, by a succession of royal charters and private gifts, the nunnery amassed vast wealth and privileges, and became a fashionable retreat for ladies of high rank, among whose number were Eleanor, widow of Henry III., and Mary, daughter of Edward I.

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  • of France, third daughter of Alphonso VIII., king of Castile, and of Eleanor of England, daughter of Henry II., was born at Valencia.

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  • In consequence of a treaty between Philip Augustus and John of England, she was betrothed to the former's son, Louis, and was brought to France, in the spring of 1200, by John's mother Eleanor.

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  • Thus, on the death of Geoffrey the Handsome (7th of September 1151), his son Henry found himself heir to a great empire, strong and consolidated, to which his marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine (May 1152) further added Aquitaine.

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  • Malvezin (Michel de Montaigne, son origine et sa famille, 1875) proved the existence of a family of Eyquems or Ayquems before the marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine to Henry II.

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  • NELL GWYN [ELEANOR] (1650-1687), English actress, and mistress of Charles II., was born on the 2nd of February 1650/I, probably in an alley off Drury Lane, London, although Hereford also claims to have been her birthplace.

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  • Hutt (1872); Memoirs of the Life of Eleanor Gwinn (1752); Burnet, History of My Own Time, part i., edited by Osmund Airy (Oxford, 1897); Louise de Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth, by H.

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  • The first subject of dispute was the inheritance of the count of Provence, Raymond-Berenger IV., father of Margaret and of Eleanor, wife of Henry III.

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  • He was twice married, first to Eleanor (d.

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  • 1270), archbishop of Canterbury, became primate in 1243, through the favour of Henry III., of whose queen, Eleanor of Provence, he was an uncle.

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  • of Castile by his wife Eleanor, daughter of the third marriage of Peter IV.

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  • de Montfort; how he served as steward at the coronation of Eleanor, queen of Henry III., is described in the Exchequer Red Book.

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  • by Eleanor of Aquitaine, was born at Oxford on the 24th of December 1167.

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  • 1241), wife of the emperor Frederick II., and Eleanor (d.

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  • of England, of his wife Eleanor of Guienne, of Richard I.

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  • of England and of Isabella of Angoulbme, wife of John of England - Eleanor's being of oak and the rest of stone.

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  • Mary Eleanor Wilkins >>

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  • These plans were artfully fostered by the Savoyard kinsmen of Eleanor, daughter of Raymond Berenger, count of Provence, whom he married at Canterbury in January 1236, and by his half-brothers, the sons of Queen Isabella and Hugo, count of la Marche.

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  • Among the lay barons, the first place naturally belonged to Richard of Cornwall who, as the king's brother, was unwilling to take any steps which might impair the royal prerogative; while Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, the ablest man of his order, was regarded with suspicion as a foreigner, and linked to Henry's cause by his marriage with the princess Eleanor.

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  • Henry died at Westminster on the 16th of November 1272; his widow, Eleanor, took the veil in 1276 and died at Amesbury on the 25th of June 1291.

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  • In 1152 by a marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine, the divorced wife of the French king Louis VII., he acquired Poitou, Guienne and Gascony; but in doing so incurred the ill-will of his suzerain from which he suffered not a little in the future.

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  • Queen Eleanor, whom he alienated by his faithlessness, stirred up her sons to rebellion; and they had grievances enough to be easily persuaded.

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  • By Eleanor of Aquitaine the king had five sons and three daughters.

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  • His daughters were: Matilda (1156-1189), who became the wife of Henry the Lion, duke of Saxony; Eleanor (1162-1214), who married Alphonso III., king of Castile; and Joanna, who, after the death of William of Sicily in 1189, became the wife of Raymund VI., count of Toulouse, having previously accompanied her brother, Richard, to Palestine.

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  • The church of St Michael, standing high, was founded by Eleanor, queen of Edward I., in 1278, and in 1740 was partly rebuilt and greatly enlarged.

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  • Arthur's fate is well known, and Eleanor, the daughter, was kept captive till her death in 1241.

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  • The Anglican church of St Collen, Norman and Early English, has a monument in the churchyard to the "Ladies of Llangollen," Lady Eleanor Butler and Hon.

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  • The LancelotGuenevere romance took form and shape in the artificial atmosphere encouraged by such patronesses of literature as Eleanor of Aquitaine and her daughter Marie, Comtesse de Champagne (for whom Chretien de Troyes wrote his Chevalier de la Charrette), and reflects the low social morality of a time when love between husband and wife was declared impossible.

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  • Adams, Village Communities of Cape Ann and Salem (Baltimore, 1883); Eleanor Putnam (the pen-name of Mrs Arlo Bates), Old Salem (Boston, 1886); C. H.

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  • 127 9), daughter of Simon, of Dammartin, count of Ponthieu, by right of his wife Marie, Ferdinand was the father of Eleanor, the wife of Edward I.

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  • of Amiens, which came into the Conde family by the marriage of Louis of Bourbon, first prince of Conde, with Eleanor de Roye in 1551.

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  • He married (1) Sophia, heiress of Mechlin, and (2) in 1331 Eleanor, sister of Edward III.

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  • He died in 1343, leaving three daughters by his first marriage, and two sons, Reinald and Edward, both minors, by Eleanor of England.

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  • His elder son was ten years of age, and succeeded to the duchy under the guardianship of his mother Eleanor.

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  • His son and heir, Gilbert de Umfraville (1310-1381), claimed the earldom, which he hoped to gain by helping Edward Baliol to win the Scottish crown, but he failed, and on his death without issue the greater part of his English estates passed to his niece, Eleanor, the wife of Sir Henry Talboys (d.

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  • He married, in 1901, Margaret Eleanor, daughter of the Rev. Henry Furneaux, a well-known Oxford scholar, his family consisting of a son and two daughters.

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  • - Part of the "Eleanor Grill."

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  • The grill over the tomb of Queen Eleanor at Westminster, by Thomas de Leghton, made about 1294, is a remarkable example of skill in welding and modelling with the hammer (see fig.

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  • and Queen Eleanor at Westminster, cast in bronze by the "cire perdue" process, and thickly gilt, are equal, if not superior, in artistic beauty to any sculptor's work of the same period (end of the 13th century) that was produced in Italy or elsewhere.

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  • In 1914 he married Miss Eleanor Wilson, a daughter of the President.

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  • The honour was granted by him to Peter of Savoy, through whom it passed to his niece Queen Eleanor.

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  • erected the last of the series of crosses to the memory of his queen, Eleanor (d.

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  • of England, who had married her other sister Eleanor.

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  • Llewelyn was, however, foolish enough to lose the results of this very favourable treaty by intriguing with the de Montfort family, and in 1273 he became betrothed to Eleanor de Montfort, the old Earl's only daughter, a piece of political folly which may possibly in some degree account for Edward's harsh treatment of the Welsh prince.

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  • Llewelyn, utterly humbled, now behaved with such prudence that Edward at last sanctioned his marriage with Eleanor de Montfort (although such an alliance must originally have been highly distasteful to the English king), and the ceremony was performed with much pomp in Worcester Cathedral in 1278.

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  • In April 1284 Queen Eleanor, who had meanwhile joined her husband in Wales, gave birth to a son in the newly built castle of Carnarvon, and this infant the victorious king, half in earnest and half in jest, presented to the Welsh people for a prince who could speak no word of English.

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  • His open adultery with his mistress, Eleanor Cobham, also made him unpopular.

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  • His position was further damaged by his connexion with Eleanor Cobham, whom he had now married.

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  • In 1441 Eleanor was charged with practising sorcery against the king, and Humphrey had to submit to see her condemned, and her accomplices executed.

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  • Before his marriage he had been contracted to Lady Eleanor Butler, and this was alleged by Richard III.

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  • married to Eleanor, daughter of Edward I.

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  • In 1537 Lord Thomas Fitzgerald and his five uncles were executed for rebellion in Munster, and the English government made every effort to lay hands also on Gerald, the youthful heir to the earldom of Kildare, a boy of twelve years of age who was in the secret custody of his aunt Lady Eleanor McCarthy.

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  • Flitt was parcel of the manor of Luton, and formed part of the marriage portion of Eleanor, sister of Henry III.

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  • (c. 1120-1152), who married Alix of Guyenne, sister of the queen, Eleanor, and had by her three children: Raoul (Rudolph) II., the Leper (count from 1152-67); Isabelle, who possessed from 1167 to 1183 the countships of Vermandois, Valois and Amiens conjointly with her husband, Philip of Alsace, count of Flanders; and Eleanor.

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  • At this date a new arrangement gave Eleanor (d.

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  • and his queen Eleanor in August 1274, he took little part in business of state, but was energetic in discharging the spiritual duties of his office.

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  • In 1899 a school of medicine was established, in connexion with which the Eleanor Taylor Bell memorial hospital was erected in 1905.

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  • But it was his marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, two years before his accession to the English throne, which gave him the right to dream of greatness such as his Norman forbears had never enjoyed.

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  • Flis wife Eleanor of Aquitaine had borne him many children.

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  • Their grudge against their father was sedulously fostered by~ their mother Eleanor, a clever and revengeful woman, who could never forgive her husband for keeping her in the background in political matters and insulting her by his frequent amours.

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  • Queen Eleanor, whom her husband regarded as responsible for the whole rebellion, was placed in a sort of honorable captivity, or retirement, and denied her royal state.

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  • There would have been trouble in Aquitaine also, if the aged Queen Eleanor had not asserted her own primary and indefeasible right to her ancestral duchy, and then declared that she transferred it to her best loved son John.

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  • He surprised his nephew while he was besieging the castle of Mirebeau in Poitou, where the old Queen Eleanor was residing.

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  • Even more numerous and no less expensive to the realm were the Provenal and Savoyard relatives of Henrys queen, Eleanor of Provence.

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  • He not only obtained it, but to the great indignation of the English baronage married the kings sister Eleanor in 1238.

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  • Edward IV., as he asserted, had been privately contracted to Lady Eleanor Talbot before he ever met Queen Elizabeth.

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  • TOBIAS MATTHEW, or ToBIE (1546-1628), archbishop of York, was the son of Sir John Matthew of Ross in Herefordshire, and of his wife Eleanor Crofton of Ludlow.

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  • Of these the earlier in date is the Roman de Brut, completed in 1155, which is said to have been dedicated to Eleanor of Aquitaine (ed.

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  • THOMAS ARUNDEL (1353-1414), archbishop of Canterbury, was the third son of Richard Fitzalan, earl of Arundel and Warenne, by his second wife, Eleanor, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, earl of Lancaster.

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  • It was at his suggestion and with his help that Miss Clough opened a house of residence for students; and when this had developed into Newnham College, and in 1880 the North Hall was added, Mr Sidgwick, who had in 1876 married Eleanor Mildred Balfour (sister of A.

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  • Returning suddenly to England in 1450, Richard left the government to James, earl of Ormonde and Wiltshire, who later married Eleanor, daughter of Edmund Beaufort, duke of Somerset, and was deeply engaged on the Lancastrian side.

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  • The most noteworthy details within the church are the exquisite Early English staircase which led to the chapter house (no longer remaining), and the Percy tomb, a remarkable example of Decorated work, commemorating Eleanor, wife of Henry Percy (d.

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  • On the (1137 other hand, thanks to his marriage with Eleanor 1180).

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  • The Crusade ended in the double disaster of military defeat and martial dishonour (1147-1149); and Sugers death in 1151 deprived Louis of a counsellor who had exercised the regency skilfully and with success, just at the very moment when his divorce from Eleanor was to jeopardize the fortunes of the Capets.

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  • For the proud and passionate Eleanor married, two months later (May 1152), the young Henry, count of Anjou and duke of Normandy, who held, besides these great fiefs, the whole of the south-west of France, and in two Rivafryof years time the crown of England as well.

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  • These houses were at Alvingham, Catley, Holland Brigg, Lincoln, before the gate of which the first Eleanor Cross was erected by Edward I.

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  • of England, who, as duke of Aquitaine, by right of his marriage with the duchess Eleanor, had a strong direct interest in Spanish politics.

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  • The judges finally decided in favor of Ferdinand, on the ground that his mother, Eleanor, was the daughter of Peter IV., and that though a woman could not reign as a proprietary queen in Aragon, she could convey the right to her husband or transmit it to her son.

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  • with his cousin Eleanor of the Sicilian line.

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  • of Eleanor, sister of Martin, and wife of John I.

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  • On his death Navarre passed to his daughter by Blanche, Eleanor, widow of Gaston IV., count of Foix.

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  • We append the pedigree of Blair Athol, winner of the Derby and St Leger in 1864, who, when subsequently sold by auction, fetched the then unprecedented sum of 12,000 guineas, as it contains, not only Stockwell (the emperor of stallions, as he has been termed), but Blink Bonny and Eleanor - in which latter animal are combined the blood of Eclipse, Herod, Matchem and Snap, - the mares that won the Derby in 1801 and 1857 respectively, as well as those queens of the stud, Eleanor's greatgranddaughter Pocahontas and Blink Bonny's dam Queen Mary.

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  • Both Eleanor and Blink Bonny won the Oaks as well as the Derby.

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  • of Castile, and his wife Eleanor, daughter of Henry II.

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  • of England (after whom he was named), and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine.

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  • Queen Eleanor was a Provençal, and belonged to a family in which the patronage of poetry was a tradition.

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  • I am glad Miss Eleanor is interested.

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  • Eleanor had to shoo the bird away, which meant she was climbing away from the car instead of closing in on it.

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  • Louis was patient when people criticized Eleanor's spendthrift ways, her passion for fashion, her large entourage of followers and hangers-on.

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  • Abstract/Extract: Eleanor Roosevelt is probably the most famous polio spouse of this century.

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  • Eleanor had to squat down carefully to avoid banging her head on the rafters.

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  • And so Eleanor 's bosom became tranquil, and she set about her new duties eagerly and gratefully.

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  • Nothing fatigues the body so much as weariness of spirit, and Eleanor 's spirit was indeed weary.

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  • On 2 May 1866 Hanley married his third wife, the widow Mrs Eleanor Hopkins (nee Tilbury), at Hampstead, London.

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  • Eleanor watched as her mother spread dust across her forehead as she wiped the sweat away.

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  • Rhododendrons of salmonred color are best kept separate from others; of these, good colorings are Lady Eleanor Cathcart and Mrs R.

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  • Williams, Sue Rodwell, and Eleanor Schlenker.

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  • Williams, Sue Rodwellm, and Eleanor Schlenker.

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  • Back then, it was known as "Press Week," a fitting name given that its founder was Eleanor Lambert, a popular fashion publicist.

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  • Featured authors include Charles Causley, Eleanor Farjeon, Berlie Doherty, and A.A.

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  • Rachel Nasvik's Eleanor Mini Bag enjoys the classic simplicity of decades past.

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  • Perry took her stage last name from her maternal aunt and uncle Eleanor and Frank Perry.

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