Eggs Sentence Examples

eggs
  • He handed her a plate of scrambled eggs and toast.

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  • Maybe there are some fresh eggs.

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  • No wonder that man added this bird to his tame stock--to say nothing of the eggs and drumsticks.

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  • You couldn't find any eggs for our breakfast?

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  • She picked up three eggs and put them into the basket.

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  • In these forms the pregnant female, instead of laying eggs, as Diptera usually do, or even producing a number of minute living larvae, gives birth at one time but to a single larva, which is retained within the oviduct of the mother until adult, and assumes the pupal state immediately on extrusion.

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  • It is not the purpose of this article to enter on the wide subject of the popular observances, such as the giving and sending of Pasch or Easter eggs as presents.

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  • These cocoons, which may often be seen carried between the mandibles of the workers, are the "ants' eggs" prized as food for fish and pheasants.

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  • The foundress of the nest lays eggs and at first feeds and rears the larvae, the earliest of which develop into workers.

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  • But the ovaries of worker ants are in some cases sufficiently developed for the production of eggs, which may give rise parthenogenetically to male, queen or worker offspring.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) states that the common British yellow ants (Lasius flavus) collect flocks of root-feeding aphids in their underground nests, protect them, build earthen shelters over them, and take the greatest care of their eggs.

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  • Fielde show that an ant follows her own old track by a scent exercised by the tenth segment of the feeler, recognizes other inmates of her nest by a sense of smell resident in the eleventh segment, is guided to the eggs, maggots and pupae, which she has to tend, by sensation through the eighth and ninth segments, and appreciates the general smell of the nest itself by means of organs in the twelfth segment.

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  • These sacs contain the developing sperm cells or eggs, and are with very few exceptions universal in the group. The testes are more commonly thus involved than are the ovaries.

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  • Eggs deposited in a cocoon.

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  • The principal imports are butter, woollens, timber, cereals, eggs, glass, cottons, preserved meat, wool, sugar and bacon.

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  • The winter moth (Cheimatobia brumata) must be kept in check by putting greasy bands round the trunks from October till December or January, to catch the wingless females that crawl up and deposit their eggs in the cracks and crevices in the bark.

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  • One of the worst pests of pear trees is the pear midge, known as Diplosis pyrivora or Cecidomyia nigra, the females of which lay their eggs in the flowerbuds before they open.

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  • The female lays her eggs in a slit made by means of her "saw-like" ovipositor in the leaf or fruit of a tree.

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  • These insects pass the pupal stage in the ground, and reach the boughs to lay their eggs by crawling up the trunks of the trees.

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  • The female lays her eggs beneath the scaly covering, from which hatch out little active six-legged larvae, which wander about and soon begin to form a new scale.

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  • Many Gastropoda deposit their eggs, after fertilization, enclosed in capsules; others, as Paludina, are viviparous; others, again, as the Zygobranchia, agree with the Lamellibranch Conchifera (the bivalves) in having simple exits for the ova without glandular walls, and therefore discharge their eggs unenclosed in capsules freely into the sea-water; such unencapsuled eggs are merely enclosed each in its own delicate chorion.

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  • In some cases all the eggs in a capsule develop; in other cases one egg only in a capsule (Neritina), or a small proportion (Purpura, Buccinum), advance in development; the rest are arrested either after the first process of cell-division (cleavage) or before that process.

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  • The arrested embryos or eggs are then swallowed and digested by those in the same capsule which have advanced in development.

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  • This is clearly the same process in essence as that of the formation of a vitellogenous gland from part of the primitive ovary, or of the feeding of an ovarian egg by the absorption of neighbouring potential eggs; but here the period at which the sacrifice of one egg to another takes place is somewhat late.

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  • What it is that determines the arrest of some eggs and the progressive development of others in the same capsule is at present unknown.

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  • It appears that in parthenogenetic eggs two polar nuclei are formed.

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  • Doncaster (1906-1907) on the eggs of sawflies, the number of chromosomes is not reduced in parthenogenetic egg-nuclei, while, in eggs capable of fertilization, the usual reduction-divisions occur.

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  • The extreme of this " division of labour " is seen, in those insects whose jaws are vestigial in the winged state, when, the need for feeding all behind them, they have but to pair, to lay eggs and to die.

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  • The eggs of locusts may remain for years in the ground before hatching; and there may thus arise the peculiar phenomenon of some species of insect appearing in vast numbers in a locality where it has not been seen for several years.

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  • Noble's List of European Birds (1898) is a useful compilation, and Dresser's magnificent Eggs of the Birds of Europe is another great contribution by that author to European ornithology.

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  • That the eggs laid by birds should offer to some extent characters of utility to systematists is only to be expected, when it is considered that those from the same nest generally bear an extraordinary family likeness to one another, and also that in certain groups the essential peculiarities of the egg-shell are constantly and distinctively characteristic. Thus no one who has ever examined the egg of a duck or of a tinamou would ever be in danger of not referring another tinamou's egg or another duck's, that he might see, to its proper family, and so on with many others.

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  • Dairying and the production of eggs are also important industries in all sections.

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  • The males are usually more brilliantly coloured than the females, and guard the eggs, which are often placed in a sort of nest made of the shell of some bivalve or of the carapace of a crab, with the convexity turned upwards and FIG.

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  • During pairing he thrusts the tip of these organs into the seminal vesicles of the female and the eggs are fertilized as they pass out of the oviduct.

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  • The number of eggs produced at a time varies enormously according to the species, from about half a dozen, more or less, in some ant-mimicking Attidae or jumping spiders to many hundreds in the larger orbicular-webbed spiders of the family Argyopidae.

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  • The first act of the female after oviposition is to wrap her eggs in a casing of silk commonly called the cocoon.

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  • Sometimes, as in Pholcus, it is merely a thin network of silk just sufficient to hold the eggs together.

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  • So, too, does it appear that ants are entirely immune to the attacks of Ichneumonidae, which destroy hosts of other insects and of spiders by laying their eggs upon their bodies.

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  • The female attaches her eggs to the inner wall of her own home, and the young when large enough to shift for themselves have the bell-making instinct fully developed.

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  • Redi, had disproved by experiment the spontaneous generation of maggots from putrid flesh, and had shown that they can only develop from the eggs of flies.

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  • They also lay eggs later in the year in the young bolls.

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  • The parent moth lays eggs, from which the young "worms" hatch out.

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  • The eggs are now too much in one basket, and local disease, or bad weather, or some other misfortune, may diminish by serious percentages the supplies anticipated.

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  • The chief business is in butter, eggs, cattle and pigs, while bleaching, dyeing and shipbuilding are also carried on here.

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  • Other articles of export are silk cocoons, wool, hides, sponges, eggs and fruits (oranges, almonds, raisins and the like); the amounts of cotton, tobacco and wine sent out of the country are small.

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  • The eggs of these species are not enveloped by such massive gelatinous P.o.d strings as are those of the genus Lineus.

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  • Each female lays a vast number of eggs, about 500,000 being the estimated amount.

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  • The eggs, often six in number, are of a very pale blue marked with reddish or purplish brown.

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  • They are the home of myriads of sea-birds and one of the nesting-places of the bonxie, or great skua (Lestris cataractes), which used to be fostered by the islanders to keep down the eagles, and the eggs of which are still strictly preserved.

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  • Again, in the early years of the administration (1885), the Pasteur system of selection of silk-worms' eggs for the rearing of silkworms was introduced, and an " Institute of Sericulture " on modern lines was erected (1888) at Brusa for gratuitous instruction in silk-rearing to students from all parts of the empire.

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  • Eggs of sea-birds are collected and eider-down.

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  • The eggs are dropped into the water by the female in large masses, resembling, in some species, bunches of grapes in miniature.

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  • Other phosphoglobulins are vitelline, found in the yolk of hens eggs, and ichthulin, found in the eggs of fish.

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  • The water which bears the oxygen for respiration and the minute organisms upon which the Brachiopod feeds is swept into the mantle cavity by the action of the cilia which cover the arms, and the eggs and excreta pass out into the same cavity.

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  • C, Transverse section of the The eggs of Limulus are fertilized in the sea after they have been laid.

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  • The male possesses elaborate copulatory structures of a chitinous nature, and the eggs are fertilized in the female without even quitting the place where they are formed on the wall of the reticular gonocoel.

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  • The eggs are fertilized, practically in the ovary, and develop in situ.

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  • There is a close relation between the pollination of many yuccas and the life of a moth (Pronuba yuccasella); the flowers are open and scented at night when the female moth becomes active, first collecting a load of pollen and then depositing her eggs, generally in a different flower from that which has supplied the pollen.

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  • The eggs are deposited in the ovary-wall, usually just below an ovule; after each deposition the moth runs to the top of the pistil and thrusts some pollen into the opening of the stigma.

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  • These turtles are so numerous that their flesh and eggs have long been a principal food supply for the Indian population of that region.

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  • Therein two eggs, with white, chalky shells, are commonly laid.

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  • There is also a considerable export trade in geese and eggs.

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  • The principal products are rubber, cacao and nuts; cattle are raised on the elevated plains of the north, while curing fish and collecting turtle eggs for their oil give occupation to many people on the rivers.

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  • Ter-pill-05a ij iirooa toroKouvra, four - footed or legless Enaema which lay eggs (= Reptiles and Amphibia).

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  • The eggs, laid on the hairs, and known as "nits," hatch in about eight days, and the lice are full grown in about a month.

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  • Leather-dressing and wool-spinning are carried on and there is trade in live-stock, in agricultural produce, especially eggs, and in marble.

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  • It becomes fully developed in its invertebrate host, but apparently cannot produce eggs until transferred into the intestine of a fish.

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  • The eggs are free in freshwater lakes and rivers, where they enter the bodies of pike, turbot and other fishes, and are thus eaten by man.

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  • During the winter earwigs lie dormant; but in the early months of the year females with their eggs may be found in the soil, frequently in deserted earthworm burrows.

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  • Maternal instincts are well developed, both the eggs, which number about fifty, and the young being carefully brooded and watched over by the parent.

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  • The nest is a neat structure of coarse grass and moss, mixed with earth, and plastered internally with mud, and here the female lays from four to six eggs of a blue colour speckled with brown.

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  • In tropical climates with a well-marked dry season mosquitoes pass into a semi-dormant condition during the period when there is little water in which to deposit their eggs.

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  • The eggs, which are 16 in number, are deposited in a leathery capsule fixed by a gum-like substance to the abdomen of the female, and thus carried about till the young are ready to escape, when the capsule becomes softened by the emission of a fluid substance.

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  • The eggs are comparatively few, and development is direct, the embryo after reaching its host remaining attached to it for life.

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  • The eggs are stalked and provided with chitinoid often operculate shell.

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  • In most cases the eggs are attached to the host, but in Polystomum the eggs are laid in water.

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  • These Polystomum deposit their eggs in the branchial chamber and die at the metamorphosis of their host.

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  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.

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  • The principal exports are grain, eggs, cattle, linen cloth and flax, and the imports include timber, groceries and coal.

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  • In some Gymnolaemata, polypides which develop an ovary possess a flask-shaped "intertentacular organ," situated between two of the tentacles, and affording a direct passage into the introvert for the eggs or even the spermatozoa developed in the same zooecium.

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  • The Cyphonautes type has been shown by Prouho (24) to occur in two or three widely different species of Cheilostomata and Ctenostomata in which the eggs are laid and develop in the external water.

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  • Two eggs are produced at a time, each measuring about three-fourths of an inch in its long and half an inch in its short axis, and enclosed in a strong, flexible, white shell.

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  • The passage at first runs obliquely upwards in the bank, sometimes to a distance of as much as 50 ft., and expands at its termination into a cavity, the floor of which is lined with dried grass and leaves, and in which, it is said, the eggs are laid' and the young brought up. Their food consists of aquatic insects, small crustaceans and worms, which are caught under water, the sand and small stones at the bottom being turned over with their bills to find them.

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  • It is known to breed in Lapland, but its eggs are of great rarity.

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  • The reproduction of tsetse-flies is highly remarkable; instead of laying eggs or being ovovivi parous the females deposit at intervals of about a fortnight or three weeks a single full-grown larva, which forthwith buries itself in the ground to a depth of several centi metres, and assumes the pupal state.

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  • They feed on animals which likewise lead an arboreal life, rarely on eggs.

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  • Snakes are carnivorous, and as a rule take living prey only; a few feed habitually or occasionally on eggs.

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  • Snakes are oviparous; they deposit from ten to eighty eggs of an ellipsoid shape, covered with a soft leathery shell, in places where they are exposed to and hatched by moist heat.

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  • The parents pay no further attention to them, except the pythons, which incubate their eggs by coiling their body over them, and fiercely defend them.

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  • In some families, as many freshwater snakes, the sea snakes, Viperinae and Crotalinae, the eggs are retained in the oviduct until the embryo is fully developed.

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  • Its eggs, which are of the size and shape of a dove's egg, are from fifteen to thirty in number, are deposited in mould or under damp leaves, and are glued together into one mass.

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  • The principal diet of these peculiar snakes seems to consist of eggs.

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  • This wine is not exported in any quantity, as it will not bear a voyage well and is not made to keep. Bee-keeping is general, and there is an export of eggs to Egypt.

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  • The larvae known as caddis-worms are aquatic. The mature females lay their eggs in the water, and the newly-hatched larvae provide themselves with cases made of various particles such as grains of sand, pieces of wood or leaves stuck together with silk secreted from the salivary glands of the insect.

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  • Some are said occasionally to resort to berries and other fruit for food, but as a rule they are carnivorous, feeding chiefly on birds and their eggs, small mammals, as squirrels, hares, rabbits and moles, but chiefly mice of various kinds, and occasionally snakes, lizards and frogs.

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  • The eggs are of comparatively large size, one female depositing from 50 to ioo.

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  • There young Parkman spent his leisure hours in collecting eggs, insects and reptiles, trapping squirrels and woodchucks, and shooting birds with arrows.

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  • There are species of gall-fly in which males are unknown, the unfertilized eggs always developing into females.

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  • Gall-fly grubs are provided with vegetable food through the eggs being laid by the mother insect within plant tissues.

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  • The ichneumon pierces the body of a caterpillar and lays her eggs where the grubs will find abundant animal food.

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  • On the other hand, there are thousands of very small species, and the tiny " fairy-flies " (Myynaridae), whose larvae live as parasites in the eggs of various insects, are excessivel y minute for creatures of such complex organization.

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  • Comparatively only a few species are, for part of their lives, denizens of fresh water; these, as larvae, are parasitic on the eggs or larvae of other aquatic insects, the little hymenopteron, Polynema natans, one of the " fairy-flies " - swims through the water by strokes of her delicate wings in search of a dragon-fly's egg in which to lay her own egg, while the rare Agriotypus dives after the case of a caddis-worm.

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  • The ovipositor is long and prominent, enabling the female insect to lay her eggs in the wood of trees, where the white larvae, whose legs are excessively short, tunnel and feed.

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  • Other flies of this group have the inquiline habit, laying their eggs in the galls of other species, while others again pierce the cuticle of maggots or aphids, in whose bodies their larvae live as parasites.

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  • They are among the most minute of all insects and their larvae are probably all parasitic in insects' eggs.

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  • The eggs are laid in the nests of various bees and wasps, the chrysid larva living as a " cuckoo " parasite.

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  • In two of the families - the Mutillidae and Thynnidae - the females are wingless and the larvae live as parasites in the larvae of other insects; the female Mutilla enters humble-bees' nests and lays her eggs in the bee-grubs.

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  • They make burrows wherein they place insects or spiders which they have caught and stung, laying their eggs beside the victim so that the young larvae find themselves in presence of an abundant and appropriate food-supply.

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  • The insect is fixed by its proboscis, but moves its abdomen about and lays thirty to forty yellow eggs in small clusters.

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  • After the lapse of six, eight or twelve days, according to the temperature, the larvae hatch out of the eggs.

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  • They moult five times, becoming with each change of skin darker in colour; in about three weeks they become adult and capable of laying parthenogenetic eggs.

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  • As the summer wears on a second form of insect appears amongst the root-dwellers, though hatched from the same eggs as the form described above.

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  • They lay their parthenogenetically produced eggs in the angles of the veins of the leaves, in the buds, or, if the season is already far advanced, in the bark.

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  • In very damp or cold weather the insect remains in the ground near the surface, and deposits its eggs there.

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  • Winged Female which lives on leaves and buds of vine, and lays parthogenetically eggs of two kinds, one developing into a wingless female, the other into a male.

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  • The fathers (Die Getreuen) of the town used to send an annual birthday present of ioi plovers' eggs to Bismarck, with a dedication in verse.

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  • The chief exports are stone for road-making, butter, eggs and vegetables; the chief imports are coal, timber, superphosphates and wine from Algeria.

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  • The eggs, from three to six in number, are of a pale bluish-green, blotched and spotted with light yellowish-brown.

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  • The superior qualities of the soil, together with the usually warm and moist months of spring and summer, make Iowa one of the foremost states of the Union in agriculture and stock-raising, especially in the production of Indian corn, oats, hay and eggs, and in the raising of hogs, horses, dairy cows and poultry.

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  • Thus he showed that the weevils of granaries, in his time commonly supposed to be bred from wheat, as well as in it, are grubs hatched from eggs deposited by winged insects.

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  • He carefully studied also the history of the ant and was the first to show that what had been commonly reputed to be "ants' eggs" are really their pupae, containing the perfect insect nearly ready for emersion, whilst the true eggs are far smaller, and give origin to "maggots" or larvae.

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  • Among the principal imports are cocoa, coffee, grain (including Indian corn), fruit, provisions (including butter, eggs and potatoes from France and the Channel Islands), wines and spirits, sugar, wool, and other foreign and colonial produce.

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  • Whilst the reeves are sitting on their eggs, scattered about the swamps, he is to be seen far away flitting about in flocks, and on the ground dancing and sparring with his companions.

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  • Of the animal products 67.3% were dairy products, and 20.8% poultry and eggs.

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  • The eggs are generally three in number, of a dull white covered with confluent specks of greenish grey.

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  • Layard, the habits of the Cape Promerops, its mode of nidification, and the character of its eggs are very unlike those of the ordinary Nectariniidae.

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  • The chief exports are butter and eggs; the chief imports sugar, petroleum, coal and iron.

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  • The state has made great advances, too, in the production of flowers, ornamental plants, nursery products, fruits, vegetables, poultry and eggs.

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  • New York was in 1904 more extensively engaged in oyster culture than any other state, and was making more rapid progress in the cultivation of hard clams. In 1909 there were distributed from state fish hatcheries 1 531,293,721 fishes (mostly smelt, pike-perch, and winter flatfish); a large number of fish and eggs were also placed in New York waters by the United States Bureau of Fisheries.

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  • Its eggs are the wellknown "plovers' eggs" of commerce,' and the bird, wary and wild at other times of the year, in the breeding-season becomes easily approachable, and is shot to be sold in the markets for "golden plover."

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  • The nest is a slight hollow in the ground, wonderfully inconspicuous even when deepened, as is usually the case, by incubation, and the blackspotted olive eggs (four in number) are almost invisible to the careless or untrained eye.

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  • The eggs are laid in the stems of water plants.

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  • Its chief exports are diamonds, live stock (cattle, horses and mules, sheep and goats), wool, mohair, coal, wheat and eggs.

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  • The canary is very prolific, producing eggs, not exceeding six in number, three or four times a year; and in a state of nature it is said to breed still oftener.

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  • In particular the Schizopods of the family Mysidae, which are abundant in the sea round our coasts, are often called "Opossumshrimps" from the fact that the female is provided with a ventral pouch or "marsupium" in which the eggs and young are carried.

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  • Some of these have excluded all animal products - such as milk and eggs and cheese.

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  • Nok Khum is one of the theories of the genesis of mankind, the Nok Khum being the sacred goose or "Hansa" from whose eggs the first human beings were supposed to have been hatched.

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  • The association of pancakes with the day was probably due to the necessity for using up all the eggs, grease, lard and dripping in stock preparatory to Lent, during which all these were forbidden.

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  • The food of the white bear consists chiefly of seals and fish, in pursuit of which it shows great power of swimming and diving, and a considerable degree of sagacity; but its food also includes the carcases of whales, birds and their eggs, and grass and berries when these can be had.

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  • He was, however, a desultory student, and in 1870 was advised to go to the little village of Martinhoe, in Devon, for quiet reading, but distinguished himself more by his daring climbs after seagulls' eggs and his engineering skill in cutting a pathway along precipitous cliffs to some caves.

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  • But these are only surmises, based upon the fact that in various dry caves limbs still surrounded by the mummified flesh and skin, feathers, and even eggs with the inner membrane, have been found.

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  • The eggs are laid usually in holes in trees, rocks, or the ground, no lining being formed.

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  • This species from the high north of Europe and Asia carries green eggs, and above them a bright pattern in ultramarine (Sars, 1896, 1897).

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  • Some caution should be used against confounding accidentally introduced indigenous species with those reared from the imported eggs.

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  • The female lays two kinds of eggs - " summer-eggs," which develop without fertilization, and " winter-eggs" or resting eggs, which require to be fertilized.

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  • Though the animals have an oral siphon, they do not carry ovisacs like the siphonostomous copepods, but glue their eggs in rows to extraneous objects.

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  • The eggs are minute, and pass out into the sea-water through the dorsal or exhalent siphon.

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  • The eggs are elliptical in shape, both poles being equal, and are covered with a shell which may be thin and leathery or hard and calcareous.

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  • The number of eggs laid is small in comparison with other reptiles, rarely exceeding a score, and some like the anolids and the geckos deposit only one or two.

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  • The parents leave the eggs to hatch where they are deposited, in sand or in mould.

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  • Many lizards, however, retain the eggs in the oviducts until the embryo is fully developed; these species then bring forth living young and are called ovo-viviparous by purists.

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  • Some of these comicallooking little creatures are viviparous, others deposit their eggs in the ground.

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  • Their long-oval, hardshelled eggs are deposited in the ground.

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  • They all are predaceous, powerful creatures, with a partiality for eggs.

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  • Their own eggs are laid in hollow trees, or buried in the sand.

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  • In the female the gonad is complex as in flatworms, composed of a germary for the formation of the eggs, and a vitellary, much more conspicuous and alone figured (ov), consisting of a definite number of large nucleated cells for the nourishment of the eggs.

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  • The cloaca is often very large; the nephridia and oviducts may open into it, and the eggs lodge there on their way outwards; they are thrown out, as are the faecal masses, by an eversion of the cloaca.

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  • It may, however, well be that the capacity for wintering in the dry state has physiologically replaced the need for resistent fertilized eggs.

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  • Insemination takes place either by the introduction of the penis into the cloaca of the female, or by the puncture of the bodywall of the female by the penis, and the injection of the sperm into the body cavity, whence the single spermatozoa must make their way to the eggs.

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  • The females habitually produce eggs without impregnation, which again habitually develop into females, more rarely into males.

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  • These unfertilized eggs develop directly, often in the uterus.

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  • The impregnated eggs undergo a very partial development in the mother, and these pass into a state of rest, for which they are furnished with a dense shell.

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  • The thin-walled eggs are often termed "summer-eggs," the fertilized ones "winter" or "ephippial" eggs (by parity with the phyllopod Entomostraca, q.v.).

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  • Lacinularia racemovata and Conochilus form free floating aggregates, the eggs, as laid, hatching and the young settling among the approximated gelatinous tubes of the parents.

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  • Agriculture on the farms still operated was now greatly modified, and the production of vegetables, fruits, dairy products, poultry and eggs was largely substituted for the production of cereals.

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  • Its eggs are buoyant and pelagic and easily recognized.

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  • The nest, in which four eggs are laid with their pointed ends meeting in its centre (as is usual among Limicoline birds), is seldom far from the water's edge, and the eggs, as well as the newly-hatched and down-covered young, closely resemble the surrounding pebbles.

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  • It lays four or five eggs of a pale purplish buff, streaked and spotted with purplish red.

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  • Canadian eggs are usually packed in cases containing thirty dozens each.

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  • There are cold storage warehouses at various points in Canada, at which the eggs are collected, sorted and packed before shipment.

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  • These permit the eggs to be landed in Europe in a practically fresh condition as to flavour, with the shells quite full.

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  • To this end experiments are conducted in the feeding of cattle, sheep and swine for flesh, the feeding of cows for the production of milk, and of poultry both for flesh and eggs.

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  • They are due to a peculiar development of the eggs of the tape-worm of the dog, which have been received into the alimentary canal with infected water or uncooked vegetables, such as watercress.

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  • The cliffs of Copinshay (10) are a favourite haunt of sea-birds, which are captured by the cragsmen for their feathers and eggs.

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  • In Anodonta the eggs pass into the space between the two lamellae of the outer gill-plate, and are there FIG.

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  • In Yoldia and Nucula proxima the ova are set free in the water and the test-larvae are free-swimming, but in Nucula delphinodonta the female forms a thin-walled egg-case of mucus attached to the posterior end of the shell and in communication with the pallial chamber; in this case the eggs develop and the test-larva is enclosed.

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  • Many of its breeding-places are a most valuable property to those who live near them and take the eggs and young, which, from the nature of the locality, are only to be had at a hazardous risk of life.

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  • In eggs which contain a larger quantity of food-yolk, the process by which the endoderm is enveloped by the ectoderm is somewhat different.

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  • By him they were induced to return to China and attempt to bring to Europe the material necessary for the cultivation of silk, which they effected by concealing the eggs of the silkworm in a hollow cane.

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  • The sexes almost immediately couple; the female in from four to six days lays her eggs, numbering 500 and upwards; and, with that the life cycle of the moth being complete, both sexes soon die.

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  • The art of sericulture concerns itself with the rearing of silkworms under artificial or domesticated conditions, their feeding, the formation of cocoons, the securing of these before they are injured and pierced by the moths, and the maturing of a sufficient number of moths to supply eggs for the cultivation of the following year.

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  • The coupling which immediately takes place demands careful attention; the males are afterwards thrown away, and the impregnated females placed in a darkened apartment till they deposit their eggs.

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  • Partly supported by imported eggs, the production of silk in France was maintained, and in 1853 reached its maximum of 26,000,000 kilos of cocoons, valued at 117,000,000 francs.

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  • For special treatment towards the regeneration of an infected race, the most robust worms were to be selected, and the moths issuing from the cocoons were to be coupled in numbered cells, where the female was to be confined till she deposited her eggs.

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  • The insects appeared quickly to revert to natural conditions; the moths brought out in open air were strongly marked, lively and active, and eggs left on the trees stood the severity of the winter well, and hatched out successfully in the following season.

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  • Its eggs were first sent to Europe by Duchene du Bellecourt, French consulgeneral in Japan in 1861; but early in March following they hatched out, when no leaves on which the larvae would feed were to be found.

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  • A further supply of eggs was secretly obtained by a Dutch physician Pompe van Meedervoort in 1863, and, as it was now known that the worm was an oak-feeder, and would thrive on the leaves of European oaks, great results were anticipated from the cultivation of the yama-mai.

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  • In 1865 a male of the same species was introduced, but though a strong disposition to breed was shown on the part of both, and the eggs, after the custom of the Ratitae, were incubated by him, no progeny was hatched (Proceedings, 1868, P. 329).

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  • With hardly an exception the transparent eggs are laid into the sea and float on its surface.

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  • The exports, which include beans, almonds, maize, chick-peas, wool, hides, wax, eggs, &c., were valued at 360,000 in 1900, £364,000 in 1904, and £248,000 in 1906.

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  • To gamekeepers and those interested in the preservation of game, all animals such as the pole-cat, weasel, stoat, hawks, owls, &c., which destroy the eggs or young of preserved birds, are classed as "vermin," and the same term includes rats, mice, &c. It is also the collective name given to all those disgusting and objectionable insects that infest human beings, houses, &c., when allowed to be in a filthy and unsanitary condition, such as bugs, fleas, lice, &c.

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  • In this tribe are included Orthoptera with a large prothorax, whose eggs are enclosed in a common purse or capsule formed by the hardening of a maternal secretion.

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  • There is a large export of eggs to Alexandria; but the wealth of the place depends most on the famous "Latakia" tobacco, grown in the plain behind the town and on the Ansarieh hills.

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  • The eggs are four in number, of a dark olive colour, blotched and spotted with rich brown.

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  • It builds a rude nest among the reeds and flags, out of the materials which surround it, and the female lays four or five eggs of a brownish olive.

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  • Some cuckoos are singular for their habit of using the nests of smaller birds to lay their eggs in, so that the young may be reared by foster-parents; and it has been suggested that the object of the likeness exhibited to the hawk is to enable the cock cuckoo either to frighten the small birds away from their nests or to lure them in pursuit of him, while the hen bird quietly and without molestation disposes of her egg.

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  • Other flies of the genus Volucella, larger and heavier in build than Eristalis, resemble humble-bees in colour and form, and it was formerly supposed that the purpose of this similarity was to enable the flies to enter with impunity the nests of the humble-bees and to lay their eggs amongst those of the latter insects.

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  • The reason for this is to be found in the greater need of protection of the female which is slower in flight than the male and is exposed to special danger of attack when resting to lay her eggs.

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  • This species lays eggs of a deep sea-green colour, having wholly the character of heron's eggs, and it often breeds in company with herons, while the eggs of all other ibises whose eggs are known resemble those of the sacred ibis.

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  • They nest in hollow trees, and lay white eggs.

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  • The exports are chiefly oxen, meat, fowls and eggs for Gibraltar and sometimes for Spain, with occasional shipments of slippers and blankets to Egypt.

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  • The eggs may be laid separately invested by a chitinous envelope, or as in Ischnochiton magdalenensis they may form strings containing nearly 200,000 eggs, or the ova may be retained in the pallial groove and undergo development there, as in Chiton polii and Hemiarthrum setulosum.

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  • Herein from four to seven eggs, of a greenishwhite closely freckled, so as to seem suffused with light olive, are laid in March or April, and the young on quitting it accompany their parents for some weeks.

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  • Sunlight has a tendency to bleach furs and to encourage the development of moth eggs, therefore continued exposure is to be avoided.

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  • It is nowhere abundant, but is found over the northern parts of Europe and Asia, and is a quiet, inoffensive animal, nocturnal and solitary in its habits, sleeping by day in its burrow, and issuing forth at night to feed on roots, beech-mast, fruits, the eggs of birds, small quadrupeds, frogs and insects.

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  • The eggs are very remarkable objects, curiously unlike those of other birds; and their shell looks as if it were of highly-burnished metal or glazed porcelain, presenting also various colours, which seem to be constant in the particular species, from pale primrose to sage-green or light indigo, or from chocolate brown to pinkish orange.

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  • The eggs are large and yellow, and produced in two rosary-like strings, as if strung together by elastic filaments continuous with the gelatinous capsules.

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  • After impregnation, the male twists them round his legs and returns to his usual retreat, going about at night in order to feed himself and to keep up the moisture of the eggs, even resorting to a short immersion in the water during exceptionally dry nights.

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  • The parasitic Histriodritus (Histriobdella) feeds on the eggs of the lobster.

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  • He may not even eat cheese or eggs or milk, for they, like meat, are produced per viam generationis seu coitus.

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  • The principal articles of export are wood, sugar, cattle, glass and glassware, iron and ironware, eggs, cereals, millinery, fancy goods, earthenware and pottery, and leather goods.

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  • It generally makes its nest in a hollow branch, plastering up the opening with clay, leaving only a circular hole just large enough to afford entrance and exit; and the interior contains a bed of dry leaves or the filmy flakes of the inner bark of a fir or cedar, on which the eggs are laid.

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  • The acts establish a close time for wild birds and impose penalties for shooting or taking them within that time; prohibit the exposing or offering for sale within certain dates any wild bird recently killed or taken unless bought or received from some person residing out of the United Kingdom; the taking or destroying of wild birds' eggs, the setting of pole traps, and the taking of a wild bird by means of a hook or other similar instrument.

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  • Propagation takes place by eggs, which are oval, quite white, with a very hard and strong shell.

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  • She lays several dozen eggs in a carefully prepared nest.

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  • The Nile crocodile makes a hole in white sand, which is then filled up and smoothed over; the mother sleeps upon the nest, and keeps watch over her eggs, and when these are near hatching - af ter about twelve weeks - she removes the 18 in.

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  • The eggs, in several layers, are laid near the top. The adults frequently dig long subterranean passages into the banks of streams, and, during dry seasons, they have been found deep in the hardened mud, whence they emerge with the beginning of the rains.

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  • Although an inveterate destroyer of eggs, this little creature prefers those of birds and the soft-shelled eggs of lizards to the very hard and strong-shelled eggs which are deeply buried in the crocodile's nest.

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  • Poultry is plentiful arid eggs form a considerable item in the exports.

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  • Dried and salted fish eggs; called batarekh, command a ready market.

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  • Of less importance are the exports of hides and skins, eggs, wheat and other grains, wool, quails, lentils, dates and Sudan produce in transit.

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  • Egypt before the Deltaic dynasties, but Diodorus in the first century B.C. describes how its eggs were hatched artificially, as they are at the present day.

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  • Next to butter the most important article of Danish export is bacon, and huge quantities of eggs are also exported.

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  • Goat skins, eggs and beeswax are the principal exports, cotton goods, tea, sugar and candles being the chief imports.

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  • Jutland; exports pork and meat, butter, eggs, fish, cattle and sheep, skins, lard and agricultural seeds, and has regular communication with Harwich and Grimsby in England.

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  • The nest of one species, as observed by Robert Owen, is at the end of a hole bored in the bank of a watercourse, and the eggs are pure white and glossy (Ibis, 1861, p. 65).

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  • The females lay a vast number of eggs upon grass stems near water.

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  • On the top is a shallow cup for the reception of the one or two eggs, which have a bluish-white shell with chalky incrustation.

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  • Spawning takes place in June and July, and the eggs, like those of the majority of marine fishes, are buoyant and transparent, but they are peculiar in having an elongated, sausage-like shape, instead of being globular.

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  • The eggs have also been obtained from the Bay of Naples, and near Marseilles, also off the coast of Holland, and once at least off the coast of Lancashire.

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  • The eggs are laid in the spring as a rule, and after about a week they give rise to a minute, ringed larva with a protrusible boring apparatus consisting of three chitinous rods.

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  • Soon after their arrival at the Jardin d'Acclimatation, some of the axolotls spawned, but the eggs, not having been removed from the aquarium, were devoured by its occupants.

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  • The native fishermen know all about them; how the eggs are fastened to the water plants, how soon after the little larvae swarm about in thousands, how fast they grow, until by the month of June they are all grown into big, fat creatures ready for the market; later in the summer the axolotls are said to take to the rushes, in the autumn they become scarce, but none have ever been known to leave the water or to metamorphose, nor are any perfect Amblystomas found in the vicinity of the two lakes."

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  • These floral products which form the food of bees and of their larvae, are in most cases collected and stored by the industrious insects; but some genera of bees act as inquilines or "cuckoo-parasites," laying their eggs in the nests of other bees, so that their larvae may feed at the expense of the rightful owners of the nest.

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  • The female Stelis lays her eggs earlier than the Osmia, and towards the bottom of the food-mass; the egg of the Osmia is laid later, and on the surface of the food.

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  • Hence the two eggs are at opposite ends of the food, and both larvae feed for a time without conflict, but the Stelis, being the older, is the larger of the two.

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  • For the fulfilment of this last condition, the older insects of the new generation must emerge from the cells while the mother is still occupied with the younger eggs or larvae.

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  • The young females (" workers ") that develop from the eggs laid in these early cells assist the queen by building fresh cells and gathering food for storage therein.

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  • Dickel and others have lately claimed that fertilized eggs can give rise to either queens, workers or males, according to the food supplied to the larvae and the influence of supposed "sex-producing glands" possessed by the nurse-workers.

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  • Weismann, however, doubts these conclusions, and having found a spermaster in every one of the eggs that he examined from workercells, and in only one out of 272 eggs taken from drone-cells, he supports Dzierzon's view, explaining the single exception mentioned above as a mistake of the queen, she having laid inadvertently this single fertilized egg in a drone instead of in a worker cell.

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  • A special interest attaches to the great auk (Alca impennis), owing to its recent extinction and the value of its eggs to collectors.

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  • Among the more interesting birds may be mentioned the " mound builder " (Megapodius cumingi, Dillwyn), which buries its large eggs in the soft sand along the sea beach, or under great mounds of earth and dead leaves, often at a depth of three or more feet below the surface.

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  • The eggs are highly prized by the natives.

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  • Their eggs are prized by the natives, and the flesh of one species, known as ibit or pelubid, is highly esteemed.

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  • English coal is foremost among the imports, which also include timber and grain, while iron ore, Caen stone,' butter and eggs and fruit are among the exports.

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  • The nest is rather rudely constructed, and the eggs, generally four in number, resemble those of the greenfinch, but are larger in size.

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  • They generally breed in association, often in the closest proximity - their nests, containing three eggs at most, being made on the shingle or among herbage.

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  • That certain species, particularly many from deep water, have disproportionately large eggs, is explained by the supposition that the young derive the advantage of being hatched in an advanced stage of development.

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  • The developing eggs are not carried about by the mother, but deposited in her subaqueous burrow, "where they are aerated by the currents of water produced by the abdominal feet of the parent."

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  • The nest is generally in long heather, and contains two eggs of a dark olive-colour, suffused with still darker brown patches.

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  • A final proof of its vigorous vitality at this period may be found in the numerous inventions of its inhabitants, which include watches, at first called "Nuremberg eggs," the air-gun, gun-locks, the terrestrial and celestial globes, the composition now called brass, and the art of wire-drawing.

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  • The water in them is exquisitely pure, except as it is impregnated by the carbonate of lime, which often forms concretions, called according to their size, pearls, eggs and snowballs.

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  • As soon as ten or a dozen eggs are laid, the cock begins to brood, always taking his place on them at nightfall surrounded by the hens, while by day they relieve one another, more it would seem to guard their common treasure from jackals and small beasts of prey than directly to forward the process of hatching, for that is often left wholly to the sun.'

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  • Hence it is that so-called artificial fertilization is possible; that is to say, fertilization will take place when ripe eggs and milt are artificially pressed from the oysters and allowed to fall into a vessel of sea-water.

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  • There, during the months of February and March, on inaccessible ledges of rock, it deposits two white eggs, from 3 to 4 in.

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  • The dead body of the mother insect serves as a protection for the eggs until they are hatched.

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  • A joint forms a holder for papers or pens, and it was in a joint of bamboo that silk-worm eggs were carried from China to Constantinople during the reign of Justinian.

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  • The eggs are collected either by "stripping" them from the mature adult immediately after capture, or by keeping the adults alive until they are ready to spawn, and then stripping them or by keeping them in reservoirs of sea-water and allowing them to spawn of their own accord.

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  • In the two former cases a little milt is allowed to fall from a male fish into a vessel containing a small quantity of water - fresh or salt as required - and the eggs are pressed from the female fish into the same vessel.

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  • In fresh-water culture the eggs thus fertilized may be at once distributed to the waters to be stocked, or they may be kept in special receptacles provided with a suitable stream of water until the fry are hatched, and then distributed, or again they may be reared in the hatchery for several months until the fry are active and hardy.

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  • The hatching of eggs, whether of fresh-water or salt-water fishes, presents no serious difficulties, if suitable apparatus is employed; but the rearing of fry to an advanced stage, without serious losses, is less easy, and in the case of sea-fishes with pelagic eggs, the larvae of which are exceedingly small and tender, is still an unsolved problem, although recent work, carried out at the Plymouth laboratory of the Marine Biological Association, is at least promising.

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  • In marine hatcheries, on the other hand, it is the invariable practice to hatch the eggs, although the fry have to be put into the sea at the most critical period of their lives.

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  • The earlier advocates of artificial propagation and fish-hatching seem to have been under the impression that the thousands of fry resulting from a single act of artificial propagation meant a corresponding increase in the numbers of edible fish when once they had been deposited in suitable waters; and also that artificial fertilization ensured a greater proportion of fertilized eggs than the natural process.

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  • It is recognized that the great fertility of fishes is nature's provision to meet a high mortality - greater in sea-fishes with minute pelagic eggs than in fresh-water fishes with larger-yolked eggs, partly because of the greater risks of marine pelagic life, and partly because of the greater delicacy of marine larvae at the time of hatching.

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  • Artificially propagated eggs and fry after planting must submit to the same mortality as the other eggs and fry around them.

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  • Consequently it is useless to plant out eggs or fry unless in numbers sufficiently great to appreciably increase the stock of eggs and fry already existing.

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  • The artificially propagated eggs of the shad from the eastern rivers of the United States were planted in those of California and the Mississippi, where the species did not naturally occur.

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  • But in the case of indigenous species the breeding stock must be very seriously reduced before the addition of the eggs or fry of a few score or hundreds of fish can appreciably increase the local stock.

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  • A single female cod liberates, according to its size, from one to five million eggs in a single season.

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  • These establishments have been principally devoted to the hatching of the eggs of plaice.

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  • As a single female plaice produces about 200,000 eggs per annum, this output does not exceed the natural produce of a few hundred fish.

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  • Yet in this area, according to the investigations of Mr Williamson (Report of the Scottish Fishery Board for 1898), nearly 500 millions of plaice eggs are naturally produced in one spawning season.

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  • Supposing this could be established, the question would still remain whether the same result could not be obtained at far less expense by dispensing with the hatching operations and distributing the eggs directly after fertilization.

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  • When that has been done (it has been achieved by the present writer in the case of the sea fish Cottus with demersal eggs,) it would be possible to deposit the young fish in suitable localities on a large scale, with a reasonable prospect of influencing the local abundance of the s p ecies of fish in question.

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  • The eggs are spawned in May and June, and are similar in the two species; they are heavier than the fresh water in which they develop, but unlike the herring's eggs they are not adhesive.

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  • The guacharo is said to build a bowl-like nest of clay, in which it lays from two to four white eggs, with a smooth but lustreless surface, resembling those of some owls.

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  • Wheat, barley, eggs, butter, oilcake, hides, tallow, leather, tobacco, rugs, feathers and other items add considerably to the total value of the exports, which increased from 14 million sterling in 1851-1860 to 8-14 millions sterling in 1901-1905.

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  • Sulphuretted hydrogen is decomposed with the formation of a black coating of silver sulphide; this is the explanation of the black tarnish seen when silver is exposed to the fumes of coal gas, and other sulphuretted compounds, such as occur in eggs.

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  • Its nest is a light construction of dry rushes, having its foundation in the water, and contains as many as six eggs, which are white tinged with buff.

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  • The oviducts may have diverticula serving as receptacles for the spermatozoa (in cases where internal impregnation takes place), and may be provided with glands secreting envelopes or shells around the eggs.

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  • Very few Crustacea are viviparous in the sense that the eggs are retained within the body until hatching takes place (some Phyllopoda), but, on the other hand, the great majority carry the eggs in some way or other after their extrusion.

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  • The eggs are retained between the valves of the shell in some Phyllopoda and in the Cladocera and Ostracoda, and they lie in the mantle cavity in the Cirripedia.

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  • The relative size of the eggs and the amount of nutritive yolk which they contain are generally much greater in those forms which have a direct development.

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  • Bruchus pisi causes considerable damage to pease; during the spring the beetle lays its eggs in the young pea, which is devoured by the larva which hatches out in it.

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  • In 1909, 2041 ships of 2,710,691 tons (1,153,564 being British) entered at Vigo; the imports in that year, including tin and tinplate, coal, machinery, cement, sulphate of copper and foodstuffs, were valued at £481,752; the exports, including sardines, mineral waters and eggs, were valued at 554,824.

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  • The genital papilla of the female acquires a great development during the breeding season and becomes produced into a tube nearly as long as the fish itself; this acts as an ovipositor by means of which the comparatively few and large eggs (3 millimetres in diameter) are introduced through the gaping valves between the branchiae of pond mussels (Unio and Anodonta), where, after being inseminated, they undergo their development, the fry leaving their host about a month later.

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  • Chacmas frequently strip orchards and fruit-gardens, break and devour ostrich eggs, and kill lambs and kids for the sake of the milk in their stomachs.

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  • The output of eggs increased from 9,3 6 9,534 dozen in 1889 to 13,304,150 dozen in 1899.

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  • Here, on the last day of the month, eggs and fish were offered to her.

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  • As for the reasoning powers in animals, the accounts of monkeys learning by experience to break eggs carefully, and pick off bits of shell, so as not to lose the contents, or of the way in which rats or martens after a while can no longer be caught by the same kind of trap, with innumerable similar facts, show in the plainest way that the reason of animals goes so far as to form by new experience a new hypothesis of cause and effect which will henceforth guide their actions.

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  • The value of all poultry raised in 1899 was $262,503; the product of eggs was 3,387,340 doz., and their value, $424,628.

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  • The eggs after being laid are carried about by the mother, adhering in a glutinous mass to the underside of the abdomen.

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  • Ascension is noted for the number of turtles and turtle eggs found on its shores, the season lasting from December to May or June.

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  • The "wideawake" birds frequent the island in large numbers, and their eggs are collected and eaten.

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  • It spawns at a distance from the shore, and its eggs are buoyant, like those of many other marine fishes and unlike those of the herring, which are adhesive and demersal, i.e.

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  • The egg of the pilchard is very easily distinguished from other pelagic eggs by the unusually large space separating the vitelline membrane from the contained ovum.

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  • The first step in the scientific refutation of the theory of abiogenesis was taken by the Italian Redi, who, in 1668, proved that no maggots were "bred" in meat on which flies were prevented by wire screens from laying their eggs.

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  • Its food consists of vegetable substances, mostly leaves, which it obtains from the forest trees among whose branches it lives and in the hollows of which it deposits its eggs.

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  • H, Acid eggs or reservoirs for B, Nitre oven.

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  • The pumping of the acids up to the top of the towers is now always performed by means of compressed air, either in the old "acid eggs," or more economically in "pulsometers."

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  • The eggs in this sheet are in a single layer, each in its own little cavity.

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  • The gorged and fertilized female quits her hold of the host, and falling to the ground, proceeds after a short delay to lay her eggs in some sheltered spot.

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  • The number of eggs laid is enormous, one computation putting it at twenty thousand.

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  • This value was almost equalled by that of eggs and poultry ($14,050,727), which increased 79.7% in the same decade.

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  • Some abstained from eggs and fruit; some confined themselves to bread; some would not take even that.

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  • The western and larger species gathers its food, consisting chiefly of sea-weeds and shellfish, on rocks at low water; but it is also known to eat birds' eggs.

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  • The eggs of both species, though of peculiar appearance, bear an unmistakable likeness to those of oyster-catchers, while occasionally exhibiting a resemblance to those of the tropic-birds.

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  • The hen-bird commonly lays three clay-coloured eggs, blotched with black, in a very slight hollow on the ground not far from the sea.

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  • The eggs of Phoronis are small and usually undergo their early development attached to the tentacles of the adult.

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  • The principal colony has its summer quarters on the Stora-Lule Lake, possesses good boats and nets, and, besides catching and drying fish, makes money by the shooting of wild fowl and the gathering of eggs.

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  • Large quantities of prunes, grain, meat, raw hides, eggs and copper are exported, chiefly to Austria-Hungary, Germany and Turkey.

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  • By command of Zeus (or Aeolus) the winds ceased to blow during their brooding-time, for seven days before and after the shortest day, that their eggs might not be carried away by the sea.

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  • Sousliks feed on roots, seeds and berries, and occasionally on animal food, preying on eggs, small birds and mice.

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  • In addition to fruits of various kinds, they consume tender shoots and buds, insects, eggs and young birds.

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  • It is polygamous, and the male performs the duty of incubation, brooding more than a score of eggs, the produce of several females - facts known to Nieremberg Rhea.

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  • The eggs of the silk-worms, formerly obtained from Japan, are now imported principally from Brusa by Greeks under French protection and from France.

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  • Almost everything connected with bee-craft has been revolutionized, and apiculture, instead of being classed with such homely rural occupations as that of the country housewife who carries a few eggs weekly to the market-town in her basket, is to-day regarded in many countries as a pursuit of considerable import ance.

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  • Fecundation would under such conditions be impossible, and without this the eggs of a resultant queen will produce nothing but drones.

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  • During the summer season, however (from May to July), when drones are abundant, the loss of a queen is of comparatively little moment, as the workers can transform eggs (or young larvae not more than three days old), which would in the ordinary course produce worker bees, into fully-developed queens, capable of fulfilling all the maternal duties of a mother-bee.

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  • This can hardly cause wonder if it is borne in mind that for many weeks during the height of the season a prolific queen will deposit eggs at the rate of from two to three thousand every twenty-four hours.

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  • There is no cell-room either for storing the abundant supply of food constantly being brought in, or for the thousands of eggs which a prolific queen will produce daily as a consequence of general prosperity; therefore unless help comes from without an exodus is prepared for, and what is known as " swarming " takes place.

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  • In these cocoons are deposited the eggs together with a certain amount of albumen upon which the developing embryos feed.

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  • A fourth of all animal products are represented by milk, butter and cheese, eggs and poultry; the rest by animals killed on the farm or sold for slaughter, most of them going to supply the meat-packing industry of South Omaha.

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  • The Australasian species come nearest to laying eggs, inasmuch as the eggs are large, full of yolk, and enclosed in a shell; but development normally takes place in the uterus, though abnormally, incompletely developed eggs are extruded.

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  • In the Cape species the eggs are smaller, though still of considerable size; the yolk is much less developed, and the egg membrane is thinner though dense.

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  • Herein are laid from six to nine eggs, of a pale bluish-green freckled with brown and blotched with ash-colour.

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  • Eggs produced in the autumn by fertilized females remain on the plant through the winter and hatching in the spring give rise to female individuals which may be winged or wingless.

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  • In the autumn winged males appear, union between the sexes takes place and the females lay the fertilized eggs which are destined to carry the species through the cold months of winter.

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  • From this egg in the spring emerges an apterous female who makes a gall in the new leaf and lays therein a large number of eggs.

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  • In the course of the summer, from some of these eggs are hatched females which acquire wings and lay eggs from which wingless males and females are born.

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  • Two chalky white or greenish eggs are laid.

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