Effect Sentence Examples

effect
  • The changes had an immediate effect.

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  • Its effect was immediate.

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  • The overall effect was surprising.

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  • Her statement had a surprising effect on Dean.

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  • Still, that wasn't the only lingering side effect of her weekend with Brandon.

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  • His deep voice had the usual effect on her pulse.

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  • The effect of the battle on the rest of the war is profound.

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  • The study also examined the effect of Head Start programs that use a different educational approach.

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  • She did, however, celebrate the deterrent effect of the new law that was passed.

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  • The only effect of this incident on Tikhon was that after being wounded he seldom brought in prisoners.

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  • In small quantities, it may even have a beneficial effect on health.

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  • He knew the effect he had on her; he did it on purpose to mess with her.

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  • The special effect they used to create the monster in the movie was laughable.

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  • But such was not the effect on Walden that year, for she had soon got a thick new garment to take the place of the old.

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  • The sounds, which he had not heard for so long, had an even more pleasurable and exhilarating effect on Rostov than the previous sounds of firing.

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  • This is like the effect of the slow dwelling on long words, not quite well managed, that one notices in a child who is telling a solemn story.

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  • But when he had gone into another room, to which the countess hurriedly followed him, he assumed a grave air and thoughtfully shaking his head said that though there was danger, he had hopes of the effect of this last medicine and one must wait and see, that the malady was chiefly mental, but...

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  • The effect on her pulse was electrifying.

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  • She exhaled happiness and love from the time Nicholas returned, and the faithful, unalterable love of this girl had a gladdening effect on him.

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  • It had a peculiarly strong effect on him because at the sight of the fire he felt himself suddenly freed from the ideas that had weighed him down.

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  • When he lighted the oil a hundred tongues of flame shot up, and the effect was really imposing.

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  • She glanced up, unhappy at how little of an effect her magic had on him.

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  • Let's consider examples of how the effect is positive for some, negative for some, but the net is a gain in the overall wealth of the system.

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  • She knew milkshakes had a bad effect on her digestion, but she couldn’t resist the creamy, chocolatey goodness.

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  • Too fast, he felt the buffers' effect on his powers lessen, and magic exploded through him.

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  • This is the effect of putting it all in a summary.

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  • The jury remained out on the effect of Julie's injury on her speech.

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  • When subjects slept longer, this had a positive effect on their health.

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  • Around 1600, the Elizabethan Poor Law came into effect and lasted more than two centuries.

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  • The Monterey mists were in full effect, filtering the sunlight.

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  • You can yourself imagine the effect this news has had on me, and your silence increases my astonishment.

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  • What can ordinary people do to make a difference andeffect changes in the law?

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  • He painted all the walls with a bright white paint, and the effect was to make the room seem much bigger than it was.

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  • And second, people are really bad at connecting cause and effect in their lives when it comes to things like this.

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  • Her presence would have the same calming effect on Dusty, who was the most wound-up man Jule knew.

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  • From time to time she smoothed the folds of her dress, and whenever the story produced an effect she glanced at Anna Pavlovna, at once adopted just the expression she saw on the maid of honor's face, and again relapsed into her radiant smile.

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  • The southern spring, the comfortable rapid traveling in a Vienna carriage, and the solitude of the road, all had a gladdening effect on Pierre.

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  • Today he is cheerful and in good spirits, but that is the effect of your visit--he is not often like that.

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  • These sights and sounds had no depressing or intimidating effect on him; on the contrary, they stimulated his energy and determination.

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  • Napoleon had assented and had given orders that news should be brought to him of the effect those batteries produced.

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  • You will be drinking a lot once you feel the effect.

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  • The possible adverse effect on humans from eating chicken are limited.

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  • The lecture explains the greenhouse effect and the percentage of each of the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

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  • As Mr. Anagnos was the head of a great institution, what he said had much more effect than the facts in Miss Sullivan's account on which he based his statements.

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  • The repugnance to animal food is not the effect of experience, but is an instinct.

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  • The lesson shocked the king, but its effect soon wore off.

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  • The imposing figure of Nesvitski followed by his Cossack, and the determination of Denisov who flourished his sword and shouted frantically, had such an effect that they managed to squeeze through to the farther side of the bridge and stopped the infantry.

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  • From the habit of fifty years all this had a physically agitating effect on the old general.

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  • I thought I would try the effect of a little belated discipline.

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  • Natasha set to work to effect a reconciliation, and so far succeeded that Nicholas received a promise from his mother that Sonya should not be troubled, while he on his side promised not to undertake anything without his parents' knowledge.

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  • To the Polish general he replied to the same effect, informing him that he was already under the command of the German.

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  • If we have a large range of examples, if our observation is constantly directed to seeking the correlation of cause and effect in people's actions, their actions appear to us more under compulsion and less free the more correctly we connect the effects with the causes.

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  • He reveled in the effect he had on people.

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  • He had for a time to put up with the presence of old servants of the electoral house, but after 1738 he was in effect sole minister.

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  • It is no exaggeration to say that a parallel condition in literature would be produced by a strong public opinion to the effect that any Enelish style was hopelessly out of date unless it consisted exclusively of the most difficult types of phrase to be found in the works of Browning and Meredith.

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  • Any suggestions as to improvements in institutions must be approved by the majority of the governing body of that institution before they may be put into effect.

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  • The best works of art are the expression of man's struggle to free himself from this condition, but the effect of our art is merely to make this low state comfortable and that higher state to be forgotten.

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  • She released her cool power into him, but to no effect.

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  • Simpson found no certain temperature effect on the value of q.

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  • Now, if CD is pressed by its weight or by a spring on the surface AB, the effect of wear will be to produce a symmetrical grinding away of both surfaces, which may be represented thus, fig.

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  • He had no artistic appreciation of the subject he discussed, and he mistook cause for effect in asserting that the decline in public morality was due to the flagrant indecency of the stage.

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  • Still the tradition had its effect.

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  • The nitro group behaves very similarly to the hydroxyl group. The effect of varying the position of the nitro group in the molecule is well marked, and conclusions may be drawn as to the orientation of the groups from a knowledge of the crystal form; a change in the symmetry of the chemical molecule being often attended by a loss in the symmetry of the crystal.

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  • A sensible effect remained, however, after the influence of splashing was eliminated.

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  • Hyphear is useful for fattening cattle if they are hardy enough to withstand the purgative effect it produces at first; viscum is medicinally of value as an emollient, and in cases of tumour, ulcers and the like.

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  • At the Council of Salisbury in 1116 the English king ordered Thurstan to submit, but instead he resigned his archbishopric, although this did not take effect.

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  • On his return the Athenians sued for peace, though without success, and a speech by Pericles had little effect on their spirits.

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  • After Cimon's death he renounced the war against Persia, and the collapse of 447-445 had the effect of completing his change ' The general impression in Greece was that this decree was the proximate cause of the war.

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  • Pedantry was an inevitable effect of the early Renaissance.

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  • The first noticeable effect of the crisis was a great scarcity of employment.

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  • The advantage of the high conducting power which copper possesses Over- is of especial value in moist climates (like that of the United Kingdom), since the effect of leakage over the surface of the damp insulators is much less noticeable when the conducting power of the wire is high than when it is low, especially when the line is a long one.

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  • The effect of their preaching, and their example and their work among the poor, made itself felt throughout Umbria and brought about a great religious revival.

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  • The proportion of evergreens is large, and has a marked effect on the landscape in winter.

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  • If the available water-power of Italy, already very considerable, be harnessed, converted into electric power (which is already being done in some districts), and further increased by reafforestation, the effect upon the industries of Italy will be incalculable, and the importation of coal will be very materially diminished.

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  • Its effect, however, has been comparatively small.

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  • As these acts of terrorism had quite the opposite of the desired effect, repeated attempts were made on the life of the emperor, and at last the carefully laid plans of the conspirators were successful.

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  • War of To effect this, he embarked on the Turkish War of 1877-78.

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  • That reformation failed to effect its purifying mission.

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  • The latter façade was completely reconstructed upon 2200 piles driven to great depths, with the result that the general harmony of the monument - the effect of time and of atmospheric conditions - was completely lost.

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  • His Christliche Dogmatik (3 vols., 1849-1852, new edition, 1870) "contains many fruitful and suggestive thoughts, which, however, are hidden under such a mass of bold figures and strange fancies, and suffer so much from want of clearness of presentation, that they did not produce any lasting effect" (Otto Pfleiderer).

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  • White days and Philadelphia had that effect.

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  • The light actually emitted laterally is thus the same as would be caused by forces exactly the opposite of these acting on the medium otherwise free from disturbance, and it only remains to see what the effect of such force would be.

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  • In winter the varying depth of snow may exert an appreciable effect.

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  • The whole effect of the grim castle, the silvery stream and the verdant woods makes one of the most striking scenes in Belgium.

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  • His first care was to carry out the instructions received from home, and effect a radical reform in the system of government.

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  • Patterson was withdrawn, the disputed territory was erected into the new county of Luzerne (1786), the land titles were confirmed (1787), and Colonel Timothy Pickering was commissioned to organize the new county and to effect a reconciliation.

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  • The armature of the electromagnet is normally attracted by the effect of the permanent magnet, but it is furnished with two antagonistic springs tending to throw it upwards.

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  • To these curves, which were also applied to effect some quadratures, Evangelista Torricelli gave the name of "Robervallian lines."

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  • The effect of these extraordinary changes, then, was the carrying out of Napoleonic satrapies in the north and centre of Italy in a way utterly inconsistent with the treaty of Luneville; and the weakness with which the courts of London and Vienna looked on at these singular events confirmed Bonaparte in the belief that he could do what he would with neighbouring states.

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  • Here a remnant of the Borinquenos, assisted by the Caribs, maintained a severe struggle with the conquerors, but in the end their Indian allies were subdued by English and French corsairs, and the unfortunate natives of Porto Rico were left alone to experience the full effect of forced labour, disastrous hurricanes, natural plagues and new diseases introduced by the conquerors.

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  • His last achievements were the bombardment of Algiers (1682-1683), in order to effect the deliverance of the Christian captives, and the bombardment of Genoa in 1684.

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  • It has had, however, a marked effect on weaker musical individualities.

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  • There was nothing new on the Byrne case—just a comment to that effect.

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  • At Magdalen College, Oxford, is one which is perforated, and has a most beautiful effect.

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  • In the youthful Dutch universities the effect of the essays was greater.

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  • Voet now issued, under the name of Martin Schoock, one of his pupils, a pamphlet with the title of Methodus novae philosophiae Renati Descartes, in which atheism and infidelity were openly declared to be the effect of the new teaching.

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  • The presentation of some object of dread, for example, to the eye has or may have a double effect.

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  • He leapt from the wall with only three companions into the hostile town, and, before the army behind him could effect an entrance, lay wounded almost to death.'

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  • With the improvements in wind instruments this continued, as a more brilliant effect was gained.

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  • Many Anglican bishops (amongst them the archbishop of York and most of his suffragans) felt so doubtful as to the wisdom of such an assembly that they refused to attend it, and Dean Stanley declined to allow Westminster Abbey to be used for the closing service, giving as his reasons the partial character of the assembly, uncertainty as to the effect of its measures and "the presence of prelates not belonging to our Church."

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  • Every operation in which mind and matter are both concerned is an effect of neither, but the direct act of God.

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  • Finally it must be remembered that musical euphony and emotional effect are inseparable from considerations of harmony and polyphony.

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  • The gradual abolition of the grist tax on minor cereals diminished the surplus in 1882 to 236,000, and in 1883 to r1o,ooo, while the total repeal of the grist tax on wheat, which took effect on the 1st of January 1884, coincided with the opening of a new and disastrous period of deficit.

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  • If this tendency is to take effect, a certain part of Kant's rational scepticism must be accepted.

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  • The effect of lime on plants is less understood even than the effect of common salt.

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  • In order to effect this the individual chromosomes must become associated in some way, for there is no diminution in the actual amount of nuclear substance, and this leads to certain modifications in the division which are not seen in the vegetative nuclei.

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  • The effect of the phylogenetic factor in homology may be illustrated in the following cases.

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  • Since, however, the emperor has the power of proroguing or dissolving the Duma as often as he pleases, it is clear that these temporary ordinances might in effect be made permanent.

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  • The remedy they proposed was that the labourers should be prohibited from migrating from one estate to another, and an order to that effect was issued, with the result that the peasants, being no longer able to change their domicile and seek new employers, fell practically under the unlimited power of the proprietors on whose land they resided.

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  • But once the order is confirmed by the Board, with or without modifications, it has effect as if it had been enacted by parliament, and it cannot afterwards be upset on the ground of any alleged irregularity in the proceedings.

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  • The mosaics of the 5th century, in the dome, are the earliest and perhaps the finest at Ravenna for their splendid decorative effect and rich colouring, and are less stiff and conventional than the later mosaics.

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  • Their effect was supplemented by the division into French and British sympathizers; the Republicans approving the aims and condoning the excesses of the French Revolution, the Federalists siding with British reaction against French democracy.

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  • This affords an example of a principle which had been stated by Hess in a very general form under the name of the Law of Constant Heat Sums - namely, that the thermal effect of a given chemical action is the same, independently of the character and number of the stages in which it takes place.

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  • Jerusalem was rebuilt by Hadrian, orders to this effect being given during the emperor's first journey through Syria in 130, the date of his foundations at.

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  • Rightly or wrongly, he was held personally responsible for the rapprochement with France and Russia and the opposition to the Powers of the Triple Alliance; and this attitude had its effect on his career when Leo XIII.

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  • It was not till 1645 that the Turks made any serious attempt to effect the conquest of the island; but in that year they landed with an army of 50,000 men, and speedily reduced the important city of Canea.

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  • Discouraged by his failure to effect this, he returned to his diocese of Cambrai at the beginning of 1408.

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  • The convict lease system was abolished by the constitution of 1890 (the provision to take effect on the 31st of December 1894), and state farms were purchased in Rankin, Hinds and Holmes counties.

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  • On the 26th of May 1908 the people of the state voted " against the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors " in the state; the prohibition act thus approved went into effect on the 1st of January 1909.

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  • The effect of this was that in January 1835 the legislature passed a bill for submitting the question legally to all the voters of the state, although this bill itself limited the proposed convention's power relating to representation by providing that it should so amend the constitution that senators be chosen by districts according to public taxes, and that commoners be apportioned by districts according to Federal representation, i.e.

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  • Such visitors are clearly prejudicial to the flower, and so we meet with arrangements which are calculated to repel the intruders, or at least to force them to enter the flower in such a way as not to effect mischief.

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  • The object of these movements will be appreciated when it is remembered that, if the pollen-masses retained the original direction they had in the anther in which they were formed, they would, when transported by the insect to another flower, merely come in contact with the anther of that flower, where of course they would be of no use; but, owing to the divergences and flexions above alluded to, the pollen-masses come to be so placed that, when transplanted to another flower of the same species, they come in contact with the stigma and so effect the fertilization of that flower.

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  • He was severe, but just and impartial, and strove to effect necessary reforms by reducing the numbers of the Janissaries, improving the coinage, and checking the state expenditure.

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  • In the winter similar consequences ensue, in a negative direction, from the prolonged loss of heat by radiation in the long and clear nights - an effect which is intensified wherever the surface is covered with snow, or the air little charged with vapour.

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  • The winter cold produces an effect of just an opposite nature, and Winds.

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  • Jenghiz Khan and Timur covered more ground than Napoleon, and no European has had such an effect on the world as Mahomet.

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  • Bactria soon became independent under an IndoGreek dynasty, and the blending of Greek, Persian, central Asiatic and Hindu influences had an important effect on the art and religion of India, and through India on all eastern Asia.

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  • The Japanese have produced few books of importance, and their compositions are chiefly remarkable as being lighter and more secular than is usual in Asia, but the older Chinese works take high rank both for their merits and the effect they have had.

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  • Though Europeans may be indebted to China for some mechanical inventions, she was too distant to produce much direct effect, and the influence of India has been mainly directed towards the East.

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  • There has been great difference of opinion as to the extent to which Alexander's conquests influenced Asia, and it is equally hard to say what is the effect now being produced by Europe.

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  • Such, at least, was the thought of later writers, who have given effect to the belief in chap. viii.

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  • The unit of knowledge is not an isolated impression but a judgment; and in such a judgment is contained, even initially, the reference both to a permanent subject and to a permanent world of thought, and, implied in these, such judgments, for example, as those of existence, substance, cause and effect.

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  • Although at times he states his principles with a wonderful degree of breadth and insight, he mars the effect by looseness of statement, and by the incorporation of irrelevant psychological matter.

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  • Further, they had the effect of sobering the culprit, and the more creditable part of his life did not begin till he left Vincennes.

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  • He first thought of becoming a minister at a very early date, if we may believe a story contained in the Memoires of the duchesse d'Abrantes, to the effect that in May 1789 the queen tried to bribe him, but that he refused this and expressed his wish to be a minister.

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  • This promise he brilliantly fulfilled by routing the forces of the Argive confederacy at the battle of Mantinea (418), the moral effect of which was out of all proportion to the losses inflicted on the enemy.

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  • The abolition of debts was carried into effect, but the land distribution was put off by Agesilaus on various pretexts.

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  • It was reluctantly accepted by Lord Sandwich, then First Lord, but before it could take effect France declared war, and a powerful French squadron was sent to America under the count d'Estaing.

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  • There is general truth in what was once said by a high authority to the effect that, while there will be something dignified in the humblest Rajput, there will be something mean in the highest Mahratta.

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  • This commercial policy had indeed a deeper and more fatal effect than the alienation of the towns; it secularized still further the brethren of the Order, and made them financiers instead of soldiers.

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  • Would the inoculation of the attenuated virus have a remedial effect on an animal already bitten ?

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  • As wife of Pluto, she sent spectres, ruled the ghosts, and carried into effect the curses of men.

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  • An Act passed in 1770, which relaxed the rigour of strict entails and afforded power to landlords to grant leases and otherwise improve their estates, had a beneficial effect on Scottish agriculture.

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  • The Copyhold Consolidation Act 1894 supersedes six previous copyhold statutes, but does not effect any alteration in the law concerning enfranchisement.

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  • The fact that the growth of a leguminous crop, such as red clover, leaves the soil in a higher condition for the subsequent growth of a grain crop - that, indeed, the growth of such a leguminous crop is to a great extent equivalent to the application of a nitrogenous manure for the cereal crop - was in effect known ages ago.

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  • So much, indeed, does the character of the herbage vary from plot to plot that the effect may fairly be described as kaleidoscopic. Repeated analyses have shown how greatly both the botanical constitution and the chemical composition of the mixed herbage vary according to the description of manure applied.

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  • Such, moreover, is the effect of different manures that the gross produce of the mixed herbage is totally different on the respective plots according to the manure employed, both as to the proportion of the various species composing it and as to their condition of development and maturity.

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  • The effect was to reduce to a minimum the risk of the introduction of disease amongst the herds and flocks of the country, and at the same time to confine the trade in store stock exclusively to the breeders of Great Britain and Ireland.

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  • He had become convinced that his comrades in the Utilitarian Society, never more than ten, had not the stuff in them for a world-shaking propaganda; the society itself was dissolved; the Parliamentary Review was a failure; the Westminster did not pay its expenses; Bentham's Judicial Evidence produced little effect on the reviewers.

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  • The reform of land tenure in Ireland, the representation of women, the reduction of the national debt, the reform of London government, the abrogation of the Declaration of Paris, were among the topics on which he spoke with marked effect.

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  • We shall best illustrate the character and method of economic reasoning by examples, and for that purpose let us take first of An all a purely historical problem, namely, the effect on of the wage-earners of the wages clauses of the Statute of Apprenticeship (1563).

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  • We cannot suppose that the policy of the Merchant Adventurers' Company had nothing to do with the woollen industry; that the export trade in woollen cloth was quite independent of the foreign exchanges and international trade relations in those times; that the effect on wages of the state of the currency, the influx of new silver, the character of the harvests, and many other influences can be conveniently ignored.

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  • In studying, therefore, such an apparently simple question as the effect of an act of parliament on wages in a small group of trades we want a general theory which we can use as a kind of index of the factors we have to consider.

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  • During Kett's rebellion he was allowed to preach in the rebels' camp on Mousehold Hill, but without much effect; and later on he encouraged his chaplain, Alexander Neville, to write his history of the rising.

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  • The last part of Bruce's life, from 1315 to 1329, began with an attempt which was the most striking testimony that could have been given to the effect of Bannockburn, and which, had it succeeded, might have altered the future of the British Isles.

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  • Nasir Lek's message and the urgent representations of Firdousi's friends had the desired effect; and Mahmud not only expressed his intention of offering full reparation to the poet, but put his enemy Maimandi to death.

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  • The characteristic torsion attains its maximum effect among the majority of the Streptoneura.

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  • The only man who tried to shake off the theological influence of Origen was Marcellus of Ancyra, who did not succeed in producing any lasting effect on theology.

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  • On his first entry into Milan (15th of May 1796) he received a rapturous welcome as the liberator of Italy from the Austrian yoke; but the instructions of the Directory allowed him at the outset to do little more than effect the organization of consultative committees and national guards in the chief towns of Lombardy.

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  • The Council of State, acting on a suggestion made by Cambaceres, now intervened with telling effect.

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  • It is worthy of note that Josephine then won a triumph over Joseph Bonaparte and his sisters, who had been intriguing to effect a divorce.

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  • After imposing these harsh terms on his enemy, the conqueror might naturally have shown clemency to the Tirolese leader, Andreas Hofer; but that brave mountaineer, when betrayed by a friend, was sentenced to death at Mantua owing to the arrival of a special message to that effect from Napoleon.

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  • The move not only failed, but it had the fatal effect of uncovering Paris to the northern forces of the allies.

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  • Their recollection of his conduct during the congress of Chatillon was the determining fact at this crisis; his professions at Lyons or Paris had not the slightest effect; his efforts to detach Austria from the coalition, as also the feelers put forth tentatively by Fouche at Vienna, were fruitless.

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  • In the first months of his tenure of office he had to deal with the furious opposition to Wood's halfpence, and to counteract the effect of Swift's Draper's Letters.

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  • The manufacture, modelling and painting of faience objects, and the making of inlays in many materials were also familiar to Aegean craftsmen, who show in all their best work a strong sense of natural form and an appreciation of ideal balance and decorative effect, such as are seen in the best products of later Hellenic art.

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  • Here there is only space to name Bontius, Clusius, Hernandez (or Fernandez), Marcgrave, Nieremberg and Piso, 6 whose several works describing the natural products of both the Indies - whether the result of their own observation or compilation - together with those of Olina and Worm, produced a marked effect, since they led up to what may be deemed the foundation of scientific ornithology.'

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  • The chief merit of the latter work lies in its forty plates, whereon the heads and feet of many birds are indifferently figured .2 But, while the successive editions of Linnaeus's great work were revolutionizing natural history, and his example of precision in language producing excellent effect on scientific writers, several other authors were advancing the study of ornithology in a very different way - a way that pleased the eye even more than his labours were pleasing the mind.

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  • Moreover, whatever the lovers of the fine arts may say, it is nearly certain that the " Bewick Collector " is mistaken in attaching so high a value to these old editions, for owing to the want of skill in printing - indifferent ink being especially assigned as one cause - many of the earlier issues fail to show the most delicate touches of the engraver, which the increased care bestowed upon the edition of 1847 (published under the supervision of John Hancock) has revealed - though it must be admitted that certain blocks have suffered from wear of the press so as to be incapable of any more producing the effect intended.

    2
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  • A similar series of works was projected and begun about the same time as that of Le Vaillant by Audebert and Vieillot, though the former, who was by profession a painter and illustrated the work, was already dead more than a year before the appearance of the two volumes, bearing date 2802, and entitled Oiseaux dores ou a reflets metalliques, the effect of the plates in which he sought to heighten by the lavish use of gilding.

    2
    0
  • He states that Gould suspected the alliance of these two forms " from external structure and habits alone "; otherwise one might suppose that he had obtained an intimation to that effect on one of his Continental journeys.

    2
    0
  • How little effect this had, however, is shown by the fact that in 1265 Odo, archbishop of Sens, could do no more than prohibit the obscene excesses of the feast, without abolishing the feast itself; that in 1444 the university of Paris, at the request of certain bishops, addressed a letter condemning it to all cathedral chapters; and that King Charles VII.

    2
    0
  • These slight differences in level, however, are found to have a most powerful effect in the direction already mentioned.

    2
    0
  • The effect upon the permanent level of the lakes of the withdrawal of water through this artificial outlet is receiving much attention.

    2
    0
  • In 1910 the coffee industry had not yet recovered from the effect of the cyclone of 1899 and the unfortunate mortgage system that prevailed under the Spanish regime.

    4
    2
  • Metallurgical operations, such as smelting, roasting, and refining, were scientifically investigated, and in some degree explained, by Georg Agricola and Carlo Biringuiccio; ceramics was studied by Bernard Palissy, who is also to be remembered as an early worker in agricultural chemistry, having made experiments on the effect of manures on soils and crops; while general technical chemistry was enriched by Johann Rudolf Glauber.1

    2
    0
  • By experiment it is found that the thermal effect of a double bond is much less than the effect of two single bonds, while a triple bond has a much smaller effect than three single bonds.

    2
    0
  • Canning carried against Buxton and his friends a motion to the effect that the desired ameliorations in the condition and treatment of the slaves should be recommended by the home government to the colonial legislatures, and enforced only in case of their resistance, direct action being taken in the single instance of Trinidad, which, being a crown colony, had no legislature of its own.

    2
    0
  • Macaulay, James Stephen, and others, continued the struggle, only suspending it during a period allowed to the local legislatures for carrying into effect the measures expected from them.

    2
    0
  • It must not be forgotten that either before or soon after the formation of the Union the Northern States - beginning with Vermont in 1777, and ending with New Jersey in 1804 - either abolished slavery or adopted measures to effect its gradual abolition within their boundaries.

    2
    0
  • A clause was inserted to the effect that a certain sum should be annually set aside from fines to aid each province in emancipating slaves by purchase.

    2
    0
  • Of these emigrants some return the following spring, and are recognizable by the more advanced state of their plumage, the effect presumably of having wintered in countries enjoying a brighter and hotter sun.

    2
    0
  • His sermons produced a great effect, and he was protected by several barons of the English faction.

    2
    0
  • The death of Wishart produced a deep effect on the Scottish people, and the cardinal became an object of general dislike, which encouraged his enemies to proceed with the design they had formed against him.

    2
    0
  • Besides the incomparable Journal, his Appeals to Men of Reason and Religion also produced an extraordinary effect in allaying prejudice and winning respect.

    2
    0
  • Arriving in Dublin at the end of October he received information to the effect that seventeen counties were ready to take up arms if a successful effort were made in Dublin.

    2
    0
  • The Epistle to Egbert, though not historical in form, may be mentioned here, because of the valuable information which it contains as to the state of the Northumbrian Church, on which the disorders and revolutions of the Northumbrian kingdom had told with disastrous effect.

    2
    0
  • They represent the Early English style at its best, and the view across the great transept is unsurpassed for architectural effect.

    2
    0
  • Individual experience is a condition which without the innate capacity cannot take effect.

    2
    0
  • The effect of this pronouncement was great, and it alarmed the Afrikanders, who at this time viewed with apprehension the virtual resumption by Cecil Rhodes of his leadership of the Progressive (British) party at the Cape.

    2
    0
  • Attempts to carry into effect the law of 1850 aroused much bitterness.

    2
    0
  • The assignats had now become totally valueless - the abolition of the "maximum" the previous year (1795) had produced no effect, and, though, by various payments into the treasury, the total number had been reduced to about 24,000,000,000 francs, their face-value was about 3 o to I of coin.

    2
    0
  • A general primary election law for the selection, by the voters, of candidates for state office came into effect in 1906.

    2
    0
  • A provisional code of judicial procedure, prepared by Edward Livingston, was in effect in 1805 to 1825.

    2
    0
  • The last two had a pernicious effect on Cuba, draining it of horses, money and of men.

    2
    0
  • This theory' is in effect a theory of the use of classes and relations, and does not decide the philosophic question as to the sense (if any) in which a class in extension is one entity.

    2
    0
  • A bibliography of such references would be in effect a bibliography of metaphysics, or rather of epistemology.

    2
    0
  • Probably the abolition of the slave-trade in 1834 was not without its effect upon the fortunes of the landed'.

    2
    0
  • The former year naturally felt the effect of this, and the tithes which should have been encashed in the last months of the year were discounted and spent several months in advance.

    2
    0
  • The economic effect of the railways upon the districts through which they run is apparent from the comparative values of the tithes in the regions traversed by the Anatolian railway in 1889 and 1898 in which years it so happened that prices were almost at exactly the same level, and again in 1908-1909, when they were only slightly higher.

    2
    0
  • The effect of the original system was that a vakuf property became the inalienable property of the state, and the original proprietor a mere tenant.

    2
    0
  • All fundamental repairs thus fell to the charge of the state, which could not afford to effect them, and the vakuf revenues decreased so rapidly that already in the reign of Selim I.

    2
    0
  • The immediate effect was good; Erlau was 1 They were renewed with England in 1593, 1603, 1606, 1622, 1624, 1641, 1662 and 1675.

    2
    0
  • This was notably the case in Servia, where the temporary domination of Austria, to which the treaty of Sistova (1791) put an end, had had the effect of awakening the national spirit of the people.

    2
    0
  • Instructions to this effect were sent to the admirals commanding in the Levant.

    2
    0
  • Meanwhile the other powers had taken advantage of the reverses of the Russian arms to discount the effect of their ultimate victory by attempting to settle the Greek question.

    2
    0
  • These stipulations of the treaty, which were in effect a confirmation of the firman granted in 1620 by Murad IV.

    2
    0
  • The sums payable by the different countries were to be fixed by the powers; but no effect has so far been given to this reasonable stipulation, which may now be looked upon as null and void.

    2
    0
  • Greece and Crete were thus confronted with what was in effect a defensive alliance between Turkey and Rumania.

    2
    0
  • The material loss inflicted on the French was not very great, but its effect in raising the moral of the raw Prussian cavalry and increasing their confidence in their old commander was enormous.

    2
    0
  • The moral effect, he promised himself, would be prodigious, and there was neither room nor food for these 100,000 elsewhere.

    2
    0
  • In July 1804 he ordered his admiral commanding at Toulon, Latouche Treville, to seize an opportunity when Nelson, who was in command of the blockade, was driven off by a northerly gale, to put to sea, with 1 0 sail of the line, pick up the French ship in Cadiz, join Villeneuve who was in the Aix roads, and then effect a junction with Ganteaume and the 21 sail of the line at Brest.

    2
    0
  • It lost at once the unity given to it by the efforts of the emperor to effect, and of the British government to baffle the passage of the Channel by an army.

    2
    0
  • It was decided by the British government that the proposals made to this effect did not offer sufficient security.

    2
    0
  • Its buildings depended for their effect principally on mass and gorgeous colouring.

    2
    0
  • In October 1908, at a special election, the security franchise was invalidated, and this seemed to have the effect of dissolving the lease held by the Municipal Traction Co., and of ending the city's experiment in operating (indirectly) the street car lines.

    2
    0
  • In 1657 he advised his father not to accept the office of king, although in 1654 he had supported a motion to this effect; 8 See Hugo Goldschmidt, "Das Orchester der italienischen Oper im 17.

    2
    0
  • The whole plan is drawn from three centres, the outer portion of the curves being arcs of a larger circle than the one used for the central portion; the complete circle of the orchestra is marked by a sill of white limestone, and greatly enhances the effect of the whole.

    2
    0
  • There are two gravitational fields which sometimes reinforce and at other times diminish each other and the effect is always a resultant one.

    2
    0
  • An effect of the greater tide-generating force will also be instability of the liquid magmas underlying volcanic areas, leading to violent eruptions and earthquakes.

    2
    0
  • Evaporation of the water and anything that lowers the hydrogen-ion concentration have the same effect.

    2
    0
  • By the pulsation of the pericardial vesicle (best observed in the larva) the blood is driven into the glomerulus, from which it issues by efferent vessels which effect a junction with the ventral (sub-intestinal) vessel in the trunk.

    2
    0
  • The French Revolution and the insecurity of the political situation, however, exercised a depressing and retarding effect.

    2
    0
  • The upper reaches are nowhere fordable between Tadum and Lhasa, but there is a ferry at Likche (opposite Tadum on the southern bank), where wooden boats covered with hide effect the necessary connexion between the two banks and ensure the passage of the Nepal trade.

    2
    0
  • In 1907 an act was passed by which the former county of Oahu, including the island of Oahu and the small islands adjacent, was made a municipal corporation under the name of the "city and county of Honolulu"; this act came into effect on the 1st of January 1909.

    2
    0
  • During this time he became subject to religious emotion and beheld visions which encouraged him to effect his escape.

    2
    0
  • Interchanges must be supposed to go on whether a current passes or not, the function of the electric forces in electrolysis being merely to determine in what direction the parts of the molecules shall work their way through the liquid and to effect actual separation of these parts (or their secondary products) at the electrodes.

    2
    0
  • If a certain minimum charge must be collected in order to start coagulation, it will need the conjunction of 6n monovalent, or 3n divalent, to equal the effect of 2n trivalent ions.

    2
    0
  • The value of k, however, does not keep constant so satisfactorily in the case of highly dissociated substances, and empirical formulae have been constructed to represent the effect of dilution on them.

    2
    0
  • But the temperature coefficient of conductivity is now generally less than before; thus the effect of temperature on ionization must be of opposite sign to its effect on fluidity.

    2
    0
  • Again, Hittorf has shown that the effect of a cyanide round a copper electrode is to combine with the copper ions.

    2
    0
  • Charlemagne's activity in this respect was, in effect, but the completion of a process that had been going on since the 6th century.

    2
    0
  • Whatever effect the reinvigoration of the papacy may have had in hastening the process, the original impulse towards the adoption of the Roman rite had proceeded, not from Rome, but from Spain and Gaul; it was the natural result of the lively intercourse between the Churches of these countries and the Holy See.

    2
    0
  • But there was little chance that any change in the rubric, even in the improbable event of its receiving the sanction of parliament, would produce any appreciable effect.

    2
    0
  • The effect of this unheard-of achievement on the Danish government was crushing.

    2
    0
  • The lack of early systematic theological training certainly had a momentous effect upon his development.

    2
    0
  • It not only made the efforts of the Turks to suppress the Greek revolt hopeless, but it made a breach difficult to heal in the traditional friendship between Great Britain and Turkey, which had its effect during the critical period of the struggle between Mehemet Ali and the Porte (1831-1841).

    2
    0
  • When exposed to air the latex gradually undergoes putrefactive changes accompanied by coagulation of the caoutchouc. The addition of a small quantity of ammonia or of formalin to some latices usually has the effect of preserving them for a considerable time.

    2
    0
  • The effect of chemical agents in producing coagulation are in consonance with what is known of other instances of polymeric or condensation changes, whilst the fact that the collection of globules separated by creaming after thorough washing, and therefore removal of all proteid, is susceptible of solidification into caoutchouc by a merely mechanical act such as churning, strongly supports the view that the character of the change is distinct from that of any alteration which may occur in the proteid constituents of the latex.

    2
    0
  • Among these are the precise extent of demand, the limit of the inevitable fall in price with largely increased production, the cost of labour as increasing amounts are required, and the effect of changed conditions on the output of " wild " rubber and the competition of the new plantations which are being established in tropical America.

    2
    0
  • The globules in the latex, however, consist more probably of a distinct liquid substance which readily changes into the solid caoutchouc. The coagulation of the latex often originates with the " curding " of the proteids present, and this alteration in the proteid leads to the solidification of the globules into caoutchouc. The latter, however, is probably a distinct effect.

    2
    0
  • The effect may, however, also be due to chemical change known as condensation, and be accompanied by the elimination of the elements of water.

    2
    0
  • Alkalis have little effect on it under ordinary circumstances, although prolonged contact with ammonia results in a partial change.

    2
    0
  • The failure of the campaign of 1760, so far as Russiaand France were concerned, induced the court of Versailles, on the evening of the 22nd of January 1761, to present to the court of St Petersburg a despatch to the effect that the king of France by reason of the condition of his dominions absolutely desired peace.

    2
    0
  • When its efficacy was not eternal, its effect was considered to endure for twenty years.

    2
    0
  • The action of missionaries, who cared only about nominal Christianizing, had no better effect.

    2
    0
  • Large quantities of ground mica are used in the manufacture of wall-paper, and to produce a frosted effect on toys, stage scenery, &c. Powdered mica is also used in the manufacture of paints and paper, as a lubricant, and as an absorbent of nitro-glycerine and disinfectants.

    2
    0
  • In addition to many other researches besides those here mentioned, he wrote or edited various books on chemistry and chemical technology, including Select Methods of Chemical Analysis, which went through a number of editions; and he also gave a certain amount of time to the investigation of psychic phenomena, endeavouring to effect some measure of correlation between them and ordinary physical laws.

    2
    0
  • This god, whose worship was introduced into Athens at a later date by the Ionian immigrants, was identified with ErechtheusErichthonius (for whose birth Athena was in a certain sense responsible), and thus was brought into connexion with the goddess, in order to effect a reconciliation of the two cults.

    2
    0
  • The function of these muscles, according to the same authority, is not only that of erecting the shell; they serve also to attach the peduncle to the shell, and thus effect the steadying of it upon the peduncle.

    2
    0
  • The central and umbonal muscles effect the direct opening and closing of the shell, the laterals enable the valves to move forward and backward on each other, and the transmedians allow the similar extremities (the rostral) of the valves to turn from each other to the right or the left on an axis subcentrically situated, that is, the medio-transverse region of the dorsal valve.

    2
    0
  • His education was limited to that which could be obtained in the common schools and at Kinderhook Academy, and there is testimony to the effect that as late as 1829, when he became secretary of state, he wrote crudely and incorrectly.

    2
    0
  • The sedative effect of lead lotion in pruritus is well known.

    2
    0
  • Induction is an effect of the field of force associated with a magnet.

    2
    0
  • Since 7ra'I is the moment of the sphere (=volume X magnetization), it appears from (10) that the magnetized sphere produces the same external effect as a very small magnet of equal moment placed at its centre and magnetized in the same direction; the resultant force therefore is the same as in (14).

    2
    0
  • Magnetization is usually regarded as the direct effect of the resultant magnetic force, which is therefore often termed the magnetizing force.

    2
    0
  • In the middle part of a rod which has a length of 400 or 500 diameters the effect of the ends is insensible; but for many experiments the condition of endlessness may be best secured by giving the metal the shape of a ring of uniform section, the magnetic field being produced by an electric current through a coil of wire evenly wound round the ring.

    2
    0
  • It can be shown 3 that in a uniform field an elongated piece of any non-crystalline material is in stable equilibrium only when its length is parallel to the lines of force; for diamagnetic substances, however, the directing couple is exceedingly small, and it would hardly be possible to obtain a uniform field of sufficient strength to show the effect experimentally.

    2
    0
  • For experiments with long thin rods or wires it has an advantage over the other arrangements in that the position of the poles need not be known with great accuracy, a small upward or downward displacement having little effect upon the magnetometer deflection.

    2
    0
  • C is a " compensating coil " consisting of a few turns of wire through which the magnetizing current passes; it serves to neutralize the effect produced upon the magnetometer by the magnetizing coil, and its distance from the magnetometer is so adjusted that when the circuit is closed, no ferromagnetic metal being inside the magnetizing coil, the ti, magnetometer needle undergoes no deflection.

    2
    0
  • The effect of the ends of the wire is, as Ewing remarks, to shear the diagram in the horizontal direction through the angle which the sloping line makes with the vertical.

    2
    0
  • After pointing out that, since the magnetization of the metal is the quantity really concerned, W is more appropriately expressed in terms of I, the magnetic moment per unit of volume, than of B, he suggests an experiment to determine whether the mechanical work required to effect the complete magnetic reversal i Phil.

    2
    0
  • During the first stage, when the magnetizing force is small, the magnetization (or the induction) increases rather slowly with increasing force; this is well shown by the nickel curve in the diagram, but the effect would be no less conspicuous in the iron curve if the abscissae were plotted to a larger scale.

    2
    0
  • He applied his method with good effect, however, in testing a large number of commercial specimens of iron and steel, the magnetic constants of which are given in a table accompanying his paper.

    2
    0
  • But a balance may still be obtained by altering the effective number of turns in the test coil, and thus increasing or decreasing the magnetizing force acting on the test rod, till the induction in the two rods is the same, a condition which is fulfilled when reversal of the current has no effect on the compass needle.

    2
    0
  • But when exceptionally strong fields are desired, the use of a coil is limited by the heating effect of the magnetizing current, the quantity of heat generated per unit of time in a coil of given dimensions increasing as the square of the magnetic field produced in its interior.

    2
    0
  • In hardened iron and steel the effect can scarcely be detected, and in weak fields these metals exhibit no magnetic hysteresis of any kind.

    2
    0
  • According to Joule's observations, the length of a bar of iron or soft steel was increased by magnetization, the elongation being proportional up to a certain point to the square of the intensity of magnetization; but when the " saturation point " was approached the elongation was less than this law would require, and a stage was finally reached at which further increase of the magnetizing force produced little or no effect upon the length.

    2
    0
  • Nickel exhibited retraction from the very beginning (as observed by Barrett), its greatest change of length considerably exceeding that undergone by iron; in a field of Boo the original length was diminished by as much as 1/40,000 part, but stronger forces failed to produce any further effect.

    2
    0
  • The effect produced by a current is exactly opposite to that of tension, raising the elongation curve instead of depressing it.

    2
    0
  • Yet notwithstanding this enormous effect in iron, the action of a current upon nickel and cobalt turned out to be almost inappreciable.

    2
    0
  • Some experiments were next undertaken with the view of ascertaining how far magnetic changes of length in iron were dependent upon the hardness of the metal, and the unexpected result was arrived at that softening produces the same effect as tensile stress; it depresses the elongation curve, diminishing the maximum extension, and reducing the " critical value " of the magnetizing force.

    2
    0
  • Finally, experiments were made to ascertain the effect of ' The loads were successively applied in decreasing order of magnitude.

    2
    0
  • The same physicists have made some additional experiments upon the effect of tension on magnetic change of length.

    2
    0
  • As regards the effect of magnetization upon volume there are some discrepancies.

    2
    0
  • Villari in 1868 that the magnetic susceptibility of an iron wire was increased by stretching when the magnetization was below a certain value, but diminished when that value was exceeded; this phenomenon has been termed by Lord Kelvin, who discovered it independently, the " Villari reversal," the value of the magnetization for which stretching by a given load produces no effect being known as the " Villari critical point " for that load.

    2
    0
  • When the load on a hardened wire is gradually increased, the maximum value of I is found to correspond with a greater stress than when the load is gradually diminished, this being an effect of hysteresis.

    2
    0
  • The latter found the effect to be enormous, not only upon the induced magnetization, but in a, still greater degree upon the residual.

    2
    0
  • Thomson, who, from the results of Bidwell's observations on the magnetic deformation of cobalt, was led to expect that that metal would exhibit a reversal opposite in character to the effect observed in iron.

    2
    0
  • The effect of tension was subsequently studied by Nagaoka and Honda, who in 1902 confirmed, mutatis mutandis, the results obtained by Chree and Ewing for cast cobalt, while for annealed cobalt it turned out that tension always caused diminution of magnetization, the diminution increasing with increasing fields.

    2
    0
  • In the same paper Nagaoka and Honda describe an important experiment on the effect of transverse stress.

    2
    0
  • The twist effect exhibited by iron under moderate longitudinal magnetization has been called by Knott a positive Wiedemann effect; if the twist were reversed, the other conditions remaining the same, the sign of the Wiedemann effect would be negative.

    2
    0
  • This explanation was not accepted by Wiedemann,' who thought that the effect was accounted for by molecular friction.

    2
    0
  • The Wiedemann effect being positive for iron is negative for nickel.

    2
    0
  • Maxwell has also given an explanation of the converse effect, namely, the production of longitudinal magnetization by twisting a wire when circularly magnetized by a current passing through it.

    2
    0
  • One other effect of torsion remains to be noticed.

    2
    0
  • And, other conditions remaining unchanged, the " sense " of any effect depends upon the nature of the metal under test, and (sometimes) upon the intensity of its magnetization.

    2
    0
  • The most striking phenomenon which they bring into prominence is the effect of any considerable quantity of manganese in annihilating the magnetic property of iron.

    2
    0
  • Another point to which attention is directed is the exceptionally great effect which hardening has upon the magnetic properties of chrome steel; one specimen had a coercive force of 9 when annealed, and of no less than 38 when oilhardened.

    2
    0
  • The effect of the addition of tungsten in increasing the coercive force is very clearly shown; in two specimens containing respectively 3.44 and 2.35% of tungsten the coercive force was 64.5 and 70.7.

    2
    0
  • The addition of 15.2% of manganese produced an enormous effect C.R., 1897, 124, 176 and 1515; 1897, 125, 235; 1898, 126, 738.2 Ibid., 1898, 126, 741.

    2
    0
  • A very small difference in the constitution often produces a remarkable effect upon the magnetic quality, and it unfortunately happens that those alloys which are hardest magnetically are generally also hardest mechanically and extremely difficult to work; they might however be used rolled or as castings.

    2
    0
  • The effect appeared to be closely connected with the intensity of magnetization, being approximately proportional to I.

    2
    0
  • Several experimenters have endeavoured to find a Hall effect in liquids, but such results as have been hitherto obtained are by no means free from doubt.

    2
    0
  • The large Hall effect in bismuth was discovered by Righi, Journ.

    2
    0
  • He considers that Hall's is the fundamental phenomenon, and that the Nernst effect is essentially identical with it, the primary electromotive force in the case of the latter being that of the Thomson effect in the unequally heated metal, while in the Hall experiment it is derived from an external source.

    2
    0
  • The sign of the thermo-electric effect for nickel, as given by Rhoads, is incorrect.

    2
    0
  • As to what effect, if any, is produced upon the thermo-electric quality of bismuth by a magnetic field there is still some doubt.

    2
    0
  • The results of experiments as to the effect of magnetization were for long discordant and inconclusive, sufficient care not having been taken to avoid sources of error, while the effects of hysteresis were altogether disregarded.

    2
    0
  • The effect of these is beautifully illustrated by a model consisting of a number of little compass needles pivoted on sharp points and grouped near to one another upon a board, which is placed inside a large magnetizing coil.

    2
    0
  • This corresponds to the second stage of magnetization, in which the susceptibility is large and permanent magnetization is set up. A still stronger magnetizing force has little effect except in causing the direction of the needles to approach still more nearly to that of the field; if the force were infinite, every member of the group ‘ would have exactly the same direction and the greatest possible resultant moment would be reached; this illustrates " magnetic saturation " - the condition approached in the third stage of magnetization.

    2
    0
  • It has been supposed that certain electrons revolve like satellites in orbits around the atoms with which they are associated, a view which receives strong support from the phenomena of the Zeeman effect, and on this assumption a theory has been worked out by P. Langevin, 2 which accounts for many, of the observed facts of magnetism.

    2
    0
  • The effect of the field upon the speed of the revolving electrons, and therefore upon the moments of the equivalent magnets, is necessarily a very small one.

    2
    0
  • Bourne (24), the poison exuded by the sting has no injurious effect on another scorpion nor on the scorpion itself.

    2
    0
  • Indeed, we have a categorical statement to this effect in 4 Ezra xiv.

    2
    0
  • This double cultivation of his scientific powers had the happiest effect on his subsequent work; for the greatest achievements of Riemann were effected by the application in pure mathematics generally of a method (theory of potential) which had up to this time been used solely in the solution of certain problems that arise in mathematical physics.

    2
    0
  • Parliament (which re-assembled on the 7th of May) and the heads of the army came to an agreement to effect his dismissal; and in the subsequent events Richard appears to have played a purely passive part, refusing to make any attempt to keep his power or to forward a restoration of the monarchy.

    2
    0
  • The ceremony was probably commemorative of the banquet of Mithras and Helios before the former's ascension, and its effect strength of body, wisdom, prosperity, power to resist evil, and participation in the immortality enjoyed by the god himself.

    2
    0
  • The constitution of Brazil provides that the coastwise trade shall be carried on by national vessels, but this provision did not go into effect until 1896.

    2
    0
  • In 1630 the Dutch attempted again to effect a settlement; and Olinda, with its port, the Recife-Olinda, was destroyed, but the Recife was fortified and held, reinforcements They had extended their limits southwards till they reached the Spanish settlements of La Plata.

    2
    0
  • A provisional government was then formed and a proclamation issued to the effect that the country would henceforth be known as the United States of Brazil, and that in due time a republican constitution would be framed.

    2
    0
  • Admiral Mello, finding that his demands were not complied with, began a bombardment of the city, but did not effect his purpose of compelling Peixoto to resign.

    2
    0
  • This salutary lesson had due effect, and no more discontent was fomented from that quarter.

    2
    0
  • The result was of importance, as it was known that Brazil was on friendly terms with Chile, and this interchange of courtesies had some effect in bringing about a settlement of the controversy between Chile and Argentina over the Andean frontier question without recourse to hostilities.

    2
    0
  • After the outbreak of the revolution of 1848 he was elected to the Constituent Assembly, and in 1849 to the Legislative Assembly, but his speeches on behalf of the extreme socialist wing were of so abstract and mystical a character that they had no effect.

    2
    0
  • Stockdale sued the Commons' publisher, and was met by the plea of parliamentary privilege, to which, however, the judges did not give effect, on the ground that they were entitled to define the privileges of the Commons, and that publication of papers was not essential to the functions of parliament.

    2
    0
  • Both facades have been recently restored, and the effect of them not altogether improved by modern mosaics.

    2
    0
  • But the finest portions beneath the domes, with scenes from the history of Abraham, Moses and Elijah, are by Domenico Beccafumi and are executed with marvellous boldness and effect.

    2
    0
  • Passing to the effect of ordination, we meet with two views, each of which still finds advocates.

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  • Therein we are told that the threefold ministry of bishops, priests and deacons may be traced back to apostolic times, and in the final revision of 1662 a clause was added to the effect that no one is to be accounted " a lawful bishop, priest or deacon in the Church of England," unless he has had episcopal consecration or ordination.

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  • The governor was strongly opposed to this step, as he was anxious to protect the coal supply, and also feared the moral effect of a withdrawal.

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  • In 1906 municipal disabilities were imposed upon Asiatics, and in 1907 a Dealers' Licences Act was passed with the object, and effect, of restricting the trading operations of Indians.

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  • His system is conditioned throughout by its relation to that of Aquinas, of which it is in effect an elaborate criticism.

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  • He joined Livingston in Paris on the 12th of April, after the negotiations were well under way; and the two ministers, on finding Napoleon willing to dispose of the entire province of Louisiana, decided to exceed their instructions and effect its purchase.

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  • He brought forward a motion in parliament to this effect, which led to a long and memorable debate, lasting over four nights, in which he was supported by Sydney Herbert, Sir James Graham, Gladstone, Lord John Russell and Disraeli, and which ended in the defeat of Lord Palmerston by a majority of sixteen.

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  • C. Oersted (1777-1851) had shown that a magnetic needle is deflected by an electric current, he attempted, in the laboratory of the Royal Institution in the presence of Humphry Davy, to convert that deflection into a continuous rotation, and also to obtain the reciprocal effect of a current rotating round a magnet.

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  • Mr Tooke declared his intention of making Horne the heir of his fortune, and, if the design was never carried into effect, during his lifetime he bestowed upon him large gifts of money.

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  • The flow of emigration is mainly to the United States, and a certain number of the emigrants return (27,612 in 1906) bringing with them much wealth, and Americanized views which have a considerable effect on the political situation.

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  • When an attempt is made to represent in colour the actual distribution of the races (as in Dr Chavanne's Geographischer and statistischer Handatlas) the effect is that of occasional blotches of solid colour on a piece of shot silk.

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  • The only effect of these reverses was to divert them elsewhere.

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