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edwards

edwards

edwards Sentence Examples

  • Among the followers of Jonathan Edwards the more prominent have been N.

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  • Edwards, History of Wales (1901); T.

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  • Edwards, History of Wales (1901); T.

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  • The " Pandora," under Captain Edwards, was sent out in search of the " Bounty," and discovered the islands of Cherry and Mitre, east of the Santa Cruz group, but she was eventually lost on a reef in Torres Strait.

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  • Edwards (Nat.

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  • The " Pandora," under Captain Edwards, was sent out in search of the " Bounty," and discovered the islands of Cherry and Mitre, east of the Santa Cruz group, but she was eventually lost on a reef in Torres Strait.

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  • Edwards: 16 knots, 4 4.71 n.).

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  • He was the last notable representative of the New England School, in which his predecessors were the younger Edwards, John Smalley (1734-1820) and Nathaniel Emmons.

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  • The occasion was the report of Major-General Edwards on the defences of Australia, and Sir Henry addressed the other premiers on the desirability of a federal union for purposes of defence.

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  • Edwards also wrote some poems and some other works relating to the history of the West Indies.

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  • Taylor (Yale) and Edwards A.

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  • At Delaware, also, are the state industrial school for girls, a Carnegie library, the Edwards Young Men's Christian Association building and a city hospital.

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  • Despite the fact that with the exception of the period of the "Great Awakening" (1740-1742), when he preached as an itinerant in several neighbouring colonies, his active labours were confined to his own parish, his influence on the religious thought of his time in America was probably surpassed only by that of his old friend and teacher Jonathan Edwards.

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  • Bellamy's "system" of divinity was in general similar to that of Edwards.

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  • However the authorities had been informed of the plot, probably by one of the conspirators named George Edwards; officers appeared upon the scene and arrested some of the conspirators; and although Thistlewood escaped in the confusion he was seized on the following day.

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  • state ownership and operation), see an article by Edgar Crammond in the Quarterly Review (London) for October 1909, which cites, among other works on the subject, Clement Edwards's Railway Nationalization (1898); Edwin A.

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  • Subsequent explorers were Captain Edwards of the "Pandora" in 1791, and Otto von Kotzebue in 1824.

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  • EDWARDS PARK Amasa (1808-1900), American Congregational theologian, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on the 29th of December 1808, the son of Calvin Park (1774-1847), a Congregational minister, professor from 5804 to 1825 at Brown University, and pastor at Stoughton, Massachusetts, in 1826-1840.

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  • An ardent admirer of Jonathan Edwards, whose great-grand-daughter he married, Park was one of the most notable American theologians and orators.

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  • Edwards took over in 1844 from Edward Robinson, who had founded it in 1843, and of which Park was assistant editor until 1851 and editor-in-chief from 1851 to 1884.

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  • "ALFRED GEORGE EDWARDS (1848-), first Archbishop of Wales, was born at Llanymawddwy Nov.

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  • Enoch Edwards >>

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  • Far better both as draughtsman and as authority was George Edwards, who in 1 743 began, under the same title as Albin, a series of plates with letterpress, which was continued by the name of Gleanings in Natural History, and finished in 1760, when it had reached seven parts, forming four quarto volumes, the figures of which are nearly always quoted with approval.4 The year which saw the works of Edwards completed was still further distinguished by the appearance in France, where little had been done since Belon's days,' in six quarto volumes, of the Ornithologie of MathurinJacques Brisson - a work of very great merit so far as it goes, for as a descriptive ornithologist the author stands even now unsurpassed; but it must be said that his knowledge, according to internal evidence, was confined to books and to the external parts of birds' skins.

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  • 4 The works of Catesby and Edwards were afterwards reproduced at Nuremberg and Amsterdam by Seligmann, with the letterpress in German, French and Dutch.

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  • The success of Edwards's very respectable work seems to have provoked competition, and in 1765, at the instigation of Buffon, the younger d'Aubenton began the publication known as the Planches enlumineez d'histoire naturelle, which appearing in forty-two parts was not completed till 1780, when the plates' it contained reached the number of 1008 - all coloured, as its title intimates, and nearly all representing birds.

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  • Bryan Edwards estimated the total import into all the British colonies of America and the West Indies from 1680 to 1786 at 2,130,000, being an annual average of 20,095.

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  • When Mungo Park returned in 1796 from his celebrated journey in Africa, Edwards, who was secretary of the Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior Parts of Africa, drew up from Park's narrative an account of his travels, which was published by the association in their Proceedings; and when Park wrote an account of his journeys he availed himself of Edwards' assistance.

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  • George Edwards >>

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  • Among historical periodicals may be numbered the American Register (1806-1811), Stryker's American Register (1848-1851), Edwards's American Quarterly Register (1829-1843), the New' England Historical and Genealogical Register (1847), Folsom's Historical Magazine (1857), the New York Genealogical Record (1869), and the Magazine of American History (1877).

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  • Edwards's Hemiptera-Homoptera of the British Isles (London, 1896); J.

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  • boundary of New Mexico the Great Plains province is known as the Edwards Plateau; between the Edwards Plateau and the valley of the Canadian river, as the Llano Estacado, or Staked Plains; and N.

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  • parts of the Edwards Plateau and the E.

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  • of the Pecos Valley, and in the Staked Plain and Edwards Plateau; and the widely extending Lower Austral zone, covering most of the state and subdivided into the Lower Sonoran or arid western part, the Austroriparian, or humid eastern, and the narrow Gulf Strip, which is semi-tropical.

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  • The flora of the Great Plains region, consisting principally of nutritious grasses, enters the north-western portion of the state and extends south to the Edwards Plateau and east into the Prairie Plains region.

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  • In the canyons of the Edwards Plateau grow the pecan, live oak, sycamore, elm, walnut and cypress; on the hilly dissected borders of the same plateau are cedars, dwarf and scrubby oak, and higher up are occasional patches of stunted oak, called "shinneries."

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  • A very thin soil covers the Edwards Plateau, but on the Llano Estacado are brownish and reddish loams derived from the sediments of a Neocene lake.

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  • In philosophy and the science of living, Jonathan Edwards, Franklin, Channing, Emerson and Theodore Parker.

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  • Edwards, Elementary Plane and Solid Mensuration (1902); William H.

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  • This classification of the members into those who were in full communion and those who belonged only to the " Half Way Covenant " was vigorously attacked by Jonathan Edwards, but it was not abolished until the early years of the 19th century.

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  • It was not until 1734 that a new outburst of zeal was aroused by the " revivalist " work of Jonathan Edwards, followed in 1740-1742 by George Whitefield.

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  • The first owed its origin to Jonathan Edwards (the elder) and was carried on by Samuel Hopkins (17 2 I-1803), Joseph Bellamy (1719-1790), Nathaniel Emmons (1745-1840), Jonathan Edwards (the younger) and Timothy Dwight (1752-1817).

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  • The company supports a school, Leclaire Academy, and has built a club-house, bowling alleys, tennis-courts, base-ball grounds, &c. The first settlement on the site of Edwardsville was made in 1812, and in 1815 the town was laid out and named in honour of Ninian Edwards (1775-1833), the governor of the Illinois Territory (1809-1818), and later United States senator (1818-1824) and governor of the state of Illinois (1826-1830).

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  • 2 The leading reformers emphasized the idea that Christ bore the punishment of sin, sufferings equivalent to the punishments deserved by men, a view maintained later on by Jonathan Edwards junior.

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  • Candidates for the Connexional ministry were compelled to shift for themselves until 1837, when Lewis Edwards (1809-1887) and David Charles (1812-1878) opened a school for young men at Bala.

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  • In 1842, the South Wales Association opened a college at Trevecca, leaving Bala to the North; the Rev. David Charles became principal of the former, and the Rev. Lewis Edwards of the latter.

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  • After the death of Dr Lewis Edwards, Dr. T.

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  • C. Edwards resigned the principalship of the University College at Aberystwyth to become head of Bala (1891), now a purely theological college, the students of which were sent to the university colleges for their classical training.

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  • His father, the Rev. Aaron Burr (1715-1757), was the second president (1748-1757) of the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University; his mother was the daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the well-known Calvinist theologian.

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  • The ironclad ram "Albemarle," built at Edwards' Ferry on the Roanoke river, had done considerable damage to the Federal vessels which, since Burnside's expedition to Newberne, had cruised in Albemarle Sound, and in 1864 a force of double-enders and gunboats, under Captain Melancton Smith, U.S.N., was given the special task of destroying the rebel ram.

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  • The still more famous voyage of William Bligh of the " Bounty " (1788) was followed by that of Captain Edwards of the " Pandora " (1791), who in the course of his search for Bligh discovered Rotumah and other islands.

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  • The word "awakening" in this sense was frequently (and possibly first) used by Jonathan Edwards at the time of the Northampton revival of 1734-1735, which spread through the Connecticut Valley and prepared the way for the work in Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut (1740-1741) of GeorgeWhitefield, who had previously been preaching in the South, especially at Savannah, Georgia.

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  • Edwards personally reprimanded Whitefield for presuming to say of any one that he was unconverted, and in his Thoughts Concerning the Present Revival of Religion devoted much space to "showing what things are to be corrected, or avoided, in promoting this work."

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  • Edwards' famous sermon at Enfield in 1741 so affected his audience that they cried and groaned aloud, and he found it necessary to bid them be still that he might go on; but Davenport and many itinerants provoked and invited shouting and even writhing, and other physical manifestations.

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  • In1867-1872Milne Edwards published his memoirs en the Miocene birds of central France.

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  • His views were ably presented in his sermon Enthusiasm and in his Seasonable Thoughts on the State of Religion in New England (1743), written in answer to Jonathan Edwards's Some Thoughts Concerning the Present Revival of Religion in New England (1742).

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  • Near the Colorado river the dissected cuesta of the Grand Prairie passes southward, by a change to a more nearly horizontal structure, into the dissected Edwards plateau (to be referred to again as part of the Great Plains), which terminates in a maturely dissected fault scarp, 300 or 400 ft.

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  • Milne Edwards (Ois.

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  • Edwards, Untrodden Peaks and Unfrequented Valleys (1873, Dolomites); Max FOrderreuther, Die Allgauer Alpen (1906); D.

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  • Edwards Beardsley, Life and Correspondence of the Rt.

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  • Edwards, A Thousand Miles up the Nile (2nd edition, London, n.d.

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  • Under orders from the former, Captain Fairfax, RN., occupied Port Said on the night of 19th August, and Commander Edwards, R.N., proceeded down the canal, taking possession of the gares and dredgers, while Captain Fitzroy, R.N., occupied Ismailia after slight opposition.

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  • BELA BATES EDWARDS (1802-1852), American man of letters, was born at Southampton, Massachusetts, on the 4th of July 1802.

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  • Edwards' Addresses and Sermons, with a memoir by Rev. Edwards A.

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  • Bryan Edwards >>

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  • Edwards's History of Illinois (1778-1833) and Life of Ninian Edwards (Springfield, 1870), E.

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  • Washburne's Edwards Papers (Chicago, 1884), C. H.

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  • AMELIA EDWARDS ANN BLANDFORD (1831-1892), English author and Egyptologist, the daughter of one of Wellington's officers, was born in London on the 7th of June 1831.

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  • Miss Edwards received, shortly before her death, a civil list pension from the British government.

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  • Bela Bates Edwards >>

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  • Edwards (1879), which is unique in having supplementary ramified branchiae developed at the bases of the pleopods.

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  • The First Church, Providence, had long since become Arminian and held aloof from the evangelism of Edwards, Whitefield and their coadjutors.

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  • by Oxford, and was appointed Edwards Professor of Egyptology at University College, London.

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  • Kicherer and Edwards, who in the early years of the 19th century devoted themselves to ameliorating the lot of these aborigines.

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  • Edwards, The Story of an African Crisis [the Jameson Raid] (1897); A.

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  • With Jonathan Edwards, than whom he was much more of a man of affairs, and with Benjamin Franklin, whose mission in England somewhat resembled Mather's, he may be ranked among the greatest Americans of the period before the War of Independence.

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  • Edwards, Differential Calculus, and for geometrical constructions see T.

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  • THOMAS CHARLES EDWARDS (1837-1900), Welsh Nonconformist divine and educationist, was born at Bala, Merioneth, on the 22nd of September 1837, the son of Lewis Edwards.

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  • Edwards, however, proved a skilful pilot, and his hold on the affection of the Welsh people enabled him to raise the college to a high level of efficiency.

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  • The 1 Though Edwards called the species he figured (ut supra) a titmouse, he properly remarked that there was no genus of European birds to which he could liken it.

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  • JONATHAN EDWARDS (1703-1758), American theologian and philosopher, was born on the 5th of October 1703 at East (now South) Windsor, Connecticut.

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  • His earliest known ancestor was Richard Edwards, Welsh by birth, a London clergyman in Elizabeth's reign.

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  • His father Timothy Edwards (1669-1758), son of a prosperous merchant of Hartford, had graduated at Harvard, was minister at East Windsor, and eked out his salary by tutoring boys for college.

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  • Of her piety and almost nun-like love of God and belief in His personal love for her, Edwards had known when she was only thirteen, and had written of it with spiritual enthusiasm; she was of a bright and cheerful disposition, a practical housekeeper, a model wife and the mother of his twelve children.

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  • In 1731 Edwards preached at Boston the " Public Lecture " afterwards published under the title God Glorified in Man's Dependence.

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  • But the relapse was brief, and the Northampton revival, which had spread through the Connecticut valley and whose fame had reached England and Scotland, was followed in1739-1740by the Great Awakening, distinctively under the leadership of Edwards.

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  • In 1741 Edwards published in its defence The Distinguishing Marks of a Work of the Spirit of God, dealing particularly with the phenomena most criticized, the swoonings, outcries and convulsions.

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  • In reply to Edwards, Charles Chauncy anonymously wrote The Late Religious Cornmotions in New England Considered (1743), urging conduct as the sole test of conversion; and the general convention of Congregational ministers in the Province of Massachusetts Bay protested " against disorders in practice which have of late obtained in various parts of the land."

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  • In spite of Edwards's able pamphlet, the impression had become widespread that " bodily effects " were recognized by the promoters of the Great Awakening as the true tests of conversion.

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  • To offset this feeling Edwards' preached at Northampton during the years 1742 and 174 3 a series of sermons published under the title of Religious Affections (1746), a restatement in a more philosophical and general tone of his ideas as to " distinguishing marks."

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  • In 1749 he published a memoir of David Brainerd; the latter had lived in his family for several months, had been constantly attended by Edwards's daughter Jerusha, to whom he had been engaged to be married, and had died at Northampton on the 7th of October 1747; and he had been a case in point for the theories of conversion held by Edwards, who had made elaborate notes of Brainerd's conversations and confessions.

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  • Edwards's grandfather and predecessor, Solomon Stoddard, had been even more liberal, holding that the Supper was a converting ordinance and that baptism was a sufficient title to all the privileges of the church.

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  • As early as 1744 Edwards, in his sermons on the Religious Affections, had plainly intimated his dislike of this practice.

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  • Edwards's preaching became unpopular; for four years no candidate presented himself for admission to the church; and when one did in 1748, and was met with Edwards's formal but mild and gentle tests, as expressed in the Distinguishing Marks and later in Qualifications for Full Communion (1749) the candidate refused to submit to them; the church backed him and the break was complete.

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  • The church by a vote of more than 200 to 23 ratified the action of the council, and finally a town meeting voted that Edwards should not be allowed to occupy the Northampton pulpit, though he did this on occasion as late as May 1755.

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  • Edwards with his large family was now thrown upon the world, but offers of aid quickly came to him.

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  • To the Indians he preached through an interpreter, and their interests he boldly and successfully defended by attacking the whites 1 Edwards recognized the abuse of impulses and impressions, opposed itinerant and lay preachers, and defended a well-ordered and well-educated clergy.

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  • 2 These were probably not fiction like Pamela, as Sir Leslie Stephen suggested, for Edwards listed several of Richardson's novels for his own reading, and considered Sir Charles Grandison a very moral and excellent work.

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  • In Stockbridge he wrote the Humble Relation, also called Reply to Williams (1752), which was an answer to Solomon Williams (1700-1776), a relative and a bitter opponent of Edwards as to the qualifications for full communion;.

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  • In 1757, on the death of President Burr, who five years before had married Edwards's daughter Esther, he reluctantly accepted the presidency of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), where he was installed on the 16th of February 1758.

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  • It is difficult to separate Edwards's.

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  • It seems certain that these conclusions were independent of Berkeley and Malebranche, and were not drawn from Arthur Collier's Clavis universalis (1713), with which they have much in common, but were suggested, in part at least, by Locke's doctrine of ideas, Newton's theory of colours, and Cudworth's Platonism, with all of which Edwards was early familiar.

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  • Perhaps the best criticism of Edwards's philosophy as a whole is that, instead of being elaborated on purely rational principles, it is mixed up with a system of theological conceptions with which it is never thoroughly combined, and that it is exposed to all the disturbing effects of theological controversy.

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  • Edwards's reputation as a thinker is chiefly associated with his treatise on the Will, which is still sometimes called " the one large contribution that America has made to the deeper philosophic thought of the world."

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  • Edwards contends that the connexion between cause and effect here is as "sure and perfect " as in the realm of physical nature and constitutes a " moral necessity."

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  • Even God Himself, Edwards here maintains, has no other liberty than this, to carry out without constraint His will, wisdom and inclination.

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  • There is no necessary connexion between Edwards's doctrine of the motivation of choice and the system of Calvinism with which it is congruent.

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  • Edwards's controversy with the Arminians was continued in the essay on Original Sin, which was in the press at the time of his death.

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  • Now beauty, in Edwards's view, always consists in a harmonious relation in the elements involved, an agreement of being with being.

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  • Thus the principle of virtue - Edwards has nothing to say of " morality " - is identical with the principle of religion.

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  • From this standpoint Edwards combats every lower view.

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  • Edwards supposes in the nature of God an original disposition to an " emanation " of His being, and it is the excellency of this divine being, particularly in the elect, which is, in his view, the final cause and motive of the world.

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  • Edwards makes no attempt to reconcile the pantheistic element in his philosophy with the individuality implied in moral government.

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  • It contains in fact nothing more questionable than an attempted deduction of the orthodox Nicene doctrine, unpalatable, however, to Edwards's immediate disciples, who were too little speculative to appreciate his statement of the subordination of the " persons " in the divine " oeconomy," and who openly derided the doctrine of the eternal generation of the Son as " eternal nonsense "; and this perhaps was the original reason why the essay was not published.

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  • Though so typically a scholar and abstract thinker on the one hand and on the other a mystic, Edwards is best known to the present generation as a preacher of hell fire.

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  • A contemporary account of it says that in spite of Edwards's academic style of preaching, the assembly was " deeply impressed and bowed down, with an awful conviction of their sin and danger.

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  • Edwards preached other sermons of this type, but this one was the most extreme.

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  • Edwards's main aim had been to revivify Calvinism, modifying it for the needs of the time, and to promote a warm and vital Christian piety.

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  • Stephen West (1735-1819), too, out-Edwardsed Edwards in his defence of the treatise on the Freedom of the Will, and John Smalley (1734-1820) developed the idea of a natural (not moral) inability on the part of man to obey God.

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  • Jonathan Edwards' the younger (1745-1801), second son of 1 Besides the younger Jonathan many of Edwards's descendants the philosopher, born at Northampton, Massachusetts, on the 26th of May 1745, also takes an important place among his followers.

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  • His collected works were edited by his grandson Tryon Edwards in two volumes, with memoir (Andover, 1842).

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  • -There have been various editions of Edwards's works.

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  • His pupil, Samuel Hopkins, in 1765 published two volumes from manuscript containing eighteen sermons and a memoir; the younger Jonathan Edwards with Dr Erskine published an edition in 4 volumes (1744 sqq.), and Samuel Austin in 1808 edited an edition in 8 volumes.

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  • Dwight, a great-grandson of Edwards, published the Life and Works in io volumes, the first volume containing the memoir, which is still the most complete and was the standard until the publication (Boston, 1889) of Jonathan Edwards, by A.

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  • Allen, who attempts to " distinguish what he (Edwards) meant to affirm from what he actually teaches."

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  • Grosart edited from original manuscripts Selections from the Unpublished Writings of Jonathan Edwards of America (Edinburgh, 1865, printed for private circulation).

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  • C. Smyth published from a copy Observations Concerning the Scripture Oeconomy of the Trinity and Covenant of Redemption (New York, 1880), a careful edition from the manuscript of the essay on the Flying Spider (in the Andover Review, January 1890) and " Some Early Writings of Jonathan Edwards," with specimens from the manuscripts (in Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, October, 1895).

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  • In 1900 on the death of Prof. Edwards A.

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  • Park, the entire collection of Edwards's manuscripts loaned to him by Tryon Edwards was transferred to Yale University.

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  • " A Study of the Manuscripts of Jonathan Edwards " was published by F.

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  • (Boston, 1902), and in the same volume of the Proceedings appeared " A Study of the Shorthand Writings of Jonathan Edwards," by W.

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  • P. Fisher under the title, An Unpublished Essay of Edwards's on the Trinity.

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  • The only other edition of Edwards (in whole or in part) of any importance is Selected Sermons of Jonathan Edwards (New York, 1904), edited by H.

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  • For estimates of Edwards consult: The Volume of the Edwards Family Meeting at Stockbridge, Massachusetts, September 6-7, A.D.

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  • 1870 (Boston, 1871); Jonathan Edwards, a Retrospect, Being the Addresses Delivered in Connecticut with the Unveiling of a Memorial were great, brilliant and versatile men.

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  • Among them were: his son Pierrepont (1750-1826), a brilliant but erratic member of the Connecticut bar, tolerant in religious matters and bitterly hated by stern Calvinists, a man whose personal morality resembled greatly that of Aaron Burr; his grandsons, William Edwards (1770-1851), an inventor of important leather rolling machinery; Aaron Burr the son of Esther Edwards; Timothy Dwight (1752-1817), son of Mary Edwards, and his brother Theodore Dwight, a federalist politician, a member, the secretary and the historian of the Hartford Convention; his great-grandsons, Tryon Edwards (1809-1894) and Sereno Edwards Dwight, theologian, educationalist and author; and his great-great-grandsons, Theodore William Dwight, the jurist, and Timothy Dwight, second of that name to be president of Yale.

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  • Gardiner (Boston, 1901); Exercises Commemorating the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth of Jonathan Edwards, held at Andover Theological Seminary, October 4-5, 1903 (Andover, 1904); and among the addresses delivered at Stockbridge in October 1903, John De Witt, " Jonathan Edwards: A Study," in the Princeton Theological Review (January, 1904).

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  • C. King, " Edwards as Philosopher and Theologian," in Hartford Theological Seminary Record, vol.

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  • Gardiner, " The Early Idealism of Jonathan Edwards," in the Philosophical Review, vol.

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  • MacCracken, " Philosophical Idealism of Edwards " in Philosophical Review, vol.

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  • (1902), pp. 26-42, suggesting that Edwards did not know Berkeley, but Collier, and the same author's Jonathan Edwards' Idealismus (Halle, 1899); F.

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  • Woodbridge, " Jonathan Edwards," in Philosophical Review, vol.

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  • Squires, of which only four parts appeared, all devoted to Edwards and all written by Squires.

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  • Lewis Edwards >>

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  • Oxford he did not find wholly congenial to his intensely earnest spirit, but he read hard, and, as he afterwards said, "Plato, Aristotle, Butler, Thucydides, Sterne, Jonathan Edwards, passed like the iron atoms of the blood into my mental constitution."

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  • Marmaduke (acting governor) 1844 John C. Edwards Democrat1844-1848Austin A.

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  • 'Jonathan Edwards was pastor here from 1727 to 1750.

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  • Hence Edwards accession took place without any friction.

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  • The rivalries and intrigues of these three magnates constitute the main part of the domestic politics of Edwards reign.

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  • There seems little doubt that he aspired to be Edwards successor:

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  • He fell into the hands of William the Bastard, of the duke of Normandy, King Edwards cousin and best- Norman loved relative.

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  • Edwards next move was against clerical encroachments.

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  • The great group of statutes that date from Edwards earlier years ends with the legislative enactments of 1285, the Second Statute of Westminster and the Statute of Winchester.

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  • Nor did Edwards relations with the more remote states of the continent lead to any important results, though he had many treaties and alliances in hand.

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  • Edwards grip on the land was strong, and it had need to be so, for in 1287 and 1294 1295 there were desperate and widespread revolts, which were only checked by the existence of the new castles, and subdued by the concentration of large royal armies.

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  • Another act of this period was Edwards celebrated expulsion of the Jews from England (1290).

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  • Meanwhile in the same year that saw the expulsion of the Jews, King Edwards good fortune began to wane, with the rise of the Scottish question, which was to overshadow the latter half of his reign.

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  • But Edwards own army achieved complete success in Scotland.

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  • ,Bordeaux had already revolted from him, and he gave up the rest of his ill gotten gains of 1294 by the treaty ofParis (Mat ~o, i-~o-tl; Now that he had only a single war upon his hands Edwards position was entirely changed.

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  • Edwards arrangements for the administration of the conquered kingdom were wise and liberal, if only the national spirit of the Scots could have tolerated them.

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  • The nation, however much it might murmur, would never have been willing to rebel against a sovereign whose only fault was that he occasionally pressed his prerogative too far, Edwards rule was seldom or never oppressive, the seizure of the merchants wool in 1297 was the only one of his acts which caused really fierce and widespread indignation.

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  • These were the two Hugh Despensers, father and son; the elder was an ambitious baron who hated Lancaster, the younger had been made Edwards chamberlain in 1318 and had become his secret councillor and constant companion.

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  • Indeed, there was a decided reaction in Edwards favor, since Lancaster and his friends had been tried and found wanting.

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  • Edwards growing confidence in the Despensers at last provoked the notice and jeakusy of the dominant party.

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  • assault on the person and retinue of Edwards queen, Isabella of - France, by the retainers of Lord Badlesmere, one of Pembrokes associates, provoked universal reprobation.

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  • But peace did not suffice to end Edwards troubles; he dropped back into his usual apathy, and the Despensers showed themselves so harsh and greedy that the general indignation only required a new leader in order to take once more the form of open insurrection.

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  • Several more of Edwards scanty band of friends the earl of Arundel and the bishop of Exeter and otherswere also slain.

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  • Edwards claimsuch as it wasrested on the assertion that his mother, Isabella, was nearer of kin to her brother Charles Edward TV., the last king of the mainlineofthehouseof Capet, III.

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  • A far more fatal bar to Edwards claim than the existence of Charles of Navarre was the fact that the peers of France, when summoned to decide the succession question nine years before, had decided that Philip of Valois had the sole valid claim to the crown, and that Edward had then done homage to him for Guienne.

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  • Edwards claim to the French crown embittered the strife in a most unnecessary fashion.

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  • The years 1345I 347 saw the zenith of King Edwards prosperity; in them fell not only his own triumphs at Crecy and Calais, but a victory at Auberoche in Prigord won ~ by his cousin Henry of Lancaster, which restored Cruss.

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  • This brought the regent Charles and his counsellors to the verge of despair; they yielded, and on the 8th of May 1360, signed an ~~J agreement at Brtigny near Chartres, by which nearly all King Edwards demands were granted.

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  • he offered to proclaim Lionel of Clarence, Edwards second son, as his heir, and would have done so but for the vigorous opposition of his parliament.

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  • In 1368 his greatest vassals, the counts of Armagnac, Prigord and Comminges, displayed their disloyalty by appealing to the king of France as their~suzerain against the legality of Edwards imposts.

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  • These two last years of Edwards reign were filled with an episode of domestic strife, which had considerable constitutional importance.

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  • Here Henry vindicated his military reputation Agn.nue~ by winning a victory even more surprising than those of Crecy, and Poitiers, for he was outnumbered in an even greater proportion than the two Edwards had been in 1346 and 1356,

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  • For the successive attainders of the Lancastrians and the Nevilles had swept away many of the older noble families, and Edwards house of peers consisted for the main part of new men, his own partisans promoted for good service, who had not the grip on the land that their predecessors had possessed.

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  • During the last period of Edwards rule England might have been described as a despotism, if only the king had cared to be a despot.

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  • Yet we s~till find complaints that too much merchandize reached and left England in foreign bottoms, and King Edwards treaty with the Hansa was censured mainly for this reason.

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  • Most of Edwards favorites had literary tastes.

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  • At the moment of King Edwards death his elder son by Elizabeth Woodville, Edward, prince of Wales, was twelve; his younger son Richard, duke of York, was nine.

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  • This treaty of Etaples was, in short, a repetition of Edwards treaty of Picquigny, equally profitable and less disgraceful, for Maximilian of Austria, whom Henry thus abandoned, had given more cause of offence than had Charles of Burgundy in 1475.

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  • Their descendant had neither Edwards sloth nor Henrys moderation; he was capable of going to almost any lengths in pursuit of the gratification of his ambition, his passions, his resentment or his simple love of self-assertion.

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  • He could trade upon Edwards precocious hatred of Marys religion, he could rely upon French fears of her Spanish inclinations, and the success which bad attended his schemes in England deluded him into a belief that he could supplant the Tudor with a Dudley dynasty.

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  • A memorial tablet, with an inscription by Archbishop Benson, is placed in the Cathedral at Truro; and Mr Passmore Edwards erected a public institute in his honour at Launceston, near his birthplace.

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  • Edwards and Edwards A.

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  • Jonathan Edwards, a very stern Calvinist, is one of the few first-rate geniuses America has to boast in theology.

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  • In the early 18th century Arminianism presented itself in New England, and sporadically elsewhere; this tendency was largely accelerated by the reaction from the excesses of the "Great Awakening" under Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield.

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  • Charles Chauncy (1705-1787), pastor of the First Church from 1727 until his death, the chief opponent of Edwards in the great revival, was both a Unitarian and a Universalist.

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  • A certain John Edwards was conspicuous.

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  • The controversy with Edwards was followed by a more memorable one with Stillingfleet, bishop of Worcester.

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  • (2) A Vindication of the Reasonableness of Christianity from Mr Edwards's Reflections (1695).

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  • Edwards (Gleanings, iii.

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  • In a hydrated form it is obtained by the reduction of vanadyl monochloride, Voci, with sodium amalgam, being precipitated from the liquid by the addition of ammonia (Locke and Edwards, Zeit.

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  • had taken reprisals against him in 1336 by making his parlement declare the forfeiture of Edwards lands and castles in Guienne; but the Hundred Years War, at first-simply a feudal quarrel between vassal and suzerain, soon became a great national conflict, in consequence of what was occurring in Flanders.

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  • Workless, and in desperation, they threw themselves on Edwards mercy,, by the advice of a rich citizen of Ghent, Jacob van Artevelde; and their last scruples of loyalty gave way when Edward decided to follow the counsels of Robert of Artois and of Artevelde, and to claim the crown of France.

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  • He published Recollections of a Minister to France (2 vols., 1887), and edited The Edwards Papers (1884),

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  • In 1908 he delivered the Jowett Lectures on Modernism at the Passmore Edwards Settlement, London.

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  • Edwards Samuel A.

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  • Edwards.

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  • amends minutes later, however, when diving to deny Edwards.

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  • The move was started by Phil Bennett and finished by Garath Edwards but five other barbarians handled the ball.

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  • Accompanying the usual bilge about Edwards surrounding himself with the best business brains there is an inevitable piece about United's world domination.

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  • Edwards and Manek struggled to lay a bat on some wayward Oratory bowling but they did bring up a 50 opening partnership.

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  • Les Dennis, Mike McShane and Jeremy Edwards star in this hilariously brutal comedy examining our infatuation with fame... .

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  • Spring 1757 Langley Edwards Gave evidence to the parliamentary committee examining the navigation bill.

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  • About the Author Ray Edwards is a master copywriter, published author and Internet Marketing Consultant.

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  • creed project is a collaboration between Jenni Thomson and Peter Edwards.

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  • White-winged dove Zenaida asiatica Seen in small numbers on the Edwards plateau & in the Rio Grande area.

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  • Duncan Edwards, i can bet you're giving them all the runaround!

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  • Edwin edwards vitter.

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  • The pit band, under the baton of John Owen Edwards, is also first-rate.

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  • The England U16 'A ' side includes open side flanker Guy Mercer (King Edwards School and Dorset and Wiltshire ).

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  • Edwards sent a constant flow of reports to the authorities.

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  • John Robson is seen here enjoying a joke with his Joint Master Jimmy Edwards at a Meet in 1979.

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  • Martin Edwards, it drones, would like to see " United emerge as the rightful kings of Europe " .

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  • ASTON MARTIN By Robert Edwards A large format book which tells the story of one of Britain's most prestigious marques.

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  • Bill Edwards on the far right, won a gold medallion in the 200m breast stroke.

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  • The Edwards Report ' Fit for the Future ' reviews national parks.

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  • Ms Dudley Edwards, in her obituary of her late former husband, Patrick Cosgrave, said he became an ardent English patriot.

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  • phenology of very dry tropical forest trees: effects of soil characteristics, rainfall, and irrigation J. Edwards, K.

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  • The Edwards are virtually self-sufficient, only buying in seaweed.

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  • shortlist of six contenders also included boxer Lennox Lewis, tennis player Tim Henman and world triple jump champion Jonathan Edwards.

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  • Rob Edwards, Core cracks may force shutdown of UK reactors.

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  • Edwards was also asked to survey the whole river and put a plan together to build a new sluice at Boston.

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  • splenetic outburst of a disaffected supporter: Martin Chuffing Edwards.

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  • May 1757 Langley Edwards Was appointed surveyor together with Thomas Yeoman.

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  • Paul Edwards Do you feel a little twinge in your epistemology?

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  • These two are joined by vocalist Andy Edwards, Tim Robinson on drums and bassist Doug Sinclair.

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  • Edwards R (2004 ): Integrated teams in acute inpatient wards R (2004 ): Integrated teams in acute inpatient wards can work.

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  • Bass player Simon Edwards the glue to holding the often wayward lead guitar on track.

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  • At Delaware, also, are the state industrial school for girls, a Carnegie library, the Edwards Young Men's Christian Association building and a city hospital.

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  • He was the last notable representative of the New England School, in which his predecessors were the younger Edwards, John Smalley (1734-1820) and Nathaniel Emmons.

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  • Taylor's theology was distinctively infra-lapsarian; it disagreed with Samuel Hopkins and Emmons in rejecting the theory of "divine efficiency" and in arguing that man can choose the right "even if he won't" - distinguishing like Edwards between natural ability and moral inability; it distinguished sensibility or susceptibility as something different from will or understanding, without moral qualities, to which the appeal for right choice may be made; and it made selflove (a term borrowed from Dugald Stewart, connoting the innocent love of happiness and distinct from selfishness) the particular feeling appealed to by the influences of the law and gospel.

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  • He graduated from Yale in 1735, studied theology for a time under Jonathan Edwards, was licensed to preach when scarcely eighteen years old, and from 1740 until his death, on the 6th of March 1790, was pastor of the Congregational church at Bethlehem, Connecticut.

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  • Despite the fact that with the exception of the period of the "Great Awakening" (1740-1742), when he preached as an itinerant in several neighbouring colonies, his active labours were confined to his own parish, his influence on the religious thought of his time in America was probably surpassed only by that of his old friend and teacher Jonathan Edwards.

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  • Bellamy's "system" of divinity was in general similar to that of Edwards.

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  • (New York, 1811-1812), and were republished with a Memoir by Rev. Tryon Edwards (2 vols., Boston, 1850).

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  • Rotumah was discovered by Captain Edwards of the "Pandora" in 1791, and was annexed by Great Britain in 1881.

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  • The occasion was the report of Major-General Edwards on the defences of Australia, and Sir Henry addressed the other premiers on the desirability of a federal union for purposes of defence.

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  • However the authorities had been informed of the plot, probably by one of the conspirators named George Edwards; officers appeared upon the scene and arrested some of the conspirators; and although Thistlewood escaped in the confusion he was seized on the following day.

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  • Edwards, Das Staatsrecht Russlands (vol.

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  • state ownership and operation), see an article by Edgar Crammond in the Quarterly Review (London) for October 1909, which cites, among other works on the subject, Clement Edwards's Railway Nationalization (1898); Edwin A.

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  • Subsequent explorers were Captain Edwards of the "Pandora" in 1791, and Otto von Kotzebue in 1824.

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  • EDWARDS PARK Amasa (1808-1900), American Congregational theologian, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on the 29th of December 1808, the son of Calvin Park (1774-1847), a Congregational minister, professor from 5804 to 1825 at Brown University, and pastor at Stoughton, Massachusetts, in 1826-1840.

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  • An ardent admirer of Jonathan Edwards, whose great-grand-daughter he married, Park was one of the most notable American theologians and orators.

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  • Edwards took over in 1844 from Edward Robinson, who had founded it in 1843, and of which Park was assistant editor until 1851 and editor-in-chief from 1851 to 1884.

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  • "ALFRED GEORGE EDWARDS (1848-), first Archbishop of Wales, was born at Llanymawddwy Nov.

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  • Enoch Edwards >>

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  • Far better both as draughtsman and as authority was George Edwards, who in 1 743 began, under the same title as Albin, a series of plates with letterpress, which was continued by the name of Gleanings in Natural History, and finished in 1760, when it had reached seven parts, forming four quarto volumes, the figures of which are nearly always quoted with approval.4 The year which saw the works of Edwards completed was still further distinguished by the appearance in France, where little had been done since Belon's days,' in six quarto volumes, of the Ornithologie of MathurinJacques Brisson - a work of very great merit so far as it goes, for as a descriptive ornithologist the author stands even now unsurpassed; but it must be said that his knowledge, according to internal evidence, was confined to books and to the external parts of birds' skins.

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  • 4 The works of Catesby and Edwards were afterwards reproduced at Nuremberg and Amsterdam by Seligmann, with the letterpress in German, French and Dutch.

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  • The success of Edwards's very respectable work seems to have provoked competition, and in 1765, at the instigation of Buffon, the younger d'Aubenton began the publication known as the Planches enlumineez d'histoire naturelle, which appearing in forty-two parts was not completed till 1780, when the plates' it contained reached the number of 1008 - all coloured, as its title intimates, and nearly all representing birds.

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  • Bryan Edwards estimated the total import into all the British colonies of America and the West Indies from 1680 to 1786 at 2,130,000, being an annual average of 20,095.

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  • When Edwards wrote (1791), the number of European factories on the coasts of Africa was 40; of these 14 were English, 3 French, 15 Dutch, 4 Portuguese and 4 Danish.

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  • On the Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery: Washington Irving, Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (1828), several times reprinted; Arthur Helps, Life of Las Casas (1868); Bryan Edwards, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British West Indies (1793; 5th ed.

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  • Edwards (Nat.

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  • Such are the Oxford House, Bethnal Green; the Cambridge House, Camberwell Road; Toynbee Hall, Whitechapel; Mansfield House, Canning Town; the Robert Browning Settlement, Southwark; and the Passmore Edwards Settlement, St Pancras.

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  • Edwards soon became a leading member of the colonial assembly of Jamaica, but in a few years he returned to England, and in 1782 failed to secure a seat in parliament as member for Chichester.

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  • In general Edwards was a supporter of the slave trade, and was described by William Wilberforce as a powerful opponent.

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  • In 1784 Edwards wrote Thoughts on the late Proceedings of Government respecting the Trade of the West India Islands with the United States of America, in which he attacked the restrictions placed by the government upon trade with the United States.

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  • When Mungo Park returned in 1796 from his celebrated journey in Africa, Edwards, who was secretary of the Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior Parts of Africa, drew up from Park's narrative an account of his travels, which was published by the association in their Proceedings; and when Park wrote an account of his journeys he availed himself of Edwards' assistance.

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  • Edwards also wrote some poems and some other works relating to the history of the West Indies.

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  • George Edwards >>

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  • Thompson, 1830) synonymous with Bryozoa (Ehrenberg, 1831) for a group commonly included with the Brachiopoda in the Molluscoidea (Milne Edwards, 1;843).

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  • Milne Edwards has identified ten species which occur in Australian seas also, and Rein mentions, as belonging to the same category, the helmet-crab or horse-shoe crab (kabuto-gani, Limulus longispina I-Ioeven).

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  • Among historical periodicals may be numbered the American Register (1806-1811), Stryker's American Register (1848-1851), Edwards's American Quarterly Register (1829-1843), the New' England Historical and Genealogical Register (1847), Folsom's Historical Magazine (1857), the New York Genealogical Record (1869), and the Magazine of American History (1877).

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  • Meanwhile, in America the Puritan tradition, adapted to the new conditions, is represented by Cotton Mather, and later by Jonathan Edwards, the greatest preacher of his time and country.

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  • Edwards: 16 knots, 4 4.71 n.).

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  • Edwards's Hemiptera-Homoptera of the British Isles (London, 1896); J.

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  • boundary of New Mexico the Great Plains province is known as the Edwards Plateau; between the Edwards Plateau and the valley of the Canadian river, as the Llano Estacado, or Staked Plains; and N.

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  • parts of the Edwards Plateau and the E.

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  • margin of the Llano Estacado have been much dissected by headward erosion of streams, but the central portion of the Edwards Plateau and nearly all of the Llano Estacado have a notably even surface rising slowly to the northwestward.

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  • of the Pecos Valley, and in the Staked Plain and Edwards Plateau; and the widely extending Lower Austral zone, covering most of the state and subdivided into the Lower Sonoran or arid western part, the Austroriparian, or humid eastern, and the narrow Gulf Strip, which is semi-tropical.

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  • The flora of the Great Plains region, consisting principally of nutritious grasses, enters the north-western portion of the state and extends south to the Edwards Plateau and east into the Prairie Plains region.

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  • In the canyons of the Edwards Plateau grow the pecan, live oak, sycamore, elm, walnut and cypress; on the hilly dissected borders of the same plateau are cedars, dwarf and scrubby oak, and higher up are occasional patches of stunted oak, called "shinneries."

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  • A very thin soil covers the Edwards Plateau, but on the Llano Estacado are brownish and reddish loams derived from the sediments of a Neocene lake.

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  • In philosophy and the science of living, Jonathan Edwards, Franklin, Channing, Emerson and Theodore Parker.

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  • Edwards, Elementary Plane and Solid Mensuration (1902); William H.

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  • This classification of the members into those who were in full communion and those who belonged only to the " Half Way Covenant " was vigorously attacked by Jonathan Edwards, but it was not abolished until the early years of the 19th century.

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  • It was not until 1734 that a new outburst of zeal was aroused by the " revivalist " work of Jonathan Edwards, followed in 1740-1742 by George Whitefield.

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  • The first owed its origin to Jonathan Edwards (the elder) and was carried on by Samuel Hopkins (17 2 I-1803), Joseph Bellamy (1719-1790), Nathaniel Emmons (1745-1840), Jonathan Edwards (the younger) and Timothy Dwight (1752-1817).

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  • Among the followers of Jonathan Edwards the more prominent have been N.

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  • Taylor (Yale) and Edwards A.

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  • The company supports a school, Leclaire Academy, and has built a club-house, bowling alleys, tennis-courts, base-ball grounds, &c. The first settlement on the site of Edwardsville was made in 1812, and in 1815 the town was laid out and named in honour of Ninian Edwards (1775-1833), the governor of the Illinois Territory (1809-1818), and later United States senator (1818-1824) and governor of the state of Illinois (1826-1830).

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  • 2 The leading reformers emphasized the idea that Christ bore the punishment of sin, sufferings equivalent to the punishments deserved by men, a view maintained later on by Jonathan Edwards junior.

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  • Candidates for the Connexional ministry were compelled to shift for themselves until 1837, when Lewis Edwards (1809-1887) and David Charles (1812-1878) opened a school for young men at Bala.

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  • In 1842, the South Wales Association opened a college at Trevecca, leaving Bala to the North; the Rev. David Charles became principal of the former, and the Rev. Lewis Edwards of the latter.

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  • After the death of Dr Lewis Edwards, Dr. T.

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  • C. Edwards resigned the principalship of the University College at Aberystwyth to become head of Bala (1891), now a purely theological college, the students of which were sent to the university colleges for their classical training.

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  • His father, the Rev. Aaron Burr (1715-1757), was the second president (1748-1757) of the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University; his mother was the daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the well-known Calvinist theologian.

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  • The ironclad ram "Albemarle," built at Edwards' Ferry on the Roanoke river, had done considerable damage to the Federal vessels which, since Burnside's expedition to Newberne, had cruised in Albemarle Sound, and in 1864 a force of double-enders and gunboats, under Captain Melancton Smith, U.S.N., was given the special task of destroying the rebel ram.

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  • The still more famous voyage of William Bligh of the " Bounty " (1788) was followed by that of Captain Edwards of the " Pandora " (1791), who in the course of his search for Bligh discovered Rotumah and other islands.

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  • The word "awakening" in this sense was frequently (and possibly first) used by Jonathan Edwards at the time of the Northampton revival of 1734-1735, which spread through the Connecticut Valley and prepared the way for the work in Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut (1740-1741) of GeorgeWhitefield, who had previously been preaching in the South, especially at Savannah, Georgia.

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  • Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Colman (1673-1747), and Joseph Bellamy, recognized the viciousness of so extreme a position.

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  • Edwards personally reprimanded Whitefield for presuming to say of any one that he was unconverted, and in his Thoughts Concerning the Present Revival of Religion devoted much space to "showing what things are to be corrected, or avoided, in promoting this work."

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  • Edwards' famous sermon at Enfield in 1741 so affected his audience that they cried and groaned aloud, and he found it necessary to bid them be still that he might go on; but Davenport and many itinerants provoked and invited shouting and even writhing, and other physical manifestations.

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  • In1867-1872Milne Edwards published his memoirs en the Miocene birds of central France.

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  • His views were ably presented in his sermon Enthusiasm and in his Seasonable Thoughts on the State of Religion in New England (1743), written in answer to Jonathan Edwards's Some Thoughts Concerning the Present Revival of Religion in New England (1742).

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  • Near the Colorado river the dissected cuesta of the Grand Prairie passes southward, by a change to a more nearly horizontal structure, into the dissected Edwards plateau (to be referred to again as part of the Great Plains), which terminates in a maturely dissected fault scarp, 300 or 400 ft.

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  • The southern and narrow part of the table-land, called the Edwards Plateau, is more dissected thanthe rest, and falls off to the south in a frayed-out fault scarp, as already mentioned, overlooking the coastal plain of the Rio Grande embayment.

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  • Milne Edwards (Ois.

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  • Edwards, Untrodden Peaks and Unfrequented Valleys (1873, Dolomites); Max FOrderreuther, Die Allgauer Alpen (1906); D.

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  • Edwards Beardsley, Life and Correspondence of the Rt.

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  • Edwards, A Thousand Miles up the Nile (2nd edition, London, n.d.

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  • Under orders from the former, Captain Fairfax, RN., occupied Port Said on the night of 19th August, and Commander Edwards, R.N., proceeded down the canal, taking possession of the gares and dredgers, while Captain Fitzroy, R.N., occupied Ismailia after slight opposition.

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  • BELA BATES EDWARDS (1802-1852), American man of letters, was born at Southampton, Massachusetts, on the 4th of July 1802.

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  • Edwards' Addresses and Sermons, with a memoir by Rev. Edwards A.

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  • Bryan Edwards >>

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  • Edwards's History of Illinois (1778-1833) and Life of Ninian Edwards (Springfield, 1870), E.

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  • Washburne's Edwards Papers (Chicago, 1884), C. H.

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  • AMELIA EDWARDS ANN BLANDFORD (1831-1892), English author and Egyptologist, the daughter of one of Wellington's officers, was born in London on the 7th of June 1831.

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  • Miss Edwards received, shortly before her death, a civil list pension from the British government.

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  • Bela Bates Edwards >>

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  • Edwards (1879), which is unique in having supplementary ramified branchiae developed at the bases of the pleopods.

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  • The First Church, Providence, had long since become Arminian and held aloof from the evangelism of Edwards, Whitefield and their coadjutors.

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  • by Oxford, and was appointed Edwards Professor of Egyptology at University College, London.

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  • Kicherer and Edwards, who in the early years of the 19th century devoted themselves to ameliorating the lot of these aborigines.

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  • Edwards, The Story of an African Crisis [the Jameson Raid] (1897); A.

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  • With Jonathan Edwards, than whom he was much more of a man of affairs, and with Benjamin Franklin, whose mission in England somewhat resembled Mather's, he may be ranked among the greatest Americans of the period before the War of Independence.

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  • Edwards, Differential Calculus, and for geometrical constructions see T.

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  • THOMAS CHARLES EDWARDS (1837-1900), Welsh Nonconformist divine and educationist, was born at Bala, Merioneth, on the 22nd of September 1837, the son of Lewis Edwards.

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  • Edwards, however, proved a skilful pilot, and his hold on the affection of the Welsh people enabled him to raise the college to a high level of efficiency.

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  • The 1 Though Edwards called the species he figured (ut supra) a titmouse, he properly remarked that there was no genus of European birds to which he could liken it.

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  • JONATHAN EDWARDS (1703-1758), American theologian and philosopher, was born on the 5th of October 1703 at East (now South) Windsor, Connecticut.

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  • His earliest known ancestor was Richard Edwards, Welsh by birth, a London clergyman in Elizabeth's reign.

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  • His father Timothy Edwards (1669-1758), son of a prosperous merchant of Hartford, had graduated at Harvard, was minister at East Windsor, and eked out his salary by tutoring boys for college.

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  • Of her piety and almost nun-like love of God and belief in His personal love for her, Edwards had known when she was only thirteen, and had written of it with spiritual enthusiasm; she was of a bright and cheerful disposition, a practical housekeeper, a model wife and the mother of his twelve children.

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  • In 1731 Edwards preached at Boston the " Public Lecture " afterwards published under the title God Glorified in Man's Dependence.

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  • The revival gave Edwards an opportunity of studying the process of conversion in all its phases and varieties, and he recorded his observations with psychological minuteness and discrimination in A Faithful Narrative of the Surprising Work of God in the Conversion of Many Hundred Souls in Northampton (1737).

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  • But the relapse was brief, and the Northampton revival, which had spread through the Connecticut valley and whose fame had reached England and Scotland, was followed in1739-1740by the Great Awakening, distinctively under the leadership of Edwards.

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  • In 1741 Edwards published in its defence The Distinguishing Marks of a Work of the Spirit of God, dealing particularly with the phenomena most criticized, the swoonings, outcries and convulsions.

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  • In reply to Edwards, Charles Chauncy anonymously wrote The Late Religious Cornmotions in New England Considered (1743), urging conduct as the sole test of conversion; and the general convention of Congregational ministers in the Province of Massachusetts Bay protested " against disorders in practice which have of late obtained in various parts of the land."

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  • In spite of Edwards's able pamphlet, the impression had become widespread that " bodily effects " were recognized by the promoters of the Great Awakening as the true tests of conversion.

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  • To offset this feeling Edwards' preached at Northampton during the years 1742 and 174 3 a series of sermons published under the title of Religious Affections (1746), a restatement in a more philosophical and general tone of his ideas as to " distinguishing marks."

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  • In 1749 he published a memoir of David Brainerd; the latter had lived in his family for several months, had been constantly attended by Edwards's daughter Jerusha, to whom he had been engaged to be married, and had died at Northampton on the 7th of October 1747; and he had been a case in point for the theories of conversion held by Edwards, who had made elaborate notes of Brainerd's conversations and confessions.

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  • Edwards's grandfather and predecessor, Solomon Stoddard, had been even more liberal, holding that the Supper was a converting ordinance and that baptism was a sufficient title to all the privileges of the church.

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  • As early as 1744 Edwards, in his sermons on the Religious Affections, had plainly intimated his dislike of this practice.

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  • Edwards's preaching became unpopular; for four years no candidate presented himself for admission to the church; and when one did in 1748, and was met with Edwards's formal but mild and gentle tests, as expressed in the Distinguishing Marks and later in Qualifications for Full Communion (1749) the candidate refused to submit to them; the church backed him and the break was complete.

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  • The church by a vote of more than 200 to 23 ratified the action of the council, and finally a town meeting voted that Edwards should not be allowed to occupy the Northampton pulpit, though he did this on occasion as late as May 1755.

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  • Edwards with his large family was now thrown upon the world, but offers of aid quickly came to him.

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  • To the Indians he preached through an interpreter, and their interests he boldly and successfully defended by attacking the whites 1 Edwards recognized the abuse of impulses and impressions, opposed itinerant and lay preachers, and defended a well-ordered and well-educated clergy.

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  • 2 These were probably not fiction like Pamela, as Sir Leslie Stephen suggested, for Edwards listed several of Richardson's novels for his own reading, and considered Sir Charles Grandison a very moral and excellent work.

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  • In Stockbridge he wrote the Humble Relation, also called Reply to Williams (1752), which was an answer to Solomon Williams (1700-1776), a relative and a bitter opponent of Edwards as to the qualifications for full communion;.

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  • In 1757, on the death of President Burr, who five years before had married Edwards's daughter Esther, he reluctantly accepted the presidency of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), where he was installed on the 16th of February 1758.

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  • It is difficult to separate Edwards's.

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  • It seems certain that these conclusions were independent of Berkeley and Malebranche, and were not drawn from Arthur Collier's Clavis universalis (1713), with which they have much in common, but were suggested, in part at least, by Locke's doctrine of ideas, Newton's theory of colours, and Cudworth's Platonism, with all of which Edwards was early familiar.

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  • Perhaps the best criticism of Edwards's philosophy as a whole is that, instead of being elaborated on purely rational principles, it is mixed up with a system of theological conceptions with which it is never thoroughly combined, and that it is exposed to all the disturbing effects of theological controversy.

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  • Edwards's reputation as a thinker is chiefly associated with his treatise on the Will, which is still sometimes called " the one large contribution that America has made to the deeper philosophic thought of the world."

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  • Edwards contends that the connexion between cause and effect here is as "sure and perfect " as in the realm of physical nature and constitutes a " moral necessity."

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  • Even God Himself, Edwards here maintains, has no other liberty than this, to carry out without constraint His will, wisdom and inclination.

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  • There is no necessary connexion between Edwards's doctrine of the motivation of choice and the system of Calvinism with which it is congruent.

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  • Modern psychology has strengthened the contention for a fixed connexion between motive and act by reference to subconscious and unconscious processes of which Edwards, who thought that nothing could affect the mind which was unperceived, little dreamed; at the same time, at least in some of its developments, especially in its freer use of genetic and organic conceptions, it has rendered much in the older forms of statement obsolete, and has given a new meaning to the idea of self-determination, which, as applied to an abstract power, Edwards rightly rejected as absurd.

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  • Edwards's controversy with the Arminians was continued in the essay on Original Sin, which was in the press at the time of his death.

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  • Now beauty, in Edwards's view, always consists in a harmonious relation in the elements involved, an agreement of being with being.

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  • Thus the principle of virtue - Edwards has nothing to say of " morality " - is identical with the principle of religion.

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  • From this standpoint Edwards combats every lower view.

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  • Edwards supposes in the nature of God an original disposition to an " emanation " of His being, and it is the excellency of this divine being, particularly in the elect, which is, in his view, the final cause and motive of the world.

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  • Edwards makes no attempt to reconcile the pantheistic element in his philosophy with the individuality implied in moral government.

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  • It contains in fact nothing more questionable than an attempted deduction of the orthodox Nicene doctrine, unpalatable, however, to Edwards's immediate disciples, who were too little speculative to appreciate his statement of the subordination of the " persons " in the divine " oeconomy," and who openly derided the doctrine of the eternal generation of the Son as " eternal nonsense "; and this perhaps was the original reason why the essay was not published.

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  • Though so typically a scholar and abstract thinker on the one hand and on the other a mystic, Edwards is best known to the present generation as a preacher of hell fire.

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  • A contemporary account of it says that in spite of Edwards's academic style of preaching, the assembly was " deeply impressed and bowed down, with an awful conviction of their sin and danger.

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  • Edwards preached other sermons of this type, but this one was the most extreme.

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  • Edwards's main aim had been to revivify Calvinism, modifying it for the needs of the time, and to promote a warm and vital Christian piety.

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  • Samuel Hopkins laid even greater stress than Edwards on the theorem that virtue consists in disinterested benevolence; but he went counter to Edwards in holding that unconditional resignation to God's decrees, or more concretely, willingness to be damned for the glory of God, was the test of true regeneration; for Edwards, though often quoted as holding this doctrine, protested against it in the strongest terms. Hopkins, moreover, denied Edwards's identity theory of original sin, saying that our sin was a result of Adam's and not identical with it; and he went much further than Edwards in his objection to " means of grace," claiming that the unregenerate were more and more guilty for continual rejection of the gospel if they were outwardly righteous and availed themselves of the means of grace.

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  • Stephen West (1735-1819), too, out-Edwardsed Edwards in his defence of the treatise on the Freedom of the Will, and John Smalley (1734-1820) developed the idea of a natural (not moral) inability on the part of man to obey God.

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  • Jonathan Edwards' the younger (1745-1801), second son of 1 Besides the younger Jonathan many of Edwards's descendants the philosopher, born at Northampton, Massachusetts, on the 26th of May 1745, also takes an important place among his followers.

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  • His collected works were edited by his grandson Tryon Edwards in two volumes, with memoir (Andover, 1842).

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  • -There have been various editions of Edwards's works.

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  • His pupil, Samuel Hopkins, in 1765 published two volumes from manuscript containing eighteen sermons and a memoir; the younger Jonathan Edwards with Dr Erskine published an edition in 4 volumes (1744 sqq.), and Samuel Austin in 1808 edited an edition in 8 volumes.

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  • Dwight, a great-grandson of Edwards, published the Life and Works in io volumes, the first volume containing the memoir, which is still the most complete and was the standard until the publication (Boston, 1889) of Jonathan Edwards, by A.

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  • Allen, who attempts to " distinguish what he (Edwards) meant to affirm from what he actually teaches."

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  • Grosart edited from original manuscripts Selections from the Unpublished Writings of Jonathan Edwards of America (Edinburgh, 1865, printed for private circulation).

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  • C. Smyth published from a copy Observations Concerning the Scripture Oeconomy of the Trinity and Covenant of Redemption (New York, 1880), a careful edition from the manuscript of the essay on the Flying Spider (in the Andover Review, January 1890) and " Some Early Writings of Jonathan Edwards," with specimens from the manuscripts (in Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, October, 1895).

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  • In 1900 on the death of Prof. Edwards A.

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  • Park, the entire collection of Edwards's manuscripts loaned to him by Tryon Edwards was transferred to Yale University.

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  • " A Study of the Manuscripts of Jonathan Edwards " was published by F.

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  • (Boston, 1902), and in the same volume of the Proceedings appeared " A Study of the Shorthand Writings of Jonathan Edwards," by W.

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  • P. Fisher under the title, An Unpublished Essay of Edwards's on the Trinity.

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  • The only other edition of Edwards (in whole or in part) of any importance is Selected Sermons of Jonathan Edwards (New York, 1904), edited by H.

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  • For estimates of Edwards consult: The Volume of the Edwards Family Meeting at Stockbridge, Massachusetts, September 6-7, A.D.

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  • 1870 (Boston, 1871); Jonathan Edwards, a Retrospect, Being the Addresses Delivered in Connecticut with the Unveiling of a Memorial were great, brilliant and versatile men.

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  • Among them were: his son Pierrepont (1750-1826), a brilliant but erratic member of the Connecticut bar, tolerant in religious matters and bitterly hated by stern Calvinists, a man whose personal morality resembled greatly that of Aaron Burr; his grandsons, William Edwards (1770-1851), an inventor of important leather rolling machinery; Aaron Burr the son of Esther Edwards; Timothy Dwight (1752-1817), son of Mary Edwards, and his brother Theodore Dwight, a federalist politician, a member, the secretary and the historian of the Hartford Convention; his great-grandsons, Tryon Edwards (1809-1894) and Sereno Edwards Dwight, theologian, educationalist and author; and his great-great-grandsons, Theodore William Dwight, the jurist, and Timothy Dwight, second of that name to be president of Yale.

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  • Gardiner (Boston, 1901); Exercises Commemorating the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth of Jonathan Edwards, held at Andover Theological Seminary, October 4-5, 1903 (Andover, 1904); and among the addresses delivered at Stockbridge in October 1903, John De Witt, " Jonathan Edwards: A Study," in the Princeton Theological Review (January, 1904).

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  • C. King, " Edwards as Philosopher and Theologian," in Hartford Theological Seminary Record, vol.

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  • Gardiner, " The Early Idealism of Jonathan Edwards," in the Philosophical Review, vol.

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  • MacCracken, " Philosophical Idealism of Edwards " in Philosophical Review, vol.

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  • (1902), pp. 26-42, suggesting that Edwards did not know Berkeley, but Collier, and the same author's Jonathan Edwards' Idealismus (Halle, 1899); F.

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  • Woodbridge, " Jonathan Edwards," in Philosophical Review, vol.

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  • Squires, Jonathan Edwards and seine Willenslehre (Leipzig, 1901); Samuel Simpson, " Jonathan Edwards, A Historical Review," in Hartford Seminary Record, vol.

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  • Squires, of which only four parts appeared, all devoted to Edwards and all written by Squires.

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  • Lewis Edwards >>

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  • Oxford he did not find wholly congenial to his intensely earnest spirit, but he read hard, and, as he afterwards said, "Plato, Aristotle, Butler, Thucydides, Sterne, Jonathan Edwards, passed like the iron atoms of the blood into my mental constitution."

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  • Marmaduke (acting governor) 1844 John C. Edwards Democrat1844-1848Austin A.

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  • 'Jonathan Edwards was pastor here from 1727 to 1750.

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  • Hence Edwards accession took place without any friction.

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  • The rivalries and intrigues of these three magnates constitute the main part of the domestic politics of Edwards reign.

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  • There seems little doubt that he aspired to be Edwards successor:

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  • He fell into the hands of William the Bastard, of the duke of Normandy, King Edwards cousin and best- Norman loved relative.

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  • Edwards next move was against clerical encroachments.

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  • The great group of statutes that date from Edwards earlier years ends with the legislative enactments of 1285, the Second Statute of Westminster and the Statute of Winchester.

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  • Nor did Edwards relations with the more remote states of the continent lead to any important results, though he had many treaties and alliances in hand.

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  • Edwards grip on the land was strong, and it had need to be so, for in 1287 and 1294 1295 there were desperate and widespread revolts, which were only checked by the existence of the new castles, and subdued by the concentration of large royal armies.

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  • Another act of this period was Edwards celebrated expulsion of the Jews from England (1290).

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  • Meanwhile in the same year that saw the expulsion of the Jews, King Edwards good fortune began to wane, with the rise of the Scottish question, which was to overshadow the latter half of his reign.

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  • But Edwards own army achieved complete success in Scotland.

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  • ,Bordeaux had already revolted from him, and he gave up the rest of his ill gotten gains of 1294 by the treaty ofParis (Mat ~o, i-~o-tl; Now that he had only a single war upon his hands Edwards position was entirely changed.

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  • Edwards arrangements for the administration of the conquered kingdom were wise and liberal, if only the national spirit of the Scots could have tolerated them.

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  • The nation, however much it might murmur, would never have been willing to rebel against a sovereign whose only fault was that he occasionally pressed his prerogative too far, Edwards rule was seldom or never oppressive, the seizure of the merchants wool in 1297 was the only one of his acts which caused really fierce and widespread indignation.

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  • These were the two Hugh Despensers, father and son; the elder was an ambitious baron who hated Lancaster, the younger had been made Edwards chamberlain in 1318 and had become his secret councillor and constant companion.

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  • Indeed, there was a decided reaction in Edwards favor, since Lancaster and his friends had been tried and found wanting.

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  • Edwards growing confidence in the Despensers at last provoked the notice and jeakusy of the dominant party.

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  • assault on the person and retinue of Edwards queen, Isabella of - France, by the retainers of Lord Badlesmere, one of Pembrokes associates, provoked universal reprobation.

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  • But peace did not suffice to end Edwards troubles; he dropped back into his usual apathy, and the Despensers showed themselves so harsh and greedy that the general indignation only required a new leader in order to take once more the form of open insurrection.

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  • Several more of Edwards scanty band of friends the earl of Arundel and the bishop of Exeter and otherswere also slain.

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  • Edwards claimsuch as it wasrested on the assertion that his mother, Isabella, was nearer of kin to her brother Charles Edward TV., the last king of the mainlineofthehouseof Capet, III.

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  • A far more fatal bar to Edwards claim than the existence of Charles of Navarre was the fact that the peers of France, when summoned to decide the succession question nine years before, had decided that Philip of Valois had the sole valid claim to the crown, and that Edward had then done homage to him for Guienne.

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  • Edwards claim to the French crown embittered the strife in a most unnecessary fashion.

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  • The years 1345I 347 saw the zenith of King Edwards prosperity; in them fell not only his own triumphs at Crecy and Calais, but a victory at Auberoche in Prigord won ~ by his cousin Henry of Lancaster, which restored Cruss.

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  • This brought the regent Charles and his counsellors to the verge of despair; they yielded, and on the 8th of May 1360, signed an ~~J agreement at Brtigny near Chartres, by which nearly all King Edwards demands were granted.

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  • he offered to proclaim Lionel of Clarence, Edwards second son, as his heir, and would have done so but for the vigorous opposition of his parliament.

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  • In 1368 his greatest vassals, the counts of Armagnac, Prigord and Comminges, displayed their disloyalty by appealing to the king of France as their~suzerain against the legality of Edwards imposts.

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  • These two last years of Edwards reign were filled with an episode of domestic strife, which had considerable constitutional importance.

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  • Here Henry vindicated his military reputation Agn.nue~ by winning a victory even more surprising than those of Crecy, and Poitiers, for he was outnumbered in an even greater proportion than the two Edwards had been in 1346 and 1356,

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  • The campaign that followed was most creditable to Edwards generalship, but must have been fatal to him if Warwick had been honestly supported by his lieutenants.

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  • For the successive attainders of the Lancastrians and the Nevilles had swept away many of the older noble families, and Edwards house of peers consisted for the main part of new men, his own partisans promoted for good service, who had not the grip on the land that their predecessors had possessed.

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  • During the last period of Edwards rule England might have been described as a despotism, if only the king had cared to be a despot.

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  • Yet we s~till find complaints that too much merchandize reached and left England in foreign bottoms, and King Edwards treaty with the Hansa was censured mainly for this reason.

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  • Most of Edwards favorites had literary tastes.

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  • At the moment of King Edwards death his elder son by Elizabeth Woodville, Edward, prince of Wales, was twelve; his younger son Richard, duke of York, was nine.

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  • This treaty of Etaples was, in short, a repetition of Edwards treaty of Picquigny, equally profitable and less disgraceful, for Maximilian of Austria, whom Henry thus abandoned, had given more cause of offence than had Charles of Burgundy in 1475.

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  • Their descendant had neither Edwards sloth nor Henrys moderation; he was capable of going to almost any lengths in pursuit of the gratification of his ambition, his passions, his resentment or his simple love of self-assertion.

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  • He could trade upon Edwards precocious hatred of Marys religion, he could rely upon French fears of her Spanish inclinations, and the success which bad attended his schemes in England deluded him into a belief that he could supplant the Tudor with a Dudley dynasty.

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  • Edward was persuaded that he could devise the crown by will, the council and the judges were browbeaten into acquiescence, and three days after Edwards death (July 6, 1553), Lady Jane Grey was proclaimed queen in London.

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  • A memorial tablet, with an inscription by Archbishop Benson, is placed in the Cathedral at Truro; and Mr Passmore Edwards erected a public institute in his honour at Launceston, near his birthplace.

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  • Edwards and Edwards A.

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  • Jonathan Edwards, a ver y stern Calvinist, is one of the few first-rate geniuses America has to boast in theology.

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  • In the early 18th century Arminianism presented itself in New England, and sporadically elsewhere; this tendency was largely accelerated by the reaction from the excesses of the "Great Awakening" under Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield.

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  • Charles Chauncy (1705-1787), pastor of the First Church from 1727 until his death, the chief opponent of Edwards in the great revival, was both a Unitarian and a Universalist.

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  • A certain John Edwards was conspicuous.

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  • The controversy with Edwards was followed by a more memorable one with Stillingfleet, bishop of Worcester.

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  • (2) A Vindication of the Reasonableness of Christianity from Mr Edwards's Reflections (1695).

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  • Edwards (Gleanings, iii.

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  • In a hydrated form it is obtained by the reduction of vanadyl monochloride, Voci, with sodium amalgam, being precipitated from the liquid by the addition of ammonia (Locke and Edwards, Zeit.

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  • and Robert of Artois, his brother-in-law, who, after having warmly supported the disinheriting of Edward III., had been convicted of deceit in a question of succession, had revenged himself on Philip by burning his waxen effigy, and had been welcomed with open arms at Edwards court.

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  • had taken reprisals against him in 1336 by making his parlement declare the forfeiture of Edwards lands and castles in Guienne; but the Hundred Years War, at first-simply a feudal quarrel between vassal and suzerain, soon became a great national conflict, in consequence of what was occurring in Flanders.

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  • Workless, and in desperation, they threw themselves on Edwards mercy,, by the advice of a rich citizen of Ghent, Jacob van Artevelde; and their last scruples of loyalty gave way when Edward decided to follow the counsels of Robert of Artois and of Artevelde, and to claim the crown of France.

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  • He published Recollections of a Minister to France (2 vols., 1887), and edited The Edwards Papers (1884),

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  • In 1908 he delivered the Jowett Lectures on Modernism at the Passmore Edwards Settlement, London.

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  • Edwards Samuel A.

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  • Edwards crashed but remounted to finish in 11th place.

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  • The Edwards are virtually self-sufficient, only buying in seaweed.

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  • A shortlist of six contenders also included boxer Lennox Lewis, tennis player Tim Henman and world triple jump champion Jonathan Edwards.

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  • Rob Edwards, Core cracks may force shutdown of UK reactors.

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  • Edwards was also asked to survey the whole river and put a plan together to build a new sluice at Boston.

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  • Next in line for the splenetic outburst of a disaffected supporter: Martin Chuffing Edwards.

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  • There is little wrong with Charles, Anne, Andrew and Edwards that the counsel of a streetwise person would not cure.

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  • May 1757 Langley Edwards Was appointed surveyor together with Thomas Yeoman.

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  • David Edwards has taught at Rhodes University in South Africa since 1972 and has a longstanding interest in humanistic and transpersonal psychotherapy.

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  • Jonathan Edwards (the British Olympic triple jumper) is a Baptist.

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  • Paul Edwards Do you feel a little twinge in your epistemology?

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  • These two are joined by vocalist Andy Edwards, Tim Robinson on drums and bassist Doug Sinclair.

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  • Edwards R (2004): Integrated teams in acute inpatient wards can work.

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  • Bass player Simon Edwards the glue to holding the often wayward lead guitar on track.

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  • Scrapbook celebrities such as Ali Edwards also make appearances in this fun and entertaining program.

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  • You'll be able to learn new crafting techniques in classes taught by Ali Edwards, Tim Holtz, Jessica Sprague, Stacy Croninger, and all your favorite Creating Keepsakes contributors.

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  • Born Eileen Edwards in 1965, in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Shania Twain always wanted to be an entertainer.

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  • He has donated $2,300 each to Clinton, Obama, and democrats John Edwards and Bill Richardson's campaigns.

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  • Jon Edwards - Like Michael Moore, another "for the people" kind of guy once left a server $13 on a $750 bill.

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  • Elizabeth Edwards was a lawyer and activist, though she is best known for marrying vice-presidential candidate John Edwards.

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  • On December 6, 2010, Edwards and her family announced that she would not be undergoing any further treatments and that doctors had given her only weeks to live.

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  • The following stages are generalized from Lowenfeld's work and that of Betty Edwards.

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  • Edwards' syndrome is caused by an extra (third) copy of chromosome 18.

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  • Edwards' syndrome is associated with the presence of a third copy of chromosome number 18.

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  • In the case of Edwards' syndrome, the child inherits three (trisomy), rather than two, copies of chromosome 18.

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  • Edwards' syndrome is usually fatal, with most babies dying before birth.

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  • Edwards' syndrome is also referred to as trisomy 18, trisomy E, and trisomy 16-18.

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  • Edwards' syndrome occurs in approximately one in every 5,000 live births and one in every 5,000 stillborn births; it affects girls more often than boys.

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  • Women older than their early thirties have a greater risk of conceiving a child with Edwards' syndrome, but it can also occur with younger mothers.

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  • Most children born with Edwards' syndrome appear weak and fragile, and they are often underweight.

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  • A child with Edwards' syndrome is likely to have many medical and development needs.

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  • If a woman gives birth to a child with Edwards' syndrome and plans to have another child, a doctor as well as a genetic counselor should be consulted so that prenatal screening and genetic counseling can be conducted.

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  • Edwards' syndrome at birth may be diagnosed by the physical abnormalities characteristic to the syndrome.

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  • Edwards' syndrome can be detected before birth.

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  • In addition, a pregnant woman carrying a child with Edwards' syndrome may have an unusually large uterus during pregnancy, due to the presence of extra amniotic fluid (polyhydramnios).

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  • Since babies with Edwards' syndrome frequently have major physical abnormalities, doctors and parents face difficult choices regarding treatment.

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  • However, 5-10 percent of children with Edwards' syndrome do survive past the first year of life, and require appropriate treatment for the many chronic effects associated with the syndrome.

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  • Constipation due to poor abdominal muscle tone is often a life-long problem for babies and children with Edwards' syndrome, resulting in fretfulness, discomfort, and feeding problems.

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  • Children with Edwards' syndrome will exhibit severe developmental delays, but with early intervention through special education and therapy programs, they can attain some developmental milestones.

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  • Children with Edwards' syndrome appear to have increased risk of developing a Wilms' tumor, a cancer of the kidney that primarily affects children.

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  • Therefore, it is recommended that older infants and children with Edwards' syndrome have a routine ultrasound of the abdominal cavity.

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  • Babies with Edwards' syndrome generally have feeding problems related to difficulties in coordination of breathing, sucking, and swallowing.

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  • The specialist can show the parents how to position the baby's head up, in good body alignment, because a baby with Edwards' syndrome may have hyperextension of the head.

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  • Because of feeding difficulties, many babies with Edwards' syndrome are fed through a tube inserted through the nose or mouth, down through the esophagus, and into the stomach.

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  • Most children born with Edwards' syndrome die within their first year of life.

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  • Most cases of Edwards' syndrome are not hereditary and cannot be prevented.

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  • However, parents who have had a child with Edwards' syndrome are at increased risk of having another child with the syndrome.

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  • Following the birth of a child with Edwards' syndrome, families may wish to seek counseling regarding the effects on relationships within the family.

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  • Support groups are good sources of information about Edwards' syndrome and can offer emotional and psychological support.

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  • There will be many challenges associated with the care of a child with Edwards' syndrome.

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