Edward ii sentence examples

  • Subsequently it went to the Albemarle family, but was again vested in the Crown, and Edward II.

  • It was sold by Edward II.

  • a few months later, and at once became the chief adviser of Edward II.

  • Edward II.

  • Bruges and Ypres rejected a request of Edward II.

  • For some time he had to hide in Paris from the officers sent by Edward II.

  • Of the ballads themselves, Robin Hood and the Monk is possibly as old as the reign of Edward II.

  • This close connexion with the royal house did not prevent him, as it did not prevent Earl Thomas of Lancaster, from joining the opposition to the feeble Edward II.

  • Hugh, son of Roger, created earl of Norfolk in 1141, succeeded his father, and the manor and castle remained in the Bigod family until 1306, when in default of heirs it reverted to the crown, and was granted by Edward II.

  • In 1324 Edward II.

  • The author obtained his knowledge about the last days of Edward II.

  • and Edward II.

  • in 1280 granting to its burgesses half the port and privileges similar to those enjoyed by the citizens of London; Edward II.

  • Under Edward II.

  • As one of the "lords ordainers" he was a recognized leader of the opposition to Edward II.

  • Lombard Street similarly points to the residence of Lombard merchants, the name existing when Edward II.

  • On the suppression of the order by command of the pope the house in Fleet Street was given in 1313 by Edward II.

  • In 1307 he became governor of Bristol Castle, and afterwards Edward II.

  • This abbey was the spot where Edward II.

  • In the reign of Edward II.

  • The castle was taken by Edward I., who defeated Baliol in the neighbourhood in 1296, and it afforded shelter to Edward II.

  • Berkeley Castle was the scene of the death of Edward II.

  • (1312-1377), "of Windsor," king of England, eldest son of Edward II.

  • In the crown of Edward II.

  • What is perhaps lost of the grace of form of the crown of Edward II.

  • The Nomina Villaruin of the reign of Edward II.

  • At what date the county of Antrim was formed is not known, but it appears that a certain district bore this name before the reign of Edward II.

  • 1348), archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Stratford-on-Avon and educated at Merton College, Oxford, afterwards entering the service of Edward II.

  • at Avignon and which was very much disliked by Edward II.

  • John's brother, Robert de Stratford, was also one of Edward II L's principal ministers.

  • The town received the grant of a market from Edward II.

  • He sent commissioners, in 1303 to inquire how and where the roads to the "new town of Kingston-upon-Hull" could best be made, and in 1321 Edward II.

  • in 1189 to the hospital of St Mary Magdalene, and by Edward II.

  • in 1291 appointed John de Berwick custodian of the abbey so that he might pay their debts from the issues of their estates, allowing them enough for their maintenance, and Edward II.

  • and Charles IV., succeeded in turn to the throne of France, and a daughter, Isabella, married Edward II.

  • (answered by Edward II.

  • Lying in the direct road from England, the abbey was frequently assaulted and in 1322 was destroyed by Edward II.

  • The murder of Edward II.

  • Archibald Douglas tried to relieve it, just as Edward II.

  • In this affair of Neville's Cross (17th of October 1346) he copied the mistakes of Edward II.

  • The accession of Edward II.

  • Having been restored to the royal favour by Edward II.

  • She sought to employ force of arms, calling upon her son, her nephew Edward II.

  • in 1287 and Edward II.

  • Confirmations and extensions of Henry III.'s charter were granted by Edward II.

  • Municipal charters and market privileges were now granted to such towns as Cardiff, Carmarthen, Builth, Cardigan, Montgomery, Aberystwith, Newborough, &c., and this wise policy was continued under Edward II.

  • He held several livings and, owing perhaps to his histrionic skill, he became a prime favourite with the prince of Wales, afterwards Edward II.

  • When Robert Winchelsea, archbishop of Canterbury, died in May 1313 Edward II.

  • Reynolds remained in general loyal to Edward II.

  • in 1278, by Edward II.

  • The ordinance of Edward II.

  • An older relative, Ralph de Brantingham, had served Edward II.

  • made by Colonel Grant-Francis, some time its honorary librarian, but one of its most valued possessions is the original contract of affiance between Edward II.

  • It was visited by King John in 1210 and probably by Edward II.

  • in 12 34, by Edward II.

  • A patent of murage and pavage - from which it may probably be inferred that Swansea was a walled town - was granted by Edward II.

  • The Bore Stone, in which Bruce planted his standard before the battle in which he defeated Edward II.

  • The English governor of Stirling had promised that, if he were not relieved by that date, he would surrender the castle, and Edward II.

  • Resigning his office as chancellor in 1302, he was chosen bishop of Chichester in 1305, and again became chancellor shortly after the accession of Edward II.

  • The barons all did homage except Edward II.

  • It occupies the site of a village called La Rye or La Riche, which was destroyed by the French in the reign of Edward II.

  • A gild merchant was granted by Edward I., Edward II.

  • But Edward II.

  • The annals of the early years of Edward II.

  • With ordinary capacity and perseverance Edward II.

  • The fortune of Edward II.

  • the earl for the murder of Edward II.

  • Both in the time of Edward II.

  • They might not be so personally odious as the favorites of Edward II.

  • The English held it for ten years, and it was in order to raise the Scottish siege in 1314 that Edward II.

  • fated lover of a queen and murderer of the deposed King Edward II.

  • Georges Eekhoud, born at Antwerp on the 27th of May 1854, was in some ways the most passionately Flemish of the whole group. He described the life of the peasants of his native Flanders with a bold realism, making himself the apologist of the vagabond and the outcast in a series of tragic stories: - Kees Doorik (1883), Kermesses (1883), Nouvelles Kermesses (1887), Le Cycle patibulaire (1892), Mes Communions (1895), Escal Vigor (1899) and La Faneuse d'amour (1900), &c. Nouvelle Carthage (1888) deals with modern Antwerp. In 1892 he produced a striking book on English literature entitled Au siècle de Shakespeare, and has written French versions of Beaumont and Fletcher's Philaster (1895) and of Marlow's Edward II.

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