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edward

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edward

edward Sentence Examples

  • Edward heard the stories from father who heard them from Grandfather Quincy who took copious notes.

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  • Edward is saying the book is 'based on the life of Annie Quincy Martin' just so he can take some liberties with the inconsequential details that have been lost in time.

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  • On Castle Hill, in the vicinity, are the remains of an earthwork, said to have been raised by Edward the Elder in 924.

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  • Shortly after this, however, all the northern princes submitted to Edward the Elder.

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  • A papal bull having also been obtained, on the 28th of August 1425, the archbishop, in the course of a visitation of Lincoln diocese, executed his letters patent founding the college, dedicating it to the Virgin, St Thomas Becket and St Edward the Confessor, and handed over the buildings to its members, the vicar of Higham Ferrers being made the first master or warden.

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  • The only point of interest on the banks is the cavern, near the mouth of the Alder, in which Prince Charles Edward concealed himself for a time after the battle of Culloden.

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  • About the time of Edward I.

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  • The woollen manufactures of Kendal have been noted since 1331, when Edward III.

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  • Edward, prince of Wales, was born on the 13th of October 1453 and baptized by Waynflete the next day.

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  • The fact too that complaints laid before Edward IV.

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  • MARGARET (1489-1541), queen of Scotland, eldest daughter of Henry VII., king of England, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Edward IV., was born at Westminster on the 29th of November 1 4 89.

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  • It was the birthplace of Henry VIII., Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, and here Edward VI.

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  • Father was a man of the cloth too, just like Edward, and Reverend Martin.

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  • Whether, as alleged by some, Waynflete fled and hid himself during the period covered by the battle of Wakefield and Edward's fist parliament in 1461, is very doubtful.

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  • It is certain that he took an active part in the restoration of Eton College, which Edward annexed to St George's, Windsor, in 1463, depriving it of a large part of its possessions.

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  • on the 28th of September 1470 Waynflete welcomed him on his release from the Tower, which necessitated a new pardon, granted a month after Edward's reinstatement on the 30th of May 1471 (Pat.

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  • On the 22nd of September 1481 Waynflete received Edward IV.

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  • With the rest of the north of England, Bridlington suffered from the ravages of the Normans, and decreased in value from £32 in the reign of Edward the Confessor, when it formed part of the possessions of Earl Morcar, to 8s.

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  • After her death he married Eadgyfu (Odgiva), daughter of Edward the Elder, king of the English, who was the mother of Louis IV.

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  • In 1736 Tucker married Dorothy, the daughter of Edward Barker of East Betchworth, cursitor baron of the exchequer.

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  • In 1765 the first four volumes of his work were published under the pseudonym "Edward Search."

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  • Henry Edward Manning >>

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  • and Leonora, daughter of Edward, king of Portugal, was born at Vienna Neustadt on the 22nd of March 1 459.

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  • The building was enlarged by Edward IV., by Henry VIII., who made it one of his chief residences, by James I.

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  • Subsequently it went to the Albemarle family, but was again vested in the Crown, and Edward II.

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  • The church contains a monument to Lord Edward Bruce, killed in a duel with Sir Edward Sackville, afterwards earl of Dorset, in 1613.

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  • In 1464 Edward IV.

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  • Another fair was granted to John de Molyns in1347-1348on the eve, feast and morrow of St Barnabas, but in 1464 Edward IV.

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  • See The Life and Death of Mr Vavasor Powell (1671), attributed to Edward Bagshaw the younger; Vavasoris Examen et Purgamen (1654), by E.

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  • Finally, under Edward I.

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  • In the reign of Edward I.

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  • A few years afterwards he married again, his second wife being Agnes, daughter of Sir James 1 The descent of the first Napier of Merchiston has been traced to "Johan le Naper del Counte de Dunbretan," who was one of those who swore fealty to Edward I.

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  • The Canonis Descriptio on its publication in 1614, at once attracted the attention of Edward Wright, whose name is known in connexion with improvements in navigation, and Henry Briggs, then professor of geometry at Gresham College, London.

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  • Presbyterian principles and ideas were entertained by many of the leading ecclesiastics in England during the reign of Edward VI.

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  • During the reign of Edward, the title of superintendent was often adopted instead of bishop, and it will be recollected that John Knox was an honoured worker in England with the title of superintendent during this reign.

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  • Holdich, the award was rendered by King Edward VII.

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  • The award of King Edward VII.

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  • Railways.The first important line in France, from Paris to Rouen, was constructed through the instrumentality of Sir Edward Blount (1809-1905), an English banker in Paris, who was afterwards for thirty years chairman of the Ouest railway.

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  • Lord Stormont's family was Jacobite in its politics, and his second son James (c. 1690-1728), being apparently mixed up in some of the plots of the time, joined the court of the exiled Stuarts and in 1721 was created earl of Dunbar by James Edward, the Old Pretender.

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  • He early adopted Protestant views, a fact which brought him into prominence when Edward VI.

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  • The oldest charter now on record is one belonging to the 6th year of Edward I.; and it refers to previous documents of the time of Edward the Confessor and William the Conqueror.

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  • He was one of the original members of the Order of Merit, instituted in connexion with the coronation of King Edward VII.

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  • He lived with the exiled court of Margaret of Anjou at Bar until 1470, and took an active part in the diplomacy which led to the coalition of Warwick and Clarence with the Lancastrians and Louis XI., and indirectly to Edward IV.'s expulsion from the throne.

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  • Morton landed with Warwick at Dartmouth on the 13th of September 1470, but the battle of Tewkesbury finally shattered the Lancastrian hopes, and Morton made his peace with Edward IV., probably through the mediation of Archbishop Bourchier.

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  • In March 1473 Morton was made Master of the Rolls, and Edward found employment for his diplomatic talents; he was sent on a mission to Hungary in 1474, and was one of the negotiators of the Treaty of Pecquigny in 1475.

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  • Woolwich (Wulewich) is mentioned in a grant of land by King Edward in 964 to the abbey of St Peter at Ghent.

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  • York Road recalls the existence of a palace of the archbishops of York, occasionally occupied by them between the reigns of Edward IV.

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  • The accession of Edward VI.

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  • It was on this question that Bonner came into conflict with Edward's government.

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  • The next salt to be obtained was the mercuric salt, which was prepared in 1 799 by Edward Charles Howard, who substituted mercury for silver in Brugnatelli's process.

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  • Two members were summoned to parliament by Edward VI.

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  • Among later residents commemorated is Edward Lloyd, who was the first person to show the value of esparto grass for the manufacture of paper, and thus started an industry which is one of the most important in Algeria.

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  • Oak was thus applied at a very early date; the shrine of Edward the Confessor, still existing in the abbey at Westminster, sound after the lapse of Boo years, is of dark-coloured oak-wood.

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  • In 1658 Colonel Edward Doyley, the governor, gained a decisive victory over thirty companies of Spanish foot, and sent ten of their flags to Cromwell.

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  • It was sold by Edward II.

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  • The French directory, which possessed information from Lord Edward Fitzgerald and Arthur O'Connor confirming Tone, prepared to despatch an expedition under Hoche.

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  • The great naval battle of Sluys, in which Edward III.

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  • The marriage of Charles the Bold and Margaret of York, sister of Edward IV., was celebrated at Damme on the 2nd of July 1468.

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  • In 1905 King Edward VII.

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  • In the time of Edward III.

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  • Highton and his brother Edward Highton, and ' See Arthur Young, Travels in France, p. 3.

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  • This was the principle of the chemical telegraph proposed by Edward Davy in 1838 and of that proposed by Bain in 1846.

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  • to Edward I.

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  • With Edward Cooper (son of Peter Cooper, whom Hewitt greatly assisted in organizing Cooper Union, and whose daughter he married) he went into the manufacture of iron girders and beams under the firm name of Cooper, Hewitt & Co.

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  • B.) S, ifOMAS Osborne, 1st Duke Of (1631-1712), Inglis Statesman, commonly known also by his earlier title of Earl Of Danby, son of Sir Edward Osborne, Bart., of Kiveton, Yorkshire, was born in 1631.

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  • The king (Henry VIII.) happened at the time to be visiting in the immediate neighbourhood, and two of his chief counsellors, Gardiner, secretary of state, afterwards bishop of Winchester, and Edward Fox, the lord high almoner, afterwards bishop of Hereford, were lodged at Cressy's house.

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  • He officiated at the coronation of the boy king Edward VI., and is supposed to have instituted a sinister change in the order of the ceremony, by which the right of the monarch to reign was made to appear to depend upon inheritance alone, without the concurrent consent of the people.

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  • But Edward's title had been expressly sanctioned by act of parliament, so that there was no more room for election in his case than in that of George I., and the real motive of the changes was to shorten the weary ceremony for the frail child.

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  • The first prayerbook of Edward VI.

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  • The forty-two articles of Edward VI.

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  • It never received any authoritative sanction, Edward VI.

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  • Cranmer stood by the dying bed of Edward as he had stood by that of his father, and he there suffered himself to be persuaded to take a step against his own convictions.

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  • by which the succession devolved upon Mary, and now he violated his oath by signing Edward's " device " of the crown to Lady Jane Grey.

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  • On grounds of policy and morality alike the act was quite indefensible; but it is perhaps some palliation of his perjury that it was committed to satisfy the last urgent wish of a dying man, and that he alone remained true to the nine days' queen when the others who had with him signed Edward's device deserted her.

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  • Addressing the gathering, Langton referred to the laws of Edward the Confessor as "good laws," which the king ought to observe, and then mentioned the charter granted by Henry I.

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  • Sir Edward Coke finds in Magna Carta a full and proper legal answer to every exaction of the Stuart kings, and a remedy for every evil suffered at the time.

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  • and by Edward I., the most important occasion being their confirmation by Edward at Ghent in November 1297.

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  • The earliest commentator of note was Sir Edward Coke, who published his Second Institute, which deals with Magna Carta, by order of the Long Parliament in 1642.

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  • Law before Edward I.

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  • Edward VI.

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  • and Edward VI., has not permanently remained.

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  • Stephen, History of the Criminal Law of England (London, 1883); Pollock and Maitland, History of English Law before Edward I.

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  • Prince Charles Edward slept in it the night following the fight at Prestonpans (1745).

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  • See Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe, compiled from her letters and journals by her son, Charles Edward Stowe (Boston, 1890).

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  • It was exceedingly burdensome, and its abolition by Edward the Confessor in 1051 was welcomed as a great relief.

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  • The chief Lenten food from the earliest days was fish, and entries in the royal household accounts of Edward III.

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  • Edward Alexander Macdowell >>

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  • It was greatly improved in the reign of Edward III.

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  • The gild, to which both sexes were admitted, was in existence early in the 13th century, and it was incorporated by a charter from Edward III.

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  • C. Watson, and his conclusions were enforced ten years later by Edward Forbes, who dealt also with the fauna.

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  • This was first suggested by Edward Forbes in I846, though the idea had earlier suggested itself to Darwin (Life, i.

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  • Sebastian afterwards made a voyage to Rio de la Plata in the service of Spain, but he returned to England in 1548 and received a pension from Edward VI.

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  • In the voyage of Sir Edward Michelborne in 1605, John Davis lost his life in a fight with a Japanese junk.

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  • The narratives Pacific of such men as Woodes Rogers, Edward Davis, George Shelvocke, Clipperton and William Dampier, can never fail to interest, while they are not without geographical value.

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  • On the 14th of February 1779, his second, Captain Edward Clerke, took command, and proceeding to Petropavlovsk in the following summer, he again examined the edge of the ice, but only got as far as 70° 33' N.

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  • The first president of the institution (from 1873 to 1881) was the distinguished geologist, Edward Orton (1829-1899), who was professor of geology from 1873 to 1899.

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  • EDWARD GIBBON WAKEFIELD (1796-1862), British colonial statesman, was born in London on the 10th of March 1796, of an originally Quaker family.

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  • His father, Edward Wakefield (1774-1854), author of Ireland, Statistical and Political (1812), was a surveyor and land agent in extensive practice; his grandmother, Priscilla Wakefield (1751-1832), was a popular author for the young, and one of the introducers of savings banks.

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  • His only son, Edward Jerningham Wakefield (1820-1879), was a New Zealand politician.

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  • On Congress Street, below the Observatory, is the Eastern Cemetery, the oldest burying ground of the city; in it are the graves of Commodore Edward Preble, and of Captain Samuel Blythe (1784-1813) and Captain William Burroughs (1785-1813), who were killed in the engagement between the British brig "Boxer" and the American brig "Enterprise," their respective ships, off this coast on the 5th of September 1813.

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  • Sir John Howard served in Edward II.'s wars in Scotland and Gascony, was sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk and governor of Norwich Castle.

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  • He followed the White Rose and was knighted at the crowning of King Edward IV., who pricked him for sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

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  • When peace was made, Edward summoned him again as a baron and gave him the Garter and the treasurership of his household.

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  • After Edward's burial, at which he bore the king's banner, Howard, an enemy of the Wydviles, linked his fortunes with those of the duke of Gloucester.

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  • A lion's share of the Mowbray estates, swollen by the great alliances of the house, heir of Breouse and Segrave, and, through Segrave, of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I., fell to Howard, who, by a patent of June 28, 1483, was created duke of Norfolk and earl marshal of England with a remainder to the heirs male of his body.

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  • The second duke, twice married, was father of at least eleven sons and six daughters, the sons including Edward the lord high admiral, killed in boarding Pregent's galleys at Brest, Edmund the knight marshal of the army at Flodden, and William the first Lord Howard of Effingham.

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  • was allying himself with the Howards, Thomas Howard, a boy of eleven, had been betrothed to Anne, daughter of the late King Edward IV., and Henry VII.

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  • In 1777 Edward, the ninth of the Howard dukes, died childless in his ninety-second year.

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  • A third cousin succeeded him in 1815, Bernard Edward Howard, who, although a Roman Catholic, was enabled, by the act of 1824, to act as earl marshal.

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  • For his services against Sir Thomas Wyat he was created (March i 1, 1553/4) Lord Howard of Effingham, the title being taken from a Surrey manor granted him by Edward VI.

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  • The abbot seems to have held a market from very early times, and charters for the holding of markets and fairs were granted by various sovereigns from Edward I.

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  • About 1479, probably with reason both suspicious and jealous, James arrested his brothers, Alexander, duke of Albany, and John, earl of Mar; Mar met his death in a mysterious fashion at Craigmillar, but Albany escaped to France and then visited England, where in 1482 Edward IV.

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  • Peace with Albany followed, but soon afterwards the duke was again in communication with Edward, and was condemned by the parliament after the death of the English king in April 1483.

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  • EDWARD HINCKS (1792-1866), British assyriologist, was born at Cork, Ireland, and educated at Trinity College, Dublin.

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  • During his term of office he appeared in a case before the United States Supreme Court, where his knowledge of civil law so strongly impressed Edward Livingston, the secretary of state, who was himself an admirer of Roman Law, that he urged Legare to devote himself to the study of this subject with the hope that he might influence American law toward the spirit and philosophy and even the forms and processes of Roman jurisprudence.

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  • SIR EDWARD GREY, 3rd Bart.

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  • In 1465 a second annual fair on the 1st of May was granted by Edward IV., which is still held on the Wednesday in Whitsun week.

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  • The screw or rotatory log of Edward Massey, invented in 1802, came into general use in 1836 and continued until 1861.

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  • We are informed that Fordun's patriotic zeal was roused by the removal or destruction of many national records by Edward III.

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  • The grammar school was founded by Dr Roger Lupton, provost of Eton College, in 1528, but as it was connected with a chantry it was suppressed by Henry VIII., to be refounded in 1551 by Edward VI.; it now takes rank among the important public schools.

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  • Thomas Arnold, criticizing Edward Hawkins, appeals rather to the atonement as deeper neglected truth.

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  • A war broke out with King Edward the Elder in 913; in 921 a king whose name is unknown was killed at the fall of Tempsford, and in the same year the Danes of East Anglia submitted to Edward the Elder.

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  • were divided into French and Italian factions, which wrangled over the election for nearly three years in the midst of great popular excitement, until finally, stirred by the eloquence of St Bonaventura, the Franciscan monk, they entrusted the choice to six electors, who hit on Visconti, at that time accompanying Edward of England on the crusade.

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  • This new entente with Great Britain, cemented by a visit paid by King Edward VII.

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  • He was soon promoted to be one of Edward VI.'s chaplains and prebendary of Westminster, and in October 1552 was one of the six divines to whom the Forty-two articles were submitted for examination before being sanctioned by the Privy Council.

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  • The academy is one of the foremost secondary schools in the country, and among its alumni have been Daniel Webster, Edward Everett, Lewis Cass (born in Exeter in a house still standing), John Parker Hale, George Bancroft, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Richard Hildreth and Francis Bowen.

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  • In Edward II.'s time, the king's forest of the Peak, in Derbyshire, is especially mentioned as infested with wolves, and it was not until the reign of Henry VII.

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  • It is presumed that he conformed with the change of religion, for he retained under Edward VI.

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  • It contains the "Descrypcion of the towre of Virtue and Honour," an elegy on Sir Edward Howard, lord high admiral of England, who perished in the attack on the French fleet in the harbour of Brest in 1513.

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  • EDWARD GIBBON (1737-1794), English historian, was descended, he tells us in his autobiography, from a Kentish family of considerable antiquity; among his remoter ancestors he reckons the lord high treasurer Fiennes, Lord Say and Sele, whom Shakespeare has immortalized in his Henry VI.

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  • This son (by name Edward) was educated at Westminster' and Cambridge, but never took a degree, travelled, became member of parliament, first for Petersfield (1734), then for Southampton (1741), joined the party against Sir Robert Walpole, and (as his son confesses, not much to his father's honour) was animated in so doing by " private revenge " against the supposed " oppressor " of his family in the South Sea affair.

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  • He was educated at King Edward's school, Birmingham, under James Prince Lee, afterwards bishop of Manchester, and had as contemporaries B.

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  • granted the men and merchants of the town the same laws and customs as they had in the time of Edward the Confessor, and that they should be quit of toll throughout England, Normandy, Aquitaine and Anjou.

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  • He is of some value for the reign of Edward I.

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  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.

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  • In George IV.'s reign were issued the so-called "lion shillings," bearing the royal crest, a crowned lion on a crown, a design reverted to in the coinage of Edward VII.

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  • Edwards took over in 1844 from Edward Robinson, who had founded it in 1843, and of which Park was assistant editor until 1851 and editor-in-chief from 1851 to 1884.

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  • An act of Edward VI.

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  • In 1841 Edward Moxon was found guilty of the publication of a blasphemous libel (Shelley's Queen Mab), the prosecution having been instituted by Henry Hetherington, who had previously been condemned to four months' imprisonment for a similar offence, and wished to test the law under which he was punished.

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  • Edward I.

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  • Portions of the abbey buildings, including the Lady chapel of the church, now converted into a dwelling-house, are incoporated in those of Sherborne grammar school, founded (although a school existed previously) by Edward VI.

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  • The Jews had been expelled from England by Edward I., after a sojourn in the country of rather more than two centuries, during which they had been the licensed and oppressed money-lenders of the realm, and had - through the special exchequer of the Jews - been used by the sovereign as a means of extorting a revenue from his subjects.

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  • It became a borough in 1319 by a charter of Edward II., which was confirmed in 1342 and 1378, and by each of the Lancastrian kings.

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  • In spite of the admission of their co-religionists to high office in the government, the Mussulmans, it is true, still complained of continuous ill-treatment having for its object their expatriation; but these complaints were declared by Sir Edward Grey, in answer to a question in parliament, to be exaggerated.

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  • No charter has been found, but a judgment given under a writ of quo warranto in 1578 confirms to the burgesses freedom from toll, passage and pontage, the tolls and stallage of the quay and the right to hold two fairs - privileges which they claimed under charters of Baldwin de Redvers and Isabel de Fortibus, countess of Albemarle, in the 13th century, and Edward Courtenay, earl of Devon, in 1405.

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  • A writ for the election of a member to parliament was issued in the reign of Edward III., but no return was made.

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  • The sister of the new sovereign, Princess Alexandra, had a few months before (loth March) married the prince of Wales, afterwards King Edward VII., and his father succeeded to the crown of Denmark in the following November.

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  • Thomas Carey contestants (Carey's rebellion) William Glover Edward Hyde, deputy-governor Thomas Pollock, president of the council.

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  • George Burrington Edward Mosely, president of the council.

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  • At the end of the reign of Edward the Elder (925) the Britons of Strathclyde submitted to that king together with all the other princes of the north.

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  • Charlotte Walpole (c. 1785-1836), an English actress who married in 1779 Sir Edward Atkyns, and spent most of her life in France.

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  • Accordingly, Edward III., by letters patent, granted them for ever the town and borough, a privilege confirmed by Edward IV.

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  • In 1254 Prince Edward, afterwards King Edward I., was created earl of Chester, and since this date the earldom has always been held by the heirs apparent to the English crown with the single exception of Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester.

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  • AETHELFLAED (Ethelfleda), the "Lady of the Mercians," the eldest child of Alfred the Great, was educated with her brother Edward at her father's court.

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  • On the accession of her brother Edward, Æthelflaed and her husband continued to hold Mercia.

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  • In 911 Æthelred died and Edward took over Middlesex and Oxfordshire.

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  • For some eighteen months Ælfwyn seems to have wielded her mother's authority, and then, just before the Christmas of 919, Edward took Mercia into his own hands, and Ælfwyn was "led away" into Wessex.

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  • She died in 1828, leaving two sons, Daniel Fletcher, killed in the second battle of Bull Run, and Edward, a major in the United States army, who died while serving in the Mexican War, and a daughter Julia, who married Samuel Appleton.

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  • - The Works of Daniel Webster (6 vols., Boston, 1851) contain a biographical memoir by Edward Everett; G.

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  • It occupies the site of a fortress erected in the time of Alexander II., which was besieged in 1303 by Edward I.

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  • 1640-1649), English royalist, son of Sir Henry Capel of Raines Hall, Essex, and of Theodosia, daughter of Sir Edward Montagu of Broughton, Northamptonshire, was elected a member of the Short and Long Parliaments in 1640 for Hertfordshire.

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  • In 1658, through the kind offices of his friend John Evelyn, Taylor was offered a lectureship in Lisburn, Ireland, by Edward Conway, second Viscount Conway.

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  • In 1661 he buried, at Lisburn, Edward, the only surviving son of his second marriage.

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  • (1770), with memoir and explanatory notes by Edward Thompson.

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  • On the site of St Mary's (1837-1839), also Gothic, stood the small chapel raised by Christiana, sister of Robert Bruce, to the memory of her husband, Sir Christopher Seton, who had been executed on the spot by Edward I.

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  • When Edward I.

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  • In both 1715 and 1745 Dumfries remained apathetic. Prince Charles Edward indeed occupied the town, holding his court in a building afterwards known as the Commercial Hotel, levying £2000 tribute money and requisitioning 1000 pairs of shoes for his Highlanders, by way of punishing its contumacy.

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  • It withstood Edward I.'s siege in 1300 for two days, although garrisoned by only sixty men.

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  • In 924 Edward the Elder fortified Bakewell, and in 942 Edmund regained Derby, which had fallen under the Danish yoke.

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  • 1312), earl of Cornwall, favourite of the English king Edward II., was the son of a Gascon knight, and was brought up at the court of Edward I.

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  • Strong, talented and ambitious, Gaveston gained great influence over young Edward, and early in 1307 he was banished from England by the king; but he returned after the death of Edward I.

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  • a few months later, and at once became the chief adviser of Edward II.

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  • He was regent of the kingdom during the king's short absence in France in 1308, and took a very prominent part at Edward's coronation in February of this year.

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  • (Oxford, 1896); and Chronicles of the Reigns of Edward I.

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  • and Edward II., edited by W.

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  • In the latter course they were encouraged by the high prices of wool during the, 4th century, and by Edward III.'s policy of fostering both the export of wool and the home manufacture of woollen goods.

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  • Edward Charles Pickering >>

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  • After the death of Margaret, the "maid of Norway," in 1290, Bruce's grandfather, the 6th Robert de Bruce, lord of Annandale, claimed the crown of Scotland as the son of Isabella, the second daughter of David, earl of Huntingdon, and greatgranddaughter of King David I.; but John de Baliol, grandson of Margaret, the eldest daughter of Earl David, was preferred by the commissioners of Edward I.

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  • His youth is said by an English chronicler to have been passed at the court of Edward I.

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  • As the disputes between Edward I.

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  • Both father and son sided with Edward against Baliol.

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  • In April 1294 the younger Bruce had permission to visit Ireland for a year and a half, and as a further mark of Edward's favour a respite of all debts owing by him to the exchequer.

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  • In August 1296 Bruce and his father swore fealty to Edward I.

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  • at Carlisle, the younger Robert joined Sir William Wallace, who raised the standard of Scottish independence in the name of Baliol after that king had surrendered his kingdom to Edward in 1296.

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  • Urgent letters were sent ordering Bruce to support John de Warenne, earl of Surrey, Edward's general, in the summer of 1297; but, instead of complying, he assisted to lay waste the lands of those who adhered to Edward.

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  • The Scottish lords were not to serve beyond the sea against their will, and were pardoned for their recent violence, in return owning allegiance to Edward.

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  • Yet, when Edward was forced by home affairs to quit Scotland, Annandale and certain earldoms, including Carrick, were excepted from the districts he assigned to his followers, Bruce and other earls being treated as waverers whose allegiance might still be retained.

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  • In the campaign of 1304, when Edward renewed his attempt on Scotland and reduced Stirling, Bruce supported the English king, who in one of his letters to him says, "If you complete that which you have begun, we shall hold the war ended by your deed and all the land of Scotland gained."

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  • But, while apparently aiding Edward, Bruce had taken a step which bound him to the patriotic cause.

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  • The death of his father in 1304 may have determined his course, and led him to prefer the chance of the Scottish crown to his English estates and the friendship of Edward.

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  • Edward hoped still to conciliate the nobles and gain Scotland by a policy of clemency to all who did not dispute his authority.

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  • Bruce is reputed to have been one of the advisers who assisted in framing it; but a provision that his castle of Kildrummy was to be placed in charge of a person for whom he should answer shows that Edward, not without reason, suspected his fidelity.

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  • According to one account, the bond between Bruce and Lamberton was revealed to Edward by Comyn while Bruce was at the English court.

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  • Alarmed by a hint dropped by Edward, he left England secretly, and in the church of the Friars Minorite at Dumfries on the 10th of -February 1306 met Comyn, whom he slew before the high altar for refusing to join in his plans.

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  • It was not their first encounter, for a letter of 1299 to Edward from Scotland describes Comyn as having seized Bruce by the throat at a meeting at Peebles, where they were with difficulty reconciled by the regents.

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  • Though a king, Bruce had not yet a kingdom, and his efforts to obtain it were disastrous failures until after the death of Edward I.

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  • Edward came to the north in the following spring.

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  • In a moment all was changed by the death of Edward I.

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  • Quitting Rathlin, he had made a short stay in Arran, and before Edward's death had failed to take Ayr and Turnberry, although he defeated Aymer de Valence, earl of Pembroke, at Loudoun Hill in May 1306.

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  • After wasting the critical moment of the war in the diversions of court life, the new English king, Edward II., made an inglorious march to Cumnock and back without striking a blow; and then returned south, leaving the war to a succession of generals.

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    0
  • Leaving Edward, now his only brother in blood and almost his equal in arms, in Galloway, he suddenly transferred his own operations to Aberdeenshire.

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  • About the same time Edward Bruce took Rutherglen and laid siege to Stirling, whose governor, Sir Philip de Mowbray, agreed to capitulate if not relieved before the 24th of June 1314.

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  • His sieges, the most difficult part of medieval warfare, though won sometimes by stratagem, prove that he and his followers had benefited from their early training in the wars of Edward I.

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  • Edward II.

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  • His troops were in four divisions: his brother Edward commanded the right, Randolph the centre, Douglas the left.

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  • The enthusiasm of the nation he had saved forgot his tardy adhesion to the popular cause, and at the parliament of Ayr on the 25th of April 1315 the succession was settled by a unanimous voice on him, and, failing males of his body, on his brother Edward and his heirs male, or failing them on his daughter Marjorie and her heirs, if she married with his consent.

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  • This was no less than the rising of the whole Celtic race, who had felt the galling yoke of Edward I.

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  • In 1315 Edward Bruce crossed to Ireland on the invitation of the natives, and in the following year the Welsh became his allies.

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  • The brothers retreated to Ulster, and, Robert having left Ireland in May 1317 to protect his own borders, Edward, who had been crowned king of Ireland, was defeated and killed at Dundalk in October 1318.

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  • Bruges and Ypres rejected a request of Edward II.

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  • Moved by this language and conscious of the weakness of Edward, the pope exhorted him to make peace with Scotland, and three years later Randolph, now earl of Moray, procured the recognition of Bruce as king from the papal see by promising aid for a crusade.

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  • Meantime hostilities more car less constant continued with England, but, though in 1322 Edward made an incursion as far as Edinburgh, the internal weakness of his government prevented his gaining any real success, while in October of this year Bruce again ravaged Yorkshire, defeated the English near Byland, and almost captured their king.

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  • Some of his chief nobles - Thomas, earl of Lancaster, in 1321, and Sir Andrew Harclay, earl of Carlisle, in 1322 - entered into correspondence with the Scots, and, though Harclay's treason was detected and punished by his death, Edward was forced to make a truce of thirteen years at Newcastle on the 30th of May 1323, which Bruce ratified at Berwick.

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  • In 1327 Edward III.

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  • Joanna, Edward's sister, was to be given in marriage to David, the infant son of Bruce, born subsequent to the settlement of 1318 and now recognized as heir to the crown, and the ceremony was celebrated at Berwick on the 12th of July 1328.

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  • The manor, then called Bellus Locus or Beaulieu on account of its beautiful situation, was afterwards granted to the Mortimers, in whose family it continued until it was merged in the crown on the accession of Edward IV.

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  • From Edward IV.

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    0
  • A fair and a market on Wednesday weregranted by Edward III.

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  • Edward IV.

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    0
  • Mary of Lorraine was approached by the English commissioner, Sir Ralph Sadler, to induce her to further her daughter's marriage contract with Edward VI.

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  • The marriage treaty between Mary, not then one year old, and Edward VI.

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    0
  • On her way back to Scotland she was driven by storms to Portsmouth harbour and paid a friendly visit to Edward VI.

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  • and Edward VI.

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    0
  • The church of St Mary contains a chapel dedicated to St Edward, commemorating that Edward who was murdered at Corfe Castle in this neighbourhood, whose body lay here before its removal to Shaftesbury.

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  • He was made tutor to Prince Edward of Windsor (afterwards Edward III.), and, according to Dibdin, inspired him with some of his own love of books.

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  • He was mixed up with the sordid intrigues which preceded the deposition of Edward II., and supplied Queen Isabella and Mortimer in Paris with money in 1325 from the revenues of Guienne, of which province he was treasurer.

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    0
  • For some time he had to hide in Paris from the officers sent by Edward II.

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  • On the accession of Edward III.

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  • This charge he resigned in the next year, and, after making arrangements for the protection of his northern diocese from an expected inroad of the Scots, he proceeded in July 1336 to France to attempt a settlement of the claims in dispute between Edward and Philip. In the next year he served on three commissions for the defence of the northern counties.

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  • Edward himself landed in Flanders to procure allies for his approaching campaign.

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  • The manor of Ottery belonged to the abbey of Rouen in the time of Edward the Confessor.

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  • The manor in 1242 was handed over to the Scottish king who held it till 1295, when Edward I.

    0
    0
  • In 1745 Prince Charles Edward twice marched through Penrith, and a skirmish took place at Clifton.

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    0
  • Between 1731 and 1 To this was added a supplement by Petiver on the Birds of Madras, taken from pictures and information sent him by one Edward Buckley of Fort St George, being the first attempt to catalogue the birds of any part of the British possessions in India.

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  • In 1830 John Edward Gray commenced the Illustrations of Indian Zoology, a series of plates of vertebrated animals, G w but mostly of birds, from drawings, it is believed by dlcke..

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    0
  • In 1832 Edward Lear, afterwards well known as a humorist, brought out his Illustrations of the Family of Psittacidae, a volume which deserves especial notice from the extreme fidelity to nature and the great artistic skill with which the figures were executed.

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    0
  • Yet the idea of a " physiological " arrangement on the same kind of principle found another follower, or, as he thought, inventor, in Edward Newman, who in 1850 communicated N ewman.

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  • A=D= -_-- - - ---Island =r= b = o =ir- monument by James Edward Kelly to General Fitz John Porter; a cottage hospital (1886); a United States naval hospital (1891); a home for aged and indigent women (1877); and the Chase home for children (1877).

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  • All Souls' church was built in 1859 from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott, of whose work it is a good example, at the expense of Mr Edward Akroyd.

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    0
  • Both the central library and museum and the Akroyd museum and art gallery occupy buildings which were formerly residences, the one of Sir Francis Crossley (1817-1872) and the other of Mr Edward Akroyd.

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  • Edward Tiffin..1803-1807Dem.-Repub.

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    0
  • Vinet of Lausanne, Edward Irving, Frederick D.

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    0
  • Greenough; of Edward Everett (W.

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  • The argument of Otis on the writs of assistance Americans, including Charles Francis Adams and Edward Everett, and also various descendants of Cotton, united to restore the southwest chapel of St Botolph's church, and to erect in it a memorial tablet to Cotton's memory.

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  • On East Rock is a monument to the Connecticut soldiers who fell in the War of Independence, the War of 1812, the Mexican War and the Civil War; on the West Rock is a cave, "Judges' Cave," in which the regicides William Goffe and Edward Whalley are said to have concealed themselves when sought for by royal officers in 1661.

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    0
  • Bartlett, Historical Sketches of New Haven (New Haven, 1897); Edward E.

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    0
  • Already in 1267 St Louis had taken the cross a second time, moved by the news of Bibars' conquests; and though the French baronage, including even Joinville himself, refused to follow the lead of their king, Prince Edward of England imitated his example.

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  • Baulked of any opportunity of joining in the main Crusade, Edward, after wintering in Sicily, conducted a Crusade of his own to Acre in the spring of 1271.

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  • He returned home at the end of 1272, the last of the western crusaders; and thus all the attempts of St Louis and Charles of Anjou, of James of Aragon and Edward of England left Bibars still in possession of all his conquests.

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  • In 1274, at the council of Lyons, Gregory X., who had been the companion of Edward in the Holy Land, preached the Crusade to an assembly which contained envoys from the Mongol khan and Michael Palaeologus as well as from many western princes.

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  • While Edward I.

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    0
  • Pierre Dubois, in a pamphlet "De recuperatione Sanctae Terrae," addressed to Edward I.

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    0
  • The mission which he undertook with his chancellor for this purpose (1362-1365) only produced a crop of promises or excuses from sovereigns like Edward III.

    0
    0
  • EDWARD EVANSON (1731-1805), English divine, was born on the 21st of April 1731 at Warrington, Lancashire.

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  • In 1740 General James Edward Oglethorpe, governor of Georgia, supported by a naval force, made an unsuccessful attack upon St Augustine; two years later a Spanish expedition against Savannah by way of St Simon's Island failed, and in 1745 Oglethorpe again appeared before the walls of St Augustine, but the treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748 prevented further hostilities.

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  • Bloxham Edward A.

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    0
  • It is supposed in the Black Book of the Admiralty to have been founded in the reign of Edward I.; but it would appear, from the learned discussion of R.

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    0
  • Marsden, that it was established as a civil court by Edward III.

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  • c. 5) provided that "the admirals and their deputies shall not meddle from henceforth of anything done within the realm, but only of a thing done upon the sea, as it hath been used in the time of the noble prince king Edward, grandfather of our lord the king that now is."

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  • In 1693 further correspondence between Gauden, Clarendon, the duke of York, and Sir Edward Nicholas was published by Mr Arthur North, who had found them among the papers of his sister-in-law, a daughter-in-law of Bishop Gauden; but doubt has been thrown on the authenticity of these papers.

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  • It is stated that the MS. was delivered by one of the king's agents to Edward Symmons, rector of Raine, near Bocking, and that it was in the handwriting of Oudart, Sir Edward Nicholas's secretary.

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    0
  • A correspondence relating to the French translation of the work has also come to light among the papers of Sir Edward Nicholas.

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    0
  • Doble; another reprint edited by Mr Edward Almack for the King's Classics (1904); and Edward Almack, Bibliography of the King's Book (1896).

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    0
  • A synod at Lambeth in 1281 put forth canons none too welcome to Edward I.; they included a detailed scheme for the religious instruction of the faithful.

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    0
  • From the time of Edward VI.

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  • The modern theological position of Oberlin college is reflected in the writings of President King and of Dean Edward I.

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  • Clarke and Edward Dodwell.

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    0
  • EDWARD CAIRD (1835-1908), British philosopher and theologian, brother of John Caird, was born at Greenock on the 22nd of March 1835, and educated at Glasgow University and Balliol College, Oxford.

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  • Of the ballads themselves, Robin Hood and the Monk is possibly as old as the reign of Edward II.

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  • The Rev. Joseph Hunter associated him with the rebel earl of Lancaster of Edward II.'s time.

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  • It is impossible to believe with Hunter that he lived so late as Edward II.'s reign.

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  • Hood is a very usual dialectal form of wood; and in his play Edward the First, George Peele actually alludes to the bandit as "Robin of the Wood."

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    0
  • 1093), count of Boulogne, was the husband of Goda, daughter of the English king 'Ethelred the Unready, and aunt of Edward the Confessor.

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  • EDWARD HAROLD BROWNE (1811-1891), English bishop, was born at Aylesbury and educated at Eton and Cambridge.

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    0
  • HAMPDEN-SIDNEY, a village of Prince Edward county, Virginia, U.S.A., about 70 m.

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  • She had thirteen children - Frederick Henry, drgwned at sea in 1629; Charles Louis, elector palatine, whose daughter married Philip, duke of Orleans, and became the ancestress of the elder and Roman Catholic branch of the royal family of England; Elizabeth, abbess and friend of Descartes; Prince Rupert and Prince Maurice, who died unmarried; Louisa, abbess; Edward, who married Anne de Gonzaga, "princesse palatine," and had children; Henrietta Maria, who married Count Sigismund Ragotzki but died childless; Philip and Charlotte, who died childless; Sophia, who married Ernest Augustus, elector of Hanover, and was mother of George I.

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  • The principal modern buildings are the Mint, the Prince of Wales' hospital (commemorating the visit of King Edward VII.

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    0
  • This Bohun lives in history as one of the recalcitrant barons of the year 1297, who extorted from Edward I.

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    0
  • He had suffered twice from the chicanery of Edward's lawyers; in 1284 when a dispute between himself and the royal favourite, John Giffard, was decided in the latter's favour; and again in 1292 when he was punished with temporary imprisonment and sequestration for a technical, and apparently unwitting, contempt of the king's court.

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  • This close connexion with the royal house did not prevent him, as it did not prevent Earl Thomas of Lancaster, from joining the opposition to the feeble Edward II.

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  • The elder, Eleanor, was given in 1374 to Thomas of Woodstock, seventh son of Edward III.; the younger, Mary, to Henry, earl of Derby, son of John of Gaunt and afterwards Henry IV., in 1380 or 1381.

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    0
  • Morris' Welsh Wars of King Edward I., chs.

    0
    0
  • In 1328 Edward III.

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    0
  • He was soon in the service of Edward, the eldest son of King Henry III., and was constantly in attendance on the prince, whose complete confidence he appears to have enjoyed.

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    0
  • in November 1272 until August 1274, when the new king, Edward I., returned from Palestine and made him his chancellor.

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    0
  • In 1275 Burnell was elected bishop of Bath and Wells, and three years later Edward repeated the attempt which he had made in 1270 to secure the archbishopric of Canterbury for his favourite.

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  • As the chief adviser of Edward I.

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    0
  • ously studied by Sir Edward Frankland, who from the investigation, not of simple inorganic compounds, but of the organo-metallic derivatives, determined the kernel of the theory of valency.

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    0
  • von Hofmann, who designed the laboratories and accepted the professorship in 1845 at the instigation of Prince Albert, and under his successor (in 1864) Sir Edward Frankland, this institution became one of the most important centres of chemical instruction.

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    0
  • By his own investigations and those of Sir Edward Frankland it was proved that the radical methyl existed in acetic acid; and by the electrolysis of sodium acetate, Kolbe concluded that he had isolated this radical; in this, however, he was wrong, for he really obtained ethane, C 2 H 6, and not methyl, CH 3.

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    0
  • (1304) granted the pesage of tin, and Edward III.

    0
    0
  • 1527), mistress of the English king Edward IV., is said to have been the daughter of Thomas Wainstead, a prosperous London mercer.

    0
    0
  • She attracted the notice of Edward IV., and soon after 1470, leaving her husband, she became the king's mistress.

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    0
  • Edward called her the merriest of his concubines, and she exercised great influence; but, says More, "never abused it to any man's hurt, but to many a man's comfort and relief."

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    0
  • After Edward's death she was mistress to Thomas Grey, marquess of Dorset, son of Elizabeth Woodville by her first husband.

    0
    0
  • She figured much in 16th-century literature, notably in the Mirrour for Magistrates, and in Thomas Heywood's Edward IV .

    0
    0
  • Lumby (Cambridge, 1883), supplemented a little„by Edward Hall (Chronicle, p p. 3 6 3-3 6 4).

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    0
  • and through his father a great-grandson of Philip III., having thus a better claim to the throne of France than Edward III.

    0
    0
  • The king of Navarre, who defended this deed, had, however, many friends in France and was in communication with Edward III.; and consequently John was forced to make a treaty at Mantes and to compensate him for the loss of Angouleme by a large grant of lands, chiefly in Normandy.

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    0
  • He continued this treacherous policy when Edward the Black Prince advanced to succour Peter the Cruel; then signed a treaty with Edward of England, and then in 1371 allied himself with Charles V.

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    0
  • In1671-1673he had visited the American plantations from Carolina to Rhode Island and had preached alike to Indians and to settlers; in 1674 a portion of New Jersey was sold by Lord Berkeley to John Fenwicke in trust for Edward Byllynge.

    0
    0
  • The social life of the 18th century and the first half of the 19th is portrayed in Records of a Quaker Family, the Richardsons of Cleveland, by Mrs Boyce, and The Diaries of Edward Pease, the Father of English Railways, edited by Sir A.

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    0
  • Dying in 1243, he was succeeded as lord of Connaught by his son Richard, and then (1248) by his younger son Walter, who carried on the family warfare against the native chieftains, and added greatly to his vast domains by obtaining (c. 1255) from Prince Edward a grant of "the county of Ulster," in consequence of which he was styled later earl of Ulster.

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    0
  • He led his forces from Ireland to support Edward I.

    0
    0
  • in his Scottish campaigns, and on Edward Bruce's invasion of Ulster in 1315 Richard marched against him, but he had given his daughter Elizabeth in marriage to Robert Bruce, afterwards king of Scotland, about 1304.

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    0
  • She was married in childhood to Lionel, son of Edward III., who was recognized in her right as earl of Ulster, and their direct representative, the duke of York, ascended the throne in 1461 as Edward IV., since when the earldom of Ulster has been only held by members of the royal family.

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  • 1407), an eminent military commander in the French wars of Edward III.

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    0
  • His estates were restored to his brother Henry, earl of Lancaster, on the accession of Edward III., and the manor has since then formed part of the duchy of Lancaster.

    0
    0
  • Two gates, the one of the time of Edward I., the other erected early in the 15th century, overlook the marshes; a third stands at a considerable distance west of the town, its position pointing the contrast between the extent of the ancient town and that of the shrunken village of to-day.

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    0
  • The town was laid out by Edward I.

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    0
  • The waves finally obliterated the site in 1288, and Edward I.

    0
    0
  • In the 14th and 15th centuries Winchelsea was frequently attacked by the French, and in 1350 Edward III.

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    0
  • Albert Edward Nyanza >>

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  • Thomas Edward Brown >>

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    0
  • Similar courtesies were exchanged during the jubilee of 1897, and again in March 1902, when Edward VII.

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    0
  • The visit of Edward VII.

    0
    0
  • C. Sirr, the same officer who had captured Lord Edward Fitzgerald in 1798.

    0
    0
  • P. Curran (2 vols., Edinburgh, 1822); Thomas Moore, Life and Death of Lord Edward Fitzgerald (2 vols.

    0
    0
  • It was incorporated under the name of "Bailiff, Burgesses and Commonalty" by Edward IV.

    0
    0
  • By the charter of Edward IV.

    0
    0
  • Others are Bootham Bar, the main entrance from the N., also having a Norman arch; Monk Bar (N.E.), formerly called Goodramgate, but renamed in honour of General Monk, and Walmgate Bar, of the time of Edward I., retaining the barbican repaired in 1648.

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    0
  • Edward Lee, 1531-1544.

    0
    0
  • Edward Grindal, 1570-1576.

    0
    0
  • Edward Vernon Harcourt, 1808-1847.

    0
    0
  • See Francis Drake, Eboracum: or the History and Antiquities of the City of York, from its original to the present time (1736); Extracts from the Municipal Records of the City of York during the Reigns of Edward IV., Edward V.

    0
    0
  • This book was widely read by Christians; it was rendered into various languages, and in 1650 was translated into English by Edward Chilmead.

    0
    0
  • A provisional code of judicial procedure, prepared by Edward Livingston, was in effect in 1805 to 1825.

    0
    0
  • Edward D.

    0
    0
  • He attended King Edward's coronation in 1902, and accompanied the British army in person in the Chinese campaign of Igoe in command of the Bikanir Camel Corps, which also did good service in Somaliland in 1904.

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    0
  • It again, however, became the resort of pirates, and the names of many of the worst of these ruffians are associated with New Providence; the notorious Edward Teach, called Blackbeard, who was afterwards killed in action against two American ships in 1718, being chief among the number.

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    0
  • By 1727 he was domiciled with Edward Gibbon (1666-1736) at Putney as tutor to his son Edward, father of the historian, who says that Law became " the much honoured friend and spiritual director of the whole family."

    0
    0
  • Ibrahim, taking this as a breach of the convention, set sail from Navarino northwards, but was turned back by Sir Edward Codrington, the British admiral.

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    0
  • King Edward VII.

    0
    0
  • Hugh, son of Roger, created earl of Norfolk in 1141, succeeded his father, and the manor and castle remained in the Bigod family until 1306, when in default of heirs it reverted to the crown, and was granted by Edward II.

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    0
  • Town and castle followed the vicissitudes of the dukedom of Norfolk, passing to the crown in 1405, and being alternately restored and forfeited by Henry V., Richard III., Henry VII., Edward VI., Mary, Elizabeth and James I., and finally sold in 1635 to Sir Robert Hitcham, who left it in 1636 to the master and fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge.

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    0
  • In the Church of England, however, it was retained among the episcopal ornaments prescribed by the first Prayerbook of Edward VI., and, though omitted in the second Prayerbook, its use seemed once more to be enjoined under the Ornaments Rubric of Elizabeth's Prayer-book.

    0
    0
  • The ancient church of St Edward the Confessor was replaced in 1850 by a structure in Decorated style.

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    0
  • THE Funeral Of Edward The Confessor At Wes1 Minster Abbey.

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    0
  • 4 Captains Edward Sabine and Clavering (1823) visited the coast between 72° 5' and 75° 12' N.

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    0
  • Edward II.'s charter of 1324 indicates that Cardiff ha, d become even then a trading and shipping centre of some importance.

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    0
  • The castle and lordship descended by heirship, male and female, through the families of De Clare, Despenser, Beauchamp and Neville to Richard III., on whose fall they escheated to the Crown, and were granted later, first to Jasper Tudor, and finally by Edward VI.

    0
    0
  • In 1324 Edward II.

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    0
  • granted a number of exemptions to Cardiff and other towns in South Wales, and this grant was confirmed by Edward III.

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    0
  • in 1452, and Edward IV.

    0
    0
  • Among the presidents of Amherst College have been in 1845-1854 and in 1876-1890 respectively - Edward Hitchcock, the famous geologist, and the Rev. Julius H.

    0
    0
  • From 1891 to 1903 he was clerk of the closet, first to Queen Victoria and afterwards to King Edward VII.

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  • He joined the crusade of his elder brother, the Lord Edward (1271-1272); and Edward, on his accession, found in Edmund a loyal supporter.

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  • He issued few ordinances; the unofficial compilation known as the Leges Henrici shows that, like the Conqueror, he made it his ideal to maintain the "law of Edward."

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  • He married in this year Dorothy, daughter of Edward East of Bledlow in Buckinghamshire.

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  • Having entered the church he became rector of Ripple, Worcestershire, and later of St Vedast, Foster Lane, London, and it was probably when he was chaplain to John de Vere, earl of Oxford, that he made the acquaintance of Elizabeth Woodville, afterwards the queen of Edward IV.

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  • When Edward IV.

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  • He founded a college at Rotherham, which was suppressed under Edward VI., and he was responsible for the building of part of the church of All Saints there.

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  • In May 1623 a settlement was established by Edward Hilton on Dover Point, about 5 m.

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  • This restriction of the term has some historical justification: in the First Prayer Book of Edward VI.

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  • The attitude of the second group is based on a mistake as to the technical meaning of "the second year of Edward VI.," the second Prayer Book not having come into use till the third year.

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  • It runs: "And here it is to be noted that such ornaments of the church and of the ministers thereof at all times of their ministration shall be retained and be in use, as was in the Church of England by the authority of parliament in the second year of the reign of King Edward VI."

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  • Thirty years after the Ridsdale judgment, the ritual confusion in the Church of England was worse than ever, and the old ideal expressed in the Acts of Uniformity had given place to a desire to sanctify with some sort of authority the parochial "uses" which had grown up. In this respect the dominant opinion in the Church, intent on compromise, seems to have been expressed in the Report presented in 1908 to the convocation of the province of Canterbury by the sub-committee of five bishops appointed to investigate the matter, namely, that under the Ornaments Rubric the vestments prescribed in the first Prayer Book of Edward VI.

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  • In 1303 it withstood for twenty days a siege in force by the English under Edward I., surrendering only when its governor, Sir Thomas Maule, had been slain.

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  • In the editorial control of this periodical he was associated with Jared Sparks and Edward T.

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  • Sir Edward Codrington, then commander-in-chief in the Mediterranean, received the treaty and his instructions on the night of the loth/11th of August at Smyrna, and proceeded at once to Nauplia to communicate them to the Greeks.

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  • Admiral de Rigny left for a cruise in the Levant, and Sir Edward Codrington, hearing that an Egyptian armament was on its way from Alexandria, and believing that it was bound for Hydra, steered for that island, which he reached on the 3rd of September, but on the 12th of September found the Egyptians at anchor with a Turkish squadron at Navarino.

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  • Andrew and Nicholas lasting for eight days, but Edward III.

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  • The best biography of Van Buren is by Edward M.

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  • Both Edward VI.

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  • Further annual fairs were granted by Edward III.

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  • in 1349 and by Edward IV.

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  • See Edward Hasted, History and Survey of Kent (Canterbury, 1778-1799, 2nd ed.

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  • The chief port is named Port Edward; it has good anchorage with a depth of 45 ft.

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  • Enguerrand VII., sire de Coucy, count of Soissons and Marle, and chief butler of France, was sent as a hostage to England, where he married Isabel, the eldest daughter of King Edward III.

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  • The great names at this period were those of Isaac Barrow (1630-1677); Robert South (1634-1716), celebrated for his wit in the pulpit; John Tillotson (1630-1694), the copyright of whose sermons fetched the enormous sum of 2500 guineas after his death, and of whom it was said that he was "not only the best preacher of the age, but seemed to have brought preaching to perfection"; and Edward Stillingfleet (1635-1699), styled, for his appearance in the pulpit, "the beauty of holiness."

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  • EDWARD HENRY STANLEY, 15th earl of Derby (1826-1893), eldest son of the 14th earl, was educated at Rugby and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took a high degree and became a member of the society known as the Apostles.

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  • He died on the 1 4 th of June 1908, when his eldest son, Edward George Villiers Stanley, became earl of Derby.

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  • In the reign of Edward the Confessor, Doncaster, as a berewic of the manor of Hexthorp, belonged to Earl Tostig; but before 1086 it had been granted to Robert, earl of Mortain, whose successor William was attainted for treason in the time of Henry I.

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  • The town was incorporated in 1467 by Edward IV., who granted a gild merchant and appointed that the town should be governed by a mayor and two serjeants-at-mace elected every year by the burgesses.

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  • See Victoria County History, Yorkshire; Edward Miller, The History and Antiquities of Doncaster (1828-1831); Calendar to the Records of the Borough of Doncaster, published by the Corporation.

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  • The author obtained his knowledge about the last days of Edward II.

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  • It has been maintained by Camden and others that More wrote an account of Edward's reign in French, and that this was translated into Latin by Geoffrey and used by him in compiling his Chronicon.

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  • In the main this conclusion substantiates the verdict of Stubbs, who has published the Vita et mors in his Chronicles of the reigns of Edward I.

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  • and Edward II.

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  • Edward the Confessor gave the manor to the church of Winchester in 1042, and it remained with the prior and convent of St Swithin until the 13th century, when it passed by exchange to Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester, though the vassals of the prior and convent remained exempt from dues and tronage in the port.

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  • Melcombe had received a charter from Edward I.

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  • in 1280 granting to its burgesses half the port and privileges similar to those enjoyed by the citizens of London; Edward II.

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  • CATHERINE SWYNFORD (c. 1350-1403), wife of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, was a daughter of Sir Payne Roelt, a knight who came to England from Hainault in the train of Edward III.'s queen, Philippa.

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  • On the annexation of Wales, Edward I.

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  • Edward III., by the Statute Staple of 1353, declared Carmarthen the sole staple for Wales, ordering that every bale of Welsh wool should be sealed or "cocketed" here before it left the Principality.

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  • Kenneth is alleged to have brought the Stone of Destiny, on which the Celtic kings were crowned, from Dunstaffnage Castle on Loch Etive, and to have deposited it in Scone, whence it was conveyed to Westminster Abbey (where it lies beneath the Coronation Chair) by Edward I.

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  • at Scone 1705) - entertained the Old Pretender for three weeks in 1716, and his son received Prince Charles Edward in 1746.

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  • 25, quoted above, those nominated on behalf of Great Britain being Lord Pauncefote, Sir Edward Malet, Sir Edward Fry and Professor Westlake.

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  • The question of liability was then referred to commissioners appointed by each state, and, on their failing to agree, to Sir Edward Thornton, British minister at Washington, who by his award, in 1875, found there was due from Mexico to Upper California, or rather to the bishops there as administrators of the fund, an arrear of interest amounting to nearly $100,000, which was directed to be paid in gold.

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  • was received there in 1822, and Queen Victoria and the prince consort occupied the palace for brief periods on several occasions, and in 1903 Edward VII., during residence at Dalkeith Palace, held his court within its walls.

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  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.

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  • It is separated from the narrow valley, in which lie the Canongate and Holyrood Palace, by Salisbury Crags, named after Edward III.'s general William Montacute, 1 st earl of Salisbury (1 3 01 - 1 344).

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  • There his pious queen, Margaret, the grand-niece of Edward the Confessor, died in 1093.

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  • The post of chancellor Campbell held for only sixteen days, and then resigned it to his successor Sir Edward Sugden (Lord St Leonards).

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  • In 1051 the duke visited England, and probably received from his kinsman, Edward the Confessor, a promise of the English succession.

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  • This is to be explained by his regard for legal forms, by his confirmation of the "laws of Edward" and by the support which he received from the church.

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  • Whether they were the successors, as most of the Fathers believed, of the seven chosen by the church of Jerusalem 1 A partial exception may be made in favour of the " Catholic Apostolic Church " founded by Edward Irving.

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  • she defines the church, without any express reference to the episcopate, as a " congregation of faithful men in which the pure word of God is preached and the sacraments be duly administered according to Christ's ordinance," and simply adds that the ordinal of Edward VI.

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  • Stubbs's Chronicles of Edward I.

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  • Edward John Trelawny >>

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  • Meanwhile dramatic literature found many champions, of whom the most energetic was Edward Szigligeti, proprie Joseph Szathmary, who enriched the Hungarian stage with more than a hundred pieces.

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  • Among successful dramatic pieces may be mentioned the Falu rossza (Village Scamp) of Edward Toth (1875), which represents the life of the Hungarian peasantry, and shows both poetic sentiment and dramatic skill; A szerelem harcza (Combat of Love), by Count Geza Zichy; Iskdriot (1876) and the prize tragedy Tamora (1879), by Anthony Varady; Janus (1877), by Gregory Csiky; and the dramatized romance Szep Mikhal (Handsome Michal), by Maurus Jokai (1877).

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  • Other novelists belonging to this school are: Desiderius Malonyai (Az utolso, " The Last "; Judith konyve, " The Book of Judith "; Tanulmdnyfejek, "Typical Heads "); Julius Pekar (Dodo fohadnagy problemai, " Lieutenant Dodo's Problems "; Az aranykesztyus kisasszony, " The Maid with the Golden Gloves "; A szoborszep asszony, " The Lady as Beautiful as a Statue "; Az esztendo legenddja, " The Legend of the Year "); Thomas Kobor (Aszfalt, " Asphalt "; 0 akarta, " He Wanted It "; A csillagok fele, " Towards the Stars "); Stephen Szomahazy (Huszonnegy Ora, " Twenty-four Hours "; A Clairette Keringd, " The Clairette Valse "; Pdratlan szerddk, " Incomparable Wednesdays "; Nydri felhok, " Clouds of Summer "); Zoltan Thury (Ullrich fdhadnagy es egyeb tortenetek, " Lieutenant Ullrich and other Tales "; Urak es parasztok, " Gentlemen and Peasants "); also Desiderius Szomory, Odon Gero, Arpad Abonyi, Koloman Szanto, Edward Sas, Julius Vertesi, Tibor Denes, Akos Pinter, the Misses Janka and Stephanie Wohl, Mrs Sigismund Gyarmathy and others.

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  • Besides Stephen Petelei (Jetti, a name - "Henrietta " - Felhok, " Clouds ") and Zoltan Ambrus (Pokhdlo Kisasszony, " Miss Cobweb "; Gyanu, " Suspicion") must be mentioned especially Francis Herczeg, who has published a number of very interesting studies of Hungarian social life (Simon Zsuzsa, " Susanna Simon "; Fenn es lenn, " Above and Below "; Egy ledny tortenete, " The History of a Girl "; Idegenete kozott, " Amongst Strangers "); Alexander Brody, who brings a delicate yet resolute analysis to unfold the mysterious and fascinating inner life of persons suffering from overwrought nerves or overstrung mind (A kitlelkil asszony, " The Double-Souled Lady "; Don Quixote kisasszony, " Miss Don Quixote "; Faust orvos, " Faust the Physician "; Tiinder Ilona, Rejtelmek, "Mysteries"; Az eziest kecske, " The Silver Goat "); and Edward Kabos, whose sombre and powerful genius has already produced works, not popular by any means, but full of great promise.

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  • The greatest of these dramatists has so far been Edward Toth (Toloncz, " The Ousted Pauper ").

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  • Guy, the 2nd, distinguished himself in the Scottish campaigns of Edward I., who warned him at his death against Piers Gaveston.

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  • Under Edward II.

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  • As one of the "lords ordainers" he was a recognized leader of the opposition to Edward II.

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  • Later cadets were John, brother of the 3rd earl, who carried the standard at Crecy, became captain of Calais, and was summoned as a peer in 1350, but died unmarried; and William, brother of the 4th earl, who was distinguished in the French wars, and succeeding to the lands of the Lords Abergavenny was summoned in that barony 1392; his son was created earl of Worcester in 1420, but died without male issue in 1422; from his daughter, who married Sir Edward Neville, descended the Lords Abergavenny.

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  • having made an alliance with Edward I.

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  • His successor, Edward III., was killed at Agincourt in 1415.

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  • The real dawn of zoology after the legendary period of the middle ages is connected with the name of an Englishman, Edward Wotton, born at Oxford in 1492, who practised Wotton.

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  • by August Weismann (memoirs translated by Meldola) by Edward B.

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  • The present structure dates, like many others in the principality, from Edward I., perhaps even from the plans of the architect of Carnarvon and Conway castles, but with the retention of old portions.

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  • without rede or counsel), son of King Edgar by his second wife lElfthryth, was born in 968 or 969 and succeeded to the throne on the murder of his step-brother Edward (the Martyr) in 979.

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  • In 1043, after Edward the Confessor had become king he seized the greater part of Emma's great wealth, and the queen lived in retirement at Winchester until her death on the 6th of March 1052.

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  • The duc de Dalberg had inherited the family property of Herrnsheim from his uncle the arch-chancellor Karl von Dalberg, and this estate passed, through his daughter and heiress, Marie Louise Pelline de Dalberg, by her marriage with Sir (Ferdinand) Richard Edward Acton, 7th baronet (who assumed the additional name of Dalberg), to her son the historian, John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton.

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  • It shared the privileges of the Cinque Ports, whose liberties were exemplified at the request of the barons of Folkestone by Edward III.

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  • corps was then attacked by Surrey in front, and by Sir Edward Stanley in flank.

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  • The terms of peace may be condensed into the following points: (1) Surrender of all burghers in the field, with all arms and munitions of war; (2) all burghers duly declaring themselves subjects of King Edward VII.

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  • 3 Edited by Edward Thwaites as Heptateuchus (Oxford, 1698); modern edition in Grein's Bibliothek der A.

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  • 1070), was the son of a Norman who had held high positions in East Anglia, perhaps that of earl, in the reign of Edward the Confessor (c. X055).

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  • In this reign also the abbot appointed the mayor, but from the reign of Edward I.

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  • All the liberties of the Cinque Ports were granted to the barons of Faversham by Edward I.

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  • in 1302, and confirmed by Edward III.

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  • The governing charter till 1835 was that of Henry VIII., granted in 1545 and confirmed by Edward VI.

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  • Edward Boscawen, and was born on the 30th of September 1788.

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  • His elder brother, General Lord (Robert) Edward (Henry) Somerset (1776-1842), distinguished himself as the leader of the Household Cavalry brigade at Waterloo.

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  • Queenborough Castle was built about 1361 by Edward III., who named the town after Queen Philippa and made it a free borough, with a governing body of a mayor and two bailiffs.

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  • By Mary of Modena he had seven children, among them being James Francis Edward (the Old Pretender) and Louisa Maria Theresa, who died at St Germain in 1712.

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  • Other institutions include a grammar school founded in the middle of the 16th century and provided for by a charter of Edward VI., the Cambridgeshire hospital, a custom-house, a cattle-market, and an important corn-exchange, for Wisbech has a large trade in grain.

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  • In 1288 King Edward I.

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  • More important in their results than any of these works were the discoveries of Edward Jenner, respecting the prevention of small-pox by vaccination, in which he superseded the partially useful but dangerous practice of inoculation, which.

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  • They are sufficiently evidenced by the fact that Edward Jenner and Matthew Baillie were his pupils.

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  • LORD EDWARD FITZGERALD (1763-1798), Irish conspirator, fifth son of James, 1st duke of Leinster, by his wife Emilia Mary, daughter of Charles Lennox, 2nd duke of Richmond, was born at Carton House, near Dublin, on the 15th of October 1763.

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  • In 1773 the duke of Leinster died, and his widow soon afterwards married William Ogilvie, who superintended Lord Edward's early education.

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  • The love-sick mood and romantic temperament of the young Irishman found congenial soil in the wild surroundings of unexplored Canadian forests, and the enthusiasm thus engendered for the "natural" life of savagery may have been already fortified by study of Rousseau's writings, for which at a later period Lord Edward expressed his admiration.

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  • Finding that his brother had procured his election for the county of Kildare, and desiring to maintain political independence, Lord Edward refused the command of an expedition against Cadiz offered him by Pitt, and devoted himself for the next few years to the pleasures of society and his parliamentary duties.

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  • According to Thomas Moore, Lord Edward Fitzgerald was the only one of the numerous suitors of Sheridan's first wife whose attentions were received with favour; and it is certain that, whatever may have been its limits, a warm mutual affection subsisted between the two.

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  • His Whig connexions combined with his transatlantic experiences to predispose Lord Edward to sympathize with the doctrines of the French Revolution, which he embraced with ardour when he visited Paris in October 1792.

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  • French revolutionary doctrines had become ominously popular, and no one sympathized with them more warmly than Lord Edward Fitzgerald, who, fresh from the gallery of the Convention in Paris, returned to his seat in the Irish parliament and threw himself actively into the work of opposition.

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  • As early as 1794 the government had information that placed Lord Edward under suspicion; but it was not till 1796 that he joined the United Irishmen, whose aim after the recall of Lord Fitzwilliam in 1795 was avowedly the establishment of an independent Irish republic. In May 1796 Theobald Wolfe Tone was in Paris endeavouring to obtain French assist ance for an insurrection in Ireland.

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