Ecuador sentence example

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  • The Galapagos Islands are of some commercial importance to Ecuador, on account of the guano and the orchilla moss found on them and exported to Europe.
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  • of Ecuador, to which country they belong.
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  • The public debt of Venezuela dates back to the War of Independence, when loans were raised in Europe for account of the united colonies of Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela.
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  • An interesting link between divergent marsupial families, still living in Ecuador, the Coenolestes, is another discovery of recent years.
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  • This claim covers all eastern Ecuador and a large part of south-eastern is` Colombia.
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  • The Peruvian telegraph system connects with those of Ecuador and Bolivia.
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  • It forms the boundary line for some distance between Ecuador and Colombia, but near its mouth where the river turns northward Colombia has taken possession of the left bank and all the territory covered by its large delta.
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  • On the western versant of the Andes of Ecuador there are three river systems of considerable size - the Mira, the Esmeraldas and the Guayas.
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  • According to Alexander Garland (Peru in 1906), the rivers of eastern Ecuador are navigable at low water for steamers of 2 to 4 ft.
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  • The Spaniards, though expelled from Colombia, still held possession of the neighbouring provinces of Ecuador and Peru; and Bolivar determined to complete the liberation of the whole country.
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  • some 300 inhabitants living in low thatched or iron-roofed huts, under the supervision of a police commissioner and other officials of Ecuador, by which country the group was annexed in 183 2, when General Villamil founded Floreana on Charles Island, naming it in honour of Juan Jose Flores, president of Ecuador.
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  • by Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and Colombia.
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  • AMBATO, or ASIENTO DE Ambato, an inland town of Ecuador, capital of the province of Tunguragua, 80 m.
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  • The product of Colombia, Venezuela, the Guianas, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador amounted in 1900 to £2,481,000 and to £2,046,000 in 1905.
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  • For the details of the struggle the reader must refer to the articles Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, Paraguay, Uruguay, Venezuela.
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  • There are a considerable number of small lakes in Ecuador, but no large ones.
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  • An agreement was proposed between Peru and Ecuador in connexion with the limits of the respective republics, but difficulties were created to prevent this proposal from becoming an accomplished fact by the pretensions put forward by Colombia.
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  • The efflorescence of aboriginal pottery is to be found in the Pueblo region of south-westernUnited States, in Mexico, Central America,Caribbean Islands, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and restricted areas of eastern Brazil.
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  • RUBBER, INDIARUBBER or Caoutchouc (a word probably derived from Cahucha or Gaucho the names in Ecuador and Peru respectively for rubber or the tree producing it), the chief constituent of the coagulated milky juice or latex furnished by a number of different trees, shrubs and vines.
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  • With the exception of parts of the Ecuador, Brazil and Bolivia frontiers, all the boundary lines have been disputed and referred to arbitration - those with Colombia and Ecuador to the king of Spain, and that with Bolivia to the president of Argentina, on which a decision was rendered on the 9th of July 1909.
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  • There have been misunderstandings with Ecuador in regard to some small areas in the Chira valley, but it may be assumed that the line is fixed between Santa Rosa (3° 21' S.) on the Gulf of Guayaquil, and the Chinchipe river, a tributary of the Maranon.
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  • These became known prematurely, and in May 1910 war was threatened between Peru and Ecuador in spite of an offer of mediation by the United States, Brazil and Argentina under the Hague Convention.
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  • At the point where the river Santa breaks through the Cordillera Negra that range begins to subside, while the Maritime Cordillera continues as one chain to and beyond the frontier of Ecuador.
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  • The Peruvian supply is practically exhausted through the destructive methods employed in collecting the bark, and the world now depends chiefly on Bolivia and Ecuador.
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  • The question of the delimitation of the frontier between Peru and the neighbouring republics of Ecuador, Colombia,.
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  • In the case of Ecuador and Colombia a dispute arose in 1894 concerning the ownership of large tracts of uninhabited country in the vicinity of the headwaters of the Amazon and its tributaries.
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  • Placing himself at the head of the army, he marched on Quito in Ecuador.
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  • New Granada (which included the present republics of Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador) was created a viceroyalty in 1718 (soon abolished, but re-created in 1740).
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  • Brazil; Caribian, around Caribbean Sea; Catamarenyan, Chaco; Changuinan, Panama; Charruan, Parana R.; Chibchan, Colombia .; Churbyan, Orinoco R.; Coconucan, Colombia; Cunan, Panama; Guaycuruan, Paraguay R.; Jivaroan, Ecuador; Kechuan, Peru; Laman, N.E.
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  • Ecuador; Matacoan, Vermejo R.; Mocoan, Colombia; Mosetenan, E.
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  • Bolivia; Zaparoan, Ecuador.
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  • Beyond Colombia are Ecuador and Peru, where, in the widening of the continent, architecture, stone-working, pottery, metallurgy, textiles are again exalted.
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  • The following islands may be classified as oceanic, but not with any of the three main divisions: the Bonin Islands, north of the Marianas, belonging to Japan; Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands (to New South Wales); Easter Island (to Chile); the Galapagos Islands (to Ecuador).
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  • from the boundary line with Ecuador, on one of the inland trade routes with that republic, and on a principal line of communication with the great forested regions of the Caqueta (Japura), Putumayo and Napo.
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  • as a partner, shortly afterwards proceeding to South America on business connected with negotiations for the granting of oil concessions in Ecuador, Colombia and Costa Rica.
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  • The third Pan-American Conference was held in the months of July and August 1906, and was attended by the United States, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Salvador and Uruguay.
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  • Ecuador, May 13, 1909.
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  • Ecuador, January 7, 1909.
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  • On the Spanish model concordats were arranged with various Central and South American republics, perhaps the most ironclad being that concluded with Ecuador in 1862 (abrogated 1878).
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  • America (Ecuador, Brazil, Argentine); some missions in Palestine.
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  • Ecuador 22d.
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  • Lastly there are two species of true crocodiles in America, C. intermedius of the Orinoco, allied to the former, and C. americanus or acutus of the West Indies, Mexico, Central America to Venezuela and Ecuador; its characteristic feature is a median ridge or swelling on the snout, which is rather slender.
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  • ECUADOR (officially La Republica del Ecuador), a republic of South America, bounded N.
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  • On the 5th of November 1904, Colombia and Ecuador agreed to submit their dispute to the German emperor, and a convention of the 12th of September 1905 between Colombia and Peru established a modus vivendi for the settlement of their conflicting claims, in which Ecuador is likewise interested.
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  • The maps of Ecuador, which are very defective, usually describe its territory as extending eastward to the Brazilian frontier, but as Peru is in actual occupation of the region east of Huiririma-chico, on the Napo river, 31 degrees west of that frontier, those maps cannot be considered correct.
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  • The eastern part of this territory is also claimed by Peru, which would have the effect, if allowed, of restricting Ecuador to a comparatively small area covered by the Andes and western Cordillera and the narrow plain on the Pacific coast.
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  • A small section of this line terminating on the Pacific coast is also in dispute, Ecuador claiming the main channel of the Mira as the dividing line, and Colombia claiming a small district south of that channel, the line running due west from the mouth of the most southern outlet of the Mira opening into Panguapi Bay, to a point of intersection with that river.
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  • The surface of Ecuador may be divided into three distinct regions: the Cis-Andine lying between the Western Cordillera and the coast; the Inter-Andine, which includes the two great mountain chains crossing the republic with the elevated plateau lying between; and the Trans-Andine, lying east of the Andes in the great Amazon valley.
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  • This is the most fertile and productive part of Ecuador, especially on the higher lands near the Cordillera.
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  • The eastern chain is known as the Andes of Ecuador, or the Cordillera Oriental, and the western as the Cordillera Occidental (Western Cordillera).
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  • South of the latter is the irregular and deeply broken Loja basin, which can hardly be considered a part of the great Ecuador plateau.
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  • It is the most northern of the higher peaks of Ecuador, with the exception of Cotocachi, and possibly of Chiles on the Colombian frontier, and reaches the elevation of 15,033 ft.
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  • The next in line is El Altar, which the natives call Capac-Urcu (" king mountain "), whose broken cone and impressive outlines make it one of the most attractive mountains of Ecuador.
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  • Turning to the Cordillera Occidental and taking the principal peaks in order from south to north, the first to claim attention is Chimborazo (from Chimpu-raza, " mountain of snow "), the highest summit of Ecuador, and once believed to be the culminating point of the Andes.
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  • The French academician Bouger, who was chief of the scientific commission sent to Ecuador in 1736 to measure a degree of the meridian on the equator, made a trigonometrical measurement of Iliniza, and Wagner ascended to within 800 ft.
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  • All the higher summits of Ecuador have true glaciers, the largest being found on Antisana, Cayambe and Chimborazo.
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  • There are two distinct hydrographic systems in Ecuador - the streams that flow south-eastward to the Maranon, or Amazon, and those which flow westward to the Pacific. The southern Ravers.
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  • The Coca forms the provisional boundary line between Ecuador and Colombia from its source to the Napo.
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  • The other rivers which flow through the Oriente territory of Ecuador into the Maranon are the Tigre, Pastaza, Morona and Santiago.
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  • The Tigre is navigable at all stages up to the Cunambo confluence, and promises to afford one of the most valuable river routes in Ecuador.
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  • Many of the rivers of eastern Ecuador are subject to similar floods from the Andean slopes, which have cut away broad, deep channels, through the adjacent plains, leaving long, narrow ridges between their courses which the natives call cuchillas.
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  • The Guayas is one of the most interesting and varied of the South American river systems, and is of great economic importance to Ecuador.
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  • There are few islands off the coast of Ecuador, and only one of any considerable size - that of Puna in the Gulf of Guayaquil, which is 29 m.
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  • The Galapagos Islands belong to the republic of Ecuador, and form a part of the province of Guayas.
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  • Siemiradzki, " Geologische Reisenotizen aus Ecuador," Neues Jahrb.
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  • Wolf, Geografia y geologia del Ecuador, publicada por orden del Supremo Gobierno de la Republica (Leipzig, 1892); W.
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  • Das Hochgebirge der Republik Ecuador (Berlin, 1892-1902).
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  • Farther north nearly the whole of the depression is filled with lavas, tuffs and agglomerates, derived from the Tertiary and recent volcanoes which form the most striking feature of the Andes of Ecuador.
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  • Climatic conditions in Ecuador are very largely contingent on altitude, and the transition from one climate to another is a matter of only a few hours' journey.
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  • It is to be noted that the Gulf of Guayaquil separates the humid, forestcovered coastal plain of Ecuador from the arid, barren coast of Peru, the two regions being widely dissimilar.
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  • The elevation at which human residence is possible seems to be unusually high in Ecuador.
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  • Many of the towns and villages of central Ecuador lie at altitudes ranging from 8606 ft.
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  • The fauna of Ecuador is comparatively poor in mammalia, but the birds and still more the insects are very numerous.
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  • A small deer and, in southern Ecuador, the llama (Auchenia) with its allied species, the alpaca, guanaco and vicuna, represent the ruminants.
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  • The avifauna of Ecuador is distinguished for the great variety of its genera and species, among which are many peculiar to the Amazon valley, and others to the colder uplands.
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  • Species of the pheasant and partridge are not uncommon, and the " guacharo " (Steatornis caripensis), once believed to inhabit Venezuela only, is found in Ecuador also.
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  • The eagle common to Ecuador is the Morphnus taeniatus, and possibly the M.
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  • An eagle with buzzard-like habits, the Leucopternis plumbea, is likewise common in Ecuador.
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  • The best-known fish of Ecuador is the insignificant Pimelodus cyclopum, the only fish found in the streams and lakes of the plateau region.
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  • The insect inhabitants of Ecuador, like the birds, include a large number of genera and species, but no complete entomological survey of the country has ever been made, and our knowledge in this respect is insufficient to warrant a detailed description.
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  • This may be considered a fair illustration of the situation in Ecuador so far as natural history exploration is concerned.
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  • The total number of species in Ecuador is roughly estimated to be 8000.
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  • The indigenous population of Ecuador was originally composed of two distinct races - the Quitus and Caras, the former being the older, and the latter presumably of Quichua origin.
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  • The Caras, according to tradition, entered the country from the coast, and had thoroughly established themselves there long before the conquest by the Inca rulers Tupac-Yupanqui and his son Huayna-Capac. This conquest was comparatively easy because the Caras spoke a dialect of the same language, and were not greatly unlike their conquerors in manners and customs. The present Indian population of Ecuador, excepting those of the trans-Andean region, may be considered as descendants of these two races.
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  • Notwithstanding all this they still represent from two-thirds to three-fourths of the actual population of Ecuador.
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  • The total number of "aucas " or uncivilized Indians in the republic has been estimated at about 200,000, but this estimate covered a larger area than Ecuador actually occupies and is evidently too high.
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  • No general census has ever been taken in Ecuador, and estimates are little better than vague conjectures.
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  • As a rule, the mestizos of Ecuador are ignorant, indolent and non-progressive.
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  • Communications.-The first railway to be completed in Ecuador was the line between Guayaquil and Quito, 290 m.
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  • During the American civil war the planters of Ecuador entered largely into the production of cotton, which at that time yielded large profits, but the industry has declined to very insignificant proportions since then because of inability to compete with the lower cost of production in the United States.
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  • Forest Products.-The forest and other natural products include rubber, cinchona bark, ivory-nuts, mocora and toquilla fibre for the manufacture of hats, hammocks, &c., cabaya fibre for shoes and cordage, vegetable wool (Bombax ceiba), sarsaparilla, vanilla, cochineal, cabinet woods, fruit, resins, &c. The original source of the Peruvian bark of commerce, the Cinchona calisaya, is completely exhausted, and the " red bark " derived from C. succirubra, is now the principal source of supply from Ecuador.
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  • Government.-Constitutionally, the government of Ecuador is that of a centralized republic, whose powers are defined by a written constitution and whose chief organs are an executive consisting of a president and vice-president, and a national congress consisting of two houses, a senate and a chamber of deputies.
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  • Revolutionary changes, however, have been very frequent in Ecuador, and no less than eleven constitutions were adopted between 1830 and 1909.
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  • - The territory of the republic of Ecuador, when first it becomes dimly visible in the grey dawn of American history, appears to be inhabited by upwards of fifty independent tribes, among which the Quitus seem to hold the most important position.
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  • A disagreement with Peru in 1828 resulted in the invasion of Ecuador and the temporary occupation of Cuenca and Guayaquil by Peruvian forces; but peace was restored in the following year after the Ecuadorian victory at Tarqui.
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  • The cause of the troubles under President Cordero was the assistance lent by Ecuador to Chile in the matter of the sale of the cruiser Esmeralda to the Japanese government in 1894, in the middle of the Japanese-Chinese War.
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  • To this end the transfer of the vessel was made to Ecuador, and she proceeded to Ecuadorian waters.
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  • On arriving at the Galapagos Islands the flag of Ecuador was replaced by that of Japan and the vessel handed over to the representatives of that nation sent for the purpose.
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  • To his personal energy and enterprise, as manager of the railway company, was largely due the continued prosecution of this difficult engineering undertaking, in connexion with which he was responsible for a thorough reconstruction of Ecuador finance.
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  • Cevallos, Resumen de la historia del Ecuador (Guayaquil, 1886); Hans Meyer, In den Hoch-Anden von Ecuador (Berlin 1907); A.
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  • Stiibel, Das Hochgebirge der Republik Ecuador (Berlin, 1892-1898); Edward Whymper, Travels amongst the Great Andes of the Equator (London, 1892); T.
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  • Wolf, Geografia y geologia del Ecuador (Leipzig, 1892); A.
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  • GUAYAQUIL, Or Santiago De Guayaquil, a city and port of Ecuador, capital of the province of Guayas, on the right bank of the Guayas river, 33 m.
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  • by Ecuador, S.
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  • AMAZONAS, a northern department of Peru, covering a mountainous district between the departments of Loreto and Cajamarca, with Ecuador on the N.
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  • Cuenca, Ecuador >>
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  • In what is now the republic of Ecuador, the only peopled portions are the central valley, between the two ridges of the Andes - height 7000 to 12,000 feet - and the hot plain at their western base; nor do the wooded slopes appear to have been inhabited, except by scattered savage hordes, even in the time of the Incas.
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  • In 1809 risings took place in Venezuela, in Ecuador, in Upper Peru and in the Argentine; the revolutionary fever spread to Chile, and on the 18th of September 1810 the cabildo of Santiago secured the resignation of the governor and vested his powers in an elected Junta (board) of seven members.
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  • tuberosum is, according to Mr Baker, a native not only of the Andes of Chile but also of those of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia, also of the mountains of Costa Rica, Mexico and the south-western United States.
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  • Petrocokino, Along the Andes, in Bolivia, Peru, and Ecuador (London, 1903); Comte C. d'Ursel, Sud Amerique: Seiours et voyages au Bresil, en Bolivie, &c. (Paris, 1879); Charles Wiener, Perou et Bolivie (Paris, 1880); Bolivia, Geographical Sketch, Natural Resources, 'c., Intern.
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  • The diplomatic agent of Belgium at Buenos Aires, e.g., is minister-resident and consul-general, and the minister of Ecuador in London is consulgeneral charge d'affaires.
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  • Political ambitions he had none, and it is said that he declined the offer of the crown of Ecuador.
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  • Until 1867 English manufacturers of quinine were entirely dependent upon South America for their supplies of cinchona bark, which were obtained exclusively from uncultivated trees, growing chiefly in Bolivia, Peru, and Ecuador, the principal species which were used for the purpose being Cinchona Calisaya; C. officinalis; C. macrocalyx, var.
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  • LATACUNGA (LLACTACUNGA, or, in local parlance, Tacunga), a plateau town of Ecuador, capital of the province of Leon, 46 m.
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  • AZUAY (sometimes written Assuay), a province of Ecuador, bounded N.
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  • CUENCA, a city and the capital of the province of Azuay, Ecuador, about 190 m.
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  • Cuenca is the third most important city of Ecuador, being the seat of a bishopric, and having a college, a university faculty, a cathedral, and several churches, and a considerable industrial and commercial development.
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  • by Brazil, Peru and Ecuador, and W.
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  • by Ecuador, the Pacific Ocean, Panama and the Caribbean Sea.
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  • With Ecuador and Peru the boundary disputes are extremely complicated, certain parts of the disputed territory being claimed by all three republics.
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  • In northern Ecuador the Andes narrows into a single massive range which has the character of a confused mass of peaks and ridges on the southern frontier of Colombia.
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  • These shocks, however, are less severe than in Venezuela or in Ecuador.
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  • The Mira has its principal sources in Ecuador, and for a short distance forms the boundary line between the two republics, but its outlets and navigable channel are within Colombia.
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  • The upper course of the Guaitara is known as the Carchi, which for a short distance forms the boundary line between Colombia and Ecuador.
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  • The Western Cordillera is the direct continuation of the Western Cordillera of Ecuador, and, like the latter, to judge from the scattered observations which are all that are available, consists chiefly of sandstones and porphyritic rocks of the Cretaceous series.
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  • The Central Cordillera is the direct continuation of the Eastern Cordillera of Ecuador, and is formed chiefly of gneiss and other crystalline rocks, but sedimentary deposits of Cretaceous age also occur.
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  • Although volcanoes are by no means absent, they are much less important than in Ecuador, and their products take a far smaller share in the formation of the Andes.
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  • In Ecuador the depression between the Eastern and Western Cordilleras is almost entirely filled with modern lavas and agglomerates; in Colombia the corresponding Cauca depression is almost free from such deposits.
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  • At Tuquerres, near the frontier of Ecuador, 10,200 ft.
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  • From Bogota the Spaniards constructed two partially-paved highways, one leading down to the Magdalena in the vicinity of Honda, while the other passed down into the upper valley of the same river in a south-westerly direction, over which communication was maintained with Popayan and other settlements of southern Colombia and Ecuador.
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  • There are only five ports, Buenaventura, Barranquilla,Cartagena, Santa Marta and Rio Hacha, which are engaged in foreign commerce, though Tumaco and Villamazar are favourably situated for carrying on a small trade with Ecuador and Venezuela.
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  • In 1740 it was restored, and it continued as long as the Spanish authority, including within its limits not only the present Colombia, but also Venezuela and Ecuador.
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  • In 1819 the great national hero, Bolivar (q.v.), effected a union between the three divisions of the country, to which was given the title of the Republic of Colombia; but in 1829 Venezuela withdrew, and in 1830, the year of Bolivar's death, Quito or Ecuador followed her example.
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  • The petty war with Ecuador, concluded by the peace of Santa Rosa de Carchi, is hardly worthy of mention.
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  • Meanwhile the opposite party was victorious in the west; and their leader, Julio Arboleda, formed an alliance with Don Garcia Moreno, the president of Ecuador.
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  • A movement was now set afoot in favour of a confederation of the three republics of Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela on the basis of the original conditions existing after the expulsion of Spanish authority, and a resolution was passed by the chamber of deputies to that effect.
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  • The opposition shown by Venezuela and Ecuador to this project prevented any definite result from being achieved.
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  • At the point where it makes its great bend the river Chinchipe pours into it from southern Ecuador.
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  • He fitted out an expedition at Loxa in Ecuador, descended the Rio Santiago to the Maranon, passed through the perilous Pongo in 1557 and invaded the country of the Maynas Indians.
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  • The Morona has been the scene of many rude explorations, with the hope of finding it serviceable as a commercial route between the inter-Andean tableland of Ecuador and the Amazon river.
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  • In 1871 Fish presided at the Peace Conference at Washington between Spain and the allied republics of Peru, Chile, Ecuador and Bolivia, which resulted in the formulation (April 12) of a general truce between those countries, to last indefinitely and not to be broken by any one of them without three years' notice given through the United States; and it was chiefly due to his restraint and moderation that a satisfactory settlement of the "Virginius Affair" was reached by the United States and Spain (1873).
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  • (The Cordillera of Argentina and Chile is clearly the continuation of the western chain alone.) In Ecuador there is still an inner chain of ancient gneisses and schists and an outer chain composed of Mesozoic beds.
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  • North of Ecuador the structure becomes more complex.
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  • (1892); Edward Whymper, Travels amongst the Great Andes of the Equator (London, 1892); Teodoro Wolff, Geografia y Geologia del Ecuador (Leipzig, 1892); E.
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  • At present this order is confined to the northern hemisphere, with the exception of two Spelerpes from the Andes of Ecuador and Peru, and a Plethodon from Argentina.
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  • The Portocello batholith is of granodioritic composition and is part of a sequence of tertiary batholiths that characterize southern Ecuador and northern Peru.
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  • There are still positives here, Ecuador will be beaten, and a quarter final place beckons.
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  • chile Peru and ecuador gone through the america norwegian princess.
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  • Packed with Spanish colonial... Five things to do in Ecuador 1. Sample Ecuadorian cuisine.
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  • The Galapagos Islands straddle the equator 600 miles west of Ecuador.
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  • glutton for punishment, year later Tom left for Ecuador to do the same!
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  • Many interns choose to take Spanish lessons when they arrive in Ecuador, then begin the internship after a week of lessons.
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  • Day 2 Napo Early morning wake-up call to visit one of the best parrot clay licks in Ecuador.
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  • porphyry copper deposits in northern Peru and Ecuador ).
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  • Alternatively, for the more adventurous, Cotopaxi, in the central sierra, is Ecuador's most frequently climbed volcano.
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  • straddle the equator 600 miles west of Ecuador.
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  • Ecuador's economic woes were, no doubt, compounded by the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1767 by King Charles III.
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  • - The second suborder of marsupials, the Paucituberculata, is exclusively South American, and typically represented by the family Epanorthidae, the majority of the members of which are extinct, their remains being found in the probably Miocene Santa Cruz beds of Patagonia, although one existing genus (Caenolestes) survives in Ecuador and Colombia.
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  • There have been misunderstandings with Ecuador in regard to some small areas in the Chira valley, but it may be assumed that the line is fixed between Santa Rosa (3° 21' S.) on the Gulf of Guayaquil, and the Chinchipe river, a tributary of the Maranon.
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  • The Trans-Andine territory occupied by Ecuador is a wedge-shaped area between the Coca and Napo, the provisional boundary line with Colombia, and a line running nearly west-south-west from Huiririma-chico (about lat.
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  • The coast of Ecuador extends from about lat.
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  • Of the insects which infest dwellings and prey upon their human inmates, such as fleas, bed-bugs, roaches, &c., Ecuador has more than a bountiful supply.
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  • As for the areas of the provinces the figures need not be questioned except those for the Oriente territory, which are much too large for the region actually occupied by Ecuador, and for the Galapagos Islands which are described by competent authorities as 2400 sq.
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  • The more recent history of Ecuador would not be complete without a reference to the work of Mr Archer Harman (b.
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  • Sti bel, Skizzen aus Ecuador (Berlin, 1886); Die Vulkanberge von Ecuador (Berlin, 1897); Handbook of Ecuador (Bureau of the American Republics, Washington, 1892); The World's Work, vol.
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  • lat., including territory occupied by Colombia, and the eastern half of the Ecuadorean department of Oriente, and Ecuador would extend her southern boundary line to the Putumayo, in long.
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  • QUITO, the capital of the republic of Ecuador, the see of an archbishopric covering the same territory, and the capital of the province of Pichincha, in lat.
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  • With the movement in Ecuador checked for the moment the focus for the continental revolt against neo-liberalism switched to Bolivia.
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  • Alternatively, for the more adventurous, Cotopaxi, in the central sierra, is Ecuador 's most frequently climbed volcano.
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  • Ecuador 's economic woes were, no doubt, compounded by the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1767 by King Charles III.
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  • She has long lobbied for greater attention to impoverished people across the globe, whether it's visiting refugees in Ecuador or pushing for legislation that will aid children in Third World countries.
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  • The sailing explores Ecuador, Peru and parts of the Amazon, where you can view wildlife and other incredible natural wonders.
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  • The Galapagos archipelago is located on the equator west of Ecuador's mainland.
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  • Many travelers explore the islands after visiting the mainland of Ecuador, and most cruise companies offer extended packages, including adventure sailings, plus hotel packages on the mainland.
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  • This species is a native of New Grenada, Peru, and Ecuador, at elevations of from 6000 to 11,000 feet.
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  • It is a native of Ecuador, and is earlier in bloom than G. argenteum.
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  • Both are made exclusively in Ecuador - the name comes from their burst in popularity by those involved in the construction of the Panama Canal.
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  • Some of the service providers you'll find in the Americas include: Telcel (Mexico), Claro (Peru, Brazil), CTI Movil (Uruguay, Argentina, Paraguay), Porta (Ecuador), Claro Chile (Chile), Enitel (Nicaragua), and Comcel (Colombia).
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  • Pockets of high trachoma infection also exist in southern Mexico, eastern Brazil, Ecuador, North Africa, India, China, Siberia, Indonesia, New Guinea, Borneo, and in Aboriginal communities in central Australia.
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  • She is of mixed ethnicity as her father was from Ecuador and her mother from Irish heritage.
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  • Vergara y Velasco's Atlas de geografia colombiana (1906-1908); Ecuador is fairly well represented by Th.
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  • With regard to the section between the Amazon and the Apaporis river, already settled between Brazil and Peru, the territory has been in protracted dispute between Peru, Ecuador and Colombia; but a treaty of limits between Brazil and Ecuador was signed in 1901 and promulgated in 1905.
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  • One species, the guacharo (Steatornis caripensis), or oil-bird, is commonly said to occur only in Venezuela, though it is found in Colombia and Ecuador also.
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  • Shortly after the battle of Carabobo (June 24, 1821), by which the power of Spain in this part of the world was broken, Venezuela was united with the federal state of Colombia, which embraced the present Colombia and Ecuador; but the Venezuelans were averse to the Confederation, and an agitation was set on foot in the autumn of 1829 which resulted in the issue of a decree (December 8) by General Paez dissolving the union, and declaring Venezuela a sovereign and independent state.
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  • The cochineal insect is found on the cactus which grows in abundance in the vicinity, and the town is known throughout Ecuador for its manufacture of boots and shoes, and for a cordage made from cabuya, the fibre of the agave plant.
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  • RIOBAMBA or Royabamba, a town of Ecuador, capital of the province of Chimborazo, on the railway between Guayaquil and Quito, about 85 m.
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  • The department of Cajamarca lies between the Western and Central Cordilleras and extends from the frontier of Ecuador S.
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