This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

economics

economics

economics Sentence Examples

  • 1827), an authority upon banking and economics generally; and Sir Reginald Francis Douce Palgrave.

  • Phillips, 1896); A Brief Introduction to the Infinitesimal Calculus (1897); The Nature of Capital and Income (1906); The Rate of Interest 0907); National Vitality (1909); The Purchasing Power of Money (1911); Elementary Principles of Economics (1913); Why is the Dollar Shrinking?

  • The study of telephone economics showed that the proper basis for charging was the " message-mile," on the theory that the user should pay according to the facilities offered and the extent to which he made use of them.

  • But apart from the applied science, there is an aspect of pure geography which concerns the theory of the relation of economics to the surface of the earth.

  • Byers, Economics of Railway Operation (New York, 1908); E.

  • Mo.) Economics And Legislation It was at one time an axiom of law and of political economy that prices should be determined by free competition.

  • - On economics of construction and of operation, see Wellington, The Economic Theory of Railway Location (5th ed., New York, 1896).

  • We now have categories for Dutch writers, Dutch historians, Journalism (linked to Industry and business), Animal Husbandry and Horticulture (linked to agriculture and agriculture was linked to economics and biology).

  • Although bitterly opposed by the partisans of scholastic routine, Genovesi found influential patrons, amongst them Bartolomeo Intieri, a Florentine, who in 1754 founded the first Italian or European chair of political economy (commerce and mechanics), on condition that Genovesi should be the first professor, and that it should never be held by an ecclesiastic. The fruit of Genovesi's professorial labours was the Lezioni di Commercio, the first complete and systematic work in Italian on economics.

  • The first sign we have of his interest in economics is a letter (1749) on paper money, written to his fellow student the abbe de Cice, refuting the abbe Terrasson's defence of Law's system.

  • We understand by economics the science which investigates the manner in which nations or other larger or smaller communities, and their individual members, obtain food, clothing, shelter and whatever else is considered desirable or necessary for the maintenance and improvement of the conditions of life.

  • There is in existence a vast store of accumulated knowledge, and few, if any, departments of economics have been left quite unilluminated by the researches of former generations.

  • It is easy to understand, therefore, why we trace the beginnings of economics, so far as England is concerned, in the 16th century, and why the application of strict scientific tests in this subject of human study has become possible only in comparatively recent times.

  • Medieval economics was little more than a casuistical system of elaborate and somewhat artificial rules of conduct.

  • Economics, therefore, under modern conditions, is not only a subject which may usefully occupy the attention of a leisured class of scientific men.

  • They vary for different periods, and are not the same for all branches of economics.

  • In times past, and to a less extent in our own day, philosophical conceptions have formed the basis of great systems of politics and economics.

  • The historical relations between philosophy and economics are of great importance in tracing the development of the latter, and have done much to determine its present form.

  • Experimental psychology may in course of time have an important bearing on economics, but the older science cannot be said to be of much significance except in its historical aspects.

  • It is in the adaptation of biological conceptions and methods, in the positive contributions of jurisprudence, law and history, in the rigorous application, where possible, of quantitative tests, that the explanation of the present position of economics is to be found.

  • Mathematics has influenced the form and the terminology of the science, and has sometimes been useful in analysis; but mathematical methods of reasoning, in their application to economics, while possessing a certain fascination, are of very doubtful utility.

  • There is no method of investigation which is peculiarly economic or of which economics has the monopoly.

  • There would probably have been no controversy at all on this subject but for the fact that economics was elaborated into systematic form, and made the basis of practical measures of the greatest importance, long before the remarkable development in the 19th century of historical research, experimental science and biology.

  • The application of the a priori method in economics was an accident, due to its association with other subjects and the general backwardness of other sciences rather than any exceptional and peculiar character in the subject-matter of the science itself.

  • The methods applied to economics in the 18th and the early part of the 19th century were no more invented with a special view to that subject than the principles of early railway legislation, in the domain.

  • Where the newer methods were assimilated, the position of economics was strengthened and its practical utility increased.

  • In all branches of economics, even in what is called the pure theory, there is an implied reference to certain historical or existing conditions of a more or less definite character; to the established order of an organized state or other community, at a stage of development which in its main features can be recognized.

  • In common with other sciences, economics makes use of " abstractions"; but if for some problems we employ symbolic processes of reasoning, we must keep clearly in view the limits of their significance, and neither endow the symbols with attributes they can never possess, nor lose sight of the realities behind them.

  • To many minds the interest and usefulness of economics depend entirely on the application of these methods, for it is the actual working of economic institutions about which the statesman, the publicist, the business man and the artisan wish to know.

  • Of what possible use are the works of the so-called classical writers, except in relation to the history of economics and the practical influence of theory in past times ?

  • If we take the mere popular view of what is meant by the " old Political Economy," that is, that a generation or so ago economics was comprised in a neatly rounded set of general propositions, universally accepted, which could be set forth in a question we have really to determine is how we can make the best use of the accumulated knowledge of past generations, and to do that we must look more closely into the economic science of the 10th century..

  • In stating the position of economics during this time we cannot ignore all writers, except those who belonged to one group, however eminent that group may have been, simply because they did not represent the dominant ideas of the period, and exercised no immediate and direct influence on the movement of economic thought.

  • We must include the pioneers of the historical school, the economic historians, the socialists, the statisticians, and others whose contributions to economics are now appreciated, and without whose labours the science as we know it now would have been impossible.

  • That they must be studied closely by every one who wishes to follow the history of economics goes without saying.

  • In the history of economics or the biography of Ricardo it is of interest to show that he anticipated later writers, or that his analysis bears the test of modern criticism; but no economist is under any obligation to defend Ricardo's reputation, nor is the fact that a doctrine is included in his works to be taken as a demonstration of its truth.

  • The appeal to authority cannot be permitted in economics any more than in chemistry, physics or astronomy.

  • No one is concerned to prove that the Ricardian economics applies to the manorial system, and it is generally supposed at any rate that the world has been approximating more and more nearly during the last century to the conditions assumed in most of the reasoning of that school.

  • On the principles we have explained, therefore, the Ricardian economics should supply just that body of general theory which is required in the investigation of modern economic problems, and the reputation of at any rate the leading writers should be as great as ever.

  • In a subject like economics it must always be very difficult to decide how far a departure from the traditional form and.

  • Economics is therefore, on the whole, an intensely conservative science, in which new truths are cautiously admitted or incorporated merely as extensions or qualifications of those enunciated by previous writers.

  • In the case of many subjects this would matter very little, but in that of economics, which touches the ordinary life of the community at so many points, it is of great importance, especially at a time like the present, when economic questions determine the policy of great nations.

  • The " economic man " of the earlier writers, with his aversion from labour and his desire of the present enjoyment of costly indulgences, has been abandoned by their successors, with the result that in the opinion of many good people altruistic sentiment may be allowed to run wild over the whole domain of economics.

  • Others, which were considered of fundamental importance, owe their position in modern economics and the form in which they are stated to the " tradition of the elders."

  • In modern economics "fertility" has no very definite meaning.

  • Moreover, the study of the theory of rent has had a very great influence on all branches of economics by destroying the notion that it is possible to draw sharp lines of distinction, or deal with economic conceptions as though they were entirely independent categories.

  • How can such a huge mass of general propositions as are necessarily included in a system of economics ever be thoroughly tested by an appeal to facts?

  • So that no great amount of original work is required for a reliable account of those general features of the modern system which should form the introduction to economics.

  • There are few if any conceptions in economics which cannot be expressed in it without depleting the ordinary vocabulary.

  • At present the language of economics is for the ordinary Englishman like a foreign language of exceptional difficulty, because he is constantly meeting with words which suggest to his mind a whole world of associations quite different form those with which economic theory has clothed them.

  • The scientific study of the economics of local administration is, however, in its infancy, and requires to be taken up in earnest by economists.

  • TREATIES; TRUSTS; MONEY; FINANCE; &c. The bibliography of economics as a whole would include a history of all the writers on the subject, and .is beyond our scope here; see the numerous articles on economic subjects throughout this work.

  • Hadley's Economics: An Account of the Relations between Private Property and Public Welfare (1896).

  • There are two excellent secondary accounts: Samuel P. Orth, The Centralization of Administration in Ohio, in the Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, xvi.

  • Wilcox, Municipal Government in Michigan and Ohio, in the Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, v.

  • Gephart's Transportation and Industrial Development in the Middle West (New York, 1909), in the Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, is a commercial history of Ohio.

  • The history of no agricultural product contains more of interest and instruction for the student of economics than does that of cotton seed in the United States.

  • Having started as a tanner and merchant at Havre, he acquired considerable wealth, was elected to the National Assembly on the 21st of August 1881, and took his seat as a member of the Left, interesting himself chiefly in matters concerning economics, railways and the navy.

  • His practical motto, if he is the author of the Economics attributed to him, is - " no outrage, and no familiarity."

  • In 1866 the Cobden Club was founded in London, to promote free-trade economics, and it became a centre for political propaganda on those lines; and prizes were instituted in his name at Oxford and Cambridge.

  • (I) General descriptions, zoology, ethnology, economics, &c.: A.

  • The faculties are theology, arts, law, music, medicine, science, engineering and economics.

  • Bacon, with bibliography of mathematics of economics by Irving Fisher, 1897) was published in 1838.

  • Besides the Istituto di studii superiori there is the Istituto di scienze sociali "Cesare Alfieri," founded by the marchese Alfieri di Sostegno for the education of aspirants to the diplomatic and consular services, and for students of economics and social sciences (about 50 students); an academy of fine arts, a conservatoire of music, a higher female training-college with 150 students, a number of professional and trade schools, and an academy of recitation.

  • 3 Closely related to Franklin's political pamphlets are his writings on economics, which, though undertaken with a political 1 " Seventy-five editions of it have been printed in English, fiftysix in French, eleven in German and nine in Italian.

  • (d) Politics and Economics - B.

  • It economics he is best known by his vindication of the American writer H.

  • But in working out the consequences of this view Say is not free from obscurities and inconsistencies; and by his comprehension of these immaterial products within the domain of economics he is confirmed in the error of regarding that science as filling the whole sphere which really belongs to sociology.

  • Bow (Economics of Construction), and is convenient in applying the theory of reciprocal figures to the computation of stresses on frames.

  • Moreover, in some minor branches of politics and economics Rousseau was a real reformer.

  • It was in favour of creating in central Europe a new political and economic system by which permanent peace would be secured - a definite understanding between all the " Succession States " of the former AustroHungarian monarchy in the matter of communications, post, telegraphs, navigation, finance and banking, exchange of goods and commercial treaties generally, opening up the way to a system of unfettered economics and freer trade - but at the same time jealously guarding the economic and political sovereignty of the Czechoslovak Republic.

  • Even those who do not fall into the error of making Smith the creator of the science, often separate him too broadly from Quesnay and his followers, and represent the history of modern economics as consisting of the successive rise and reign of three doctrines - the mercantile, the physiocratic and the Smithian.

  • In 1900 illiterates (that is, persons unable to write, the 2 See his Discussions in Economics and Statistics, ii.

  • Harrington and others; also articles in Canadian Economics and in the Handbook of Canada, published on the occasion of visits of the British Association.

  • 64 OLKovopecb: De cura rei familiaris: Economics, on the good of the family.

  • 5) and co-ordinated with politics and economics (ib.

  • Economics, about the good of the family.

  • E 2), and would in the classification include not only metaphysics and mathematics, but also physics, ethics, economics, politics, necessary and fine art; or in short.

  • In the German Reichstag he was the leading authority on matters of finance and economics, as well as a clear and persuasive speaker, and it was chiefly owing to him that a gold currency was adopted and that the German Imperial Bank took its present form; in his later years he wrote and spoke strongly against bimetallism.

  • In the year 1866 he published a little book about girls, and written for girls, a mixture of morals, theology, economics and geology, under the title of Ethics of the Dust; and this was followed by a more important and popular work, The Crown of Wild Olive.

  • But the negative part of Ruskin's teaching on economics, social and political problems, has been much more effective than the positive part of his teaching.

  • The Board of Trade was asked to supply full figures, and while its report was awaited the uncertainty of attitude on the part of the government afforded grateful opportunity for opposition mischief-making, since the Liberal party had now the chance of acting as the conservative champions of orthodox economics.

  • But Hume was the first to apply to economics the scientific methods of his philosophy.

  • His services to economics may be summed up in two heads: (I) he established the relation between economic facts and the fundamental phenomena of social life, and (2) he introduced into the study of these facts the new historical method.

  • A very few examples must suffice to illustrate his services to economics.

  • Practically every treatise on economics deals with Malthus and his essay, but the following special works may be referred to: Soetbeer, Die Stellung der Sozialisten zur Malthusschen Bevälkerungslehre (Berlin, 1886); G.

  • includes Geography, Economics, Government, Inhabitants, Finance and Army.

  • But it was in the field of economics that he principally achieved his fame.

  • Among Mr Shaw's later writings on economics are: Socialism for Millionaires (1901), The Common Sense of Municipal Trading (1904), and Fabianism and the Fiscal Question (1904).

  • About this time he turned to questions of economics and government.

  • He graduated at Amherst, at the head of his class, in 1872;� and between 1873 and 1876 he studied political science, history and economics at Göttingen, Berlin and Heidelberg, Germany, receiving the degree of Ph.D.at Heidelberg in 1876, with the highest honours (summa cum laude).

  • In that capacity, and, before his appointment at Leiden, as a lecturer on political science, history and economics at Amsterdam, he gained great reputation as a political reformer, particularly after the publication of his standard work, Aanteekeningen op de Grondwet (" Annotations on the Constitution," 1839; 2nd ed., Amsterdam, 1841-1843), which became the textbook and the groundwork for the new reform party in Holland, as whose leader Thorbecke was definitely recognized.

  • 2 (New York, 1904) of Columbia University Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law; C. H.

  • Man's place is not even central, as he appears a temporary inhabitant of a minor planet in one of the lesser stellar systems. Every science is involved, and theology has come into conflict with metaphysics, logic, astronomy, physics, chemistry, geology, zoology, biology, history and even economics and medicine.

  • The founding and the growth of such communities furnish matter for an interesting chapter in the history as well of ancient as of modern civilization; and the regulation of the relations between the parent state and its dependencies abroad gives rise to important problems alike in national policy and in international economics.

  • It is clear that a survey of the history of these so-called middle ages - long use makes the term inevitable - must include not only the political phase, but also economics, religion, law, science, literature, &c., since all are involved in the concept.

  • The application of the method of reciprocal figures was facilitated by a system of notation published in Economics of Construction in relation to framed Structures, by Robert H.

  • He also wrote on questions of finance and economics.

  • He resigned from the civil service in 1891 to give his whole time to the work of the Council (where he was chairman of the Technical Education Board) and to the study of economics.

  • He married in 1892 Miss Beatrice Potter, herself a writer on economics and sociology, the author of The Co-operative Movement in Great Britain (1891)(1891) and a contributor to Charles Booth's Life and Labour of the People (1891-1903).

  • Professor Marshall has said of his work in economics that it "will probably be found to have more constructive force than any, save that of Ricardo, that has been done during the last hundred years."

  • Jevons arrived quite early in his career at the doctrines that constituted his most characteristic and original contributions to economics and logic. The theory of utility, which became the keynote of his general theory of political economy, was practically formulated in a letter written in 1860; and the germ of his logical principles of the substitution of similars may be found in the view which he propounded in another letter written in 1861, that "philosophy would be found to consist solely in pointing out the likeness of things."

  • The theory of utility above referred to, namely, that the degree of utility of a commodity is some continuous mathematical function of the quantity of the coin modity available, together with the implied doctrine that economics is essentially a mathematical science, took more definite form in a paper on "A General Mathematical Theory of Political Economy," written for the British Association in 1862.

  • As regards the discovery of the connexion between value in exchange and final (or marginal) utility, the priority belongs to Gossen, but this in no way detracts from the great importance of the service which Jevons rendered to English economics by his fresh discovery of the principle, and by the way in which he ultimately forced it into notice.

  • A Serious Fall in the Value of Gold (1863) and The Coal Question (1865) placed him in the front rank as a writer on applied economics and statistics; and he would be remembered as one of the leading economists of the 19th century even had his Theory of Political Economy never been written.

  • He was engaged at the time of his death upon the preparation of a large treatise on economics and had drawn up a table of contents and completed some chapters and parts of chapters.

  • This fragment was published in 1905 under the title of The Principles of Economics: a Fragment of a Treatise on the Industrial Mechanism of Society, and other Papers.

  • Economics and Commerce.

  • He first introduced into economics on a great scale the method of deduction from a priori assumptions.

  • These form precisely that branch of economics into which moral ideas (beyond the plain prescriptions of honesty) can scarcely be said to enter, and where the operation of purely mercantile principles is most immediate and invariable.

  • he translated the Ethics, Politics and Economics of Aristotle.

  • The perspective changes - the Renaissance grows less and the middle ages more; the Protestant Revolution becomes a complex of economics and politics and religion; the French Revolution a vast social reform in which the Terror was an incident, &c., &c. The result has been a complete transformation of history since the middle of the 19th century.

  • The university embraces a college and engineering school, the Western Pennsylvania School of Mines and Mining Engineering, a graduate department, an evening school of economics, accounts and finances, a summer school, evening classes, Saturday clasess, and departments of astronomy (the Allegheny Observatory, in the Allegheny district), law (the Pittsburg Law School), medicine (the Western Pennsylvania Medical College), pharmacy (the Pittsburgh College of Pharmacy) and dentistry (the Pittsburgh Dental College).

  • (a) Descriptive accounts, geography, commerce and economics: - The best early accounts of the colony are found in de la Caille's Journal historique du voyage fait au Cap de Bonne Espe'rance (Paris, 1763), the Nouvelle Description du Cap de Bonne Esperance (Amsterdam, 1778); F.

  • Gilbert's Trade and Currency in Early Oregon, in the Columbia University Studies in Economics, vol.

  • occur in statistics, economics, &c. An average is found by adding together several measurements of the same kind and dividing by the number of measurements.

  • To this revolt, and to the general tendency to find the principle of morality in an ideal good present to the consciousness of all persons capable of acting morally, the widespread recognition of reason as the ultimate court of appeal alike in religion or politics, and latterly in economics also, has no doubt contributed largely.

  • Johnston Lavis, " Notes on the Geography, Geology, Agriculture and Economics of Iceland," Scott.

  • C.) Economics And Administration Population.

  • His turn for economics made Orry,1 the controller-general of finance, for long his essential partner.

  • 2 He was born in Hinsdale, New Hampshire, on the Loth of January 1844; served in the Union army during the Civil War; graduated at Brown University in 1870 and at Newton Theological Institution in 1874; taught homiletics at Newton in 1879-1882, history and economics at Brown in 1882-1888, and political economy and finance at Cornell in 1888-1889; and was president of Brown University in 1889-1898.

  • He wrote on the currency question, and published a History of the United States in our Own Times (1904) and other works on American history and economics.

  • 7 Hamilton's Report on Manufactures (1791) by itself entitles him to the place of an epoch-maker in economics.

  • Dunbar, Quarterly Journal of Economics, iii.

  • Other than aesthetics and economics, she had little idea what kind of vehicle she wanted.

  • It discusses hoof trimming, the economics of lameness, biotin and lameness and the influence of diet and rumen acidosis.

  • assistant professor of economics who specializes in international economics.

  • associative economics.

  • According to Mises, all of the categories, theorems, or laws of economics are implied in the action axiom.

  • Many agree that this shift toward neo-liberal economics and away from Keynesianism signaled the beginning of the sometimes rather nebulous term ' globalization ' .

  • boom bust economics.

  • The same situation has taken place in economics, industry, etc. The list of commodities (goods and services) has become boundless.

  • Get them to write down a definition or hold a brainstorm of words they associate with economics.

  • business administration courses introduces you to subjects such as economics, accounting and finance and comprises a third of the degree scheme.

  • bust economics.

  • Don't forget the mess we inherited in 1997: boom bust economics.

  • combine expertise in diverse disciplines including law, finance, economics and politics.

  • Martin Wolf is associate editor and chief economics commentator at the Financial Times.

  • Serious study of the work of these economists is essential if a coherent, logically consistent ' new economics ' is to emerge.

  • And nobody has dared to seriously challenge it. · William Keegan is the Observer's senior economics correspondent.

  • cut taxes while hugely increasing the defense budget as " voodoo economics.

  • My longer term project is a critical deconstruction of the concept of " classical economics " .

  • defy what was universally taught in economics courses around the world.

  • The claim to universality and the isolated abstract individual presupposed by such economics constitutes a denial of interdependence and impermanence.

  • disciplines of economics and management with engineering.

  • His own work on micro economics makes him extremely doubtful.

  • A mixture of water chemistry, wetland ecology and dynamics, environmental economics and agri-environmental policy!

  • Candidates may have research interests in any area of economics, including econometrics.

  • The MSc in Economics and econometrics, which has a specialization in advanced econometrics and a choice from a set of further econometrics options.

  • This book is a model of applied ecological economics.

  • Note the number of them who teach economics in the state universities.

  • Classical and neoclassical economics are primarily about the efficient allocation of resources.

  • Brittan is well known for his critique of Keynesian economics and advocacy of market friendly and politically libertarian ideas.

  • In post-war Germany, the harsh realities of pure free-market economics were tempered by political concerns for decades.

  • For some it's an opportunity to build a vast campaign to assert the popular will against the tides of neo-liberal economics and politics.

  • Instead of locating the rule-breakers n the vocabulary of neoliberal economics, they are presented as threats to the security of US citizens.

  • Growing up on Carswell Farm, a traditional cattle and arable farm near Plymouth, Sayers studied agricultural economics at Edinburgh University.

  • economics camarota s benefits may be meeting a child's percent of employeesnational.

  • economics jensen g notes that the nearly l people.

  • economics hadley not having healthcare new york state health insurance coverage the agency for.

  • economics policymakers and of having group.

  • economics remler d similar to private.

  • economics professor, turned out to know exactly what was needed to heal the wounds of Italy's economy.

  • During the primaries, Bush had derided Reagan's hallmark pledge to cut taxes while hugely increasing the defense budget as " voodoo economics.

  • Business economics - Covers macro economics, looking at how industry operates and how it is affected by governmental policies and international agreements.

  • Before that he had various research jobs, mainly concerned with labor economics.

  • Don't forget the mess we inherited in 1997: Boom bust economics.

  • Obviously the converse is true of Individual B. Two Theorems of welfare economics And now two theorems of welfare economics.

  • Subjects: health care, health economics, health links.

  • Happiness economics would target unemployment beyond what is economically efficient to what is optimal for well-being.

  • Applied economics at RGU, with its interdisciplinary approach makes RGU graduates eminently employable.

  • Many people see him as the founding father of modern economics.

  • Only in economics, it seems, are natural laws persistently flouted.

  • foster entrepreneurship and act as centers of expertise in the teaching of economics and business in parallel with enterprise.

  • founding father of modern economics.

  • Keyes, C. F. " Buddhist Economics and Buddhist fundamentalism in Burma and Thailand.

  • Quot state insurance psychological distress scale regulatory economics jensen gical distress scale regulatory economics jensen g describe any experience.

  • Quot state insurance psychological distress scale regulatory economics jensen gical distress scale regulatory economics jensen g describe any experience.

  • The economics of developing proprietary hardware didn't measure up for companies accustomed to high-margin businesses like software and Internet services.

  • heterodox economics Lawson, Tony Vol.

  • heterodox tradition in economics.

  • heterodox approaches to Economics.

  • During these periods the girls did what would now be called home economics.

  • In March 1942 Vichy passed a law making home economics a compulsory subject for girls.

  • ignorance of economics.

  • It is quite helpful to me as I am woefully ignorant when it comes to matters of economics at this level.

  • You do not need a PhD in airport economics to find this forecast wildly implausible.

  • imprecise term in economics.

  • And the difficulty in distinguishing between the two is one of the things that lead economists to differ and economics to appear so imprecise.

  • technological innovation has driven changes in the underlying economics of the industry.

  • The set of papers thus shows many interrelations that could be welded into a firm foundation for evolutionary economics.

  • Students are required to attend introductory September courses in mathematics, statistics, economics and econometrics before the main teaching program starts in October.

  • lecturer in economics at the University of East Anglia.

  • Such findings are at odds with standard theory yet accord with a substantial number of findings within the marketing and experimental economics literatures.

  • The division teaches the ma in Economics and contributes significantly to MAs in Economics and Finance and in Transport Economics.

  • He is Professor of Economics and Head of Department at the London School of Economics, where he teaches mainly macroeconomics.

  • His teaching interests include macroeconomics and labor economics, and his research interests cover all aspects of labor markets.

  • mainsprings of growth identified by the new growth economics.

  • In many cases the overall economics are so unexceptional in most median sized practices that corporate investors will not even consider them for acquisition.

  • Ian teaches applied microeconomics, business decision-making, finance and defense economics.

  • Transport Economics Transport Economics as a branch of applied microeconomics has a long and venerable history.

  • monetarist economics and the misery that has brought.

  • Giantism in economics is anti-competitive and limits choice, and has already all but ruined British agriculture thanks to the retail monopolists.

  • Certainly, in media interviews the normally voluble economics graduate was virtually monosyllabic, his face resembling an Easter Island statue.

  • new economicsves of the Northern Dimension Research Program in the light of the new institutional economics (with A.Kuznetsov ).

  • new economics of the minimum wage suggests that the impact on employment is broadly neutral.

  • normative economics means to include value judgments in our reasoning.

  • outpace is also outpacing other East Asian countries, according to Shahid Yusuf, head of research for development economics at the World Bank.

  • pamphlet collection of the London School of Economics.

  • The economics and the psychology of these elements is essentially parasitic in character.

  • pervades every aspect of our policy, from economics to public services.

  • Gail Wilson is lecturer in social policy at the London School of Economics.

  • He has a Master's degree in comparative politics from the London School of Economics.

  • polityomics or Institutions The practices researched and commended to Business Economics students related to the Business Man and his decisions within changing polities.

  • pragmatism rules, irrespective of your economics!

  • June 2005 To use the data to investigate the economics of cardiovascular disease prevention in primary care.

  • professor of economics at the University of Queensland.

  • rational in terms of national economics is, however, overturned by the business logic of individual employers.

  • That which sounds rational in terms of national economics is, however, overturned by the business logic of individual employers.

  • satirist economics had (something it badly needed, and still does ).

  • Ansible 222, " Economics 2.0 pyramid scams " -- a nod to Charles Stross's Accelerando.

  • served as a poignant reminder that trade is not just about economics and business.

  • The ideological shibboleths of neo-liberal economics have been broken.

  • It's not slavish devotion to free market economics to point that out.

  • Colleges could teach the core units to combined classes of students studying a number of engineering specialisms, thereby improving the economics of teaching.

  • What advice can you give prospective economics students to help them get the most from studying the subject?

  • supply-side economics to date.

  • Where she is in the territory of health economics or health policy, she seems less sure-footed.

  • tapped into a rich vein of thinking in both law and economics.

  • Of course people can't switch jobs just like that - only in economics textbooks, not in the real world.

  • It discusses hoof trimming, the economics of lameness, biotin and lameness and the influence of diet and rumen acidosis.

  • He did not study economics until his third year at Cambridge where it was required as part of the moral sciences tripos.

  • The Economics and Statistics Library will operate as usual until 16 August.

  • Beginning particularly with John Stuart Mill, bourgeois science differentiated itself into an Ethics called utilitarianism and a science called Economics.

  • voodoo economics, like the new age cult members they are.

  • She herself produced various works on economics, including Political Economy for Beginners (1870), Tales in Political Economy (1875), and, with her husband, a volume of Essays and Lectures (1872).

  • President Harper more than once stated most categorically that contrary to prevalent beliefs no donor of funds to the university " has ever (1902) by a single word or act indicated his dissatisfaction with the instruction given to students in the university, or with the public expression of opinion made by any officer of the university "; and certainly so far as the public press reveals, no other university of the country has had so many professors who have in various lines, including economics, expressed radical views in public.

  • 1827), an authority upon banking and economics generally; and Sir Reginald Francis Douce Palgrave.

  • Phillips, 1896); A Brief Introduction to the Infinitesimal Calculus (1897); The Nature of Capital and Income (1906); The Rate of Interest 0907); National Vitality (1909); The Purchasing Power of Money (1911); Elementary Principles of Economics (1913); Why is the Dollar Shrinking?

  • The study of telephone economics showed that the proper basis for charging was the " message-mile," on the theory that the user should pay according to the facilities offered and the extent to which he made use of them.

  • But apart from the applied science, there is an aspect of pure geography which concerns the theory of the relation of economics to the surface of the earth.

  • Byers, Economics of Railway Operation (New York, 1908); E.

  • Mo.) Economics And Legislation It was at one time an axiom of law and of political economy that prices should be determined by free competition.

  • - On economics of construction and of operation, see Wellington, The Economic Theory of Railway Location (5th ed., New York, 1896).

  • Dixon, " The Interstate Commerce Act as Amended," Quarterly Journal of Economics, xxi.

  • We now have categories for Dutch writers, Dutch historians, Journalism (linked to Industry and business), Animal Husbandry and Horticulture (linked to agriculture and agriculture was linked to economics and biology).

  • Although bitterly opposed by the partisans of scholastic routine, Genovesi found influential patrons, amongst them Bartolomeo Intieri, a Florentine, who in 1754 founded the first Italian or European chair of political economy (commerce and mechanics), on condition that Genovesi should be the first professor, and that it should never be held by an ecclesiastic. The fruit of Genovesi's professorial labours was the Lezioni di Commercio, the first complete and systematic work in Italian on economics.

  • The first sign we have of his interest in economics is a letter (1749) on paper money, written to his fellow student the abbe de Cice, refuting the abbe Terrasson's defence of Law's system.

  • It is an admirably lucid, and even elegant, exposition of the Ricardian economics, the Malthusian theory being of course incorporated with these; but, notwithstanding the introduction of many minor novelties, it is in its scientific substance little or nothing more.

  • We understand by economics the science which investigates the manner in which nations or other larger or smaller communities, and their individual members, obtain food, clothing, shelter and whatever else is considered desirable or necessary for the maintenance and improvement of the conditions of life.

  • There is in existence a vast store of accumulated knowledge, and few, if any, departments of economics have been left quite unilluminated by the researches of former generations.

Browse other sentences examples →