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école

école

école Sentence Examples

  • He was educated at the Ecole Normale, and returned thither as director of studies in 1838, after some years spent in provincial schoolmasterships.

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  • His father, a professor of philosophy, gave him an excellent education at the Stanislas College and the Ecole Normale, where he graduated in 1848.

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  • After being professor of philosophy at several provincial universities, he received the degree of doctor, and came to Paris in 1858 as master of conferences at the Ecole Normale.

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  • The general staff and also the staff of the corps and divisions are composed of_certificated (breveUs) officers who have passed all through the Ecole de Guerre.

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  • Artillery and engineer officers come from the Ecole Polytechnique, infantry and cavalry from the Ecole spciale militaire de St-Cyr.

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  • The chief naval school is the Ecole navale at Brest, which is devoted to the training of officers; the age of admission is from fifteen to eighteen years, and pupils after completing their course pass a year on a frigate school.

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  • At Paris there is a more advanced school (Ecole superieure de la Marine) for the supplementary training of officers.

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  • In 1812 his Escuela de los maridos, a translation of Moliere's Ecole des maris, was produced at Madrid, and in 1813 El Medico a Palos (a translation of Le Medecin malgre lui) at Barcelona.

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  • The very fine torso of Athena in the Ecole des Beaux Arts at Paris, which has unfortunately lost its head, may perhaps best serve to help our imagination in reconstructing a Pheidian original.

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  • 1889-97, at the Ecole Normale Superieure 1897-1900 and at the College de France 1900-21.

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  • In 1872 he was elected master of conferences at the Ecole Normale, and was made doctor of philosophy in recognition of his two treatises, Platonis Hippias Minor sive Socratica contra liberum arbitrium argumenta and La Liberte et le determinisme.

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  • But his progress was so rapid that in two or three years he was able to take his master's place at the lecture-table, and Fourcroy and Vauquelin were so satisfied with his performance that they procured for him a school appointment in 1797 as teacher of chemistry, and in 1798 one as repetiteur at the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • In 1804 Vauquelin resigned his professorship at the College de France and successfully used his influence to obtain the appointment for Thenard, who six years later, after Fourcroy's death, was further elected to the chairs of chemistry at the Ecole Polytechnique and the Faculte des Sciences.

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  • In 1881 Leroy-Beaulieu was elected professor of contemporary history and eastern affairs at the Ecole Libre des Sciences Politiques, becoming director of this institution on the death of Albert Sorel in 1906, and in 1887 he became a member of the Academic des Sciences Morales et Politiques.

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  • He was the son of a banker of Dauphiny, and after receiving his early education at a lyceum, was sent in 1813 to the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • From 1808 to 1810 he attended the .Ecole polytechnique, and afterwards, till 1812, the Ecole d'application at Metz.

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  • From 1815 to 1825 he was occupied with military engineering at Metz; and from 1825 to 1835 he was professor of mechanics at the Ecole d'application there.

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  • In 1834 he became a member of the Academie; from 1838 to 1848 he was professor to the faculty of sciences at Paris, and from 1848 to 1850 commandant of the Ecole polytechnique.

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  • His education was obtained mainly at the Ecole Normale in Paris, where his father, a painter and architect, was engaged in the construction of the Theatre Italien, From his twenty-fifth year he began to lecture in the colleges of Evreux, Dieppe, Blois and Toulouse.

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  • After studying at the Ecole Normale Superieure he was sent to the French school at Athens in 1853, directed some excavations in Chios, and wrote an historical account of the island.

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  • Appointed to a lectureship at the Ecole Normale Superieure in February 1870, to a professorship at the Paris faculty of letters in 1875, and to the chair of medieval history created for him at the Sorbonne in 1878, he applied himself to the study of the political institutions of ancient France.

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  • In 1875 he was elected member of the Academie des Sciences Morales, and in 1880 reluctantly accepted the post of director of the Ecole Normale.

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  • Educated at the Ecole Polytechnique, Gramont early gave up the army for diplomacy.

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  • Ecole Polytechn.

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  • Shortly afterwards the Pasteur family removed to Arbois, where Louis attended the Ecole primaire, and later the college of that place.

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  • Fortunately at Arbois he came under the influence of an excellent teacher in the person of the director of the college, who must have discerned in the quiet boy the germs of greatness, as he constantly spoke to him of his future career at the Ecole normale in Paris.

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  • In October 1838 Louis was sent with a friend to the metropolis, to a school in the Quartier Latin, preparatory to the Ecole normale.

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  • Two years later he passed the examination for the "baccalaureat es sciences" enabling him to become candidate for the Ecole normale.

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  • At the age of twenty-one he entered the Ecole Normale in Paris, and from 1853 to 1858 he held the appointment of keeper of the scientific collections.

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  • The French Ecole d'Athenes, founded in 1846, is under the scientific direction of the Academie des Inscriptions et Belleslettres.

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  • Wurtz reported the existence of only one efficient laboratory in France, namely the Ecole Normale Superieure, under the direction of H.

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  • After passing through the Ecole Polytechnique he became ingenieur-q cier in 1808, and saw active service with the imperial troops in Spain from 1810 to 1812, and again in France in 1814.

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  • Antoine Henri Becquerel (1852-1908), son of the lastnamed, who succeeded to his chair at the Musee d'Histoire Naturelle in 1892, was born in Paris on the 15th of December 1852, studied at the Ecole Polytechnique, where he was appointed a professor in 1895, and in 1875 entered the department des posts et chaussees, of which in 1894 he became chef.

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  • Educated at the Ecole des Chartes, he became professor in the faculty of letters at Grenoble in 1844, and in 1849 at Lyons, where he remained nearly thirty years.

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  • Educated at the Ecole Normale Superieure, he taught for some years in the lycee at Algiers before he joined the diplomatic service in 1871.

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  • After attending the Ecole Polytechnique at Paris, he became professor of physics successively at Bologna (1832), Ravenna (1837) and Pisa (1840).

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  • where he took the first prize in mathematics and physics; at the Ecole Polytechnique, where he stood first at the exit examination in 1819; and at the Ecole des Mines (1819-1822), where he began to show a decided preference for the science with which his name is associated.

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  • In 1823 he was selected along with Dufrenoy by Brochant de Villiers, the professor of geology in the Ecole des Mines, to accompany him on a scientific tour to England and Scotland, in order to inspect the mining and metallurgical establishments of the country, and to study the principles on which Greenough's geological map of England (1820) had been prepared, with a view to the construction of a similar map of France.

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  • In 1835 he was appointed professor of geology at the Ecole des Mines, in succession to Brochant de Villiers, whose assistant he had been in the duties of the chair since 1827.

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  • After his superannuation at the Ecole des Mines he continued to superintend the issue of the detailed maps almost until his death, which occurred at Canon on the 21st of September 1874.

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  • His design was frustrated by the establishment of and his official connexion with the Ecole Normale, and the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • The first, second and third sections of this publication comprise respectively the papers communicated by him to the Academies of Sciences of Turin, Berlin and Paris; the fourth includes his miscellaneous contributions to other scientific collections, together with his additions to Euler's Algebra, and his Lecons elementaires at the Ecole Normale in 1795.

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  • Balard at the Ecole Normale, and in 1859 became professor at the Sorbonne in place of J.

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  • Having attended at the Ecole des Mines in Paris, he assisted Elie de Beaumont in the chair of geology at the College de France from 1855 until he succeeded him in 1874.

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  • He accordingly obtained for him an appointment as professor of mathematics in the Ecole Militaire of Paris, and continued zealously to forward his interests.

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  • He was one of the first members, and became president of the Bureau of Longitudes, took a prominent place at the Institute (founded in 1796), professed analysis at the Ecole Normale, and aided in the organization of the decimal system.

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  • When sixteen years old he began to attend the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris, and from 1837 to 1839 studied at the Ecole des Mines.

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  • List of authentic works of Jean Goujon: Two marble columns supporting the organ of the church of St Maclou (Rouen) on right and left of porch on entering; left-hand gate of the church of St Maclou; bas-reliefs for decoration of screen of St Germain l'Auxerrois (now in Louvre); "Victory" over chimney-piece of Salle des Gardes at Ecouen; altar at Chantilly; illustrations for Jean Martin's translation of Vitruvius; bas-reliefs and sculptural decoration of Fontaine des Innocents; bas-reliefs adorning entrance of Hotel Carnavalet, also series of satyrs' heads on keystones of arcade of courtyard; fountain of Diana from Anet (now in Louvre); internal decoration of chapel at Anet; portico of Anet (now in courtyard of Ecole des Beaux Arts); bust of Diane de Poictiers (now at Versailles); Tribune of Caryatides in the Louvre; decoration of "Escalier Henri II.," Louvre; eeils de beeuf and decoration of Henri II.

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  • On the institution of the Ecole Normale at Paris in 1795 he was sent to teach in it, and was afterwards attached to the Ecole Polytechnique, where he occupied the chair of analysis.

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  • In 1826 Fourier became a member of the French Academy, and in 1827 succeeded Laplace as president of the council of the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • de Senarmont (1808-1862), was appointed conservator of the mineralogical collections at the Ecole des Mines.

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  • Des Cloizeaux (1817-1897) at the Ecole Normale, and in 1876 he became professor of mineralogy at the Sorbonne, but on the death of Wurtz in 1884 he exchanged that position for the chair of organic chemistry.

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  • He then entered the Ecole des Chartes, where, under the influence of J.

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  • The lectures at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, which he attended from its foundation in 1868, revealed his true bent; and henceforth he devoted himself almost entirely to scholarship. He began modestly by the study of the municipal charters of St Omer.

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  • Having been appointed assistant lecturer and afterwards full lecturer at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, it was to the town of St Omer that he devoted his first lectures and his first important work, Histoire de la vile de Saint-Omer et de ses institutions jusqu'au XI V e siecle (1877).

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  • About this time personal considerations induced Giry to devote the greater part of his activity to the study of diplomatic, which had been much neglected at the Ecole des Chartes, but had made great strides in Germany.

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  • CHARLES CAGNIARD DE LA TOUR (1777-1859), French engineer and physicist, was born in Paris on the 31st of March 1 777, and after attending the Ecole Polytechnique became one of the ingenieurs geographiques.

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  • Gaultier de Claubry (1792-1873), professor of chemistry at the Ecole de Pharmacie, and soon afterwards, by the influence of A.

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  • In his childhood Gaston Paris learned to appreciate the Old French romances as poems and stories, and this early impulse to the study of Romance literature was placed on a solid basis by courses of study at Bonn (1856-1857) under Friedrich Diez, at Göttingen (1857-1858) and finally at the Ecole des Chartes (1858-1861).

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  • In France itself he trained at the Ecole des Chartes and the College de France a band of disciples who continued the traditions of exact research that he established.

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  • At the Ecole des Chartes, where his career was remarkably brilliant, his valedictory thesis was an Essai sur les revenus publics en Normandie au XII' siècle (1849), and it was to the history of his native province that he devoted his early works.

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  • He must not be confused with Emil Kopp (1817-1875), who, born at Warselnheim, Alsace, became in 1847 professor of toxicology and chemistry at the Ecole superieure de Pharmacie at Strasburg, in 1849 professor of physics and chemistry at Lausanne, in 1852 chemist to a Turkey-red factory near Manchester, in 1868 professor of technology at Turin, and finally, in 1871, professor of technical chemistry at the Polytechnic of Zurich, where he died in 1875.

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  • He was sent for his earliest instruction to the school of the town, and in 1814 was admitted to the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • After he had been two years at the Ecole Polytechnique he took a foremost part in a mutinous demonstration against one of the masters; the school was broken up, and Comte like the other scholars was sent home.

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  • He continued his studies, and after obtaining the doctor's degree at the Sorbonne, he was appointed teacher of German in the Ecole militaire at St Cyr, and shortly afterwards, professor of foreign literatures at Douai.

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  • He studied medicine in Paris at the newly established Ecole de Medecine, and was appointed by competition prosector when only eighteen years of age.

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  • He was admitted to the Ecole Polytechnique in 1812, and late in 1814 he left with a commission in the Engineers and with prospects of rapid advancement in his profession.

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  • Accordingly as early as 1669 the French government decided on the foundation of a school for French dragomans at Constantinople, for which in later years was substituted the Ecole des langues orientales in Paris; most of the great powers eventually took some similar step, England also adopting in 1877 a system, since modified, for the selection and tuition of a corps of Britishborn dragomans.

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  • Delecluze, Louis David, son ecole et son temps (Paris, 1855), and Le Peintre Louis David.

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  • In November 1885 he was appointed lecturer at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes.

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  • In 1870 he was at the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, but enlisted in the army, and was wounded.

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  • He became engineer-in-chief of mines, and professor of mineralogy and director of studies at the Ecole des Mines at Paris.

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  • He used his influence for the advancement of science and higher education, and with Victor Duruy was one of the founders of the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • When almost despairing, in December 1791, he fled once more to London, where he wrote his Ecole du citoyen.

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  • At the Ecole Militaire youths are trained nominally for the army, but many go there who intend to enter one of the professions or the public service.

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  • In 1835 Quicherat entered the Ecole des Chartes; he left two years later at the head of the college.

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  • of Melanges historiques, part of Documents inedits), &c. These works did not wholly occupy his time: in 1847 he inaugurated a course of archaeological lectures at the Ecole des Chartes, and in 1849 was appointed professor of diplomacy at the same college.

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  • After 1871, his course of lectures on diplomacy having been given up, Quicherat, still professor of archaeology, was nominated director of the Ecole des Chartes.

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  • GASPARD CLAIR FRANCOIS MARIE RICHE DE PRONY (1755-1839), French engineer, was born at Chamelet, in the department of the Rhone, on the 22nd of July 1755, and was educated at the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees.

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  • The laborious enterprise of drawing up the famous Tables du Cadastre was entrusted to his direction in 1792, and in 1794 he was appointed professor of the mathematical sciences at the Ecole Polytechnique, becoming director at the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees four years later.

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  • Soon afterwards he was appointed professor of mathematics in the Ecole Militaire at Paris, and he was afterwards professor in the Ecole Normale.

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  • He was examiner in the Ecole Polytechnique, but held few important state offices.

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  • The university took possession of the Collegium Claromontanum, then known as the College Louis-le-Grand, and transformed it into an ecole normale.

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  • In 1863, under Napoleon III., Victor Duruy encouraged the study of history, and also did much for classical learning by founding the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • He studied at the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris, and in 1817 entered the Administration des Poudres et Salpetres.

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  • After studying at the Ecole normale superieure, he completed his studies in Germany.

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  • He was appointed "repetiteur" at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes on its foundation in 1868.

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  • He was educated at the Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, and, after a period of mental struggle which he has described in Souvenirs de ma jeunesse, he was ordained priest in 1832.

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  • After a stay at Strassburg as professor of the Petit Seminaire, he was appointed director of the College Stanislas in Paris in 1842 and, in 1847, chaplain of the Ecole Normale Superieure.

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  • In 1865 he left the ecole normale superieure, and went to Germany, where he studied at Göttingen and Berlin.

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  • Duruy to give lectures on history, following the method used in German seminaries, at the ecole des hautes etudes.

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  • A year later he was entrusted with a course of chemical instruction at Miilhausen, and he remained in that town till 1865 as professor at the Ecole Superieure des Sciences.

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  • Balard at the College de France, in 1876 he succeeded that chemist in the chair of chemistry, and in 1882 he became directing professor at the municipal Ecole de Physique et de Chimie.

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  • He was educated at the lycee Louis-le-Grand and the ecole normale superieure, and took his degree as associate in philosophy in 1881.

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  • After studying in his native town and taking the university course in Berlin (1842-1843) he went to Paris, and passed first in the examination for fellowship (agregation) of the lycees (1845), first in the examinations on leaving the Ecole des Chartes, and first in the examination for fellowship of the faculties (1849).

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  • At the age of twelve he entered the Ecole royale de Sculpture, and at twenty, having learnt all that he could from Michel Ange Slodtz and Pigalle, he carried off the prix de Rome and left France for Italy, where he spent the next ten years of his life.

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  • As a boy he served in an ambulance corps during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, and later passed with distinction through the Ecole Polytechnique in mining, becoming a mining engineer, but soon abandoning practical work for teaching, first at Caen and later in the university of Paris.

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  • Entering GayLussac's laboratory in 1831, he became preparateur at the Ecole Polytechnique in 1834 and at the College de France in 1837.

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  • His next post was that of repetiteur at the Ecole Polytechnique, where in 1846 he was appointed professor, and in 1850 he succeeded Gay-Lussac in the chair of chemistry at the Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, of which he was director, in succession to M.

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  • Bertrand, Un Critique d'art dans l'antiquite: Philostrate et son ecole (1882); Bergk, "Die Philostrate" in Rini' Abhandlungen zur Geschichte der griechischen Philosophic and Astronomic (1883); Schmid, Atticismus iv.

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  • He received his historical training in the Ecole des Chartes, and became maitre de conferences in the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • Towards the close of 1794, when the Ecole Polytechnique was established, he was appointed along with Monge over the department of descriptive geometry.

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  • He retained, however, till his death the office of professor in the faculty of sciences in the Ecole Normale, to which he had been appointed in 1810.

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  • It was left to him to develop the geometry of Monge, and to him also is due in great measure the rapid advancement which France made soon after the establishment of the Ecole Polytechnique in the construction of machinery .

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  • Ecole poly.

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  • He was also professor at the ecole illustre.

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  • In 1843 he was appointed to a professorship in the Ecole Evangelique at Geneva, but the development of his opinions in favour of the Liberal movement in Protestant theology led to his resigning the post six years later.

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  • The process was worked out by Deville in his laboratory at the Ecole Normale in Paris.

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  • He studied at Nevers, and at the Ecole Normale, where he graduated in 1868.

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  • There are also a large number of state-aided schools for special purposes; (1) for military instruction, there are the Ecole Militaire at Brussels, the school of cadets at Namur, and army schools at different stations, e.g.

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  • Bouillon, &c. For officers in the army, there are the Ecole de Guerre or staff college at Brussels with an average attendance of twenty, a riding school at Ypres where a course is obligatory for the cavalry and horse artillery, and for soldiers in the army there are regimental schools and evening classes for illiterate soldiers.

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  • It was here that he wrote the Ecole des vieillards (1823), his best comedy, which gained his election to the Academy in 1825.

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  • His father, who held a small post under government, made great efforts to send him to Paris, where a brilliant examination gained him, in 1831, admittance to the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • After the coup d'Nat of 1851 he became a senator and inspector-general of superior instruction, sat upon the commission for the reform of the Ecole Polytechnique (1854), and, on the 30th of January 1854, succeeded Arago as director of the Paris observatory.

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  • MARIE ALFRED CORNU (1841-1902), French physicist, was born at Orleans on the 6th of March 1841, and after being educated at the Ecole Polytechnique and the Ecole des Mines, became in 1867 professor of experimental physics in the former institution, where he remained throughout his life.

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  • Bartlett in Boston, of the Ecole des Beaux Arts, the Academie Julien and the sculptors Henri M.

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  • In 1794 he became a scholar at the Ecole Polytechnique, which he left in 1796 to act as a civil engineer.

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  • In 1804 he was appointed professor of mathematics at the Lycee, in 1809 professor of analysis and mechanics, and in 1816 examiner at the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • Marshall, Discovery in Greek Lands (1920); Cyrene, Notiziario Archeologico del Ministero delle Colonie (1915); Ecole Francaise d'Athenes, Exploration Archeologique de Delos (1911-4); J.

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  • Being employed upon the fortifications of Dunkirk, he attracted the notice of the director of the works, and was selected as a member of the Ecole polytechnique then to be established under G.

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  • After three years at the Ecole he was admitted into the corps of engineers, and served in the army of the Sambre and Meuse; he was present at the passage of the Rhine in 1797, and at the affairs of Ukratz and Altenkirch.

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  • CHARLES ANNE LAISANT (1841-), French politician, was born at Nantes on the 1st of November 1841, and was educated at the Ecole Polytechnique;as a military engineer.

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  • He was attached to the staff of the Ecole Polytechnique, and in 1903-1904 was president of the French Association for the Advancement of Science.

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  • At an early age he studied chemistry, under Lavoisier, and after passing through the Ecole des Mines he took honours at the E.

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  • When the time came for him to choose between Germany and France, he settled definitely in Paris, where he completed his scientific training at the Ecole des Chartes and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • In 1865 he obtained a fellowship in history, and in 1875 became a doctor of letters; he was appointed maitre de conference (1876) at the ecole normale superieure, succeeding Fustel de Coulanges, and then professor of modern history at the Sorbonne (1888), in the place of Henri Wallon.

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  • When the ecole normale was joined to the university of Paris, Lavisse was appointed director of the new organization, which he had helped more than any one to bring about.

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  • Trained at the Ecole des Chartes and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, he made his first appearance in the world of scholarship as the author of an excellent book called Etudes sur l'industrie et la classe industrielle a Paris au XIII e et au XI V e siècle (1877).

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  • He was educated at the Ecole Normale, and after having held the professorship of rhetoric at Moulins for a year, was sent to Athens in 1851 as one of the professors in the Ecole Frangaise there.

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  • Mabille, " Les Invasions Normandes dans la Loire " (Ecole des chartes bibl.

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  • He was educated at the Ecole Militaire, which he left at the age of sixteen.

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  • He was professor of philosophy at Caen, at the Ecole Normale in Paris and later at the Sorbonne.

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  • He was educated at the Ecole Polytechnique, and entered the government service as a mining engineer.

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  • Having given promise of mathematical talent he was sent to the Ecole Centrale of Fontainebleau, and was fortunate in having a kind and sympathetic teacher, M.

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  • In 1798 he entered the Ecole Polytechnique at Paris as first in his year, and immediately began to attract the notice of the professors of the school, who left him free to follow the studies of his predilection.

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  • Immediately after finishing his course at the Ecole Polytechnique he was appointed repetiteur there, an office which he had discharged as an amateur while still a pupil in the school; for it had been the custom of his comrades often to resort to his room after an unusually difficult lecture to hear him repeat and explain it.

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  • He further became member of the Institute in 1812, examiner at the military school at St Cyr in 1815, leaving examiner at the Ecole Polytechnique in 1816, councillor of the university in 1820, and geometer to the Bureau des Longitudes in succession to P. S.

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  • The most important of these are his memoirs "Sur les inegalites seculaires des moyens mouvements des planetes," "Sur la variation des constantes arbitraires dans les questions de mecanique," both published in the Journal of the Ecole Polytechnique (1809); "Sur la libration de la lune," in Connaiss.

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  • Riemann on the same subject; these are to be found in the Journal of the Ecole Polytechnique from 1813 to 1823, and in the Memoirs de l'academie for 1823.

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  • Then he entered the Ecole Polytechnique, and passed in 1832 to the Ecole des Mines, where he developed an aptitude for experimental chemistry.

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  • In 1840 he was recalled to Paris by his appointment to the chair of chemistry in the Ecole Polytechnique; at the same time he was elected a member of the Academie des Sciences, in the chemical section, in room of P. J.

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  • Young Gay-Lussac received his early education at home under the direction of the abbe Bourdieux and other masters, and in 1794 was sent to Paris to prepare for the Ecole Polytechnique, into which he was admitted at the:end of 1797 after a brilliant examination.

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  • Three years later he was transferred to the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees, and shortly afterwards was assigned to C. L.

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  • Fourcroy at the Ecole Polytechnique, where subsequently (1809) he became professor of chemistry, and from 1808 to 1832 he was professor of physics at the Sorbonne, a post which he only resigned for the chair of chemistry at the Jardin des Plantes.

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  • After studying at the Ecole Normale Superieure he held history professorships at various lycdes.

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  • After acting as assistant to Berthollet, he became successively professor of chemistry at the faculty of sciences and the normal and veterinary schools at Alfort, and then (1820) professor of physics at the Ecole Polytechnique, of which he was appointed director in 1830.

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  • In 1815, in conjunction with Alexis Therese Petit (1791-1820), the professor of physics at the Ecole Polytechnique, he made careful comparisons between the mercury and the air thermometer.

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  • He continued his studies at Berlin and Bonn, and, having graduated doctor juris, attended lectures at the Ecole de Droit in Paris.

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  • On his return to France he studied at the ecole centrale des travaux publics, and his social education was accomplished in the salon of Pauline de Beaumont, the friend of Chateaubriand and Joubert.

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  • At the age of sixteen he entered the Ecole Polytechnique at Paris, and at twenty obtained his first appointment in the civil service.

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  • He early showed a remarkable aptitude for learning, but had a pronounced aversion for pure rhetoric. His studies at the Ecole des Chartes (where he took first place both on entering and leaving) and at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes did much to develop his critical faculty, and the historical method taught and practised at these establishments brought home to him the dignity of history, which thenceforth became his ruling passion.

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  • His valedictory thesis at the Ecole des Chartes, Serie chronologique des gardiens et seigneurs des Iles Normandes (1876), was a definitive work and but slightly affected by later research.

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  • Educated at the Ecole Normale Superieure, and at the French school at Athens, he received his doctorate in literature in 1868.

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  • The system of the Ecole des Beaux Arts was hateful to him, and it was not until after much hesitation that he decided to enter an official studio - that of Delaroche.

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  • chinoise (1889); Letourneau, L'Evolution religieuse (Paris, 1898); Publications of the Ecole des hautes etudes, section des sciences religieuses; and Annales du Musee Guimet, " Bibliotheque de Vulgarisation."

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  • CHARLES BERNARD RENOUVIER (1815-1903), French philosopher, was born at Montpellier on the 1st of January 1818, and educated in Paris at the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • In 1845 he became assistant to Dumas at the Ecole de Medecine, and four years later began to give lectures on organic chemistry in his place.

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  • His laboratory at the Ecole de Medecine was very poor, and to supplement it he opened a private one in 1850 in the Rue Garenciere; but soon afterwards the house was sold, and the laboratory had to be abandoned.

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  • In the same year he was appointed maitre de conferences at the Ecole normale.

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  • He was educated at the lycee Louis-le-Grand, and became assistant master at the lycee Charlemagne, and subsequently at the Ecole Normale.

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  • Educated at the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris, he entered the French army as an engineer, rising to the rank of captain.

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  • He received the military medal for service in the Franco-Prussian War, and in 1872 entered the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • PIERRE EDMOND TEISSERENC DE BORT (1814-1892), French writer and politician, was born at Chateauroux on the 17th of September 1814, and entered the civil service after the completion of his education at the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • Interrupted by the Revolution, it revived in the 19th century, and the roll of honour of the French Ecole des Chartes has almost rivalled that of St Germaindes-Pres.

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  • He was a pupil at the Ecole des Chartes, which he left in 1873, and also at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes; and he obtained appointments in the public libraries at the Mazarine (1878), at Fontainebleau (1884), and at St Genevieve, of which he was nominated librarian in 1885.

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  • His thesis on leaving the Ecole des Chartes was his [[Catalogue]] des actes de Simon et d'Amauri de Montfort (inserted in vol.

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  • In 1893 he was nominated professor at the Ecole des Chartes, and gave a successful series of lectures which he published (Manuel des sources de l'histoire de France au moyen age, 1902-1906).

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  • He also taught at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • He was educated as a civil engineer, and after having highly distinguished himself at the Ecole Polytechnique and the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees, obtained an appointment in the public service.

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  • At the age of thirteen he entered the Ecole Centrale in Caen, and at sixteen and a half the Ecole Polytechnique, where he acquitted himself with distinction.

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  • Thence he went to the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees.

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  • Early next year the school obtained possession of [he Globe through Pierre Leroux, who had joined the school, which now numbered some of the ablest and most promising young men of France, many of the pupils of the Ecole Polytechnique having caught its enthusiasm.

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  • Booth, Saint-Simon and Saint-Simonism (London, 1871); Georges Weill, Un Precurseur du socialisme, Saint-Simon et son oeuvre (Paris, 1894), and a history of the Ecole Saint-Simonienne, by the same author (1896); G.

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  • After passing through the Ecole Normale Superieure he became professor of philosophy successively at Pau and at Limoges.

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  • He was chosen a member of the Academie des Sciences in 1836, became "repetiteur" in 1838, and in 1840 professor in the Ecole Polytechnique, and finally succeeded S.

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  • In addition to those criticisms which appeared when Locke was alive, among the most important are Leibnitz's Nouveaux Essais sur l'entendement humain - written about 1700 and published in 1765, in which each chapter of the Essay of Locke is examined in a corresponding chapter by Leibnitz; Cousin's " Ecole sensualiste: systeme de Locke," in his Ilistoire de la philosophie au X VIII e siecle (1829); and the criticisms in T.

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  • After going through the usual course of military instruction with credit, he became a sous-lieutenant in the artillery in 1882, and was promoted captain in 1889; and, after passing through the Ecole de Guerre with distinction, he was appointed to the general staff.

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  • Vacherot, Ecole d'Alexandrie (1846-1851), tome iii.

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  • He was one of the founders of the Ecole Polytechnique, and shared in the establishment of the Institute of France; the adoption of the metric system and the foundation of the bureau of longitude were also due to his efforts.

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  • He afterwards became keeper of manuscripts at the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris, and professor of palaeography at the Ecole des Chartes.

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  • In 1875 he published a thesis on the mythology of the Zend Avesta, and in 1877 became teacher of Zend at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • He studied under Gaston Paris at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, and became professor of Old French language and literature at the Sorbonne.

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  • In 1886 he became a teacher in the newly founded religious science department of the Ecole des Hautes Etudes of the Sorbonne.

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  • Having received his early education from his father Louis Francois Cauchy (1760-1848), who held several minor public appointments and counted Lagrange and Laplace among his friends, Cauchy entered Ecole Centrale du Pantheon in 1802, and proceeded to the Ecole Polytechnique in 1805, and to the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees in 1807.

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  • He obtained an appointment at the Ecole Polytechnique, which, however, he relinquished in 1830 on the accession of Louis Philip p e, finding it impossible to take the necessary oaths.

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  • Returning to Paris in 1838, he refused a proffered chair at the College de France, but in 1848, the oath having been suspended, he resumed his post at the Ecole Polytechnique, and when the oath was reinstituted after the coup d'etat of 1851, Cauchy and Arago were exempted from it.

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  • These are mainly embodied in his three great treatises, Cours d'analyse de l'Ecole Polytechnique (1821); Le Calcul infinitesimal (1823); Lecons sur les applications du calcul infinitesimal a la g'ometrie (1826-1828); and also in his courses of mechanics (for the Ecole Polytechnique), higher algebra (for the Faculte des Sciences), and of mathematical physics (for the College de France).

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  • In 1890 he was appointed professor of civil and canon law at the ecole des chartes.

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  • He entered the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, and studied under Falguiere and Jouffroy, and in 1868 gained the Grand Prix de Rome.

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  • Mercie was appointed professor of drawing and sculpture at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, and was elected a member of the Academie Frangaise in 1891, after being awarded the biennial prize of the institute of 800 in 1887.

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  • Judging by the signs, the little river Ecole also supports a thriving water cress industry.

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  • Art & images for Easter crucifixion Images The Ecole Initiative Range of crucifixion image.

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  • At the event exposed to light ecole polytechnique curie m. Of chips by an improbable number out in t-shirts.

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  • In 1879 he was appointed professor of Arabic, and in 1886 professor of Mahommedan Religion, at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes in Paris.

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  • In 1859 he was appointed professor of organic chemistry at the Ecole Superieure de Pharmacie, and in 1865 he accepted the new chair of organic chemistry, which was specially created for his benefit at the College de France.

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  • Further promotion came rapidly; in 1817 he was appointed director of the Ecole des Chartes, in 1819 inspector-general of the university, and in 1831 professor of history in the College de France.

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  • He was educated at the Ecole Normale, and returned thither as director of studies in 1838, after some years spent in provincial schoolmasterships.

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  • His father, a professor of philosophy, gave him an excellent education at the Stanislas College and the Ecole Normale, where he graduated in 1848.

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  • After being professor of philosophy at several provincial universities, he received the degree of doctor, and came to Paris in 1858 as master of conferences at the Ecole Normale.

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  • The general staff and also the staff of the corps and divisions are composed of_certificated (breveUs) officers who have passed all through the Ecole de Guerre.

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  • Artillery and engineer officers come from the Ecole Polytechnique, infantry and cavalry from the Ecole spciale militaire de St-Cyr.

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  • The chief naval school is the Ecole navale at Brest, which is devoted to the training of officers; the age of admission is from fifteen to eighteen years, and pupils after completing their course pass a year on a frigate school.

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  • At Paris there is a more advanced school (Ecole superieure de la Marine) for the supplementary training of officers.

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  • In the first class must be mentioned the College de France, founded 1530, giying courseje of highest study of all sorts, the Museum of Natural History, the Ecole des Chartes (palaeography and archives), the School of Modern Oriental Languages, the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (scientific research), &c. All these institutions are in Paris.

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  • In 1812 his Escuela de los maridos, a translation of Moliere's Ecole des maris, was produced at Madrid, and in 1813 El Medico a Palos (a translation of Le Medecin malgre lui) at Barcelona.

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  • The very fine torso of Athena in the Ecole des Beaux Arts at Paris, which has unfortunately lost its head, may perhaps best serve to help our imagination in reconstructing a Pheidian original.

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  • 1889-97, at the Ecole Normale Superieure 1897-1900 and at the College de France 1900-21.

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  • In 1872 he was elected master of conferences at the Ecole Normale, and was made doctor of philosophy in recognition of his two treatises, Platonis Hippias Minor sive Socratica contra liberum arbitrium argumenta and La Liberte et le determinisme.

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  • But his progress was so rapid that in two or three years he was able to take his master's place at the lecture-table, and Fourcroy and Vauquelin were so satisfied with his performance that they procured for him a school appointment in 1797 as teacher of chemistry, and in 1798 one as repetiteur at the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • In 1804 Vauquelin resigned his professorship at the College de France and successfully used his influence to obtain the appointment for Thenard, who six years later, after Fourcroy's death, was further elected to the chairs of chemistry at the Ecole Polytechnique and the Faculte des Sciences.

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  • Soon after his appointment as repetiteur at the Ecole Polytechnique he began a lifelong friendship with J.

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  • In 1881 Leroy-Beaulieu was elected professor of contemporary history and eastern affairs at the Ecole Libre des Sciences Politiques, becoming director of this institution on the death of Albert Sorel in 1906, and in 1887 he became a member of the Academic des Sciences Morales et Politiques.

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  • He was the son of a banker of Dauphiny, and after receiving his early education at a lyceum, was sent in 1813 to the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • From 1808 to 1810 he attended the .Ecole polytechnique, and afterwards, till 1812, the Ecole d'application at Metz.

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  • From 1815 to 1825 he was occupied with military engineering at Metz; and from 1825 to 1835 he was professor of mechanics at the Ecole d'application there.

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  • In 1834 he became a member of the Academie; from 1838 to 1848 he was professor to the faculty of sciences at Paris, and from 1848 to 1850 commandant of the Ecole polytechnique.

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  • His education was obtained mainly at the Ecole Normale in Paris, where his father, a painter and architect, was engaged in the construction of the Theatre Italien, From his twenty-fifth year he began to lecture in the colleges of Evreux, Dieppe, Blois and Toulouse.

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  • After studying at the Ecole Normale Superieure he was sent to the French school at Athens in 1853, directed some excavations in Chios, and wrote an historical account of the island.

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  • Appointed to a lectureship at the Ecole Normale Superieure in February 1870, to a professorship at the Paris faculty of letters in 1875, and to the chair of medieval history created for him at the Sorbonne in 1878, he applied himself to the study of the political institutions of ancient France.

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  • In 1875 he was elected member of the Academie des Sciences Morales, and in 1880 reluctantly accepted the post of director of the Ecole Normale.

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  • Throughout his historical career - at the Ecole Normale and the Sorbonne and in his lectures delivered to the empress Eugenie - his sole aim was to ascertain the truth, and in the defence of truth his polemics against what he imagined to be the blindness and insincerity of his critics sometimes assumed a character of harshness and injustice.

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  • Educated at the Ecole Polytechnique, Gramont early gave up the army for diplomacy.

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  • Ecole Polytechn.

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  • Shortly afterwards the Pasteur family removed to Arbois, where Louis attended the Ecole primaire, and later the college of that place.

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  • Fortunately at Arbois he came under the influence of an excellent teacher in the person of the director of the college, who must have discerned in the quiet boy the germs of greatness, as he constantly spoke to him of his future career at the Ecole normale in Paris.

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  • In October 1838 Louis was sent with a friend to the metropolis, to a school in the Quartier Latin, preparatory to the Ecole normale.

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  • Two years later he passed the examination for the "baccalaureat es sciences" enabling him to become candidate for the Ecole normale.

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  • At the age of twenty-one he entered the Ecole Normale in Paris, and from 1853 to 1858 he held the appointment of keeper of the scientific collections.

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  • The French Ecole d'Athenes, founded in 1846, is under the scientific direction of the Academie des Inscriptions et Belleslettres.

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  • Wurtz reported the existence of only one efficient laboratory in France, namely the Ecole Normale Superieure, under the direction of H.

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  • After passing through the Ecole Polytechnique he became ingenieur-q cier in 1808, and saw active service with the imperial troops in Spain from 1810 to 1812, and again in France in 1814.

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  • Antoine Henri Becquerel (1852-1908), son of the lastnamed, who succeeded to his chair at the Musee d'Histoire Naturelle in 1892, was born in Paris on the 15th of December 1852, studied at the Ecole Polytechnique, where he was appointed a professor in 1895, and in 1875 entered the department des posts et chaussees, of which in 1894 he became chef.

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  • Educated at the Ecole des Chartes, he became professor in the faculty of letters at Grenoble in 1844, and in 1849 at Lyons, where he remained nearly thirty years.

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  • To appreciate it without prejudice, one should recall that this assembly saved France from a civil war and invasion, that it founded the system of public education (Museum, Ecole Polytechnique, .Ecole Normale Superieure, Ecole des Langues orientales, Conservatoire), created institutions of capital importance, like that of the Grand Livre de la Dette publique, and definitely established the social and political gains of the Revolution.

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  • At the end of 1900 Loisy secured a government lectureship at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes Pratiques, and delivered there in succession courses on the Babylonian myths and the first chapters of Genesis; the Gospel parables; the narrative of the ministry in the synoptic Gospels; and the Passion narratives in the same.

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  • Educated at the Ecole Normale Superieure, he taught for some years in the lycee at Algiers before he joined the diplomatic service in 1871.

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  • After attending the Ecole Polytechnique at Paris, he became professor of physics successively at Bologna (1832), Ravenna (1837) and Pisa (1840).

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  • where he took the first prize in mathematics and physics; at the Ecole Polytechnique, where he stood first at the exit examination in 1819; and at the Ecole des Mines (1819-1822), where he began to show a decided preference for the science with which his name is associated.

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  • In 1823 he was selected along with Dufrenoy by Brochant de Villiers, the professor of geology in the Ecole des Mines, to accompany him on a scientific tour to England and Scotland, in order to inspect the mining and metallurgical establishments of the country, and to study the principles on which Greenough's geological map of England (1820) had been prepared, with a view to the construction of a similar map of France.

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  • In 1835 he was appointed professor of geology at the Ecole des Mines, in succession to Brochant de Villiers, whose assistant he had been in the duties of the chair since 1827.

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  • After his superannuation at the Ecole des Mines he continued to superintend the issue of the detailed maps almost until his death, which occurred at Canon on the 21st of September 1874.

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  • His design was frustrated by the establishment of and his official connexion with the Ecole Normale, and the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • The former institution had an ephemeral existence; but amongst the benefits derived from the foundation of the Ecole Polytechnique one of the greatest, it has been observed, 4 was the restoration of Lagrange to mathematics.

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  • The first, second and third sections of this publication comprise respectively the papers communicated by him to the Academies of Sciences of Turin, Berlin and Paris; the fourth includes his miscellaneous contributions to other scientific collections, together with his additions to Euler's Algebra, and his Lecons elementaires at the Ecole Normale in 1795.

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  • Balard at the Ecole Normale, and in 1859 became professor at the Sorbonne in place of J.

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  • Having attended at the Ecole des Mines in Paris, he assisted Elie de Beaumont in the chair of geology at the College de France from 1855 until he succeeded him in 1874.

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  • He accordingly obtained for him an appointment as professor of mathematics in the Ecole Militaire of Paris, and continued zealously to forward his interests.

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  • He was one of the first members, and became president of the Bureau of Longitudes, took a prominent place at the Institute (founded in 1796), professed analysis at the Ecole Normale, and aided in the organization of the decimal system.

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  • When sixteen years old he began to attend the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris, and from 1837 to 1839 studied at the Ecole des Mines.

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  • List of authentic works of Jean Goujon: Two marble columns supporting the organ of the church of St Maclou (Rouen) on right and left of porch on entering; left-hand gate of the church of St Maclou; bas-reliefs for decoration of screen of St Germain l'Auxerrois (now in Louvre); "Victory" over chimney-piece of Salle des Gardes at Ecouen; altar at Chantilly; illustrations for Jean Martin's translation of Vitruvius; bas-reliefs and sculptural decoration of Fontaine des Innocents; bas-reliefs adorning entrance of Hotel Carnavalet, also series of satyrs' heads on keystones of arcade of courtyard; fountain of Diana from Anet (now in Louvre); internal decoration of chapel at Anet; portico of Anet (now in courtyard of Ecole des Beaux Arts); bust of Diane de Poictiers (now at Versailles); Tribune of Caryatides in the Louvre; decoration of "Escalier Henri II.," Louvre; eeils de beeuf and decoration of Henri II.

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  • On the institution of the Ecole Normale at Paris in 1795 he was sent to teach in it, and was afterwards attached to the Ecole Polytechnique, where he occupied the chair of analysis.

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  • In 1826 Fourier became a member of the French Academy, and in 1827 succeeded Laplace as president of the council of the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • de Senarmont (1808-1862), was appointed conservator of the mineralogical collections at the Ecole des Mines.

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  • Des Cloizeaux (1817-1897) at the Ecole Normale, and in 1876 he became professor of mineralogy at the Sorbonne, but on the death of Wurtz in 1884 he exchanged that position for the chair of organic chemistry.

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  • He then entered the Ecole des Chartes, where, under the influence of J.

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  • The lectures at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, which he attended from its foundation in 1868, revealed his true bent; and henceforth he devoted himself almost entirely to scholarship. He began modestly by the study of the municipal charters of St Omer.

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  • Having been appointed assistant lecturer and afterwards full lecturer at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, it was to the town of St Omer that he devoted his first lectures and his first important work, Histoire de la vile de Saint-Omer et de ses institutions jusqu'au XI V e siecle (1877).

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  • About this time personal considerations induced Giry to devote the greater part of his activity to the study of diplomatic, which had been much neglected at the Ecole des Chartes, but had made great strides in Germany.

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  • In 1894 he published his Manuel de diplomatique, a monument of lucid and wellarranged erudition, which contained the fruits of his long experience of archives, original documents and textual criticism; and his pupils, especially those at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes,.

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  • CHARLES CAGNIARD DE LA TOUR (1777-1859), French engineer and physicist, was born in Paris on the 31st of March 1 777, and after attending the Ecole Polytechnique became one of the ingenieurs geographiques.

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  • Gaultier de Claubry (1792-1873), professor of chemistry at the Ecole de Pharmacie, and soon afterwards, by the influence of A.

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  • In his childhood Gaston Paris learned to appreciate the Old French romances as poems and stories, and this early impulse to the study of Romance literature was placed on a solid basis by courses of study at Bonn (1856-1857) under Friedrich Diez, at Göttingen (1857-1858) and finally at the Ecole des Chartes (1858-1861).

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  • In France itself he trained at the Ecole des Chartes and the College de France a band of disciples who continued the traditions of exact research that he established.

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  • At the Ecole des Chartes, where his career was remarkably brilliant, his valedictory thesis was an Essai sur les revenus publics en Normandie au XII' siècle (1849), and it was to the history of his native province that he devoted his early works.

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  • He must not be confused with Emil Kopp (1817-1875), who, born at Warselnheim, Alsace, became in 1847 professor of toxicology and chemistry at the Ecole superieure de Pharmacie at Strasburg, in 1849 professor of physics and chemistry at Lausanne, in 1852 chemist to a Turkey-red factory near Manchester, in 1868 professor of technology at Turin, and finally, in 1871, professor of technical chemistry at the Polytechnic of Zurich, where he died in 1875.

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  • He was sent for his earliest instruction to the school of the town, and in 1814 was admitted to the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • After he had been two years at the Ecole Polytechnique he took a foremost part in a mutinous demonstration against one of the masters; the school was broken up, and Comte like the other scholars was sent home.

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  • He continued his studies, and after obtaining the doctor's degree at the Sorbonne, he was appointed teacher of German in the Ecole militaire at St Cyr, and shortly afterwards, professor of foreign literatures at Douai.

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  • He studied medicine in Paris at the newly established Ecole de Medecine, and was appointed by competition prosector when only eighteen years of age.

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  • By his indefatigable activity he amassed a fortune of X300,000, the bulk of which he bequeathed to his daughter, with the deduction of considerable sums for the endowment of the anatomical chair in the Ecole de Medecine, and the establishment of a benevolent institution for distressed medical men.

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  • He was admitted to the Ecole Polytechnique in 1812, and late in 1814 he left with a commission in the Engineers and with prospects of rapid advancement in his profession.

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  • Accordingly as early as 1669 the French government decided on the foundation of a school for French dragomans at Constantinople, for which in later years was substituted the Ecole des langues orientales in Paris; most of the great powers eventually took some similar step, England also adopting in 1877 a system, since modified, for the selection and tuition of a corps of Britishborn dragomans.

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  • Delecluze, Louis David, son ecole et son temps (Paris, 1855), and Le Peintre Louis David.

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  • In November 1885 he was appointed lecturer at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes.

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  • In 1870 he was at the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, but enlisted in the army, and was wounded.

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  • He became engineer-in-chief of mines, and professor of mineralogy and director of studies at the Ecole des Mines at Paris.

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  • He used his influence for the advancement of science and higher education, and with Victor Duruy was one of the founders of the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • Halevy, Ecole pratique des hautes etudes (1905), pp. 52 4, and the Chinese parallel in the Mittheilungen of the Berlin Seminar for Oriental Languages (1904), vii.

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  • When almost despairing, in December 1791, he fled once more to London, where he wrote his Ecole du citoyen.

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  • At the Ecole Militaire youths are trained nominally for the army, but many go there who intend to enter one of the professions or the public service.

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  • In 1835 Quicherat entered the Ecole des Chartes; he left two years later at the head of the college.

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  • of Melanges historiques, part of Documents inedits), &c. These works did not wholly occupy his time: in 1847 he inaugurated a course of archaeological lectures at the Ecole des Chartes, and in 1849 was appointed professor of diplomacy at the same college.

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  • After 1871, his course of lectures on diplomacy having been given up, Quicherat, still professor of archaeology, was nominated director of the Ecole des Chartes.

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  • GASPARD CLAIR FRANCOIS MARIE RICHE DE PRONY (1755-1839), French engineer, was born at Chamelet, in the department of the Rhone, on the 22nd of July 1755, and was educated at the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees.

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  • The laborious enterprise of drawing up the famous Tables du Cadastre was entrusted to his direction in 1792, and in 1794 he was appointed professor of the mathematical sciences at the Ecole Polytechnique, becoming director at the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees four years later.

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  • Soon afterwards he was appointed professor of mathematics in the Ecole Militaire at Paris, and he was afterwards professor in the Ecole Normale.

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  • He was examiner in the Ecole Polytechnique, but held few important state offices.

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  • The university took possession of the Collegium Claromontanum, then known as the College Louis-le-Grand, and transformed it into an ecole normale.

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  • In 1863, under Napoleon III., Victor Duruy encouraged the study of history, and also did much for classical learning by founding the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • He studied at the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris, and in 1817 entered the Administration des Poudres et Salpetres.

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  • After studying at the Ecole normale superieure, he completed his studies in Germany.

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  • He was appointed "repetiteur" at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes on its foundation in 1868.

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  • When five years old he was sent to the Ecole de Gymnase at Lyons and, after six months' training as an acrobat, made his first public appearance as "The Little Wonder."

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  • He was educated at the Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, and, after a period of mental struggle which he has described in Souvenirs de ma jeunesse, he was ordained priest in 1832.

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  • After a stay at Strassburg as professor of the Petit Seminaire, he was appointed director of the College Stanislas in Paris in 1842 and, in 1847, chaplain of the Ecole Normale Superieure.

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  • In 1865 he left the ecole normale superieure, and went to Germany, where he studied at Göttingen and Berlin.

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  • Duruy to give lectures on history, following the method used in German seminaries, at the ecole des hautes etudes.

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  • They showed their gratitude by dedicating a book to him in 1896, Etudes d'histoire age, and after his retirement in 1905 by having his features engraved on a slab (see A Gabriel Monod, en souvenir de son enseignement: ecole pratique des hautes etudes, 1868-1905, ecole normale superieure, 1880-1904.

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  • A year later he was entrusted with a course of chemical instruction at Miilhausen, and he remained in that town till 1865 as professor at the Ecole Superieure des Sciences.

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  • Balard at the College de France, in 1876 he succeeded that chemist in the chair of chemistry, and in 1882 he became directing professor at the municipal Ecole de Physique et de Chimie.

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  • He was educated at the lycee Louis-le-Grand and the ecole normale superieure, and took his degree as associate in philosophy in 1881.

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  • After studying in his native town and taking the university course in Berlin (1842-1843) he went to Paris, and passed first in the examination for fellowship (agregation) of the lycees (1845), first in the examinations on leaving the Ecole des Chartes, and first in the examination for fellowship of the faculties (1849).

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  • At the age of twelve he entered the Ecole royale de Sculpture, and at twenty, having learnt all that he could from Michel Ange Slodtz and Pigalle, he carried off the prix de Rome and left France for Italy, where he spent the next ten years of his life.

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  • As a boy he served in an ambulance corps during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, and later passed with distinction through the Ecole Polytechnique in mining, becoming a mining engineer, but soon abandoning practical work for teaching, first at Caen and later in the university of Paris.

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  • Entering GayLussac's laboratory in 1831, he became preparateur at the Ecole Polytechnique in 1834 and at the College de France in 1837.

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  • His next post was that of repetiteur at the Ecole Polytechnique, where in 1846 he was appointed professor, and in 1850 he succeeded Gay-Lussac in the chair of chemistry at the Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, of which he was director, in succession to M.

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  • Bertrand, Un Critique d'art dans l'antiquite: Philostrate et son ecole (1882); Bergk, "Die Philostrate" in Rini' Abhandlungen zur Geschichte der griechischen Philosophic and Astronomic (1883); Schmid, Atticismus iv.

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  • He received his historical training in the Ecole des Chartes, and became maitre de conferences in the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • Towards the close of 1794, when the Ecole Polytechnique was established, he was appointed along with Monge over the department of descriptive geometry.

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  • He retained, however, till his death the office of professor in the faculty of sciences in the Ecole Normale, to which he had been appointed in 1810.

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  • It was left to him to develop the geometry of Monge, and to him also is due in great measure the rapid advancement which France made soon after the establishment of the Ecole Polytechnique in the construction of machinery .

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  • Ecole poly.

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  • He was also professor at the ecole illustre.

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  • In 1843 he was appointed to a professorship in the Ecole Evangelique at Geneva, but the development of his opinions in favour of the Liberal movement in Protestant theology led to his resigning the post six years later.

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  • The process was worked out by Deville in his laboratory at the Ecole Normale in Paris.

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  • He studied at Nevers, and at the Ecole Normale, where he graduated in 1868.

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  • There are also a large number of state-aided schools for special purposes; (1) for military instruction, there are the Ecole Militaire at Brussels, the school of cadets at Namur, and army schools at different stations, e.g.

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  • Bouillon, &c. For officers in the army, there are the Ecole de Guerre or staff college at Brussels with an average attendance of twenty, a riding school at Ypres where a course is obligatory for the cavalry and horse artillery, and for soldiers in the army there are regimental schools and evening classes for illiterate soldiers.

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  • It was here that he wrote the Ecole des vieillards (1823), his best comedy, which gained his election to the Academy in 1825.

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  • His father, who held a small post under government, made great efforts to send him to Paris, where a brilliant examination gained him, in 1831, admittance to the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • The place of teacher of that science at the Ecole Polytechnique falling vacant in 1837, it was offered to and accepted by Leverrier, who, "docile to circumstance," instantly abandoned chemistry, and directed the whole of his powers to celestial mechanics.

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  • After the coup d'Nat of 1851 he became a senator and inspector-general of superior instruction, sat upon the commission for the reform of the Ecole Polytechnique (1854), and, on the 30th of January 1854, succeeded Arago as director of the Paris observatory.

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  • MARIE ALFRED CORNU (1841-1902), French physicist, was born at Orleans on the 6th of March 1841, and after being educated at the Ecole Polytechnique and the Ecole des Mines, became in 1867 professor of experimental physics in the former institution, where he remained throughout his life.

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  • Bartlett in Boston, of the Ecole des Beaux Arts, the Academie Julien and the sculptors Henri M.

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  • In 1794 he became a scholar at the Ecole Polytechnique, which he left in 1796 to act as a civil engineer.

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  • In 1804 he was appointed professor of mathematics at the Lycee, in 1809 professor of analysis and mechanics, and in 1816 examiner at the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • Marshall, Discovery in Greek Lands (1920); Cyrene, Notiziario Archeologico del Ministero delle Colonie (1915); Ecole Francaise d'Athenes, Exploration Archeologique de Delos (1911-4); J.

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  • Being employed upon the fortifications of Dunkirk, he attracted the notice of the director of the works, and was selected as a member of the Ecole polytechnique then to be established under G.

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  • After three years at the Ecole he was admitted into the corps of engineers, and served in the army of the Sambre and Meuse; he was present at the passage of the Rhine in 1797, and at the affairs of Ukratz and Altenkirch.

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  • CHARLES ANNE LAISANT (1841-), French politician, was born at Nantes on the 1st of November 1841, and was educated at the Ecole Polytechnique;as a military engineer.

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  • He was attached to the staff of the Ecole Polytechnique, and in 1903-1904 was president of the French Association for the Advancement of Science.

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  • At an early age he studied chemistry, under Lavoisier, and after passing through the Ecole des Mines he took honours at the E.

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  • When the time came for him to choose between Germany and France, he settled definitely in Paris, where he completed his scientific training at the Ecole des Chartes and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • In 1865 he obtained a fellowship in history, and in 1875 became a doctor of letters; he was appointed maitre de conference (1876) at the ecole normale superieure, succeeding Fustel de Coulanges, and then professor of modern history at the Sorbonne (1888), in the place of Henri Wallon.

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  • When the ecole normale was joined to the university of Paris, Lavisse was appointed director of the new organization, which he had helped more than any one to bring about.

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  • Trained at the Ecole des Chartes and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, he made his first appearance in the world of scholarship as the author of an excellent book called Etudes sur l'industrie et la classe industrielle a Paris au XIII e et au XI V e siècle (1877).

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  • He was educated at the Ecole Normale, and after having held the professorship of rhetoric at Moulins for a year, was sent to Athens in 1851 as one of the professors in the Ecole Frangaise there.

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  • Mabille, " Les Invasions Normandes dans la Loire " (Ecole des chartes bibl.

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  • He was educated at the Ecole Militaire, which he left at the age of sixteen.

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  • He was professor of philosophy at Caen, at the Ecole Normale in Paris and later at the Sorbonne.

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  • He was educated at the Ecole Polytechnique, and entered the government service as a mining engineer.

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  • Having given promise of mathematical talent he was sent to the Ecole Centrale of Fontainebleau, and was fortunate in having a kind and sympathetic teacher, M.

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  • In 1798 he entered the Ecole Polytechnique at Paris as first in his year, and immediately began to attract the notice of the professors of the school, who left him free to follow the studies of his predilection.

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  • Immediately after finishing his course at the Ecole Polytechnique he was appointed repetiteur there, an office which he had discharged as an amateur while still a pupil in the school; for it had been the custom of his comrades often to resort to his room after an unusually difficult lecture to hear him repeat and explain it.

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  • He further became member of the Institute in 1812, examiner at the military school at St Cyr in 1815, leaving examiner at the Ecole Polytechnique in 1816, councillor of the university in 1820, and geometer to the Bureau des Longitudes in succession to P. S.

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  • As a teacher of mathematics Poisson is said to have been more than ordinarily successful, as might have been expected from his early promise as a repetiteur at the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • The most important of these are his memoirs "Sur les inegalites seculaires des moyens mouvements des planetes," "Sur la variation des constantes arbitraires dans les questions de mecanique," both published in the Journal of the Ecole Polytechnique (1809); "Sur la libration de la lune," in Connaiss.

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  • Riemann on the same subject; these are to be found in the Journal of the Ecole Polytechnique from 1813 to 1823, and in the Memoirs de l'academie for 1823.

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  • Then he entered the Ecole Polytechnique, and passed in 1832 to the Ecole des Mines, where he developed an aptitude for experimental chemistry.

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  • In 1840 he was recalled to Paris by his appointment to the chair of chemistry in the Ecole Polytechnique; at the same time he was elected a member of the Academie des Sciences, in the chemical section, in room of P. J.

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  • Young Gay-Lussac received his early education at home under the direction of the abbe Bourdieux and other masters, and in 1794 was sent to Paris to prepare for the Ecole Polytechnique, into which he was admitted at the:end of 1797 after a brilliant examination.

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  • Three years later he was transferred to the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees, and shortly afterwards was assigned to C. L.

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  • Fourcroy at the Ecole Polytechnique, where subsequently (1809) he became professor of chemistry, and from 1808 to 1832 he was professor of physics at the Sorbonne, a post which he only resigned for the chair of chemistry at the Jardin des Plantes.

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  • After studying at the Ecole Normale Superieure he held history professorships at various lycdes.

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  • After acting as assistant to Berthollet, he became successively professor of chemistry at the faculty of sciences and the normal and veterinary schools at Alfort, and then (1820) professor of physics at the Ecole Polytechnique, of which he was appointed director in 1830.

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  • In 1815, in conjunction with Alexis Therese Petit (1791-1820), the professor of physics at the Ecole Polytechnique, he made careful comparisons between the mercury and the air thermometer.

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  • He continued his studies at Berlin and Bonn, and, having graduated doctor juris, attended lectures at the Ecole de Droit in Paris.

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  • On his return to France he studied at the ecole centrale des travaux publics, and his social education was accomplished in the salon of Pauline de Beaumont, the friend of Chateaubriand and Joubert.

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  • At the age of sixteen he entered the Ecole Polytechnique at Paris, and at twenty obtained his first appointment in the civil service.

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  • He early showed a remarkable aptitude for learning, but had a pronounced aversion for pure rhetoric. His studies at the Ecole des Chartes (where he took first place both on entering and leaving) and at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes did much to develop his critical faculty, and the historical method taught and practised at these establishments brought home to him the dignity of history, which thenceforth became his ruling passion.

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  • His valedictory thesis at the Ecole des Chartes, Serie chronologique des gardiens et seigneurs des Iles Normandes (1876), was a definitive work and but slightly affected by later research.

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  • Educated at the Ecole Normale Superieure, and at the French school at Athens, he received his doctorate in literature in 1868.

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  • The system of the Ecole des Beaux Arts was hateful to him, and it was not until after much hesitation that he decided to enter an official studio - that of Delaroche.

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  • chinoise (1889); Letourneau, L'Evolution religieuse (Paris, 1898); Publications of the Ecole des hautes etudes, section des sciences religieuses; and Annales du Musee Guimet, " Bibliotheque de Vulgarisation."

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  • CHARLES BERNARD RENOUVIER (1815-1903), French philosopher, was born at Montpellier on the 1st of January 1818, and educated in Paris at the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • In 1845 he became assistant to Dumas at the Ecole de Medecine, and four years later began to give lectures on organic chemistry in his place.

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  • His laboratory at the Ecole de Medecine was very poor, and to supplement it he opened a private one in 1850 in the Rue Garenciere; but soon afterwards the house was sold, and the laboratory had to be abandoned.

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  • In the same year he was appointed maitre de conferences at the Ecole normale.

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  • He was educated at the lycee Louis-le-Grand, and became assistant master at the lycee Charlemagne, and subsequently at the Ecole Normale.

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  • Educated at the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris, he entered the French army as an engineer, rising to the rank of captain.

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  • He received the military medal for service in the Franco-Prussian War, and in 1872 entered the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • PIERRE EDMOND TEISSERENC DE BORT (1814-1892), French writer and politician, was born at Chateauroux on the 17th of September 1814, and entered the civil service after the completion of his education at the Ecole Polytechnique.

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  • Interrupted by the Revolution, it revived in the 19th century, and the roll of honour of the French Ecole des Chartes has almost rivalled that of St Germaindes-Pres.

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  • He was a pupil at the Ecole des Chartes, which he left in 1873, and also at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes; and he obtained appointments in the public libraries at the Mazarine (1878), at Fontainebleau (1884), and at St Genevieve, of which he was nominated librarian in 1885.

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  • His thesis on leaving the Ecole des Chartes was his [[Catalogue]] des actes de Simon et d'Amauri de Montfort (inserted in vol.

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  • In 1893 he was nominated professor at the Ecole des Chartes, and gave a successful series of lectures which he published (Manuel des sources de l'histoire de France au moyen age, 1902-1906).

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  • He also taught at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • He was educated as a civil engineer, and after having highly distinguished himself at the Ecole Polytechnique and the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees, obtained an appointment in the public service.

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  • At the age of thirteen he entered the Ecole Centrale in Caen, and at sixteen and a half the Ecole Polytechnique, where he acquitted himself with distinction.

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  • Thence he went to the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees.

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  • Early next year the school obtained possession of [he Globe through Pierre Leroux, who had joined the school, which now numbered some of the ablest and most promising young men of France, many of the pupils of the Ecole Polytechnique having caught its enthusiasm.

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  • Booth, Saint-Simon and Saint-Simonism (London, 1871); Georges Weill, Un Precurseur du socialisme, Saint-Simon et son oeuvre (Paris, 1894), and a history of the Ecole Saint-Simonienne, by the same author (1896); G.

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  • After passing through the Ecole Normale Superieure he became professor of philosophy successively at Pau and at Limoges.

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  • He was chosen a member of the Academie des Sciences in 1836, became "repetiteur" in 1838, and in 1840 professor in the Ecole Polytechnique, and finally succeeded S.

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  • In addition to those criticisms which appeared when Locke was alive, among the most important are Leibnitz's Nouveaux Essais sur l'entendement humain - written about 1700 and published in 1765, in which each chapter of the Essay of Locke is examined in a corresponding chapter by Leibnitz; Cousin's " Ecole sensualiste: systeme de Locke," in his Ilistoire de la philosophie au X VIII e siecle (1829); and the criticisms in T.

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  • After going through the usual course of military instruction with credit, he became a sous-lieutenant in the artillery in 1882, and was promoted captain in 1889; and, after passing through the Ecole de Guerre with distinction, he was appointed to the general staff.

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  • Vacherot, Ecole d'Alexandrie (1846-1851), tome iii.

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  • He was one of the founders of the Ecole Polytechnique, and shared in the establishment of the Institute of France; the adoption of the metric system and the foundation of the bureau of longitude were also due to his efforts.

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  • He afterwards became keeper of manuscripts at the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris, and professor of palaeography at the Ecole des Chartes.

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  • In 1875 he published a thesis on the mythology of the Zend Avesta, and in 1877 became teacher of Zend at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes.

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  • He studied under Gaston Paris at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, and became professor of Old French language and literature at the Sorbonne.

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  • In 1886 he became a teacher in the newly founded religious science department of the Ecole des Hautes Etudes of the Sorbonne.

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  • Having received his early education from his father Louis Francois Cauchy (1760-1848), who held several minor public appointments and counted Lagrange and Laplace among his friends, Cauchy entered Ecole Centrale du Pantheon in 1802, and proceeded to the Ecole Polytechnique in 1805, and to the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees in 1807.

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  • He obtained an appointment at the Ecole Polytechnique, which, however, he relinquished in 1830 on the accession of Louis Philip p e, finding it impossible to take the necessary oaths.

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  • Returning to Paris in 1838, he refused a proffered chair at the College de France, but in 1848, the oath having been suspended, he resumed his post at the Ecole Polytechnique, and when the oath was reinstituted after the coup d'etat of 1851, Cauchy and Arago were exempted from it.

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  • These are mainly embodied in his three great treatises, Cours d'analyse de l'Ecole Polytechnique (1821); Le Calcul infinitesimal (1823); Lecons sur les applications du calcul infinitesimal a la g'ometrie (1826-1828); and also in his courses of mechanics (for the Ecole Polytechnique), higher algebra (for the Faculte des Sciences), and of mathematical physics (for the College de France).

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  • In 1890 he was appointed professor of civil and canon law at the ecole des chartes.

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  • He entered the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, and studied under Falguiere and Jouffroy, and in 1868 gained the Grand Prix de Rome.

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  • Mercie was appointed professor of drawing and sculpture at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, and was elected a member of the Academie Frangaise in 1891, after being awarded the biennial prize of the institute of 800 in 1887.

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  • Ecole de Trois Ponts, in Roanne, also offers French language study immersion style.

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  • Julia Morgan, the first female graduate of Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, was the architect of The Fairmont, which cost $5 million to build in 1907.

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