This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

eck

eck

eck Sentence Examples

  • He hid himself in the Dominican convent at Leipzig in fear of popular violence, and died there on the 4th of July 1519, just as Luther was beginning his famous disputation with Eck.

  • Van Eck, Schetsen van het eiland Bali, Tijdsch.

  • To the east of the Hohe Tauern stretches the group of the primitive Alps of Carinthia and Styria, namely the Pöllauer Alps with the glacier-covered peak of the Hafner Eck (10,041 ft.); the Stang Alps with the highest peak the Eisenhut (8007 ft.); the Saualpe with the highest peak the Grosse Saualpe (6825 ft.); and finally the Koralpen chain or the Stainzer Alps (7023 ft.) separated from the preceding group by the Lavant valley.

  • The confession was turned over to a committee of conservative theologians, including Eck, Faber and Cochlaeus.

  • It was not, however, until after the Leipzig disputation with Eck that Luther won his allegiance.

  • Melanchthon, however, soon found that, owing to attacks by Johann Eck of Ingolstadt ("404 Articles"), Saxony must state its position in doctrinal matters as well.

  • Luther had confronted the cardinal legate Cajetan, had passed through his famous controversy at Leipzig with Johann Eck, and was about to burn the bull of excommunication.

  • He had been reproved by Johann Eck for giving aid to Carlstadt ("Tace tu, Philippe, ac tua studia cura nec me perturba"), and he was shortly afterwards himself attacked by the great papal champion.

  • Melanchthon replied in a brief and moderately worded treatise, setting forth Luther's first principle of the supreme authority of Scripture in opposition to the patristic writings on which Eck relied.

  • John Mayr of Eck, a noted controversialist and professor of theology in the university of Ingolstadt, scented the Hussite heresy in the Theses, and denounced them in a tract entitled Obelisks.

  • But the Curia did not support Miltitz, and placed more faith in Eck, who was eager to extinguish Luther in a public discussion.

  • While he was in this state of mind he received Eck's challenge to dispute with him at Leipzig on the papal supremacy.

  • He met Eck in June 1519.

  • Eck left Leipzig triumphant, and Luther returned to Wittenberg much depressed.

  • Meanwhile at Rome the pope had entrusted Eck and Prierias with the preparation of a bull (Exurge Domine) against Luther - a bull which followed the line of Eck's charges at Leipzig.

  • Kohler, Luthers 95 Theses sammt seinen Resolutionen, den Gegenschriften von Wimpina-Tetzel, Eck and Prierias, and den Antworten Luthers darauf (Leipzig, 1903); Emil Reich, Select Documents illustrating Medieval and Modern History (London, 1905); The Leipzig Disputation: Seidemann, Die Leipziger Disputation im Jahre 1519 (Dresden, 1843); Luther before the Diet of Worms: Deutsche Reichstagsakten unter Kaiser Karl V.

  • JOHANN MAIER ECK (1486-1543), German theologian, the most indefatigable and important opponent of Martin Luther, was born on the 13th of November 1486 at Eck in Swabia, from which place he derived his additional surname, which he himself, after 1505, always modified into Eckius or Eccius, i.e."of Eck."

  • This attitude brought him into conflict with the senate of the university, a conflict which Eck's masterful temper, increased by an extreme self-confidence perhaps natural in one so young and so successful, did not serve to allay.

  • A ducal commission, appointed to find a means for ending the interminable strife between the rival academic parties, entrusted Eck with the preparation of fresh commentaries on Aristotle and Petrus Hispanus.

  • During these early years Eck was still reckoned among the "modernists," and his commentaries are inspired with much of the scientific spirit of the New Learning.

  • It is, however, by his controversy with Luther and the other reformers that Eck is best remembered.

  • Luther, who had some personal acquaintance with Eck, sent him in 1517 copies of his celebrated 95 theses.

  • Eck made no public reply; but in 1518 he circulated, privately at first, his Obelisci, in which Luther was branded as a Hussite.

  • Luther entrusted his defence to Carlstadt, who, besides answering the insinuations of Eck in 400 distinct theses, declared his readiness to meet him in a public disputation.

  • On June 27 and 28 and on July 1 and 3 Eck disputed with Carlstadt on the subjects of grace, free will and good works, ably defending the Roman Semipelagian standpoint.

  • The arbitrators declined to give a verdict, but the general impression was that victory rested with Eck.

  • Bishops, universities and humanists were at one in denunciation of the outrage; and as for the attitude of the people, Eck was glad to escape from Saxony with a whole skin.

  • (February 18, 1521) called on the emperor to take measures against Luther, a demand soon to be responded to in the edict of Worms. In 1521 and 1522 Eck was again in Rome, reporting on the results of his nunciature.

  • In return for this action of the duke, who had at first been opposed to the policy of repression, Eck obtained for him, during a third visit to Rome in 1523, valuable ecclesiastical concessions.

  • At Baden-in-Aargau in May and June 1526 a public disputation on the doctrine of transubstantiation was held, in which Eck and Thomas Murner were pitted against Johann Oecolampadius.

  • Though Eck claimed the victory in argument, the only result was to strengthen the Swiss in their memorial view of the Lord's Supper, and so to diverge them further from Luther.

  • At the Augsburg diet in 1530 Eck was charged by Charles V.

  • Eck died at Ingolstadt on the 10th of February 1543, fighting to the last and worn out before his time.

  • Wiedemann, Dr Johann Eck (Regensburg, 1865).

  • Johann Maier Eck >>

  • Eck, D.

  • ar eck.

  • This duke, however, at whose instigation the famous discussion between Luther and Johann von Eck took place in the Pleissenburg of Leipzig, inflicted some injury upon the town's trade and also upon its university by the harsh treatment which he meted out to the adherents of the new doctrines; but under the rule of his successor, Henry, Leipzig accepted the teaching of the reformers.

  • A papal bull of the 15th of June 1520, which condemned forty-one propositions extracted from Luther's teachings, was taken to Germany by Eck in his capacity of apostolic nuncio, published by him and the legates Alexander and Caracciola, and burned by Luther on the 10th of December at Wittenberg.

  • He hid himself in the Dominican convent at Leipzig in fear of popular violence, and died there on the 4th of July 1519, just as Luther was beginning his famous disputation with Eck.

  • Van Eck, Schetsen van het eiland Bali, Tijdsch.

  • To the east of the Hohe Tauern stretches the group of the primitive Alps of Carinthia and Styria, namely the Pöllauer Alps with the glacier-covered peak of the Hafner Eck (10,041 ft.); the Stang Alps with the highest peak the Eisenhut (8007 ft.); the Saualpe with the highest peak the Grosse Saualpe (6825 ft.); and finally the Koralpen chain or the Stainzer Alps (7023 ft.) separated from the preceding group by the Lavant valley.

  • The confession was turned over to a committee of conservative theologians, including Eck, Faber and Cochlaeus.

  • It was not, however, until after the Leipzig disputation with Eck that Luther won his allegiance.

  • Melanchthon, however, soon found that, owing to attacks by Johann Eck of Ingolstadt ("404 Articles"), Saxony must state its position in doctrinal matters as well.

  • Luther had confronted the cardinal legate Cajetan, had passed through his famous controversy at Leipzig with Johann Eck, and was about to burn the bull of excommunication.

  • He had been reproved by Johann Eck for giving aid to Carlstadt ("Tace tu, Philippe, ac tua studia cura nec me perturba"), and he was shortly afterwards himself attacked by the great papal champion.

  • Melanchthon replied in a brief and moderately worded treatise, setting forth Luther's first principle of the supreme authority of Scripture in opposition to the patristic writings on which Eck relied.

  • John Mayr of Eck, a noted controversialist and professor of theology in the university of Ingolstadt, scented the Hussite heresy in the Theses, and denounced them in a tract entitled Obelisks.

  • But the Curia did not support Miltitz, and placed more faith in Eck, who was eager to extinguish Luther in a public discussion.

  • While he was in this state of mind he received Eck's challenge to dispute with him at Leipzig on the papal supremacy.

  • He met Eck in June 1519.

  • Eck left Leipzig triumphant, and Luther returned to Wittenberg much depressed.

  • Meanwhile at Rome the pope had entrusted Eck and Prierias with the preparation of a bull (Exurge Domine) against Luther - a bull which followed the line of Eck's charges at Leipzig.

  • Kohler, Luthers 95 Theses sammt seinen Resolutionen, den Gegenschriften von Wimpina-Tetzel, Eck and Prierias, and den Antworten Luthers darauf (Leipzig, 1903); Emil Reich, Select Documents illustrating Medieval and Modern History (London, 1905); The Leipzig Disputation: Seidemann, Die Leipziger Disputation im Jahre 1519 (Dresden, 1843); Luther before the Diet of Worms: Deutsche Reichstagsakten unter Kaiser Karl V.

  • JOHANN MAIER ECK (1486-1543), German theologian, the most indefatigable and important opponent of Martin Luther, was born on the 13th of November 1486 at Eck in Swabia, from which place he derived his additional surname, which he himself, after 1505, always modified into Eckius or Eccius, i.e."of Eck."

  • This attitude brought him into conflict with the senate of the university, a conflict which Eck's masterful temper, increased by an extreme self-confidence perhaps natural in one so young and so successful, did not serve to allay.

  • A ducal commission, appointed to find a means for ending the interminable strife between the rival academic parties, entrusted Eck with the preparation of fresh commentaries on Aristotle and Petrus Hispanus.

  • During these early years Eck was still reckoned among the "modernists," and his commentaries are inspired with much of the scientific spirit of the New Learning.

  • It is, however, by his controversy with Luther and the other reformers that Eck is best remembered.

  • Luther, who had some personal acquaintance with Eck, sent him in 1517 copies of his celebrated 95 theses.

  • Eck made no public reply; but in 1518 he circulated, privately at first, his Obelisci, in which Luther was branded as a Hussite.

  • Luther entrusted his defence to Carlstadt, who, besides answering the insinuations of Eck in 400 distinct theses, declared his readiness to meet him in a public disputation.

  • On June 27 and 28 and on July 1 and 3 Eck disputed with Carlstadt on the subjects of grace, free will and good works, ably defending the Roman Semipelagian standpoint.

  • The arbitrators declined to give a verdict, but the general impression was that victory rested with Eck.

  • Bishops, universities and humanists were at one in denunciation of the outrage; and as for the attitude of the people, Eck was glad to escape from Saxony with a whole skin.

  • (February 18, 1521) called on the emperor to take measures against Luther, a demand soon to be responded to in the edict of Worms. In 1521 and 1522 Eck was again in Rome, reporting on the results of his nunciature.

  • In return for this action of the duke, who had at first been opposed to the policy of repression, Eck obtained for him, during a third visit to Rome in 1523, valuable ecclesiastical concessions.

  • At Baden-in-Aargau in May and June 1526 a public disputation on the doctrine of transubstantiation was held, in which Eck and Thomas Murner were pitted against Johann Oecolampadius.

  • Though Eck claimed the victory in argument, the only result was to strengthen the Swiss in their memorial view of the Lord's Supper, and so to diverge them further from Luther.

  • At the Augsburg diet in 1530 Eck was charged by Charles V.

  • Eck died at Ingolstadt on the 10th of February 1543, fighting to the last and worn out before his time.

  • Wiedemann, Dr Johann Eck (Regensburg, 1865).

  • Johann Maier Eck >>

  • Eck, D.

  • ar eck.

  • This duke, however, at whose instigation the famous discussion between Luther and Johann von Eck took place in the Pleissenburg of Leipzig, inflicted some injury upon the town's trade and also upon its university by the harsh treatment which he meted out to the adherents of the new doctrines; but under the rule of his successor, Henry, Leipzig accepted the teaching of the reformers.

Browse other sentences examples →