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earwigs

earwigs Sentence Examples

  • Distinct vestiges of the maxillulae exist also in the earwigs and booklice, according to G.

  • 13, od) leads, and in some of the more primitive insects (bristle-tails, earwigs, may-flies) the two oviducts open separately direct to the exterior.

  • Palmen (1884) on these ducts have shown that in may-flies and in female earwigs the paired mesodermal ducts open directly to the exterior, while in male earwigs there is a single mesodermal duct, due either to the coalescence of the two or to the suppression of one.

  • 20) and earwigs, for example - when young closely resemble their parents, except for the absence of wings.

  • The earwigs, cockroaches and locusts, which Linnaeus included among the Coleoptera, were early grouped into a distinct order, the Orthoptera.

  • Includes two families - the Forficulidae or earwigs (q.v.) and the Hemimeridae.

  • Apart from these characteristics, the most distinctive feature of earwigs is the presence at the end of the abdomen of a pair of pincers which are in reality modified appendages, known as cercopods, and represent the similar limbs of Japyx and the caudal feelers of Campodea and some other insects.

  • During the winter earwigs lie dormant; but in the early months of the year females with their eggs may be found in the soil, frequently in deserted earthworm burrows.

  • Kirby (1815) founded an order Dermaptera for the earwigs, which had formed part of de Geer's Dermaptera, accepting Olivier's term Orthoptera for the rest of the assemblage, and as modern research has shown that the earwigs undoubtedly deserve original separation from the cockroaches, grasshoppers, crickets, &c., this terminology will probably become established.

  • The other family is that of the Forficulidae or earwigs (q.v.), all of which have the cerci modified as a forceps, while wings of thecharacteristic form described above are present in many of the species.

  • The insects comprised in it are distinguished from the earwigs by their elongate, rather narrow forewings, which usually cover, or nearly cover, the abdomen when at rest, and which are firmer in texture than the hindwings.

  • See also, for earwigs, Kirby, Journ.

  • Many wingless insects - such as lice, fleas and certain earwigs and cockroaches - are placed in various orders together with winged insects to which they show evident relationships.

  • The cerci in Japyx are not, as usual, jointed feelers, but strong, curved appendages forming a forceps as in earwigs.

  • These titles may have arisen when people slept at floor level, and found earwigs searching for dark cavities.

  • female earwigs have forceps which meet with a straight edge.

  • Female earwigs have forceps which meet with a straight edge.

  • Common and conspicuous insects include grasshoppers, earwigs, and many species of beetles, butterflies and moths.

  • Distinct vestiges of the maxillulae exist also in the earwigs and booklice, according to G.

  • Prominent paired limbs are often borne on the tenth segment, the elongate tail-feelers (cerci) of bristle-tails and may-flies, or the forceps of earwigs, for example.

  • 13, od) leads, and in some of the more primitive insects (bristle-tails, earwigs, may-flies) the two oviducts open separately direct to the exterior.

  • Palmen (1884) on these ducts have shown that in may-flies and in female earwigs the paired mesodermal ducts open directly to the exterior, while in male earwigs there is a single mesodermal duct, due either to the coalescence of the two or to the suppression of one.

  • 20) and earwigs, for example - when young closely resemble their parents, except for the absence of wings.

  • The earwigs, cockroaches and locusts, which Linnaeus included among the Coleoptera, were early grouped into a distinct order, the Orthoptera.

  • Includes two families - the Forficulidae or earwigs (q.v.) and the Hemimeridae.

  • Apart from these characteristics, the most distinctive feature of earwigs is the presence at the end of the abdomen of a pair of pincers which are in reality modified appendages, known as cercopods, and represent the similar limbs of Japyx and the caudal feelers of Campodea and some other insects.

  • During the winter earwigs lie dormant; but in the early months of the year females with their eggs may be found in the soil, frequently in deserted earthworm burrows.

  • Kirby (1815) founded an order Dermaptera for the earwigs, which had formed part of de Geer's Dermaptera, accepting Olivier's term Orthoptera for the rest of the assemblage, and as modern research has shown that the earwigs undoubtedly deserve original separation from the cockroaches, grasshoppers, crickets, &c., this terminology will probably become established.

  • The other family is that of the Forficulidae or earwigs (q.v.), all of which have the cerci modified as a forceps, while wings of thecharacteristic form described above are present in many of the species.

  • The insects comprised in it are distinguished from the earwigs by their elongate, rather narrow forewings, which usually cover, or nearly cover, the abdomen when at rest, and which are firmer in texture than the hindwings.

  • See also, for earwigs, Kirby, Journ.

  • Many wingless insects - such as lice, fleas and certain earwigs and cockroaches - are placed in various orders together with winged insects to which they show evident relationships.

  • The cerci in Japyx are not, as usual, jointed feelers, but strong, curved appendages forming a forceps as in earwigs.

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