Earthworms sentence example

earthworms
  • There are few earthworms or snails.
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  • In the earthworms, on the other hand, this coat is thick and composed of many layers.
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  • Most earthworms live in the soil, which they devour as they burrow through it.
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  • Many of our native species spend the day lurking beneath stones, and sally forth at night in pursuit of their prey, which consistsof small insects, earthworms and snails.
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  • Various species among those that are predaceous attack smaller insects, hunt in packs crustaceans larger than themselves, insert their narrow heads into snail-shells to pick out and devour the occupants, or pursue slugs and earthworms underground.
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  • Nocturnal intake rates were higher than diurnal intake rates owing to the consumption of more large earthworms at night.
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  • Again, the well-known action of earthworms may be said to be a biological work; but the resulting aeration of the soil causes edaphic differences; and earthworms are absent from certain soils, such as peat.
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  • They are disposed in two groups on either side, corresponding in the Polychaeta to the parapodia; the two bundles are commonly reduced among the earthworms to two pairs of setae or even to a single seta.
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  • Among the aquatic Oligochaeta and many earthworms (the families Lumbricidae, Geoscolicidae and a few other genera) the spermathecae are simple structures, as has been described.
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  • 12 and 13 are shown the spermathecae of the genera Hyperiodrilus and Heliodrilus, which are simple sacs ending blindly as in other earthworms, but of which there is only one median opening in the thirteenth segment or in the eleventh.
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  • Earthworms are divided into the following families, viz.
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  • These ducts therefore have not their exact counterparts in the Oligochaeta, unless we are to assume that they collectively are represented by the seminal vesicles of earthworms and the vasa deferentia.
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  • All reptiles belong to the class of insects, for the same reasons that earthworms belong to it."
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  • Earthworms, leeches, lugworms and marine worms bryozoans Bryozoans look like plants but actually consist of thousands of tiny animals.
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  • He describes how when the cow has moved on, an army of creatures including earthworms, snails, mites and nematodes take over.
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  • I suggested the grass may have been ingested whilst eating earthworms.
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  • Moles survive and thrive in virtually every part of the country, save only where acid soils contain no earthworms.
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  • Crop and food residues are used to grow earthworms to feed fish and fowl.
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  • Prickly sow-thistle seeds ingested by earthworms have been found intact in the worm casts.
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  • The segments occupied by the gonads are fixed, and are for earthworms invariably X, XI.
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  • The drainage is good and it contains an ample supply of organic matter including healthy earthworms and other beneficial organisms.
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  • You can make even richer compost by allowing earthworms to process the scraps for you.
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  • Ideally, soil is a living, thriving ecosystem, with complex interactions between garden plants, earthworms, microorganisms and fungi.
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  • Earthworms will appear, so you can scoop them up into a container to store them for bait.
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  • In the earthworms, on the other hand, the epidermis becomes specialized into several layers of cells, all of which are glandular.
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  • The prevalent number of testes is one pair in the aquatic genera and two pairs in earthworms. But there are exceptions; thus a species of Lamprodrilus has four pairs of testes.
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  • Aldrovandi in De animalibus insectis (1602) almost contemporaneously distinguished between "terrestrial insects," including woodlice, earthworms and slugs, and "aquatic insects," comprising annelids and starfishes.
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  • The general practice for many years past among naturalists has been to restrict the terms "Insecta" and "insect" to the class of Arthropods with three pairs of legs in the adult condition: bees, flies, moths, bugs, grasshoppers, springtails are "insects," but not spiders, centipedes nor crabs, far less earthworms, and still less slugs, starfishes or coral polyps.
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  • It is a remarkable fact that these genera, comprizing a separate family Lumbricidae, when introduced into tropical and other countries, thrive abundantly and oust the indigenous forms. In gatherings of earthworms from various extra-European countries it is always found that if the collections have been made in cultivated ground and near the coast the worms are of European species; farther inland the native forms are met with.
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  • It might be inferred, therefore, and the inference is proved by facts, that truly oceanic islands have no indigenous fauna of earthworms, but are inhabited by forms which are identical with those of neighbouring continents, and doubtless, therefore, accidentally introduced.
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  • Like the leeches the earthworms produce cocoons which are a product of the glandular epithelium of the clitellum.
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  • The young leave the cocoon as fully formed earthworms in which, however, the genitalia are not fully developed.
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  • The work of earthworms in aiding in the production of the subsoil and in levelling the surface was first studied by C. Darwin, and has since been investigated by others.
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  • Some birds like to eat them, but these native British earthworms are well loved by badgers too.
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  • Also, the smallest earthworms are considerably longer than a quarter inch.
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  • Leeches without biting jaws possess a protrusible proboscis, and generally engulf their prey, as does the horse leech when it attacks earthworms. But some of them are also ectoparasites.
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  • And the recession of the New Zealand earthworms and flies before exotic forms probably falls under this category.
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  • White not only notes the homes and ways, the times and seasons, of plants and animals - comparing, for instance, the different ways in which the squirrel, the fieldmouse and the nuthatch eat their hazel-nuts - or watches the migrations of birds, which were then only beginning to be properly recorded or understood, but he knows more than any other observer until Charles Darwin about the habits and the usefulness of the earthworms, and is certain that plants distil dew and do not merely condense it.
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  • The word was introduced to English readers in a translation (1601) of Pliny's Natural History by Philemon Holland, who defined "insects" as "little vermine or smal creatures which have (as it were) a cut or division betwene their heads and bodies, as pismires, flies, grashoppers, under which are comprehended earthworms, caterpilers, &c."
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  • In that country, also, the earthworms of Europe are noticed to replace native forms as the ground is broken.
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  • So far as is known, the production of cocoons is universal among earthworms and the remaining Oligochaeta of aquatic habit.
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  • The earthworms of England belong entirely to the three genera Lumbricus, Allolobophora and Allurus, which are further subdivided by some systematists; and these genera form the prevalent earthworm fauna of the Palaearctic region and are also very numerous in the Nearctic region.
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