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earthworks

earthworks Sentence Examples

  • The surrounding hills (Vinik, Goritsa, Kamenitsa) were, after 1886, fortified by modern earthworks.

  • Under it the cost of the necessary land was to be found as to one-third by the state and as to the residue locally, but this arrangement proved unworkable and was abandoned in 1845, when it was settled that the state should provide the land and construct the earthworks and stations, the various companies which obtained concessions being left to make the permanent way, provide rolling stock and work the lines for certain periods.

  • It retains an ancient town hall; there is a good market cross; and in the neighbourhood, along the Fal, are several early earthworks.

  • Of the castle earthworks and fragments of walls remain.

  • Across the river from the town ancient earthworks (Bucton Castle), of British origin, are seen, and a Roman road passing them, and running north and south is also traceable.

  • The town is of high antiquity, and is partially surrounded by earthworks probably of British construction.

  • The earthworks, of British origin, were modified in almost every successive age.

  • East of the Rocky Mountains (Washington, 1891), and his Report on the Mound Explorations of the Bureau of Ethnology in the 12th Report (1894) of that Bureau, supplementing his earlier bulletins, Problem of the Ohio Mounds and the Circular, Square and Octagonal Earthworks of Ohio (1889); and W.

  • The region was repeatedly raided by camp followers of each army; earthworks and a fort, commanding the Hudson ferry and the ferry to Paramus, New Jersey, were built; the British army made Dobbs Ferry a rendezvous, after the battle of White Plains, in November 1776, and the continental division under General Benjamin Lincoln was here at the end of January 1777.

  • Then or possibly even earlier the old rampart was for two-thirds of its circuit buried under enormous earthworks, the remainder being rebuilt.

  • They consisted of three great lines, strengthened by about 150 redoubts, and earthworks Vedras, of various descriptions, mounting some 600 cannon; 1810-11.

  • With him the line ended, but a younger branch was seated at Eaton Socon, Beds., where the earthworks of their castle remain, and held their barony there into the 14th century.

  • To sum up the history of Scythia, the oldest inhabitants of whom we hear in Scythia were the Cimmerii; the nature of the country makes it probable that some of them were nomads, while others no doubt tilled some land in the river valleys and in the Crimea, where they left their name to ferries, earthworks and the Cimmerian Bosporus.

  • To the north the town is sheltered by hills rising sharply to heights of 400 to 500 ft., on several of which, such as Sugarloaf and Castle Hills, are ancient earthworks.

  • Still, if the attacking side enjoyed an advantage in this respect, the possible landingplaces were few in number and were therefore well indicated, there had been ample time to protect them with earthworks and barbed wire, and in any disembarkation in face of resistance the tactical conditions favour the defence.

  • His troops were entrenching themselves solidly in face of the invaders both at Helles and at Anzac, so that his antagonists would be obliged to storm lines of earthworks whenever they should attempt to make further progress.

  • But trench warfare was the order of the day, and the British and French were trying to carry this on without that ample artillery support which is almost indispensable when earthworks have to be stormed under modern tactical conditions.

  • Within the town - ship are mounds and earthworks which Professor E.

  • Here also are McArt's Fort and other earthworks, and from here the importance of the physical position of Belfast may be appreciated to the full.

  • The castle, of which nothing but the earthworks and foundations remain, is famous as the scene of the imprisonment of Mary queen of Scots from September 1586 to her trial and execution on the 8th of February 1587.

  • The earthworks, commanding a ford of the river, are apparently of very early date, and probably bore a castle from Norman times.

  • The archaeologist recovers his specimens from waste places, cave deposits, abandoned villages, caches, shell-heaps, refuse-heaps, enclosures, mounds, hut rings, earthworks, garden beds, quarries� and workshops, petroglyphs, trails, graves and cemeteries, cliff and cavate dwellings, ancient pueblos, ruined stone dwellings, forts and temples, canals or reservoirs.

  • Algonquin-Iroquois Canada, thanks to the Geological Survey and the Department of Education in Ontario, has revealed old Indian camps, mounds and earthworks along the northern drainage of Lakes Erie and Ontario, and pottery in a curved line from Montreal to Lake of the Woods.

  • In October 1868 a unique collection of ancient Augustan silver plate was discovered on the Galgenberg near Hildesheim by some soldiers who were throwing up earthworks.

  • To the south of the town stands a modern palace, defended by earthworks and Krupp guns.

  • Julius Caesar attacked it in 52 B.C., but was beaten off; some walls and earthworks seem still to survive from this period.

  • All these modern fortifications are low and thickly armoured earthworks, powerfully armed with heavy Krupp guns in turrets.

  • The town lies on the Roman Watling Street, and remains of earthworks are seen at Knave's Castle, on the Street, and at Castle Old Fort, 2 m.

  • Also of interest are the Rosario chapel; the ruined earthworks of Fort Marcy, north of the city, constructed by General Kearny in 1846; the ruins of the Garita, an old Spanish fortification used as a custom house under the Mexican government; the so-called "oldest house," a dilapidated adobe structure claimed to be the oldest building, continuously inhabited, in the United States; the state library; and the national cemetery, in which 1022 American soldiers are buried.

  • Outside, on the north-east, is the grassy hollow of a tiny amphitheatre; on the west a line of earthworks runs in wider circuit than the walls.

  • For ancient earthworks see A.

  • Early earthworks and tumuli are numerous in the locality.

  • Esarhaddon, on his way to Egypt for the second time, determined to deal out punishment; he blockaded Tyre, and raised earthworks on the shore and cut off the water-supply; but he did not capture the city itself.

  • On the adjacent Borough Hill arc extensive earthworks, and the discovery of remains here and at Burnt Walls, immediately south, proves the existence of a considerable Roman station.

  • In the vicinity are large earthworks, probably of British origin, known as Loughton Camp.

  • Several early earthworks are seen in the vicinity, among which the circular camp on Bury Hill, S.W.

  • The situation of Axminster at the intersection of the two great ancient roads, Iknield Street and the Fosse Way, and also the numerous earthworks and hill-fortresses in the neighbourhood indicate a very early settlement.

  • Early in the Civil War the Confederates regarded the site (then an island) as of such strategic importance that (near the brick church tower and probably near the site of the first fortifications by the original settlers) they erected heavy earthworks upon it for defence.

  • Numerous early earthworks fringe the hills to the south.

  • There are numerous early earthworks on the chalk hills in the neighbourhood.

  • farther out, a new continuous line of wall fortifications, with outlying clusters of earthworks and forts, has since been erected; 1000 acres, now occupied by handsome streets, squares and two public parks, were thus added to the inner town, almost doubling its area.

  • The order received by Admiral Sir Beauchamp Seymour (afterwards Lord Alcester) on the 3rd of July was as follows: Prevent any attempt to bar channel into port- If work is resumed on earthworks, or fresh guns mounted, inform military commander that you have orders to prevent it; and if not immediately discontinued, destroy earthworks and silence batteries if they open fire, having given sufficient notice to population, shipping and foreign men-of-war.

  • The attacking force was disposed in three groups: (i) the Alexandra, Sultan and Superb, outside the reef, to engage the Ras-el-Tin and the earthworks under weigh; (2) the Monarch, Invincible and Penelope, inside the harbour, to engage the Meks batteries; and (3) the Inflexible and Temeraire, to take up assigned stations outside the reef and to co-operate, with the inshore squadron.

  • Surrounding the church (which stands in a highlying portion of the g own known as Chipping Hill) there are earthworks, possibly the remains of a fortification recorded as made by order of Edward the Elder in 913, but perhaps of British origin.

  • The Castle Hill is crowned with some fine earthworks of uncertain date.

  • Of the old castle, dating probably from the 12th century, but in part protected by much earlier earthworks, the keep and a few other portions still remain.

  • The earthworks west and south of the town are of great extent; there was a large Saxon burial-ground here.

  • Half a mile east of the borough hall is Washington or Fort Greene Park (30 acres), laid out on the site of earthworks (known as Fort Greene) constructed during the War of Independence, and commanding good views.

  • The North, alarmed at the threat, speedily transformed Washington into a great military post and protected it on all sides with strong earthworks.

  • Prehistoric earthworks are to be seen in the neighbourhood, several animal-shaped mounds upon the shores of Lakes Mendota, Monona and Waubesa being among the best examples.

  • British earthworks and Roman roads and relics prove later occupation.

  • Earthworks, of this or an earlier date, remain.

  • For an account of the earthworks see Gerard Fowke, Archaeological History of Ohio (Columbus, 1902).

  • The districts south of the old Roman earthworks which link the Dniester with the Pruth along the line of the Botna, just south of Bender, consist of level pastureland known as the Budjak steppes.

  • Tradition tells that Uffa, who probably threw up the earthworks called the Castle Hill, established the capital of East Anglia here about 575.

  • The Bala Hissar was destroyed and has never since been entirely rebuilt, and a fortified cantonment at Sherpur (one side of which was represented by the historic Bemaru ridge) had taken the place of the old earthworks of the British occupation of 1842 which were constructed on nearly the same site.

  • Although the neighbourhood abounds in British earthworks and barrows, and there are traces of a Roman road leading from Poole to Wimborne, Poole (La Pole) is not mentioned by the early chroniclers or in Domesday Book.

  • by earthworks; and the Allies found themselves forced, with scanty preparations, to undertake a regular- siege against an enemy ~vhose force was numerically superior to their own.

  • Then the isthmus a few miles north of the town, between it and Bulair, was fortified with strong earthworks by English and French engineers, mainly on the lines of the old works constructed in 13 57.

  • S., is known as the Kalah i Darab, or citadel of Darius, and consists of a series of earthworks arranged in a circle round an isolated rock.

  • Tradition claims that King Athelstan threw up defensive earthworks here, but the existing castle is attributed to Joel of Totnes, who held the manor during the reign of William the Conqueror, and also founded a Cluniac priory, dedicated to St Mary Magdalene.

  • The passage of the Mississippi was forced on the 24th of April 1862, and New Orleans surrendered on the 26th; this was immediately followed by the operations against Vicksburg, from which, however, Farragut was compelled to withdraw, having relearnt the old lesson that against heavy earthworks, crowning hills of sufficient height, a purely naval attack is unavailing; it was not till the following summer, and after a long siege, that Vicksburg surrendered to a land force under General Grant.

  • The castle of the same founder has left little but its foundations, but it was erected within the protection of a remarkable series of earthworks, which remain in good condition.

  • For more than two centuries they had remained prudently entrenched behind the earthworks that extended from Cologne to Ratisbon (Regensburg); but the intestine feuds which prevailed among the barbarians and were fostered by Rome, the organizatipn under bold and turbulent chiefs of the bands greedy for booty, the pressing forward on populations already settled of tribes in their rear; all this caused the Germanic invasion to filter by degrees across the frontier.

  • Near by are some 18th century buildings, some interesting earthworks of the "mound-builders," and a cemetery in which are buried many soldiers who fought in the War of Independence.

  • The new study consisted of a measured survey of the surviving earthworks, together with a geophysical survey of features below the surface.

  • Traces of a Saxon settlement have been found from the seventh century, and in the tenth century the Danes constructed defensive earthworks here.

  • They built huge earthworks, the largest indigenous buildings north of Mexico.

  • earthworks required for an agricultural or horticultural site.

  • The series of linear earthworks, just north of the fort, also merit further investigation.

  • ancient earthworks survive just to the east of the field containing the well.

  • earthworks on the SE side of the present village belong in fact to the Saxon village of East Overton.

  • earthworks in the fields.

  • Medieval ridge and furrow earthworks and three post medieval tree stumps were recorded within the development area.

  • The trees behind the building on the edge of the village are growing on the banks of the village's iron age earthworks.

  • furrow earthworks and three post medieval tree stumps were recorded within the development area.

  • The four great ridges of earthworks surrounding the hilltop were found to have been heaped up over many periods from prehistoric times.

  • prehistoric earthworks.

  • Another surprise arose, when the earthworks ditch was dug in the local limestone basement rock.

  • The surrounding hills (Vinik, Goritsa, Kamenitsa) were, after 1886, fortified by modern earthworks.

  • Under it the cost of the necessary land was to be found as to one-third by the state and as to the residue locally, but this arrangement proved unworkable and was abandoned in 1845, when it was settled that the state should provide the land and construct the earthworks and stations, the various companies which obtained concessions being left to make the permanent way, provide rolling stock and work the lines for certain periods.

  • It retains an ancient town hall; there is a good market cross; and in the neighbourhood, along the Fal, are several early earthworks.

  • Of the castle earthworks and fragments of walls remain.

  • Across the river from the town ancient earthworks (Bucton Castle), of British origin, are seen, and a Roman road passing them, and running north and south is also traceable.

  • The town is of high antiquity, and is partially surrounded by earthworks probably of British construction.

  • The earthworks, of British origin, were modified in almost every successive age.

  • East of the Rocky Mountains (Washington, 1891), and his Report on the Mound Explorations of the Bureau of Ethnology in the 12th Report (1894) of that Bureau, supplementing his earlier bulletins, Problem of the Ohio Mounds and the Circular, Square and Octagonal Earthworks of Ohio (1889); and W.

  • The region was repeatedly raided by camp followers of each army; earthworks and a fort, commanding the Hudson ferry and the ferry to Paramus, New Jersey, were built; the British army made Dobbs Ferry a rendezvous, after the battle of White Plains, in November 1776, and the continental division under General Benjamin Lincoln was here at the end of January 1777.

  • Then or possibly even earlier the old rampart was for two-thirds of its circuit buried under enormous earthworks, the remainder being rebuilt.

  • They consisted of three great lines, strengthened by about 150 redoubts, and earthworks Vedras, of various descriptions, mounting some 600 cannon; 1810-11.

  • extreme east) the commanding ridge of Mont Rave, crowned with redoubts and earthworks.

  • With him the line ended, but a younger branch was seated at Eaton Socon, Beds., where the earthworks of their castle remain, and held their barony there into the 14th century.

  • To sum up the history of Scythia, the oldest inhabitants of whom we hear in Scythia were the Cimmerii; the nature of the country makes it probable that some of them were nomads, while others no doubt tilled some land in the river valleys and in the Crimea, where they left their name to ferries, earthworks and the Cimmerian Bosporus.

  • To the north the town is sheltered by hills rising sharply to heights of 400 to 500 ft., on several of which, such as Sugarloaf and Castle Hills, are ancient earthworks.

  • Still, if the attacking side enjoyed an advantage in this respect, the possible landingplaces were few in number and were therefore well indicated, there had been ample time to protect them with earthworks and barbed wire, and in any disembarkation in face of resistance the tactical conditions favour the defence.

  • His troops were entrenching themselves solidly in face of the invaders both at Helles and at Anzac, so that his antagonists would be obliged to storm lines of earthworks whenever they should attempt to make further progress.

  • But trench warfare was the order of the day, and the British and French were trying to carry this on without that ample artillery support which is almost indispensable when earthworks have to be stormed under modern tactical conditions.

  • Within the town - ship are mounds and earthworks which Professor E.

  • Here also are McArt's Fort and other earthworks, and from here the importance of the physical position of Belfast may be appreciated to the full.

  • The castle, of which nothing but the earthworks and foundations remain, is famous as the scene of the imprisonment of Mary queen of Scots from September 1586 to her trial and execution on the 8th of February 1587.

  • The earthworks, commanding a ford of the river, are apparently of very early date, and probably bore a castle from Norman times.

  • The archaeologist recovers his specimens from waste places, cave deposits, abandoned villages, caches, shell-heaps, refuse-heaps, enclosures, mounds, hut rings, earthworks, garden beds, quarries� and workshops, petroglyphs, trails, graves and cemeteries, cliff and cavate dwellings, ancient pueblos, ruined stone dwellings, forts and temples, canals or reservoirs.

  • Algonquin-Iroquois Canada, thanks to the Geological Survey and the Department of Education in Ontario, has revealed old Indian camps, mounds and earthworks along the northern drainage of Lakes Erie and Ontario, and pottery in a curved line from Montreal to Lake of the Woods.

  • In October 1868 a unique collection of ancient Augustan silver plate was discovered on the Galgenberg near Hildesheim by some soldiers who were throwing up earthworks.

  • To the south of the town stands a modern palace, defended by earthworks and Krupp guns.

  • Julius Caesar attacked it in 52 B.C., but was beaten off; some walls and earthworks seem still to survive from this period.

  • All these modern fortifications are low and thickly armoured earthworks, powerfully armed with heavy Krupp guns in turrets.

  • The town lies on the Roman Watling Street, and remains of earthworks are seen at Knave's Castle, on the Street, and at Castle Old Fort, 2 m.

  • Also of interest are the Rosario chapel; the ruined earthworks of Fort Marcy, north of the city, constructed by General Kearny in 1846; the ruins of the Garita, an old Spanish fortification used as a custom house under the Mexican government; the so-called "oldest house," a dilapidated adobe structure claimed to be the oldest building, continuously inhabited, in the United States; the state library; and the national cemetery, in which 1022 American soldiers are buried.

  • Outside, on the north-east, is the grassy hollow of a tiny amphitheatre; on the west a line of earthworks runs in wider circuit than the walls.

  • For ancient earthworks see A.

  • Early earthworks and tumuli are numerous in the locality.

  • Esarhaddon, on his way to Egypt for the second time, determined to deal out punishment; he blockaded Tyre, and raised earthworks on the shore and cut off the water-supply; but he did not capture the city itself.

  • On the adjacent Borough Hill arc extensive earthworks, and the discovery of remains here and at Burnt Walls, immediately south, proves the existence of a considerable Roman station.

  • In the vicinity are large earthworks, probably of British origin, known as Loughton Camp.

  • Several early earthworks are seen in the vicinity, among which the circular camp on Bury Hill, S.W.

  • The situation of Axminster at the intersection of the two great ancient roads, Iknield Street and the Fosse Way, and also the numerous earthworks and hill-fortresses in the neighbourhood indicate a very early settlement.

  • Early in the Civil War the Confederates regarded the site (then an island) as of such strategic importance that (near the brick church tower and probably near the site of the first fortifications by the original settlers) they erected heavy earthworks upon it for defence.

  • Numerous early earthworks fringe the hills to the south.

  • There are numerous early earthworks on the chalk hills in the neighbourhood.

  • farther out, a new continuous line of wall fortifications, with outlying clusters of earthworks and forts, has since been erected; 1000 acres, now occupied by handsome streets, squares and two public parks, were thus added to the inner town, almost doubling its area.

  • The order received by Admiral Sir Beauchamp Seymour (afterwards Lord Alcester) on the 3rd of July was as follows: Prevent any attempt to bar channel into port- If work is resumed on earthworks, or fresh guns mounted, inform military commander that you have orders to prevent it; and if not immediately discontinued, destroy earthworks and silence batteries if they open fire, having given sufficient notice to population, shipping and foreign men-of-war.

  • The attacking force was disposed in three groups: (i) the Alexandra, Sultan and Superb, outside the reef, to engage the Ras-el-Tin and the earthworks under weigh; (2) the Monarch, Invincible and Penelope, inside the harbour, to engage the Meks batteries; and (3) the Inflexible and Temeraire, to take up assigned stations outside the reef and to co-operate, with the inshore squadron.

  • The tomb of Munatius Plancus, on the summit of the promontory (see Caietae Portus), is now a naval signal station, and lies in the centre of the extensive earthworks of the modern fortifications.

  • Surrounding the church (which stands in a highlying portion of the g own known as Chipping Hill) there are earthworks, possibly the remains of a fortification recorded as made by order of Edward the Elder in 913, but perhaps of British origin.

  • The Castle Hill is crowned with some fine earthworks of uncertain date.

  • Of the old castle, dating probably from the 12th century, but in part protected by much earlier earthworks, the keep and a few other portions still remain.

  • The earthworks west and south of the town are of great extent; there was a large Saxon burial-ground here.

  • Half a mile east of the borough hall is Washington or Fort Greene Park (30 acres), laid out on the site of earthworks (known as Fort Greene) constructed during the War of Independence, and commanding good views.

  • The North, alarmed at the threat, speedily transformed Washington into a great military post and protected it on all sides with strong earthworks.

  • Prehistoric earthworks are to be seen in the neighbourhood, several animal-shaped mounds upon the shores of Lakes Mendota, Monona and Waubesa being among the best examples.

  • British earthworks and Roman roads and relics prove later occupation.

  • Earthworks, of this or an earlier date, remain.

  • Along two of the forks of the Licking are some of the most extensive earthworks of the "mound builders"; they occupy about 3 sq.

  • For an account of the earthworks see Gerard Fowke, Archaeological History of Ohio (Columbus, 1902).

  • The districts south of the old Roman earthworks which link the Dniester with the Pruth along the line of the Botna, just south of Bender, consist of level pastureland known as the Budjak steppes.

  • Tradition tells that Uffa, who probably threw up the earthworks called the Castle Hill, established the capital of East Anglia here about 575.

  • The Bala Hissar was destroyed and has never since been entirely rebuilt, and a fortified cantonment at Sherpur (one side of which was represented by the historic Bemaru ridge) had taken the place of the old earthworks of the British occupation of 1842 which were constructed on nearly the same site.

  • Although the neighbourhood abounds in British earthworks and barrows, and there are traces of a Roman road leading from Poole to Wimborne, Poole (La Pole) is not mentioned by the early chroniclers or in Domesday Book.

  • by earthworks; and the Allies found themselves forced, with scanty preparations, to undertake a regular- siege against an enemy ~vhose force was numerically superior to their own.

  • Then the isthmus a few miles north of the town, between it and Bulair, was fortified with strong earthworks by English and French engineers, mainly on the lines of the old works constructed in 13 57.

  • S., is known as the Kalah i Darab, or citadel of Darius, and consists of a series of earthworks arranged in a circle round an isolated rock.

  • Tradition claims that King Athelstan threw up defensive earthworks here, but the existing castle is attributed to Joel of Totnes, who held the manor during the reign of William the Conqueror, and also founded a Cluniac priory, dedicated to St Mary Magdalene.

  • The passage of the Mississippi was forced on the 24th of April 1862, and New Orleans surrendered on the 26th; this was immediately followed by the operations against Vicksburg, from which, however, Farragut was compelled to withdraw, having relearnt the old lesson that against heavy earthworks, crowning hills of sufficient height, a purely naval attack is unavailing; it was not till the following summer, and after a long siege, that Vicksburg surrendered to a land force under General Grant.

  • The castle of the same founder has left little but its foundations, but it was erected within the protection of a remarkable series of earthworks, which remain in good condition.

  • For more than two centuries they had remained prudently entrenched behind the earthworks that extended from Cologne to Ratisbon (Regensburg); but the intestine feuds which prevailed among the barbarians and were fostered by Rome, the organizatipn under bold and turbulent chiefs of the bands greedy for booty, the pressing forward on populations already settled of tribes in their rear; all this caused the Germanic invasion to filter by degrees across the frontier.

  • Near by are some 18th century buildings, some interesting earthworks of the "mound-builders," and a cemetery in which are buried many soldiers who fought in the War of Independence.

  • Several battalions of soldiers, in their shirt sleeves despite the cold wind, swarmed in these earthworks like a host of white ants; spadefuls of red clay were continually being thrown up from behind the bank by unseen hands.

  • Another surprise arose, when the earthworks ditch was dug in the local limestone basement rock.

  • Earthworks:- undulations in the ground surface mark the location of the earlier church.

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