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earnest

earnest

earnest Sentence Examples

  • Again she lashed out with the whip - this time in earnest.

  • We agreed on an allowance figure and she began working in earnest.

  • Julie began crying in earnest.

  • "Officer David --" she began in earnest.

  • She replaced the sweater and began hunting in earnest.

  • Ryland listed his address as Grand Junction, Colorado and indicated he'd stay at least through the weekend when the ice climbing festivities began in earnest.

  • When the crowd began to break up in earnest, she took her husband's arm and led him to their kitchen where a chicken pot pie was still bubbling on the table.

  • As the weather improved, the goats began kidding in earnest.

  • The guardsman lowered his gaze to the ashes as he began digging in earnest.

  • The tears started in earnest as she reached the laundry room.

  • His simple, earnest response and the conviction on his face floored her.

  • An attack of the ague sent him home, and on recovery, having resolved to attend a high school and fit himself to become a teacher, he passed the next four years in a hard struggle with poverty and in an earnest effort to secure an education, studying for a short time in the Geauga Seminary atChester, Ohio.

  • When the convention met and the balloting began, the contest along these factional lines started in earnest.

  • But just as the agreeable jester rose into the earnest satirist, one of the most striking peculiarities of his style became a more manifest defect.

  • His conduct of affairs was by earnest efforts to promote education and to develop the resources of the country.

  • The military rule excited universal hostility; there was an earnest desire for a settled and constitutional government, and the revival of the monarchy in the person of Cromwell appeared the only way of obtaining it.

  • Bonaparte, with whom Tone had several interviews about this time, was much less disposed than Hoche had been to undertake in earnest an Irish expedition; and when the rebellion broke out in Ireland in 17 9 8 he had started for Egypt.

  • Thus, in 1480, when a Turkish fleet seized Otranto, Matthias, at the earnest solicitation of the pope, sent Balasz Magyar to recover the fortress, which surrendered to him on the 10th of May 1481.

  • It had been intended tc leave that part of Rome to the pope, but by the earnest desin of the inhabitants it too was included in the Italian kingdom At the plebiscite there were 133,681 votes for union and I 50~ against it.

  • The earnest and well-expressed prayer or hymn of praise cannot fail to draw the divine power to the worshipper and make it yield to his supplication; whilst offerings, so far from being mere acts of devotion calculated to give pleasure to the god, constitute the very food and drink which render him vigorous and capable of battling with the enemies of his mortal friend.

  • Perhaps in the department of thought where it is most in earnest - in ethics - it is an idealism.

  • Still, it may be doubted how far Hume was in earnest.

  • His biographers state that he showed himself from the beginning very earnest in austere life and humility; and he became a recognized example of the virtues of a Dominican.

  • a Talmudist, was an earnest promoter of kabbalistic studies.

  • Preparations were made in earnest for his subjugation.

  • His political career began in earnest at the opening of the War of 1812.

  • The scientific study of the economics of local administration is, however, in its infancy, and requires to be taken up in earnest by economists.

  • The pope, John XXII., made him his principal chaplain, and presented him with a rochet in earnest of the first vacant bishopric in England.

  • He is an earnest worshipper of the Virgin, but a bold and vigorous hater of monks and abbots.

  • It is remarkable that systematic instruction in the theory and practice of chemistry only received earnest attention in our academic institutions during the opening decades of the 19th century.

  • The periods of silence are regarded as times of worship equally with those occupied with vocal service, inasmuch as Friends hold that robustness of spiritual life is best promoted by earnest striving on the part of each one to know the will of God for xI.

  • The most earnest and unremitting exertions were made by the persons so associated in investigating facts and collecting evidence, in forming branch committees and procuring petitions, information and support of those who pleaded the cause in parliament.

  • He was an earnest advocate of the adoption of the Federal constitution, was a member of the Massachusetts convention which ratified that instrument, and was one of the most influential advisers of the leaders of the Federalist party.

  • The longing to arrive at the one explanation of all things, which had inspired the older philosophers, became less earnest; the belief, indeed, that any such explanation was attainable began to fail.

  • But he taught that the state may interfere with legal or public duties only, and not with moral or private ones; He would not have even atheists punished, though they should be expelled the country, and he came forward as an earnest opponent of the prosecution of witches and of the use of torture.

  • He then addressed himself to the French ministers, and had much earnest conversation, especially with Rouher, whom he found well inclined to the economical and commercial principles which he advocated.

  • As this ungrateful work brought no reward, Richelieu, in spite of the earnest entreaties of the queen-mother, retired once more to his bishopric. But the king, while approving his conduct, was still suspicious of him, and he was exiled to Avignon, along with his brother and brother-in-law, on the 7th of April 1618.

  • The third may be characterized as a period of transition; it marks the adoption in earnest of a guerrilla policy on the part of the enemy, and an uncertain casting about on the part of the British for a definite system with which to grapple with an unforeseen development.

  • But much time was consumed and the plan underwent several modifications before its execution began in earnest on the 16th of January.

  • Soon after the great earthquake of 1509, which laid Constantinople in ruins, Selim, the ungovernable pasha of Trebizond, whose vigorous rule in Asia had given Europe an earnest of his future career as sultan, appeared before Adrianople, where Bayezid had sought refuge.

  • Nearly all the best writers are characterized by a certain naive and earnest piety which is attractive, and not infrequently display a force of moral indignation which arrests attention.

  • His earnest, rugged, simple style of oratory made him extremely popular, and at once secured for him a wide reputation.

  • He published: Nature and Life (1867); A Man in Earnest: Life of A.

  • not to change any doctrines held by them which are not contrary to that faith which the Holy Spirit, speaking through the Oecumenical Councils of the Undivided Church of Christ, has taught us as necessary to be believed by all Christians, but to strengthen an ancient Church, at the earnest request of the Catholicos, and with the knowledge and blessing of the Catholic patriarch of Antioch, one of the four patriarchs of the Holy Orthodox Eastern Church, and occupant of the Apostolic See from which the Church of the East revolted at the time of Nestorius."

  • The great concern of the time and the chief practical theme of these chapters is the building of the temple; but its restoration is only the earnest of greater things to follow, viz., the glorious restoration of David's kingdom.

  • But death removed him (April 30, 1555) before he could do more than give an earnest of his intentions.

  • He gave earnest support to the Legal Tender Act, and the substitution of the national for the state banking system.

  • It was the brilliant exhibition in November 1833 that, in modern times particularly, attracted earnest students to investigate the subject of meteors generally, and to make systematic observations of their apparitions on ordinary nights of the year.

  • The industry was threatened with extinction, and would certainly have dwindled to insignificant dimensions had not a few earnest artists, working in the face of many difficulties and discouragements, succeeded in striking out new lines and establishing new standar4s for excellence.

  • It is generally and traditionally praised, but those who have read it will be more disposed to agree with Charles Lamb, who considers it "of a vile and debasing tendency," and thinks it "almost impossible to suppose the author in earnest."

  • War was averted for a moment by the result of the battle of Austerlitz, but it broke out in earnest in October 1806.

  • He was the earnest champion of the advancement of American shipping, and advocated liberal subsidies, insisting that the policy of protection should be applied on sea as well as on land.

  • Britton was an earnest advocate of the preservation of national monuments, proposing in 1837 the formation of a society such as the modern Society for the Preservation of Ancient Monuments.

  • Both at King's College and at Cambridge Maurice gathered round him a band of earnest students, to whom he directly taught much that was valuable drawn from wide stores of his own reading, wide rather than deep, for he never was, strictly speaking, a learned man.

  • In 1842 he published a treatise on The Unity of the Church, and his reputation as an eloquent and earnest preacher being by this time considerable, he was in the same year appointed select preacher by his university, thus being called upon to fill from time to time the pulpit which Newman, as vicar of St Mary's, was just ceasing to occupy.

  • Venezuela declared its independence on the 5th of July 1811, and in the following year the war commenced in earnest by the advance of Monteverde with the Spanish troops.

  • Soon the Imperialists advanced in earnest, greatly superior in numbers.

  • It is crude, but original and earnest, and shows a wide range of reading very remarkable in so young a man.

  • The French Revolution seemed to many earnest thinkers the one great outcry of modern times for the liberty of thought and action which is the eternal heritage of every human being.

  • This appoinment had a deep influence on the already vigorous religious life of Huss himself; and one of the effects of the earnest and independent study of Scripture into which it led him was a profound conviction of the great value not only of the philosophical but also of the theological writings of Wycliffe.

  • South camp is now named Stanhope Lines, after Mr Stanhope, who was secretary of state for war when the Barracks Act 1890 was passed and the reconstruction commenced in earnest.

  • Meanwhile the Zanzibar Arabs had reached Buganda in everincreasing numbers as traders; but many of them were earnest 1 The letter was entrusted to Linant de Bellefonds, a Belgian in the Egyptian service, who had been sent to Buganda by Gordon.

  • The slaying of Patroclus by the Trojan hero Hector roused Achilles from his indifference; eager to avenge his beloved comrade, he sallied forth, equipped with new armour fashioned by Hephaestus, slew Hector, and, after dragging his body round the walls of Troy, restored it to the aged King Priam at his earnest entreaty.

  • But this implied the gathering of the earnest " professors " in each locality into a definite body, committed to the Gospel as their law of life.

  • He was educated at Toul, where he successively became canon and (1026) bishop; in the latter capacity he rendered important political services to his relative Conrad II., and afterwards to Henry III., and at the same time he became widely known as an earnest and reforming ecclesiastic by the zeal he showed in spreading the rule of the order of Cluny.

  • It is an earnest and striking appeal on behalf of the Empire, which was clearly in great danger, and it shows the terms offered to the Church, as well as the strength of the Church at the time.

  • Moshesh now turned in earnest to Sir Philip Wodehouse for preservation.

  • de Gournay (1712-1759), who was also an earnest inquirer in the economic field; and round these two distinguished men was gradually formed the philosophic sect of the Economistes, or, as for distinction's sake they were afterwards called, the Physiocrates.

  • But he exercised a wholesome influence over the more earnest students of history among the resident graduates.

  • These terms were never kept, despite the earnest remonstrances of the king, and the complaints of the aggrieved borderers.

  • There was thus a considerable number of earnest people dispersed throughout the country waiting for the rousing of the parish clergy.

  • The duration of the war was due to the nature of the country and the enormous distances to be traversed, not to any want of energy, for the armies were in deadly earnest and their battles and combats (of which two thousand four hundred can be named) sterner than those of almost any war in modern history.

  • In the east hostilities began in earnest in western Virginia.

  • The men of the South were not less in earnest, and the most highly individualized people in the world was thus found ready to accept a rigorous discipline as the only way to success.

  • The withdrawal of Sennacherib's army, in which the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion received the most striking practical confirmation, was welcomed by Isaiah and his disciples as an earnest of the speedy inbringing of the new spiritual era.

  • Earnest >>

  • His colleagues in the Religious Tract Society united with other earnest evangelical leaders to establish a new society, which should have for its sole object "to encourage a wider circulation of the Holy Scriptures, without note or comment."

  • He was not an original thinker, but a diligent student, distinguished by great learning, by a turn for historical and philological criticism, and by an earnest purpose to uproot false teaching - especially Christianity, to ennoble men and train them to goodness.

  • So great was the general decline that this Neoplatonic philosophy offered a welcome shelter to many earnest and influential men, in spite of the 1 It was condemned by an edict of the emperors Theodosius II.

  • He succeeded to the throne on the 16th of November 1797 and at once gave earnest of his good intentions by cutting down the expenses of the royal establishment, dismissing his father's ministers, and reforming the most oppressive abuses of the late reign.

  • He became Zwingli's best helper, and after more than a year of earnest preaching and four public disputations in which the popular verdict had been given in favour of Oecolampadius and his friends, the authorities of Basel began to see the necessity of some reformation.

  • In 1842, before the expiration of his term, he resigned his seat, and at Concord, New Hampshire, began his career at the bar in earnest, though still retaining an interest in politics.

  • At the present day, despite the earnest wish of the council of Trent (Sess.

  • These Simple And Earnest Scenes De La Vie Reelle Are An Appealing Revelation Of That Eternal Secret Of The Soil Which Every People.; Wishing To Have A Country Of Its Own Must Early Lay To Heart;' And Jean Rivard, Le Defricheur, Will Always Remain The Eponym Of The New Colons Of The 19Th Century.

  • He studied with earnest zeal the Greek philosophers; Plato in particular, and the writings of the Stoics, he had fully at command, and his treatise De Anima shows that he himself was able to investigate and discuss philosophical problems. From the philosophers he had been led to the medical writers, whose treatises plainly had a place in his working library.

  • He was an earnest, appreciative, independent student.

  • Under Elizabeth's succession he returned to England, and made earnest efforts to secure what would now be called a low-church settlement of religion.

  • His reputation in the parliament of 1880-1886 was that of a dilettante, who allied himself with the three politicians already named from a feeling of irresponsibility rather than of earnest purpose; he was regarded as one who, on the rare occasions when he spoke, was more desirous to impart an academic quality to his speeches than to make any solid contribution to public questions.

  • Even if the bull encouraged the persecution of witches, in so far as it encouraged the inquisitors to take earnest action, there is still no valid ground for the accusation that Innocent VIII.

  • Careless of the glories of Renaissance art, a stranger to all worldly instincts, the earnest Netherlander inscribed on his banner the healing of the moral ulcers, the restoration of unity to the Church - especially in Germany - and the preservation of the West from the Turkish danger.

  • was guided by the earnest desire to see the doctrine of Papal Infallibility brought to universal recognition.

  • But besides being a true educator, and perhaps the greatest popular teacher of natural philosophy in his generation, he was an earnest and original observer and explorer of nature.

  • Building began in earnest about 1135, and was continued steadily until the middle of the 13th century, after which the only important erection was Abbot Huby's tower (c. 1 500).

  • On the 21st of February 1648, at his earnest request, he was carried in a litter from Fredriksborg to his beloved Copenhagen, where he died a week later.

  • It was then too that he chose his " lady-love," whom he was expected to regard with an adoration at once earnest, respectful, and the more meritorious if concealed.

  • The revival was not a little due to the foundation in 18 22, by a few earnest but (as they called themselves) " humble and obscure " Catholics at Lyons, of a new voluntary society, called the Institution for the Propagation of the Faith.

  • By the influence of Lord James, in spite of the earnest opposition of Knox, permission was obtained for her to hear Mass celebrated in her private chapel - a licence to which, said the Reformer, he would have preferred the invasion of ten thousand Frenchmen.

  • According to the Memoirs of Sir James Melville, both Lord Herries and himself resolved to appeal to the queen in terms of bold and earnest remonstrance against so desperate and scandalous a design; Herries, having been met with assurances of its unreality and professions of astonishment at the suggestion, instantly fled from court; Melville, evading the danger of a merely personal protest without backers to support him, laid before Mary a letter from a loyal Scot long resident in England, which urged upon her consideration and her conscience the danger and disgrace of such a project yet more freely than Herries had ventured to do by word of mouth; but the sole result was that it needed all the queen's courage and resolution to rescue him from the violence of the man for whom, she was reported to have said, she cared not if she lost France, England and her own country, and would go with him to the world's end in a white petticoat before she would leave him.

  • His most formidable assailant was Johann Melchior Goeze (1717-1786), the chief pastor of Hamburg, a sincere and earnest theologian, but utterly unscrupulous in his choice of weapons against an opponent.

  • He had at Rome already made the acquaintance of Lord Elcho and of John Murray of Broughton; at Paris he had seen many supporters of the Stuart cause; he was aware that in every European court the Jacobites were represented in earnest intrigue; and he had now taken a considerable share in correspondence and other actual work connected with the promotion of his own and his father's interests.

  • When Alaric found himself once more outwitted by the machinations of such a foe, he marched southward and began in deadly earnest his third, his ever-memorable siege of Rome.

  • In March 1861 he was made private life, his earnest Christianity and the unrepining loyalty colonel of the 1st U.S. Cavalry; but his career in the old army with which he accepted the ruin of his party.

  • As a preacher he was vivid, eager and earnest, equally plainspoken and uncompromising when preaching to a fashionable congregation or to his own village poor.

  • No sooner was this effected than the project of a legislative union between the British and Irish parliaments, which had been from time to time discussed since the beginning of the 18th century, was taken up in earnest by Pitt's government.

  • The slavery question, in one form or another, had become the great overshadowing issue in national, and even in state politics; the abolition movement, begun in earnest by W.

  • The consent of several of the electors having been purchased by concessions, Frederick signed with Pope Nicholas V., the successor of Eugenius, in February 1448 the concordat of Vienna, an arrangement which bound the German Church afresh to Rome and perpetuated the very evils from which earnest churchmen had been seeking deliverance.

  • Maximilian found time to make earnest but unavailing efforts to mediate between his cousin, Philip II.

  • He had no sympathy with political liberalism, but throughout his long reign of forty-two years, with a constant interchange of ministries and many ministerial crises, he never had a serious conflict with the states-general, and his ministers could always count upon his fair-mindedness and an earnest desire to help them to further the national welfare.

  • of Sicily in good earnest.

  • On the other hand, he always had the highest respect for every earnest and faithful opponent of slavery, however far their special views might differ.

  • Innocent was a strong and earnest man of monastic temperament, but not altogether free from nepotism.

  • Frederick William, whose temper was by no means so ruthlessly Spartan as tradition has painted it,was overjoyed, and commissioned the clergyman to receive from the prince an oath of filial obedience, and in exchange for this proof of "his intention to improve in real earnest" his arrest was to be lightened, pending the earning of a full pardon.

  • The early death of his parents, which illustrated to him in the most forcible manner the unstableness of all human existence, threw a gloom over his whole life, and fostered in him that earnest piety and fervent love for solitude and meditation which have left numerous traces in his poetical writings, and served him throughout his literary career as a powerful antidote against the enticing favours of princely courts, for which he, unlike most of his contemporaries, never sacrificed a tittle of his self-esteem.

  • Earnest men could not disguise from themselves the moral dangers almost inevitably consequent upon them; they recognized, moreover, that many pilgrims were actuated by extremely dubious motives; and they distrusted the exaggerated value set on outward works.

  • In depth of philosophic insight, in the method of Socratic questioning often adopted, in the earnest and elevated tone of the whole, in the evidence they afford of the most cultured thought of the day, these dialogues constantly remind the reader of the dialogues of Plato.

  • He still corresponded with his Leipzig friends, but the tone of his letters changed; life had become graver and more earnest for him.

  • He never was a member of the Humanist circle; he was too much in earnest about religious questions and of too practical a turn of mind.

  • began in earnest with the establishment of the Liberator by William Lloyd Garrison in 1831, soon led to the sending of innumerable petitions to congress for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, over which the Federal government had jurisdiction, and for other action by congress with respect to that institution.

  • There was grace, nevertheless, in his manners; and his frank and earnest address, his quick sympathy (yet he seemed cold to strangers), his vivacious, desultory, informing talk, gave him an engaging charm.

  • A man of deep religious feeling and an earnest churchman, he strongly resented a measure which was calculated, to his mind, greatly to injure the cause of religion in Wales.

  • There for several years he lived, and taught by close earnest personal address and conversation.

  • He is an earnest, sometimes stern and sometimes pathetic, preacher of righteousness, who despises the mere graces of style and the subtleties of an abstruse logic. He has no patience with mere antiquarian study of the Stoical writers.

  • It was at this period of his life, when his inner troubles of spirit harmonized with the unhappy external conditions of his lot, that he began an earnest and prolonged study of the Bible; and from this time dates the tone of extreme pietism which is characteristic of his writings, and which undoubtedly alienated many of his friends.

  • Roused by these crying evils, a small band of earnest men formed themselves into an association for the improvement of prison discipline.

  • The earnest desire of most prison administration is to develop industrial training and trade profits side by side with mildness of treatment.

  • There is in reality no room for suspecting Moawiya of not having been in earnest when making this appeal; he might well regret that internecine strife should drain the forces which were so much wanted for the spread of Islam.

  • When, however, after the lapse of three days, a final earnest appeal had been answered insultingly, he began the battle.

  • But Hisham, to whom he was successor-designate, foolishly kept him in the background, and even made earnest efforts to get his own son Maslama acknowledged as his successor.

  • The denunciations of the "money power" and the reiteration of democratic dogmas deserve earnest attention.

  • Lord Gambier was a man of earnest, almost morbid, religious principle, and of undoubted courage; but the administration of the admiralty has seldom given rise to such flagrant scandals as during the time when he was a member of it; and through the whole war the self-esteem of the navy suffered no such wound as during Lord Gambier's command in the Bay of Biscay.

  • An earnest attempt to satisfy this demand was made by Fichte whose single principle was the activity of the pure Ego, while his single method was the assertion of a truth revealed by reflection on the content of conscious experience, the characterization of this as a half truth and the supplementation of it by its other, and finally the harmonization of both.

  • Joly published his Manual of Quaternions (London); the valuable contents of this are doubled by copious so-called examples; every earnest student should take these as part of the main treatise.

  • Apart, however, from these pseudo-revelations the Theosophical Society has given rise to an extensive literature, some of which displays a high degree of argumentative and expository ability; and moreover the movement has from time to time attracted the attention and secured the co-operation of many earnest seekers, of some few of whom it can be truly said that they possessed undoubted spiritual power, insight and knowledge.

  • About this time negotiations for the release of James were begun in earnest, and in September 1423 a treaty was signed at York, the Scottish nation undertaking to pay a ransom of 60,000 marks "for his maintenance in England."

  • He proposed to the French consul-general at Alexandria to make advances to the Porte, and suggested sending back the Ottoman fleet as an earnest of his good intentions, a course which, it was hoped, "would lead to a direct and amicable arrangement of the Turco-Egyptian question."

  • After one year at Hope chapel, Clifton, he was called to the ministry of Argyle Independent chapel in Bath; and on the 30th of January 1791 he began the work of his life there, attracting hearers of every religious denomination and of every rank, and winning for himself a wide reputation as a brilliant pulpit orator, an earnest religious author, and a friendly counsellor.

  • This power rested upon his earnest and commanding personality, and also upon the support which he received from the German church, the possession of a valuable private domain, and the care with which he exacted feudal dues from his dependents.

  • In spite of great physical weakness he made several earnest speeches in behalf of these measures to save the Union.

  • As the middle ages drew to a close, earnest churchmen were compelled to ask themselves whether it would not be better to let the priests marry than to continue a system under which concubinage was even licensed in some districts.

  • His religion is, however, anything but an abstraction to the savage, and stands rather for the whole of his concrete life so far as it is penetrated by a spirit of earnest endeavour.

  • Incidentally the candidate is trained to perform his duties as a tribesman, but religion presides over the course, demanding earnest endeavour of an impressionable age.

  • While in England on public business in 1652, Clarke published Ill News from New England, which contained an impressive account of the proceedings against himself and his brethren at Lynn, and an earnest and wellreasoned plea for liberty of conscience.

  • Long after the Act of Toleration (1689) was in full forcein England, the Boston Baptists pleaded in vain for the privileges to which they were thereby entitled, and it required the most earnest efforts of English Baptists and other dissenters to gain for them a recognition of the right to exist.

  • Horsley now entered in earnest upon his famous controversy with Joseph Priestley, who denied that the early Christians held the doctrine of the Trinity.

  • Schopenhauer took up the subject in earnest, and the result of his reflexions (and a few elementary observations) soon after appeared (Easter 1816) as a monograph, Ober das Sehen and die Farben (ed.

  • Abbas, who had been proclaimed king by the nobles at Nishapur some two or three years before this occurrence, may be said to have now undertaken in earnest the cares of sovereignty.

  • Such, presumably, was the construction put in after times on his earnest endeavour to unite Christians on the footing of the " pure gospel."

  • In contemporary movements he was an earnest and conscientious advocate of Catholic democracy and socialism and of the view that the church should adapt itself to the changed political conditions consequent to the Revolution.

  • Butler was an earnest and deep-thinking Christian, melancholy by temperament, and grieved by what seemed to him the hopelessly irreligious condition of his age.

  • Fenion assailed him on the religious side, and managed to transform him into a devotee, exceedingly affectionate, earnest and religious, but woefully lacking in tact and common sense.

  • But once let this system be presented to men in earnest about right living, and eager to profit by what they are taught, and an ethical reform is inevitable.

  • 3, and shortly afterwards the attack was renewed in earnest against the Turkish strongholds of Muselimi and the Great Bardanjolt, which had been entrenched and fortified in places by blasting in the rocky soil.

  • Three corps of pikemen in solid masses formed the first line, which was kept out of sight behind the crest until the enemy advanced in earnest.

  • was not merely earnest and conscientious, but of incisive intellect, and unfailingly cheerful and witty.

  • It is needless to add that, under the overpowering influence of these vain imaginations, the earnest moral teachings of Gotama became more and more hidden from view.

  • David's Theological College, Lampeter, where he gathered about him a band of earnest religious enthusiasts, known as the Lampeter Brethren, and was eventually ordained to the curacy of Charlinch in Somerset, where he had sole charge in the illness and absence of the rector, the Rev. Samuel Starkey.

  • This event by no means disconcerted the believers, who saw in it only another manifestation of Pigott's divinity, and proclaimed it as "an earnest of the total redemption of man."

  • Fleury, Rabelais is a sober reformer, an apostle of earnest work, of sound education, of rational if not dogmatic religion, who wraps up his morals in a farcical envelope partly to make them go down with the vulgar and partly to shield himself from the consequences of his reforming zeal.

  • Rabelais is, in short, if he be read without prejudice, a humorist pure and simple, feeling often in earnest, thinking almost always in jest.

  • Pamphilus gathered about him a circle of earnest students who devoted themselves especially to the study of the Bible and the transcription of Biblical codices, and also to the defence and spread of the writings of Origen, whom they regarded as their master.

  • Christy took an earnest part in many philanthropic movements of his time, especially identifying himself with the efforts to relieve the sufferers from the Irish famine of 1847.

  • He was not born, he declared, with knowledge, but was fond of antiquity, and earnest in seeking knowledge there.

  • His gestures were scanty, his voice was not powerful, but he was desperately in earnest, and he held his audience whether his sermon contained a picturesque and detailed description of the torments of the damned, or, as was often the case, spoke of the love and peace of God in the heart of man.

  • He was an earnest, devout Christian, and a man of blameless life.

  • In time, however, he perceives that behind the fantastic garb of language there is an earnest and vigorous mind, an imagination that harbours fire within its cloudy folds, and an insight into the mysteries of spiritual life which is often startling.

  • Lastly, recent research has proved that it was in 1494 that Leonardo got to work in earnest on what was to prove not only by far his greatest but by far his most expeditiously and steadily executed work in painting.

  • He married in 1830 Hannah O'Brien Chaplin (1809-1865), who was herself the author of The Earnest Man, a biography of Adoniram Judson (1855), and of The History of the English Bible (1859), besides being her husband's able assistant in his Hebrew studies.

  • Oxford he did not find wholly congenial to his intensely earnest spirit, but he read hard, and, as he afterwards said, "Plato, Aristotle, Butler, Thucydides, Sterne, Jonathan Edwards, passed like the iron atoms of the blood into my mental constitution."

  • Many an earnest heart full of disappointment or enthusiasm has gone through a similar struggle, has learnt to look upon all earthly gains and hopes as worse than vanity, has envied the calm life of the cloister, troubled by none of these things, and has longed for an opportunity of entire selfsurrender to abstinence and meditation.

  • So strongly did Lord Roberts feel on the subject, that he at once made Colonel Brabant, a well-known and respected colonial veteran and member of the House of Assembly, a brigadier-general, and started recruiting loyal colonists in earnest.

  • As forerunners of the Pietists in the strict sense, not a few earnest and powerful voices had been heard bewailing the shortcomings of the Church and advocating a revival of practical and devout Christianity.

  • In 1675 Spener published his Pia desideria, or Earnest Desires for a Reform of the True Evangelical Church.

  • In this publication he made six proposals as the best means of restoring the life of the Church: (1) the earnest and thorough study of the Bible in private meetings, ecclesiolae in ecclesia; 1 Labadie had formed the ascetic and mystic sect of "The Regenerati" in the Church of Holland (c. 1660), and then in other parts of the Reformed Church.

  • Soon after the Civil War a Democratic " machine " got firm control of the city, and although a struggle to overthrow the machine was begun in earnest in 1875 by a coalition of the reform element of the Democratic party with the Republican party, it was not till 1895 that the coalition won its first decisive victory at the polls.

  • At a comparatively early age he entered the church, and held for some time the office of anagnost or reader; subsequently he manifested a desire to devote himself to the secular life as a rhetorician, an impulse which was checked by the earnest remonstrances of Gregory of Nazianzus.

  • If we cut away the mass of mere fiction which Philostratus accumulated, we have left a highly imaginative, earnest reformer who laboured to infuse into the flaccid dialectic of paganism a saner spirit of practical morality.

  • The Jains are the last direct representatives on the continent of India of those schools of thought which grew out of the active philosophical speculation and earnest spirit of religious inquiry that prevailed in the valley of the Ganges during the 5th and 6th centuries before the Christian era.

  • Finding himself involved in two wars~ at once, Edward made an earnest appeal to his subjects to rise to the occasion and because that which touches all should be approved of all summoned the The celebrated model parliament of November 1295, ~odeJ which exactly copied in its constitution Montforts parliaparliament of 1265, members from all cities and ~ of boroughs being summoned along with the knights of the shires, and the inferior clergy being also represented by their proctors.

  • The Tories had never been as United earnest in the prosecution of the war as the Whigs; min~iry.

  • When war began in earnest, and the reality of danger came home to Englishmen by the capture of Minorca (1756), there arose a demand for a more capable government than any which Newcastle could offer.

  • Lord John Russell, indeed, was too earnest in his desire for reform to abstain from one serious effort to accomplish it.

  • The introduction to his first volume of Actes et paroles, ranging in date from 1841 to 1851, is dated in June 1875; it is one of his most earnest and most eloquent appeals to the conscience and intelligence of the student.

  • In all its varieties Burke's style is noble, earnest, deep-flowing, because his sentiment was lofty and fervid, and went with sincerity and ardent disciplined travail of judgment.

  • We are not exhilarated by the cheerfulness, the polish, the fine manners of Bolingbroke, for Burke had an anxious conscience, and was earnest and intent that the good should triumph.

  • But he was too fiercely in earnest in his horror of Jacobinism to allow mere party associations to guide him.

  • In the spring of 1796 Pitt's constant anxiety for peace had become more earnest than ever.

  • In 1640, however, at the earnest invitation of Duke Ernest the Pious, he removed to Gotha as court preacher and general superintendent in the execution of important reforms which had been initiated in the ecclesiastical and educational establishments of the duchy.

  • The movement for the admission of Wisconsin to the Union was taken up in earnest soon after 1840, and after several years' agitation, in which Governor Doty took a leading part, on the 10th of August 1846 an Enabling Act introduced in Congress by Morgan L.

  • The Ritschl school, and others too, have made an earnest effort to incorporate Christ's words in Dogmatic and no longer shunt them into systems of " Christian Ethics."

  • He is one of the speakers in the Phaedo of Plato, in which he is represented as an earnest seeker after virtue and truth, keen in argument and cautious in decision.

  • His own Christian belief, sincere and earnest, was more the outcome of the common sense which, largely through him, moulded the prudential theology of England in the 18th century, than of the nobler elements present in More, Cudworth and other religious thinkers of the preceding age, or afterwards in Law and Berkeley, Coleridge and Schleiermacher.

  • A period of quietness now set in, and the condition of the kingdom, its education, its agriculture and its trade and manufactures, began to receive earnest attention, while by frugality, both in public and in private matters, King William helped to repair the shattered finances of the country.

  • The results to which this Probabilism, applied with an earnest desire to avoid dangerous rigour, led in the 17th century were revealed to the world in the immortal Lettres provinciales of Pascal.

  • Arngrim Jonsson's Brevis Commentarius (1593), and Crymogaea (1609), were the first-fruits of this movement, of which Bishops Odd, Thorlak and Bryniulf (worthy parallels to Parker and Laud) were the wise and earnest supporters.

  • In 1441 exploration began again in earnest with the venture of Antam Goncalvez, who brought to Portugal the first slaves and gold-dust from the Guinea coasts beyond Bojador; while Nuno Tristam in the same year pushed on to Cape Blanco.

  • From faith proceeds repentance, which is the turning of our life to God, proceeding from a sincere and earnest fear of God, and consisting in the mortification of the flesh and the old man within us and a vivification of the Spirit.

  • Farnese, as soon as he had obtained a secure basis of operations in Hainaut and Artois, set himself in earnest to the task of reconquering Brabant and Flanders by force of arms. Town after town fell into his power.

  • To our modern feeling, the eloquence of Demosthenes exhibits everywhere a general stamp of earnest and simple strength.

  • At his earnest request, the work, which he doubtless intended to bring down to his own times, was continued after his death by his friend Theophanes Confessor.

  • In politics he was an earnest friend of liberty and progress, and in the period of reaction which followed the overthrow of Napoleon he was charged by the Prussian government with "demagogic agitation" in conjunction with the great patriot Arndt.

  • to take his kingship in earnest, thinking to cure him by war of his effeminate passions; and, in the spring of 1744, the kings grave illness at Metz gave a momentary hope of reconciliation between him and the deserted queen.

  • Hooker now advanced in earnest on Rossville, and by nightfall the whole Confederate army, except the troops on Tunnel Hill, was retreating in disorder.

  • It was not until-December that his earnest desire of returning to Florence was realized, and the remaining eight years of his life were spent in his villa at Arcetri called "Il Giojello," in the strict seclusion which was the prescribed condition of his comparative freedom.

  • On Lyon's refusal to accede to the Secessionists' proposal that the state should be neutral, hostilities opened in earnest, and Lyon, having cleared Missouri of small hostile bands in the central part of the state, turned to the southern districts, where a Confederate army was advancing from the Arkansas border.

  • The name of "Tariff Commission," given to this voluntary and unofficial body, was a good deal criticized, but though flouted by the political free-traders it set to work in earnest, and accumulated a mass of evidence as to the real facts of trade, which promised to be invaluable to economic inquirers.

  • Both his father and his mother, he tells us, were "earnest followers of Calvin," but he himself "could never swallow that hard doctrine."

  • The parents paid thirty marks for their son's admission; and he expresses the conviction that they imposed this exile upon him from an earnest desire for his welfare.

  • began a persecution of the image-worshippers in real earnest.

  • He was an earnest advocate of reclamation of land, and suggested that farms for soldiers returned from the World War could be provided by extensive drainage and irrigation.

  • Again she lashed out with the whip - this time in earnest.

  • We agreed on an allowance figure and she began working in earnest.

  • Julie began crying in earnest.

  • Darian was gazing at her in earnest, torn.

  • Cynthia managed a smile as she cleaned and stacked the utensil carnage from her baking frenzy while Dean sipped his coffee in silence, content to spend a few quiet minutes before the swarm of guests descended in earnest.

  • "Officer David --" she began in earnest.

  • She replaced the sweater and began hunting in earnest.

  • Ryland listed his address as Grand Junction, Colorado and indicated he'd stay at least through the weekend when the ice climbing festivities began in earnest.

  • When the crowd began to break up in earnest, she took her husband's arm and led him to their kitchen where a chicken pot pie was still bubbling on the table.

  • As the weather improved, the goats began kidding in earnest.

  • Anger filled her, and she began to saw in earnest, unwilling to let another innocent person die in the darkness of the underworld.

  • The guardsman lowered his gaze to the ashes as he began digging in earnest.

  • But I have something your father wants, and I have something you need if you are earnest about saving your people.

  • The tears started in earnest as she reached the laundry room.

  • His simple, earnest response and the conviction on his face floored her.

  • Forty Shades of Blue is a textbook Sundance Film Festival favorite - all long lenses, grainy stock and arduously earnest indie angst.

  • clipper races between American and British vessels begin in earnest.

  • collaborationist government began in earnest.

  • commenced in earnest in March 2003, with the appointment of Dr. Stan Head as the project manager.

  • commencement of earnest negotiations on the future autonomous status of Tibet.

  • Islamic Arabs began the conquest of the region in earnest in the early eighth century.

  • On 11 Jul 1828 Miguel was proclaimed king by the traditional Cortes and the Liberals Wars began in earnest.

  • It was no go for Earnest even if we removed cratch.

  • During this time he started his studio career in earnest, having now played on over 170 albums (see discography, below ).

  • The present space will hold no more beds, but to build an additional dormitory is the earnest desire and intention of Dr. Gilbert.

  • The protector about this time gave a commendable earnest of his resolution to assert rigorous justice against offenders.

  • She turned to look at me her face had an expression of deadly earnest.

  • He was running in dead earnest now, faster than he had ever run in his life.

  • I cannot get him to write or speak in real, solid earnest.

  • I made up my mind to go to Russia, and began my preparations in good earnest.

  • His sons, William and George, set themselves in right earnest to bring back the prosperity of the old firm.

  • Do lavish attention on the person, as the more earnest the attention given the more likely you will end up together.

  • earnest entreaty in behalf of our souls.

  • earnest endeavor to impart to her some rather unusual id.. .

  • earnest heed to what I said, despite the wind and snow.

  • earnest prayer, is hard work.

  • earnest desire on both sides to do the work?

  • earnest endeavor to avoid litigation click here for the full article.

  • There was no mistaking his astonishing sincerity, his painfully earnest endeavor to impart to her some rather unusual id.. .

  • In that case, I can only counsel " the importance of not being too earnest " !

  • They are closely followed by a couple of very fit, very earnest young men.

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