This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

eardrum

eardrum

eardrum Sentence Examples

  • burst eardrum was diagnosed.

  • Sound waves enter the ear canal and cause the eardrum to vibrate.

  • Some people have a partial eardrum or no ear drum at all.

  • This is the passage that sound travels along to reach the eardrum.

  • Because the fluid stops the eardrum moving freely, it can lead to a more serious hearing problem.

  • The grommets usually fall out themselves any time between a few months to 2 years and this allows the eardrum to heal.

  • The middle ear bones work together like this: Sound enters your ears and makes the eardrum vibrate.

  • She was noted to have an intact red drum on the right side and a perforated eardrum on the left.

  • eardrum bursts, the discharge of fluid may be a welcome relief from pain.

  • In most cases, a burst eardrum heals by itself.

  • Three small bones (called the ossicles) in the middle ear link the eardrum to the inner ear.

  • perforated eardrum on the left.

  • perforation of the eardrum that can result in litigation.

  • Doctors treating chronic otitis media (or glue ear) often puncture the eardrum on purpose to drain pus from the middle ear.

  • The middle ear needs to be full of air to let the eardrum and small bones vibrate freely.

  • Colbert is deaf in his right ear, the result of damage during surgery that was meant to repair a perforated eardrum.

  • Myringotomy is a surgical procedure in which a small incision is made in the eardrum (the tympanic membrane), usually in both ears.

  • The eardrum heals around them, securing them in place.

  • The ear is washed, a small incision made in the eardrum, the fluid sucked out, a tube inserted, and the ear packed with cotton to control bleeding.

  • Another technique to keep the incision in the eardrum open without the need for tube insertion is application of a medication called mitomycin C, which was originally developed to treat bladder cancer.

  • Water should be kept out of the ear canal until the eardrum is intact.

  • If the procedure is repeated, structural changes in the eardrum can occur, such as loss of tone (flaccidity), shrinkage or retraction, or hardening of a spot on the eardrum (tympanosclerosis).

  • It is also possible that the incision will not heal properly, leaving a permanent hole in the eardrum, which can cause some hearing loss and increases the risk of infection.

  • Middle ear-The cavity or space between the eardrum and the inner ear.

  • It includes the eardrum, the three little bones (hammer, anvil, and stirrup) that transmit sound to the inner ear, and the eustachian tube, which connects the inner ear to the nasopharynx (the back of the nose).

  • Tympanic membrane-The eardrum, a thin disc of tissue that separates the outer ear from the middle ear.

  • The most familiar of this type of testing is the tympanogram, which determines if fluid has built up behind the eardrum.

  • The eardrum is inflamed with swelling of the ear canal wall.

  • Myringotomy-A surgical procedure in which an incision is made in the eardrum to allow fluid or pus to escape from the middle ear.

  • Otoscope-A hand-held instrument with a tiny light and a funnel-shaped attachment called an ear speculum, which is used to examine the ear canal and eardrum.

  • A perforated eardrum (tympanum perforation) is an opening or rupture in the eardrum (tympanic membrane), the thin membrane that separates the outer ear canal from the middle ear.

  • A perforated eardrum may be caused by infection, trauma, or negative pressure from underwater diving or an airplane flight.

  • The eardrum (tympanic membrane) is a thin, semi-transparent membranous wall that stretches across the ear canal and separates the outer ear from the middle ear.

  • The eardrum vibrates when sound waves travel into the ear canal and strike it.

  • The middle ear is connected to the nose by the eustachian tube, a narrow channel that runs from the eardrum to the back of the throat.

  • In addition to conducting sound, the eardrum also protects the middle ear from bacteria and possible infection.

  • In general, the larger the opening in the eardrum, the greater the potential for temporary hearing loss.

  • Eardrum perforation caused by a loud noise may result in disturbing ear noise (tinnitus) as well as a temporary hearing loss.

  • Perforated eardrum occurs commonly in people of all ages; it is especially common in early childhood when children are exposed regularly to colds and upper respiratory infections in their contact with other children.

  • Middle ear infection, the most frequent cause of perforated eardrum, is the most prevalent reported illness in children between six months and 20 months of age.

  • Middle ear infection (otitis media) is the most common cause of perforation of the eardrum.

  • Infection usually stems from an upper respiratory infection in which swelling (edema) in the eustachian tube causes fluid and mucous to gather behind the eardrum.

  • The resulting congestion builds up pressure behind the eardrum, causing severe pain and spontaneous rupture, which reduces the pain immediately.

  • The eardrum can also become damaged by direct injury from a foreign object or sudden noise.

  • Rarely, a small hole may remain in the eardrum after a pressure-equalizing tube (tympanostomy tube) falls out or is removed by a doctor.

  • This examination makes possible the diagnosis of eardrum perforation by allowing the doctor to see an opening in the eardrum or damage to bones in the middle ear.

  • MRI or CT imaging studies may be done to rule out skull fracture, middle ear tumor, or acoustic neuroma, which may cause pain and hearing loss and be confused with a possible perforated eardrum.

  • Treatment of a perforated eardrum is aimed at relieving pain or pressure behind the eardrum, treating any infection of the ear itself or of the upper respiratory tract, and restoring hearing.

  • Sometimes the doctor may lance a bulging eardrum and place a tympanostomy tube in it to relieve pain and pressure and allow the ear infection to drain before spontaneous rupture occurs.

  • A perforated eardrum usually heals by itself within two months.

  • Sometimes, a paper patch is placed over the eardrum until the membrane heals.

  • If the eardrum does not heal on its own, surgical repair (tympanoplasty) may be necessary to resolve the infection and restore hearing.

  • The ear should be kept clean and dry while the eardrum heals; it may help to insert ear plugs into the ears when showering or shampooing to block any water from getting in.

  • While a perforated eardrum may be uncomfortable, it usually heals on its own within two months.

  • A perforated eardrum can be prevented by avoiding insertion of any object into the ear to clean it or to remove earwax (cerumen).

  • Preventing ear infection is the primary way to prevent a perforated eardrum.

  • Early treatment of ear infection is another way to guard against a ruptured eardrum and associated hearing loss.

  • Its purpose is to equalize pressure on either side of the eardrum.

  • Otitis media-Inflammation or infection of the middle ear space behind the eardrum.

  • Otoscope-A hand-held instrument with a tiny light and a funnel-shaped attachment called an ear speculum, which is used to examine the ear canal and eardrum.

  • "Perforated Eardrum (Tympanic Membrane Perforation)."

  • Otitis media-Inflammation or infection of the middle ear space behind the eardrum.

  • Another cause of conductive hearing impairment is an excessive build-up of earwax that prevents sound waves from reaching the eardrum.

  • A small plastic tube is inserted through the eardrum to drain fluid and equalize the air pressure between the middle ear and the ear canal.

  • The tube usually falls out within six to 12 months and the hole in the eardrum closes.

  • Symptoms of acute otitis media usually disappear within a few days, although a ruptured eardrum may take several weeks to heal.

  • Its purpose is to equalize pressure on either side of the eardrum.

  • Myringotomy-A surgical procedure in which an incision is made in the eardrum to allow fluid or pus to escape from the middle ear.

  • Otitis media-Inflammation or infection of the middle ear space behind the eardrum.

  • Otoscope-A hand-held instrument with a tiny light and a funnel-shaped attachment called an ear speculum, which is used to examine the ear canal and eardrum.

  • Tympanometry-A test where air pressure in the ear canal is varied to test the condition and movement of the eardrum.

  • Middle ear-The cavity or space between the eardrum and the inner ear.

  • It includes the eardrum, the three little bones (hammer, anvil, and stirrup) that transmit sound to the inner ear, and the eustachian tube, which connects the inner ear to the nasopharynx (the back of the nose).

  • Otitis externa refers to an infection of the ear canal (outer ear), the tube leading from the outside opening of the ear in towards the eardrum.

  • The external ear canal is a tube approximately 1 in (2.5 cm) in length that runs from the outside opening of the ear to the start of the middle ear, which is behind the tympanic membrane (eardrum).

  • Cerumen impaction refers to the buildup of layers of earwax within the ear canal to the point of blocking the canal and putting pressure on the eardrum.

  • Cerumen impaction develops when earwax accumulates in the inner part of the ear canal and blocks the eardrum.

  • Cerumen traps sand or dust particles before they reach the eardrum.

  • Cerumen is most likely to become impacted when it is pushed against the eardrum by cotton-tipped applicators, hair pins, or other objects that people put in their ears, and when it is trapped against the eardrum by a hearing aid.

  • The pain is caused by the pressure of several layers of impacted earwax against the eardrum.

  • In children younger than one year, cerumen impaction is sometimes discovered during a routine check-up when the doctor finds that the earwax is blocking his or her view of the eardrum.

  • The diagnosis of impacted cerumen is usually made by examining the ear canal and eardrum with an otoscope, an instrument with a light attached that allows the doctor to look into the canal.

  • Although some doctors use Water Piks to remove cerumen, most do not recommend them because the stream of water is too forceful and may damage the eardrum.

  • Irrigation can, however, lead to infection of the outer or the middle ear if the patient has a damaged or absent eardrum.

  • Older children or adolescents who try to remove earwax themselves with hair pins or similar objects run the risk of perforating the eardrum or damaging the fragile skin covering the ear canal, causing bleeding and the risk of infection.

  • Myringotomy-A surgical procedure in which an incision is made in the eardrum to allow fluid or pus to escape from the middle ear.

  • Otitis media-Inflammation or infection of the middle ear space behind the eardrum.

  • Otitis media-Inflammation or infection of the middle ear space behind the eardrum.

  • An otoscope allows the doctor to look into the ear canal to see the eardrum.

  • Redness or fluid in the eardrum can indicate an ear infection.

  • Some otoscopes (called pneumatic otoscopes) can deliver a small puff of air to the eardrum to see if the eardrum will vibrate (which is normal).

  • An ear examination with an otoscope can also detect a build-up of wax in the ear canal or a rupture or puncture of the eardrum.

  • The doctor or nurse may hold the ear lobe as the speculum is inserted into the ear and may adjust the position of the otoscope to get a better view of the ear canal and eardrum.

  • The eardrum is typically thin, shiny, and pearly-white to light gray in color.

  • The tiny bones in the middle ear can be seen pushing on the eardrum membrane like tent poles.

  • The light from the otoscope will reflect off of the surface of the eardrum.

  • An ear infection will cause the eardrum to look red and swollen.

  • In cases where the eardrum has ruptured, there may be fluid draining from the middle ear.

  • A doctor may also see scarring, retraction of the eardrum, or bulging of the eardrum.

  • If there is an object lodged in the ear canal, pushing on the otoscope may push the object further into the ear and damage the eardrum.

  • Sometimes if there is an excessive build up of wax in the ear, the doctor or nurse will remove some of it so that the eardrum can be seen more clearly.

  • This process can irritate an infected external ear canal and can rupture an eardrum if performed improperly or if the patient moves suddenly.

  • Ear speculum-A cone- or funnel-shaped attachment for an otoscope that is inserted into the ear canal to examine the eardrum.

  • Otoscope-A hand-held instrument with a tiny light and a funnel-shaped attachment called an ear speculum, which is used to examine the ear canal and eardrum.

  • Pneumatic otoscope-An otoscope that can also produce a small puff of air that vibrates the eardrum.

  • Items that are lodged deep in the ear canal are more difficult to remove because of the possibility of damaging the eardrum.

  • Otitis media-Inflammation or infection of the middle ear space behind the eardrum.

  • Otitis media is an infection of the middle ear, which is located behind the eardrum.

  • Deep within the outer ear canal is the eardrum, which is a thin, transparent membrane that vibrates in response to sound.

  • Behind the eardrum is the space called the middle ear.

  • When the eardrum vibrates, three tiny bones within the middle ear, called ossicles, transmit these sounds to the inner ear.

  • The eustachian tube, which connects the middle ear to the nose, normally equalizes pressure in the middle ear, allowing the eardrum and ossicles to vibrate correctly, so that hearing is normal.

  • The physician will visualize the ear canal and eardrum by using a special lighted instrument called an otoscope.

  • Normally, the light from the otoscope reflects off the eardrum in a characteristic fashion called the "cone of light."

  • The probe measures how much sound energy bounces back off the eardrum, rather than being transmitted to the middle ear.

  • A physical examination may reveal fluid behind the eardrum and poor movement of the eardrum.

  • The eardrum may look clear and have no signs of redness, but may not move in response to air, as a normal eardrum would.

  • A tympanometry test may reveal an impairment of eardrum mobility.

  • If OME persists for more than four to six months, even if hearing tests are normal, the doctor may suggest surgery to drain the eardrum and implant ear tubes for continuous drainage.

  • Its purpose is to equalize pressure on either side of the eardrum.

  • Myringotomy-A surgical procedure in which an incision is made in the eardrum to allow fluid or pus to escape from the middle ear.

  • These bones help carry sound from the eardrum to the inner ear.

  • In addition, treatment of ear and throat infections with antibiotics and of recurring ear infections with surgical drainage through the eardrum (tympanostomy) has greatly reduced the incidence of surgical removal of these lymph glands.

  • Its purpose is to equalize pressure on either side of the eardrum.

  • Its purpose is to equalize pressure on either side of the eardrum.

Browse other sentences examples →