E-d sentence example

e-d
  • The lower end e of the cable in the tank T is taken to the testing room, so that continuous tests for electrical condition can be made.
    0
    0
  • The ink is electrified by a small induction electrical machine E placed on the top of the instrument; this causes it to fall in very minute drops from the open end of the siphon tube upon the brass table or the paper slip passing over it.
    0
    0
  • The other end is connected with the absorption vessels, which consist of a tube (e) containing calcium chloride, and a set of bulbs (f) containing potash solution.
    0
    0
  • The segmentation of the prosoma and the form of the appendages bear a homoplastic similarity to the head, pro-, meso-, and meta-thorax of a Hexapod with mandibles, maxillary palps and three pairs of walking legs; while the opistho io i e d c b o a S' S" 2 I VT V S IV III II I Opisthosoma Prosoma FIG.
    0
    0
  • These cells are f - - imbedded in the peri pheral parenchyma, E"- and lead into convo luted excretory tubes _ that form an anasto- - mosis opening to the exterior by a pore at the " hinder " end of the body.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This early Chinese manner, which lasted in the parent country down to the end of the 13th century, was characterized by a viril,e grace of line, a grave dignity of composition, striking simplicity of technique, and a strong but incomplete naturalistic ideal.
    0
    0
  • Every tube of electric force must therefore begin and end on electrified surfaces of opposite sign, and the quantities of positive and negative electricity on its two ends are equal, since the force E just outside an electrified surface is normal to it and equal to a/41r, where a is the surface density; and since we have just proved that for the ends of a tube of force EdS = E 1 dS', it follows that adS = a'dS', or Q = Q', where Q and Q' are the quantities of electricity on the ends of the tube of force.
    0
    0
  • The A reprieve till the end of 1892 followed, funds having Question of been raised through the efforts of Bishop Tucker E vacuation, by the Church Missionary Society and friends.
    0
    0
  • Also the velocity v at the end of the arc is given by (87) ve = u e sec 0 cos n.
    0
    0
  • The corrections of s e are important, as they are based (according to a note by that scribe, at the end of Esther) on an early copy which had been corrected by, Pamphilus, the disciple of Origen, friend of Eusebius and founder of a library at Caesarea.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This complicated arrangement may be represented in the following diagram: A,B,P, Z E H, 0 The simplest explanation is that Aristotle began by writing separate discourses, four at least, on political subjects; that he continued to write them and perhaps tried to combine them; but that in the end he failed and left the Politics unfinished and in disorder.
    0
    0
  • The observer's eye is applied to the small telescope E, which (by means of prisms numbered I, 2, 3, 4) views the vernier attached to the cross-head simultaneously with the hour circle attached to the upper end of the polar axis.
    0
    0
  • Through the eyepiece of the bent 1 telescope E' another hour circle attached to the lower end of the polar axis can be seen; thus an assistant is able to direct the telescope by a handle at H to any desired hour angle.
    0
    0
  • The telescope is attached to one end of this axis and a counterpoise e to the other.
    0
    0
  • It therefore made the aspirates A, E, Q and the semi-vowel I into vowels, and apparently converted the semi-vowel Y = w into the vowel which it placed at the end of the alphabet and substituted for it as the sixth symbol of the alphabet the letter F with the old value of w.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is generally known as the Dvenos inscription, from the name of the maker who wrote on the vessel from right to left the in scription, part of which is DV E N OS MED F E C E D (= fecit).
    0
    0
  • The Latin alphabet is used, with special signs to represent sounds borrowed from Slavonic, &c. All the unaccented vowels except e are pronounced as in Italian; e has the same phonetic value as in Old Slavonic (=French e) and is often similarly preiotized (= ye in yet), notably at the beginning of all words except neologisms. The accented vowels é and ó are pronounced as ea and oa (petra, rock, = peatra; morte, death, = moarte); they are written in full, as diphthongs, at the end of a word and sometimes in other positions.
    0
    0
  • The reservoir begins to fall at the end of February, and continues to do so with few and short exceptions until the end of August, and it so happens that about the end of August this dotted line, b b representing actual cumulative demand, crosses the straight line a a of uniform demand, so that the excess of demand, represented by the slope from June to September, is balanced by the deficiency of demand, represented by the flatter slope in the first five months, except as regards the small quantity b e near the end of February, which, not having been drawn off during January and February, must overflow before the end of February.
    0
    0
  • In assuming a demand at the beginning of the year below the mean, resulting in an overflow equal in this case to b e at the end of February and increasing our reservoir to meet it, we assume also that some additional supply to that reservoir beyond the 11% of the streamflow from the driest year can be obtained from the previous year.
    0
    0
  • Using the symbols of the diagram, it can be shown that the effect of placing the weight W at E instead of F is to cause the end of the beam to descend, as if under the action of an additional weight, w, at F such that w Wa(ml - l +tan 0)/h.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • 8, in which a worm A, operated by a hand-wheel B and chain C, drives the worm-wheel D, thereby coiling up a chain E, one end F of which is secured to the upper block, and the other end hangs loosely, after passing round the sprocketwheel.
    0
    0
  • They are as follows: (a) while the Servians pronounce the Old Slavonic yach as ye or e or ee, the Croats pronounce it always as ee (Servian beeyelo or belo, Croatian beelo); (b) the Servians have the sound gye (softened d or g), the Croats are without it, but have instead ya or ye (Servian gospogya, Croatian gospoya); (c) the Servians let the vowel i transform the preceding consonant into a soft consonant, whereas the Croats pronounce the consonant unaffected by the softening influence of i (Servian bratya, Croatian bratia); (d) the Servians change the letter l at the end of a word into o whereas the Croats always pronounce it as 1.
    0
    0
  • The Latin never yields ie in Catalan as it does in French and occasionally in Provenal; s e d e t becomes seu (where u represents the final d), p e d e m makes peu, and e go eu; in some words where the tonic is followed by a syllable in which an i occurs, it may become I (ir, he r i; mig, me di us; m-,is, m eli us); and the same holds good for in a similar situation (ciri, c r i u s, c e r e u s; fire, f e r i a), and for e in a close syllable before a nasal (eximpli, e x e to p 1 u m; mintr for mentir, gint for gent).
    0
    0
  • Final d after a vowel has produced u (pea, p e d e in; niu, n i d u m; mou, to o d u m); buf when the d, in consequence of the disappearance of the preceding vowel, rests upon a consonant, it remains and passes into the corresponding surd; f r I g i d u s gives fred (pronounced fret).
    0
    0
  • The group di, when produced by the disappearance of the intermediate vowel, becomes ur (creure, c red crc; ociure, 0 c c i d e r e; veure, v i d b r e; seure, s e d C r e).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Assibilated c before e, 1 is treated like d; within a word it disappears after having been represented for a while by s (1 u c e r e gives lius-ir, iluhir; r e c i p e r e gives re~ebne, reebre, rebre); at the end of a word it is replaced by a (yea, v i c e in; feu, f e c i t).
    0
    0
  • B is replaced by the surd pat the end of a word (trobar in the infinitive, but trop in the present tense); so also in the interiOr of a word when it precedes a consonant (supvensr, s u b v e n i re, sopte, s u b t 0).
    0
    0
  • V, wherever it has been preserved, has the same pronunciation as at the end of a word and between vowels it becomes vocalized into u (suau, s u a vi s; viure, vi v e r e).
    0
    0
  • Dj gives ~f between vowels (verger, v i r i d i a r u m), and c as, a terminal (written either ig or lx: goig, g a u d i u m mig, snitx, m e d i u in).
    0
    0
  • The verb e s s e r a has been mixed, not as in the other Romance languages with s t a r a, but with s e d e r e, as is proved by older forms seer, siedes, sieden, seyendo, obviously derived from s e d e r e, and which have in the texts sometimes the meaning of to be seated, sometimes that of to be, and sometimes both.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In old Latin charters also s e d e r e is frequently met with in the sense of e ss e: e.g.
    0
    0
  • D between vowels kept its ground longer than in Castilian: documents of the 14th century supply such forms as vidieron, vido, hudso, provedir, red emsr, prodeza, Benedit, vidiendo, &c.; but afterwards y came to be substituted fordordj: veyere (vi d e r e), seyer (s e d e r e), seya (s edo a t), goyo (g a u d I u m), enueyo (I nod i u m).
    0
    0
  • Portuguese, though less frequently than Castilian, employs ter (t e n e r e) as an auxiliary, alongside of aver; and it also supplements the use of e s s e r e with s e d e r e, which furnished the subj.
    0
    0
  • The rounded corner cupola makes an excellent point de vue at the E end of Broad Street.
    0
    0
  • M o r e D e t a i l s.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Lesson 2 e at the end of a word sometimes makes the preceding vowel ' hard ' .
    0
    0
  • Thus in A the twist may be right-handed or left-handed; in B the polarity of a given end may become north or south; in C the circular magnetization may be clockwise or counter-clockwise; in D the length may be increased or diminished; in E the magnetization may become stronger or weaker.
    0
    0
  • C, genital sinus and neighbouring parts (from Sommer); a, ventral sucker; b, cirrus sac; c, genital pore; d, evaginated cirrus sac: e, end of vagina; f, vasa deferentia; g, vesicula seminalis; h, ductus ejaculatorius; i, accessory gland.
    0
    0
  • The Latin alphabet is used, with special signs to represent sounds borrowed from Slavonic, &c. All the unaccented vowels except e are pronounced as in Italian; e has the same phonetic value as in Old Slavonic (=French e) and is often similarly preiotized (= ye in yet), notably at the beginning of all words except neologisms. The accented vowels é and ó are pronounced as ea and oa (petra, rock, = peatra; morte, death, = moarte); they are written in full, as diphthongs, at the end of a word and sometimes in other positions.
    0
    0
  • Lesson 2 e at the end of a word sometimes makes the preceding vowel ' hard '.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Feed the loose end of the low E string through the low E tuning peg and pull it through so about eight inches of string is through the peg.
    0
    0
  • Mauvais can be used as is (adding an "e" on the end for feminine nouns and an "s" on the end for plurals).
    0
    0
  • Another point of anticipation is always found at the end of the show, where A & E displays a brief update.
    0
    0