This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

dyed

dyed Sentence Examples

  • The gangly youth before him had dyed his hair from platinum back to its natural color of black.

  • Naturally white-blonde, she'd dyed it pink on a whim last weekend.

  • These native cloths are exceedingly durable, and many of them are ornamented by using dyed yarns and in other ways: Southern Nigeria (Lagos) and northern Nigeria are the most important cotton countries amongst the British possessions on the coast.

  • Many at least of the "blue fox" skins of the furtrade are white skins dyed.

  • Spotted and discoloured straws are dyed either in pipe or in plait.

  • A modern Bedouin equivalent has long sleeves; it is common to both sexes, the chief difference lying in the colour - white for men, dyed with indigo for women.

  • The Babylonian temples received garments as payment in kind, and the Egyptian lists in the Papyrus Harris (Rameses III.) enumerate an enormous number of skirts, tunics and mantles, dyed and undyed, for the various deities.

  • In ancient Ireland a king's mantle was dyed with saffron, and even down to the 17th century the "lein-croich," or saffron-dyed shirt, was worn by persons of rank in the Hebrides.

  • The addition of brilliant ornamentation in shell, teeth, feathers, wings of insects and dyed fibres completed the round of the textile art.

  • They are then allowed to cool and mellow, are stripped and carefully dried in sun and air and remain dyed a rich tawny brown or buff colour.

  • For some purposes - making of gauzes, crapes, flour-bolting cloth and for what is termed " souples " - the silk is not scoured, and for silks to be dyed certain dark colours half-scouring is practised.

  • After protracted experimenting Sir Thomas Wardle was able in 1873 to show a series of tussurs well dyed in all the darker shades of colour, but the lighter and bright blues, pinks, scarlets, &c., he could not produce, Subsequently Tessie du Motay found that the fawn colour of natural tussur could be discharged by solution of permanganate of potash, but the oxidizing action was so rapid and violent that it destroyed the fibre itself.

  • It may be washed or dyed just as required, either in hank or in warp.

  • The hair is naturally dark, but is often dyed red or fawn, and crisp, inclining to woolly.

  • In the great bog-deposit at Thorsbjaerg in Angel, which dates from about the 4th century, there were found a coat with long sleeves, in a fair state of preservation, a pair of long trousers with remains of socks attached, several shoes and portions of square cloaks, one of which had obviously been dyed green.

  • A great amount of doubled and trebled yarn is now sold, though it does not appear that recent expansions have added much to doubling spindles, and considerable developments continue in the use of dyed and mercerized yarns.

  • The various Indian markets take largely of 40 8 mule twist and in various proportions of 30 8 mule, water twists, two-folds grey and bleached, fine Egyptian counts and dyed yarns.

  • Cotton linings include silesia, originally a linen cloth made in Silesia and now usually a twilled cotton cloth which is dyed various colours; Italian cloth, a kind of jean or sateen produced originally in Italy.

  • Among these are sateen, which, dyed or printed, is largely used for dresses, linings, upholstery, &c.; linenette, dyed and finished to imitate coloured linen in the north of Ireland and elsewhere; hollandette, usually unbleached or half-bleached and finished to imitate linen holland; and interlining, a coarse, plain white calico used as padding for linen collars.

  • Glasgow buys largely of yarns and cloth, some considerable part of which is dyed or printed, for India and elsewhere, and has an indigenous manufacture and trade in fine goods such as book-muslins and lappets, a somewhat delicate department of manufacture which necessitates a slower running of machinery than is usual in Lancashire.

  • The chief exceptions are the Persian and Astrachan lambs, which are bought at the Russian 'fairs, and are dressed and dyed in Leipzig, and the ermine and Russian squirrels, which are dressed and manufactured into linings either in Russia or Germany before offered for sale to the wholesale merchants or manufacturers.

  • The Russian are smaller, but more silky and, as now dyed, make a cheap and fair substitute for sable.

  • The white foxes that are dyed smoke and celestial blue are brilliant and totally unlike the browner shades of this fox.

  • Where the best coloured skins are not used for carriage rugs they are extensively dyed, and badger and other white hairs are inserted to resemble silver fox.

  • They are also dyed a sable colour.

  • The skins that are not perfectly white are dyed jet black, dark or light smoke, violet-blue, blue-grey, and also in imitation of the drab shades of the natural blue.

  • Many from Russia are dyed black for floor and carriage rugs; the hair is brittle, with poor underwool and not very durable; the cost, however, is small.

  • A great many are dyed black and brown, in imitation of bear, and are used largely in the western parts of the United States and Canada for sleigh and carriage rugs.

  • Thousands of the kids are also dyed black and worked into cross-shaped pieces, in which shape they are largely exported to Germany, France, Great Britain and America, and sold by the retail as caracal, kid or caracul.

  • The colour is a light fawn, but it is so pale that it lends itself to be dyed any colour.

  • This fur is dyed jet black and various shades of brown and grey, and manufactured into articles for the small drapers and for exportation.

  • The North American hares are also dyed black and brown and used in the same way.

  • Many of the swamp sort are dyed to imitate skunk and look well.

  • On the European continent many of these are dyed.

  • They have been successfully dyed and used as a substitute for sable.

  • When dressed and dyed they should have regular, close and bright curl, varying from a small to a very large one, and if of equal size, regularity, tightness and brightness, the value is comparatively a matter of fancy.

  • All the above enumerated lambs are naturally a rusty black or brown, and with very few exceptions are dyed a jet black.

  • For attire the skins manufactured in Europe are generally dyed black or brown, in which state it has a similar appearance to dyed fox, but having less thick underwool, and finer hair flows freely.

  • The finest skins when dyed black are used very largely in America in place of the dyed black fox so fashionable for mourning wear in Great Britain and France.

  • It is dyed for the cheap trade for boas and muffs, but it is not an attractive fur at the best of times.

  • Skins of a pale bluish tone are generally used in their natural state for stoles, boas and muffs, but the less clear coloured skins are dyed in beautiful shades similar in density to the dark and valuable sables from Russia, and are the most effective skins that can be purchased at a reasonable price.

  • The Asiatic sorts are less woolly, but being silky are useful when dyed.

  • The Russian species is dark but flat and poor in quality, and the Chinese and Japanese are so pale that they are invariably dyed.

  • It has, however, of later years been "unhaired," the underwool clipped very even and then dyed seal colour, in which way very useful and attractive garments are supplied at less than half the cost of the cheaper sealskins.

  • It is also dyed sealskin colour, but its woolly nature renders it less effective than the more silky musquash.

  • About 1870 in England it was dyed dark brown or black and used for boas, muffs and trimmings, but until recently has been neglected on the continent.

  • The worst coloured ones are frequently dyed black and brown.

  • A large number of skins, after unhairing, is dyed seal colour and used in America.

  • The worst coloured skins are dyed black or brown and are used for British military busbies, or caps, st(des, boas, muffs and coachmen's capes.

  • When dyed dark blue or skunk colour it is good-looking and is sold widely in Europe.

  • The very palest skins are dyed and made by the Chinese into mandarins' coats, in which form they are found in the London trade sales, but being overdressed they are inclined to be loose in the hair and the colour of the dye is not good.

  • Some of the better haired sorts are dyed black and brown and used for men's motor coats when quite a waterproof garment is wanted, and they are used also for this quality in China.

  • These fur skins are dyed black or dark brown and are used for military caps and hearth-rugs.

  • Many of the domestic kind in central and northern Europe and Canada are used for drivers' and peasants' coat linings, &c. In Great Britain many coats of the home-reared sheep, having wools two and a half to five inches long, are dyed various colours and used as floor rugs.

  • Skins with very short wool are dyed black and used for military saddlecloths.

  • Subsequently the hard top hairs are taken out as in the case of otters and beavers and the whole thoroughly cleaned in the revolving drums. The close underwool, which is of a slightly wavy nature and mostly of a pale drab colour, is then dyed by repeated applications of a rich dark brown colour, one coat after another, each being allowed to thoroughly dry before the next is put on, till the effect is almost a lustrous black on the top. The whole is again put through the cleaning process and evenly reduced in thickness by revolving emery wheels, and eventually finished off in the palest buff colour.

  • Small quantities of good beaver are dyed in Russia occasionally, and white hairs put in so well that an effect similar to sea otter is obtained.

  • The enormous quantities of pieces admit of good selection and where odd colours prevail in a lining it is dyed.

  • Many squirrellock linings are dyed blue and brown and used for the outside of cheap garments.

  • One of the most remarkable results of the European intervention in the Boxer rising in China (I goo) was the absurd price paid for so-called "loot" of furs, particularly in mandarins' coats of dyed and natural fox skins and pieces, and natural ermine, poor in quality and yellowish in colour; from three to ten times their value was paid for them when at the same time huge parcels of similar quality were warehoused in the London docks, because purchasers could not be found for them.

  • The sables, martens, minks and otters are poor in quality, and all of a very yellow colour and they are generally dyed for the cheap trade.

  • Where the skins are heavily dyed it is comparatively easy to see the difference between a natural and a dyed colour, as the underwool and top hair become almost alike and the leather is also dark, whereas in natural skins the base of the underwool is much paler than the top, or of a different colour, and the leather is white unless finished in a pale reddish tone as is sometimes the case when mahogany sawdust is used in the final cleaning.

  • This is also of the marten species and has been frequently offered, when dyed dark, as have baum and stone martens, as Russian sables.

  • Hares, too, are dyed a sable colour and advertised as sable.

  • Among the principal imitations of other furs is musquash, out of which the top hair has been pulled and the undergrowth of wool clipped and dyed exactly the same colour as is used for seal, which is then offered as seal or red river seal.

  • Rabbit is prepared and dyed and frequently offered as "electric sealskin."

  • The most usual misnaming of manufactured furs is as follow: - Musquash, pulled and dyed .

  • Nutria, pulled and dyed .

  • Rabbit, sheared and dyed.

  • Sold as Marmot, dyed Sold as Fitch, dyed Sold as Rabbit, dyed Sold as Hare, dyed Sold as Musquash, dyed Sold as Wallaby, dyed Sold as White Rabbit Sold as White Rabbit, dyed..

  • Sold as White Hare, dyed or natural Sold a other Goat, dyed Sold as Dyed manufactured articles of all kinds.

  • The cloth is made of the cotton grown in the country, woven on small handlooms and dyed either with indigo or with a magenta dye obtained from the bark of a tree.

  • The women of the lower orders have trousers of printed or dyed cotton, and a close waistcoat.

  • A ladys veil is of white muslin, embroidered at the ends in gold and colors; that of a person of the lower class is simply dyed blue.

  • Its importance was maintained, however, by its trade in agricultural products and in Apulian wool (which was there dyed and cleaned), by its port (probably Cannae) at the mouth of the Aufidus, and by its position on the high-road.

  • The beard is frequently dyed with henna and indigo for much the same reasons as in Europe by elderly men; this is entirely optional.

  • From the further use of "grain" for the texture of substances, such as wood, meat, &c., "engrained" or "ingrained" means ineradicable, impregnated, dyed through and through.

  • The grasses are dyed in all shades and plaited to form attractive designs suitable for the purposes to which they are to be applied.

  • It is customary to mix these colours together, thus producing a curious ginger-coloured yarn, which upon being dyed black in the piece takes a fuller and deeper shade than can be obtained by piecedyeing a solid-coloured wool.

  • When the fibre is intended for goods in the natural colour it is essential that it should be of a light shade and uniform, but if intended for yarns which are to be dyed a dark shade, the colour is not so important.

  • The yarns are capable of being dyed brilliant colours, but, unfortunately, the colours are not very fast to light.

  • The lower orders often have it dyed blue; but the servant and upper classes always prefer a white shirt.

  • Among the very religious during the mourning month (Muharram) the shirt is at times dyed black.

  • The Persian ladies hair is very luxuriant and never cut; it is nearly always dyed red with henna, or with indigo to a blue-black tinge; it is naturally a glossy black.

  • Coarse cotton stuffs, chiefly of the kind called Kerbaz, used in their natural color, or dyed blue with indigo, are manufactured in all districts but not exported; cottons, called Kalamkar, which are made in Manchester and block-printed in colors at Isfahan and Kumishah, find their way to foreign markets, principally Russian.

  • The men and unmarried girls go practically naked, the married women wearing a goatskin dyed red.

  • In the Woldeba district hermits dress in ochre-yellow cloths, while the priests of some sects wear hides dyed red.

  • On festal occasions he decks his wellforked-out and dyed hair with feathers and flowers, and sticks others in his ear-lobe holes and under his armlets; while a warrior will have ovula shells and various bones of his victims dangling from ringlets of his hair, or fixed to his armbands or girdle.

  • Sandals and shoes of bronze are mentioned in Irish literature, and quite a number are to be seen in museums. A loose flowing garment, intermediate between the brat and lend, usually of linen dyed saffron, was commonly worn in outdoor life, and was still used in the Hebrides about 1700.

  • Bauan has a fine church and is known as a market for "sinamay" or hemp cloth, the hemp and cotton being imported and dyed and woven by the women in their homes.

  • The gangly youth before him had dyed his hair from platinum back to its natural color of black.

  • Naturally white-blonde, she'd dyed it pink on a whim last weekend.

  • Tall, gawky with hair dyed blue-black and contacts that glowed red like his eyes did naturally, she wore a I heart Xander T-shirt beneath a leather coat.

  • Nubuck Aniline dyed leather which has been lightly abraded on the grain surface to create a velvety finish or nap.

  • aniline dyed in a vat process with no color coating added to the surface.

  • full aniline dyed leathers are more susceptible to absorbing liquids because of the natural porosity of the hide.

  • I learned that fin he grew auld he pit on corsets an dyed his hair.

  • They were dyed orange, and mounted on 24-inch split bamboo sticks.

  • Over the years there has been some debate to whether green tiger barbs are dyed.

  • blondehas very long blond hair, which may have been dyed brown, which she normally wears in two plaits.

Browse other sentences examples →