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dy

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dy Sentence Examples

  • Without attempting to answer this question categorically, it may be pointed out that within the limits of the family (Ptychoderidae) which is especially characterized by their presence there are some species in Y art dY YY cts, posterior limit of collar.

  • The symbols - dy, d z, ...

  • C or cz is pronounced as English ts; cs as English ch; ds as English j; zs as French j; gy as dy.

  • (2), where S = ff sin(px+gy)dx dy,.

  • (3), C = ffcos(px--gy) dx dy,.

  • When, as in the application to rectangular or circular apertures, the form is symmetrical with respect to the axes both of x and y, S = o, and C reduces to C = ff cos px cos gy dx dy,.

  • Thus, if x = p cos 4), y= p sin 0, C =11 cos px dx dy =f o rt 2 ' T cos (pp cos 0) pdp do.

  • The integration of the several terms may then be effected by the formula e y dy =r(4+2)=(4 - i)(4-2)...

  • = b 2 (dx + dy + de l (a 2 - b2) dx (dx+dy+dz) ness where a 2 and b 2 denote the two arbitrary constants.

  • According to this notation, the three equations of motion are dt2 = b2v2E + (a2 - b2) d.s dt =b2v2rj+(a2 - b2) dy d2 CIF - b2p2+(a2_b2)dz It is to be observed that denotes the dilatation of volume of the element situated at (x, y, z).

  • If we suppose that the force impressed upon the element of mass D dx dy dz is DZ dx dy dz, being everywhere parallel to the axis of Z, the only change required in our equations (I), (2) is the addition of the term Z to the second member of the third equation (2).

  • (b2V2 + n2) (a2 - b 2) = - z It will now be convenient to introduce the quantities a l, a 2', 7731 which express the rotations of the elements of the medium round axes parallel to those of co-ordinates, in accordance with the equations Ty - 1 = dz ' 3= - dy 2 = dx - In terms of these we obtain from (7), by differentiation and subtraction, (b 2 v 2 + n 2) 7,3 = 0 (b 2 0 2 +n 2) .r i = dZ/dy (b 2 v 2 +n 2)', , 2 = - dZ/dx The first of equations (9) gives 3 = 0 (10) For al we have ?1= 47rb2, f dy e Y tkr dx dy dz

  • (11), where r is the distance between the element dx dy dz and the point where a l is estimated, and k = n/b = 27r/X (12), X being the wave-length.

  • Integrating by parts in (II), we get J e = ikr d7 pc-11 / d (e r - ay= rJ Z d y - r / 1 dY, in which the integrated terms at the limits vanish, Z being finite only within the region T.

  • Thus f (= 4-rb 2;JJ Z dY (e r) dx dy dz.

  • Since the dimensions of T are supposed to be very small in com d parison with X, the factor dy (--) is sensibly constant; so that, if Z stand for the mean value of Z over the volume T, we may write TZ y d e T ?

  • But by Green's transformation f flpdS = f f PPdxdydz, (2) thus leading to the differential relation at every point = dy dp The three equations of equilibrium obtained by taking moments round the axes are then found to be satisfied identically.

  • Ignoring temperature effect, and taking the density as a function of the pressure, surfaces of equal pressure are also of equal density, and the fluid is stratified by surfaces orthogonal to the lines of force; n ap, dy, P d z, or X, Y, Z (4) are the partial differential coefficients of some function P, =fdplp, of x, y, z; so that X, Y, Z must be the partial differential coefficients of a potential -V, such that the force in any direction is the downward gradient of V; and then dP dV (5) ax + Tr=0, or P+V =constant, in which P may be called the hydrostatic head and V the head of potential.

  • The integral equation of continuity (I) may now be written l f fdxdydz+ff (lpu+mpv+npdso, (4) which becomes by Green's transformation (dt +d dz dy dx (p u) + d (p v) + d (p w) l I dxdydz - o, dp leading to the differential equation of continuity when the integration is removed.

  • Taking the fixed direction parallel to the axis of x, the time-rate of increase of momentum, due to the fluid which crosses the surface, is - f'fpuq cos OdS = - f f (lpu 2 -+mpuv+npuw)dS, (1) which by Green's transformation is (d(uiu 2) dy dz dxdydz.

  • The time rate of increase of momentum of the fluid inside S is )dxdydz; (5) and (5) is the sum of (I), (2), (3), (4), so that /if (dpu+dpu2+dpuv +dpuw_ +d p j d xdyd z = o, (b)` dt dx dy dz dx / leading to the differential equation of motion dpu dpu 2 dpuv dpuv _ X_ (7) dt + dx + dy + dz with two similar equations.

  • These equations may be simplified slightly, using the equation of continuity (5) § for dpu dpu 2 dpuv dpuw dt dx + dy + dz =p Cat +uax+vay+waz?

  • dp dpu dpv dpw -z)' reducing to the first line, the second line vanishing in consequence of the equation of continuity; and so the equation of motion may be written in the more usual form du du du du d dt +udx+vdy +wdz =X -n dx' with the two others dv dv dv dv i dp dt +u dx +v dy +w dz - Y -P d y' dw dw dw Z w dw i d p dt +u dx +v dy +wd - -P dz.

  • (5) (8) (I) The components of acceleration of a particle of fluid are consequently Du dudu du du dt = dt +u dx +v dy + wdz' Dr dv dv dv dv dt -dt+udx+vdy+wdz' dt v = dtJ+udx+vdy +w dx' leading to the equations of motion above.

  • = dx dy dz the equations of motion may be Written du - 2v?

  • d o, dx dy dz dx dy dz so that, at any instant, the surfaces over which tk and m are constant intersect in the vortex lines.

  • Equation (5) becomes, by a rearrangement, dK dmdm dm din dx dt +u dx + dy +Zee dz + dx (dt +u dx +v dy +w d) = o,.

  • In the equations of uniplanar motion = dx - du = dx + dy = -v 2 ?, suppose, so that in steady motion dx I +v24 ' x = ?'

  • dy I +v2" dy = 0' d4' Y' =o, and 2 must be a function of 4'.

  • (22) Conjugate functions can be employed also for the motion of liquid in a thin sheet between two concentric spherical surfaces; the components of velocity along the meridian and parallel in colatitude 0 and longitude A can be written d¢_ i _ d4, I dip _ dy (13) d8 sin - 0 dX' sin 0 dX de' and then = F (tan O.

  • If the liquid is stirred up by the rotation R of a cylindrical body, d4lds = normal velocity reversed dy = - Rx- Ry ds (5) ds 4' + 2 R (x2 + y2) = Y, (6) a constant over the boundary; and 4,' is the current-function of the relative motion past the cylinder, but now V 2 4,'+2R =o, (7) throughout the liquid.

  • Along the path of a particle, defined by the of (3), _ c) sine 2e, - x 2 + y2 = y a 2 ' (Io) sin B' de' _ 2y-c dy 2 ds ds' on the radius of curvature is 4a 2 /(ylc), which shows that the curve is an Elastica or Lintearia.

  • Taking two planes x = =b, and considering the increase of momentum in the liquid between them, due to the entry and exit of liquid momentum, the increase across dy in the direction Oy, due to elements at P and P' at opposite ends of the diameter PP', is pdy (U - Ua 2 r2 cos 20 +mr i sin 0) (Ua 2 r 2 sin 2 0+mr 1 cos 0) + pdy (- U+Ua 2 r 2 cos 2 0 +mr1 sin 0) (Ua 2 r 2 sin 2 0 -mr 1 cos 0) =2pdymUr '(cos 0 -a 2 r 2 cos 30), (8) and with b tan r =b sec this is 2pmUdo(i -a 2 b2 cos 30 cos 0), (9) and integrating between the limits 0 = 27r, the resultant, as before, is 27rpmU.

  • When the motion is irrotational, dq_ _I d deId> G =o, a=-dxy dy, v dy ydx' v 21, ' = o, or dx + dy -y chi, '1/4724, 4 1 1+1 Rx2 = $Rc 2 (ch 2 a1 +I), +h+I Ry2 = 8Rc 2 (ch 2a 1 - I), (6) (7) b2)2/(a2 + b2).

  • The velocity past the surface of the sphere is dC r sin 0 dy 2U (2r+ a 2) r sin g z U sin e, when r =a; (20) so that the loss of head is (!

  • The kinetic energy of the liquid inside a surface S due to the velocity function 4' f i (s given by T=2p + (d) 2+ (t) dxdydz, pff f 75 4 dS (I) by Green's transformation, dv denoting an elementary step along the normal to the exterior of the surface; so that d4ldv = o over the surface makes T = o, and then (d4 2 d4) 2 'x) + (dy) + (= O, dd?

  • In plane motion the kinetic energy per unit length parallel to Oz T 2p J J [(d4)) 2+ (d dy (P)1dxdy=lpfl[ a) 2+ (=zp 4d ds=zp f, ydvds.

  • ,In a fluid, the circulation round an elementary area dxdy is equal to dv du udx + (v+dx) dy- (u+dy) dx-vdy= () dxdy, so that the component spin is dv du (5) 2 dx - dy) in the previous notation of § 24; so also for the other two components and n.

  • So far these theorems on vortex motion are kinematical; but introducing the equations of motion of § 22, Du + dQ =o, Dv+dQ =o, Dw + dQ dt dx dt dy dt dz and taking dx, dy, dz in the direction of u, v, w, and dx: dy: dz=u: v: w, (udx + vdy + wdz) = Du dx +u 1+..

  • .,' d x 2 dy e d z2' (10) which is expressed .

  • u '= - dx -md x, ' - dy -m dy, w = - dz-mdz' as in § 25 (I), a first integral of the equations in (5) may be written dp V + 2q 2 - d - n dt +14-14) (dx + m dz) +(v-v') (+m) +(w - w) (+m) =F(t), (7) in which d4, do, d?

  • dt-(u)dy- (w-w) dz = d - (U-yR+zQ) dy - (V-zP+xR)d -(W-xQ+yP) d z (8) is the time-rate of change of 49 at a point fixed in space, which is left behind with velocity components u-u', v-v', w-w'.

  • I, ' 2 dx (y dx) +dy U dy) so that § 34 (4) is satisfied, with f' (W') =1.0 a2, f (Y") = 2 U'a2; and (ro) reduces to `)(() P +v-3 U j _ S = constant; (16) this gives the state of motion in M.

  • d t dy dz where _ oo abcdA A, B ' C ' - (a 2 +A, b 2 ±x, A, c 2 +A) P P 2 = 4(a 2 -F-A) (b 2 ±A) (c2+A).

  • Thus if T is expressed as a quadratic function of U, V, W, P, Q, R, the components of momentum corresponding are dT dT dT (I) = dU + x2=dV, x3 =dW, dT dT dT Yi dp' dQ' y3=dR; but when it is expressed as a quadratic function of xi, 'x2, x3, yi, Y2, Y3, U = d, V= dx, ' w= ax dT Q_ dT dT dy 1 dy2 dy The second system of expression was chosen by Clebsch and adopted by Halphen in his Fonctions elliptiques; and thence the dynamical equations follow X = dt x2 dy +x3 d Y = ..., Z ..., (3) = dt1 -y2?y - '2dx3+x3 ' M =..

  • origin up to the moving origin 0, so that dy x=y=z=o, but dt U, dt= ' dG _ dyl =l (- yi y3Q x2w+xiv) +m (dY2yP+Yrxu+xw) +n (?

  • Clebsch to take the form T= 2p(x12 +x22)+2p'x32 + q (xiyi +x2y2) +q'x3y3 +2r(y12+y22)+2r'y32 so that a fourth integral is given by dy 3 /dt = o, y = constant; dx3 (4 y) (q + y) _ (y y) dt - xl 'x2 xl Y Y x l 2 - 1, y2 () = (x12 +x22) (y12 + y22) = (X 1 2 + X 2) +y22)-(FG-x3y3)2 = (x 1 y32-G2)-(Gx3-Fy3) 2, in which 2 = F 2 -x3 2, x l y l +x2y2 = FG-x3y3, Y(y1 2 +y2 2) = T -p(x12 +x22) -p'x32 -2q(xiyi 'x2y2)- 2 q ' x = (p -p') x 2 + 2 (- q ') x 3 y 3+ m 1, (6) m1 = T 2 i y 3 2 (7) so that dt3) 2 =X3, (8) where X3 is a quartic function of x3, and thus t is given by an elliptic (8) (6) (I) integral of the first kind; and by inversion x 3 is in elliptic function of the time t.

  • Introducing Euler's angles 0, c15, x1= F sin 0 sin 0, x 2 =F sin 0 cos 0, xl+x 2 i =iF sin 0e_, x 3 = F cos 0; sin o t=P sin 4+Q cos 0, dT F sin 2 0d l - dy l + dy 2x = (qx1+ryi)xl +(qx2+ry2)x2 = q (x1 2 +x2 2) +r (xiyi +x2y2) = qF 2 sin 2 0-Fr (FG - x 3 y 3), (16) _Ft (FG _x 323 Frdx3 (17) F x3 X3 elliptic integrals of the third kind.

  • therwise, if A is positive rt= J y-s1 (A+2By+Cy') dy sh1 A'/ (A+2By+Cy 2) I ch1 A+By (26) -V A ch1 31, (B2--AC) - A sh - 1 (B2-AC)' nd the axis falls away ultimately from its original direction.

  • Let us apply the above theorem to the case of a small parallelepipedon or rectangular prism having sides dx, dy, dz respectively, its centre having co-ordinates (x, y, z).

  • Let this rectangular prism be supposed to be wholly filled up with electricity of density p; then the total quantity in it is p dx dy dz.

  • Hence the total flux is - (+ d2V d 2 V d2V dye + dz2) dy dz, dx2 and by the previous theorem this must be equal to 4'rrp dxdydz.

  • Consider the integral W dx dy dz .

  • We have by partial integration ff1 fV dd - ' 2 dy JJ dx y JJ y dxd dz = V - d dzdxd dz, and Itwo (similar equations in y and z.

  • Hence 8?rJJJ.dx l i 2 + i dy) 2 2 dxdydz= 8 Jfv d s_JJJvvvdx dngr dy dz.

  • tall, with a well-rounded, powerful figure; he inherited an excellent constitution from his parents - " I never knew," says he, " either my father or mother to have any sickness but that of which they dy'd, he at 89, and she at 85 years of age " - but injured it somewhat by excesses; in early life he had severe attacks of pleurisy, from one of which, in 1727, it was not expected that he would recover, and in his later years he was the victim of stone and gout.

  • If we write -fxo f yox s yiu dx dy, we first calculate the raw values coo., ai,o, 0.1,1,

  • If the data of the briquette are, as in § 86, the volumes of the minor briquettes, but the condition as to close contact is not satisfied, we have y "`x P u dx dy = K + L + R - X111010-0,0 f xo yo i'?

  • Either or both of the expressions K and L will have to be calculated by means of the formula of § 84; if this is applied to both expressions, we have a formula which may be written in a more general form f f 4 u4(x, y) dx dy = u dx dy.

  • q) a J O l x f o udxdy (1619(X q) dx 4 P u dx dy d 4)(b, y) dy dy +.

  • f b f 4 f x f P u dx dy d x dy) dx dy.

  • The layer of air originally of thickness dx now has thickness dx+dy, since N is displaced forwards dy more than M.

  • X - Edz+poU 2 (i +) =poU2, X = (E - p oU 2) dy / dx.

  • We have c3 and u expressed in terms of the original length dx and the displacement dy so that we must y put dE= (dx+dy = (I +dy/dx)dx, and U dy p = .l o (w+pu t) I dx.

  • We have already found that if V changes to V - v iw= yP + 11 v2 2(d y y + I dy 2 r (V 2 12) =p0U i - dx + 1 since v/V = - dy/dx.

  • (27) Now u/U = - dy/dx, (28) for the particle at A moves over dy backwards, while the disturbance moves over U.

  • Also since dx has been stretched to +dy p&,(dx +dy) =po&odx or p&'(I +dy/dx) = (29) Substituting from (28) in (27) Y&a + P(2)U 2 (I + dy (3) 2 = p oc?oU 2, 0) and substituting from (29) in (30) Y&ao dx + pocZoU 2 + dx) = p owoU 2, (31) whence Yc = powoU2, or U2 = Y/ p, (32) where now p is the normal density of the rod.

  • The following is the approximate expression for the relation between a change Os in the length of the half chain and the corresponding change Ay in the dip s +Os =x+ (2/3x) {y2 or, neglecting the last term, 5 As= 4YAY/3x, and 6 Dy = 3xOs/4Y From these equations the deflection produced by any given stress on the chains or by a change of temperature can be calculated.

  • Then dy _I Mdx dx EI?

  • These circuital relations, when expressed analytically, are then for a dielectric medium of types = (dt + x) (f',g',h')+dt(f,g,h), dR dQ = da dy dz dt' ' I See H.

  • Now, since v sec i (54) di sec i dq C f(q sec i)' and multiplying by /dt or q, (55) dx C q sec i dq - f (q sec i)' and multiplying by dy/dx or tan i, (56) dy C q sec i tan dq - f (q sec i) ' also (57) di Cg dq g sec i .f (g sec i)' (58) d tan i C g sec i dq - q.

  • di g d tan i g dt - v cos i ' and now (53) dx d 2 y dy d2xdx Cif dt 2 dt dt2 _ - _ gdt' and this, in conjunction with (46) dy _ d y tan i = dx dt/dt' (47)di d 2 d d 2 x dx sec 2 idt = (ctt d t - at dt2) I (dt), reduces to (48) Integrating from any initial pseudo-velocity U, (60) du t _ C U uf(u) x= C cos n f u (u) y=C sin n ff (a); and supposing the inclination i to change from 0, to 8 radians over the arc.

  • There is, however, considerable evidence in support of the view that Greek va representing the sound arising from Ky, xy, Ty, By was pronounced as sh (s), while representing gy, dy was pronounced in some districts zh (z).4 On an inscription of Halicarnassus, a town which stood in ancient Carian territory, the sound of vv in `AXoKapvaao-Ewv is represented by T, as it is also in the Carian name Panyassis (IIavvfiTcos, geni tive), though the ordinary is also found in the same inscription.

  • dy my mv~= mg sin = mg-~, ~--= mg cos ~+R.

  • dy, 3.

  • Zend asha for Sanskrit tha, Old Persian aria (in dy taxerxes); fravashi for Pahlavi fravardln, New Persian ferrer tn ie spirits of the dead).

  • DY - Should the trombone solo be a legato counterpoint to the rather angular bass vocal solo?

  • dysprosium atom (element 62, abbreviated Dy )?

  • Without attempting to answer this question categorically, it may be pointed out that within the limits of the family (Ptychoderidae) which is especially characterized by their presence there are some species in Y art dY YY cts, posterior limit of collar.

  • The symbols - dy, d z, ...

  • C or cz is pronounced as English ts; cs as English ch; ds as English j; zs as French j; gy as dy.

  • (2), where S = ff sin(px+gy)dx dy,.

  • (3), C = ffcos(px--gy) dx dy,.

  • When, as in the application to rectangular or circular apertures, the form is symmetrical with respect to the axes both of x and y, S = o, and C reduces to C = ff cos px cos gy dx dy,.

  • Thus, if x = p cos 4), y= p sin 0, C =11 cos px dx dy =f o rt 2 ' T cos (pp cos 0) pdp do.

  • The integration of the several terms may then be effected by the formula e y dy =r(4+2)=(4 - i)(4-2)...

  • = b 2 (dx + dy + de l (a 2 - b2) dx (dx+dy+dz) ness where a 2 and b 2 denote the two arbitrary constants.

  • According to this notation, the three equations of motion are dt2 = b2v2E + (a2 - b2) d.s dt =b2v2rj+(a2 - b2) dy d2 CIF - b2p2+(a2_b2)dz It is to be observed that denotes the dilatation of volume of the element situated at (x, y, z).

  • If we suppose that the force impressed upon the element of mass D dx dy dz is DZ dx dy dz, being everywhere parallel to the axis of Z, the only change required in our equations (I), (2) is the addition of the term Z to the second member of the third equation (2).

  • (b2V2 + n2) (a2 - b 2) = - z It will now be convenient to introduce the quantities a l, a 2', 7731 which express the rotations of the elements of the medium round axes parallel to those of co-ordinates, in accordance with the equations Ty - 1 = dz ' 3= - dy 2 = dx - In terms of these we obtain from (7), by differentiation and subtraction, (b 2 v 2 + n 2) 7,3 = 0 (b 2 0 2 +n 2) .r i = dZ/dy (b 2 v 2 +n 2)', , 2 = - dZ/dx The first of equations (9) gives 3 = 0 (10) For al we have ?1= 47rb2, f dy e Y tkr dx dy dz

  • (11), where r is the distance between the element dx dy dz and the point where a l is estimated, and k = n/b = 27r/X (12), X being the wave-length.

  • Integrating by parts in (II), we get J e = ikr d7 pc-11 / d (e r - ay= rJ Z d y - r / 1 dY, in which the integrated terms at the limits vanish, Z being finite only within the region T.

  • Thus f (= 4-rb 2;JJ Z dY (e r) dx dy dz.

  • Since the dimensions of T are supposed to be very small in com d parison with X, the factor dy (--) is sensibly constant; so that, if Z stand for the mean value of Z over the volume T, we may write TZ y d e T ?

  • Phil.): - Let x, y, z be the coordinates of P in the orbit,, r t, those of the corresponding point T in the hodograph, then dx dy _ dz c= ' 71 - a' - at therefore Also, if s be the arc of the hodograph, ds = v = V V1 1) j dt + (dt2) dt Equation (1) shows that the tangent to the hodograph is parallel to the line of resultant acceleration, and (2) that the velocity in the hodograph is equal to the acceleration.

  • But by Green's transformation f flpdS = f f PPdxdydz, (2) thus leading to the differential relation at every point = dy dp The three equations of equilibrium obtained by taking moments round the axes are then found to be satisfied identically.

  • Ignoring temperature effect, and taking the density as a function of the pressure, surfaces of equal pressure are also of equal density, and the fluid is stratified by surfaces orthogonal to the lines of force; n ap, dy, P d z, or X, Y, Z (4) are the partial differential coefficients of some function P, =fdplp, of x, y, z; so that X, Y, Z must be the partial differential coefficients of a potential -V, such that the force in any direction is the downward gradient of V; and then dP dV (5) ax + Tr=0, or P+V =constant, in which P may be called the hydrostatic head and V the head of potential.

  • The integral equation of continuity (I) may now be written l f fdxdydz+ff (lpu+mpv+npdso, (4) which becomes by Green's transformation (dt +d dz dy dx (p u) + d (p v) + d (p w) l I dxdydz - o, dp leading to the differential equation of continuity when the integration is removed.

  • Taking the fixed direction parallel to the axis of x, the time-rate of increase of momentum, due to the fluid which crosses the surface, is - f'fpuq cos OdS = - f f (lpu 2 -+mpuv+npuw)dS, (1) which by Green's transformation is (d(uiu 2) dy dz dxdydz.

  • The time rate of increase of momentum of the fluid inside S is )dxdydz; (5) and (5) is the sum of (I), (2), (3), (4), so that /if (dpu+dpu2+dpuv +dpuw_ +d p j d xdyd z = o, (b)` dt dx dy dz dx / leading to the differential equation of motion dpu dpu 2 dpuv dpuv _ X_ (7) dt + dx + dy + dz with two similar equations.

  • These equations may be simplified slightly, using the equation of continuity (5) § for dpu dpu 2 dpuv dpuw dt dx + dy + dz =p Cat +uax+vay+waz?

  • dp dpu dpv dpw -z)' reducing to the first line, the second line vanishing in consequence of the equation of continuity; and so the equation of motion may be written in the more usual form du du du du d dt +udx+vdy +wdz =X -n dx' with the two others dv dv dv dv i dp dt +u dx +v dy +w dz - Y -P d y' dw dw dw Z w dw i d p dt +u dx +v dy +wd - -P dz.

  • (5) (8) (I) The components of acceleration of a particle of fluid are consequently Du dudu du du dt = dt +u dx +v dy + wdz' Dr dv dv dv dv dt -dt+udx+vdy+wdz' dt v = dtJ+udx+vdy +w dx' leading to the equations of motion above.

  • = dx dy dz the equations of motion may be Written du - 2v?

  • d o, dx dy dz dx dy dz so that, at any instant, the surfaces over which tk and m are constant intersect in the vortex lines.

  • Equation (5) becomes, by a rearrangement, dK dmdm dm din dx dt +u dx + dy +Zee dz + dx (dt +u dx +v dy +w d) = o,.

  • The osculating plane of a stream line in steady motion contains the resultant acceleration, the direction ratios of which are du du, du d i g d g 2 _ dH dx +v dy + dz - 2v?

  • In the equations of uniplanar motion = dx - du = dx + dy = -v 2 ?, suppose, so that in steady motion dx I +v24 ' x = ?'

  • dy I +v2" dy = 0' d4' Y' =o, and 2 must be a function of 4'.

  • Y If the motion is irrotational, u=-x-- dy' 2' d y = dx' y y so that :(, and 4' are conjugate functions of x and y, 0+4,i = f(x + y i), v 2 4 =o, v 2 0 =o; or putting 0+0=w, +yi=z, w=f(z).

  • (22) Conjugate functions can be employed also for the motion of liquid in a thin sheet between two concentric spherical surfaces; the components of velocity along the meridian and parallel in colatitude 0 and longitude A can be written d¢_ i _ d4, I dip _ dy (13) d8 sin - 0 dX' sin 0 dX de' and then = F (tan O.

  • If the liquid is stirred up by the rotation R of a cylindrical body, d4lds = normal velocity reversed dy = - Rx- Ry ds (5) ds 4' + 2 R (x2 + y2) = Y, (6) a constant over the boundary; and 4,' is the current-function of the relative motion past the cylinder, but now V 2 4,'+2R =o, (7) throughout the liquid.

  • Along the path of a particle, defined by the of (3), _ c) sine 2e, - x 2 + y2 = y a 2 ' (Io) sin B' de' _ 2y-c dy 2 ds ds' on the radius of curvature is 4a 2 /(ylc), which shows that the curve is an Elastica or Lintearia.

  • Taking two planes x = =b, and considering the increase of momentum in the liquid between them, due to the entry and exit of liquid momentum, the increase across dy in the direction Oy, due to elements at P and P' at opposite ends of the diameter PP', is pdy (U - Ua 2 r2 cos 20 +mr i sin 0) (Ua 2 r 2 sin 2 0+mr 1 cos 0) + pdy (- U+Ua 2 r 2 cos 2 0 +mr1 sin 0) (Ua 2 r 2 sin 2 0 -mr 1 cos 0) =2pdymUr '(cos 0 -a 2 r 2 cos 30), (8) and with b tan r =b sec this is 2pmUdo(i -a 2 b2 cos 30 cos 0), (9) and integrating between the limits 0 = 27r, the resultant, as before, is 27rpmU.

  • When the motion is irrotational, dq_ _I d deId> G =o, a=-dxy dy, v dy ydx' v 21, ' = o, or dx + dy -y chi, '1/4724, 4 1 1+1 Rx2 = $Rc 2 (ch 2 a1 +I), +h+I Ry2 = 8Rc 2 (ch 2a 1 - I), (6) (7) b2)2/(a2 + b2).

  • The velocity past the surface of the sphere is dC r sin 0 dy 2U (2r+ a 2) r sin g z U sin e, when r =a; (20) so that the loss of head is (!

  • The kinetic energy of the liquid inside a surface S due to the velocity function 4' f i (s given by T=2p + (d) 2+ (t) dxdydz, pff f 75 4 dS (I) by Green's transformation, dv denoting an elementary step along the normal to the exterior of the surface; so that d4ldv = o over the surface makes T = o, and then (d4 2 d4) 2 'x) + (dy) + (= O, dd?

  • In plane motion the kinetic energy per unit length parallel to Oz T 2p J J [(d4)) 2+ (d dy (P)1dxdy=lpfl[ a) 2+ (=zp 4d ds=zp f, ydvds.

  • ,In a fluid, the circulation round an elementary area dxdy is equal to dv du udx + (v+dx) dy- (u+dy) dx-vdy= () dxdy, so that the component spin is dv du (5) 2 dx - dy) in the previous notation of § 24; so also for the other two components and n.

  • So far these theorems on vortex motion are kinematical; but introducing the equations of motion of § 22, Du + dQ =o, Dv+dQ =o, Dw + dQ dt dx dt dy dt dz and taking dx, dy, dz in the direction of u, v, w, and dx: dy: dz=u: v: w, (udx + vdy + wdz) = Du dx +u 1+..

  • .,' d x 2 dy e d z2' (10) which is expressed .

  • Now if k denotes the component of absolute velocity in a direction fixed in space whose direction cosines are 1, m, n, k=lu+mv+nw; (2) and in the infinitesimal element of time dt, the coordinates of the fluid particle at (x, y, z) will have changed by (u', v', w')dt; so that Dk dl, do dt dt dt dt + dtw +1 (?t +u, dx +v, dy +w, dz) +m (d +u dx + v dy +w' dz) dw, dw +n (dt ?dx+v?dy +w dz) But as 1, m, n are the direction cosines of a line fixed in space, dl= m R-n Q, d m = nP-lR an =1Q-mP dt dt ' dt ' so that Dk __ du, du, du, du dt l (dt -vR+ wQ+u + v dy + w dz) +m(..

  • u '= - dx -md x, ' - dy -m dy, w = - dz-mdz' as in § 25 (I), a first integral of the equations in (5) may be written dp V + 2q 2 - d - n dt +14-14) (dx + m dz) +(v-v') (+m) +(w - w) (+m) =F(t), (7) in which d4, do, d?

  • dt-(u)dy- (w-w) dz = d - (U-yR+zQ) dy - (V-zP+xR)d -(W-xQ+yP) d z (8) is the time-rate of change of 49 at a point fixed in space, which is left behind with velocity components u-u', v-v', w-w'.

  • In the case of a steady motion of homogeneous liquid symmetrical about Ox, where 0 is advancing with velocity U, the equation (5) of § 34 p/p +V +Zq'2-f(,P') = constant becomes transformed into P +V + 2- dy + 2U 2 -f(t +2Uy 2) = constant, = 1,t+4Uy2, subject to the condition, from (4) § 34, Y -2 V = - f ' (Y', y 2 2 +2Uy2).

  • I, ' 2 dx (y dx) +dy U dy) so that § 34 (4) is satisfied, with f' (W') =1.0 a2, f (Y") = 2 U'a2; and (ro) reduces to `)(() P +v-3 U j _ S = constant; (16) this gives the state of motion in M.

  • d t dy dz where _ oo abcdA A, B ' C ' - (a 2 +A, b 2 ±x, A, c 2 +A) P P 2 = 4(a 2 -F-A) (b 2 ±A) (c2+A).

  • Thus if T is expressed as a quadratic function of U, V, W, P, Q, R, the components of momentum corresponding are dT dT dT (I) = dU + x2=dV, x3 =dW, dT dT dT Yi dp' dQ' y3=dR; but when it is expressed as a quadratic function of xi, 'x2, x3, yi, Y2, Y3, U = d, V= dx, ' w= ax dT Q_ dT dT dy 1 dy2 dy The second system of expression was chosen by Clebsch and adopted by Halphen in his Fonctions elliptiques; and thence the dynamical equations follow X = dt x2 dy +x3 d Y = ..., Z ..., (3) = dt1 -y2?y - '2dx3+x3 ' M =..

  • origin up to the moving origin 0, so that dy x=y=z=o, but dt U, dt= ' dG _ dyl =l (- yi y3Q x2w+xiv) +m (dY2yP+Yrxu+xw) +n (?

  • Clebsch to take the form T= 2p(x12 +x22)+2p'x32 + q (xiyi +x2y2) +q'x3y3 +2r(y12+y22)+2r'y32 so that a fourth integral is given by dy 3 /dt = o, y = constant; dx3 (4 y) (q + y) _ (y y) dt - xl 'x2 xl Y Y x l 2 - 1, y2 () = (x12 +x22) (y12 + y22) = (X 1 2 + X 2) +y22)-(FG-x3y3)2 = (x 1 y32-G2)-(Gx3-Fy3) 2, in which 2 = F 2 -x3 2, x l y l +x2y2 = FG-x3y3, Y(y1 2 +y2 2) = T -p(x12 +x22) -p'x32 -2q(xiyi 'x2y2)- 2 q ' x = (p -p') x 2 + 2 (- q ') x 3 y 3+ m 1, (6) m1 = T 2 i y 3 2 (7) so that dt3) 2 =X3, (8) where X3 is a quartic function of x3, and thus t is given by an elliptic (8) (6) (I) integral of the first kind; and by inversion x 3 is in elliptic function of the time t.

  • Introducing Euler's angles 0, c15, x1= F sin 0 sin 0, x 2 =F sin 0 cos 0, xl+x 2 i =iF sin 0e_, x 3 = F cos 0; sin o t=P sin 4+Q cos 0, dT F sin 2 0d l - dy l + dy 2x = (qx1+ryi)xl +(qx2+ry2)x2 = q (x1 2 +x2 2) +r (xiyi +x2y2) = qF 2 sin 2 0-Fr (FG - x 3 y 3), (16) _Ft (FG _x 323 Frdx3 (17) F x3 X3 elliptic integrals of the third kind.

  • therwise, if A is positive rt= J y-s1 (A+2By+Cy') dy sh1 A'/ (A+2By+Cy 2) I ch1 A+By (26) -V A ch1 31, (B2--AC) - A sh - 1 (B2-AC)' nd the axis falls away ultimately from its original direction.

  • Let us apply the above theorem to the case of a small parallelepipedon or rectangular prism having sides dx, dy, dz respectively, its centre having co-ordinates (x, y, z).

  • Let this rectangular prism be supposed to be wholly filled up with electricity of density p; then the total quantity in it is p dx dy dz.

  • Hence the total flux is - (+ d2V d 2 V d2V dye + dz2) dy dz, dx2 and by the previous theorem this must be equal to 4'rrp dxdydz.

  • Consider the integral W dx dy dz .

  • We have by partial integration ff1 fV dd - ' 2 dy JJ dx y JJ y dxd dz = V - d dzdxd dz, and Itwo (similar equations in y and z.

  • Hence 8?rJJJ.dx l i 2 + i dy) 2 2 dxdydz= 8 Jfv d s_JJJvvvdx dngr dy dz.

  • tall, with a well-rounded, powerful figure; he inherited an excellent constitution from his parents - " I never knew," says he, " either my father or mother to have any sickness but that of which they dy'd, he at 89, and she at 85 years of age " - but injured it somewhat by excesses; in early life he had severe attacks of pleurisy, from one of which, in 1727, it was not expected that he would recover, and in his later years he was the victim of stone and gout.

  • If we write -fxo f yox s yiu dx dy, we first calculate the raw values coo., ai,o, 0.1,1,

  • If the data of the briquette are, as in § 86, the volumes of the minor briquettes, but the condition as to close contact is not satisfied, we have y "`x P u dx dy = K + L + R - X111010-0,0 f xo yo i'?

  • Either or both of the expressions K and L will have to be calculated by means of the formula of § 84; if this is applied to both expressions, we have a formula which may be written in a more general form f f 4 u4(x, y) dx dy = u dx dy.

  • q) a J O l x f o udxdy (1619(X q) dx 4 P u dx dy d 4)(b, y) dy dy +.

  • f b f 4 f x f P u dx dy d x dy) dx dy.

  • The layer of air originally of thickness dx now has thickness dx+dy, since N is displaced forwards dy more than M.

  • X - Edz+poU 2 (i +) =poU2, X = (E - p oU 2) dy / dx.

  • We have c3 and u expressed in terms of the original length dx and the displacement dy so that we must y put dE= (dx+dy = (I +dy/dx)dx, and U dy p = .l o (w+pu t) I dx.

  • We have already found that if V changes to V - v iw= yP + 11 v2 2(d y y + I dy 2 r (V 2 12) =p0U i - dx + 1 since v/V = - dy/dx.

  • (27) Now u/U = - dy/dx, (28) for the particle at A moves over dy backwards, while the disturbance moves over U.

  • Also since dx has been stretched to +dy p&,(dx +dy) =po&odx or p&'(I +dy/dx) = (29) Substituting from (28) in (27) Y&a + P(2)U 2 (I + dy (3) 2 = p oc?oU 2, 0) and substituting from (29) in (30) Y&ao dx + pocZoU 2 + dx) = p owoU 2, (31) whence Yc = powoU2, or U2 = Y/ p, (32) where now p is the normal density of the rod.

  • The following is the approximate expression for the relation between a change Os in the length of the half chain and the corresponding change Ay in the dip s +Os =x+ (2/3x) {y2 or, neglecting the last term, 5 As= 4YAY/3x, and 6 Dy = 3xOs/4Y From these equations the deflection produced by any given stress on the chains or by a change of temperature can be calculated.

  • Then dy _I Mdx dx EI?

  • These circuital relations, when expressed analytically, are then for a dielectric medium of types = (dt + x) (f',g',h')+dt(f,g,h), dR dQ = da dy dz dt' ' I See H.

  • Now, since v sec i (54) di sec i dq C f(q sec i)' and multiplying by /dt or q, (55) dx C q sec i dq - f (q sec i)' and multiplying by dy/dx or tan i, (56) dy C q sec i tan dq - f (q sec i) ' also (57) di Cg dq g sec i .f (g sec i)' (58) d tan i C g sec i dq - q.

  • di g d tan i g dt - v cos i ' and now (53) dx d 2 y dy d2xdx Cif dt 2 dt dt2 _ - _ gdt' and this, in conjunction with (46) dy _ d y tan i = dx dt/dt' (47)di d 2 d d 2 x dx sec 2 idt = (ctt d t - at dt2) I (dt), reduces to (48) Integrating from any initial pseudo-velocity U, (60) du t _ C U uf(u) x= C cos n f u (u) y=C sin n ff (a); and supposing the inclination i to change from 0, to 8 radians over the arc.

  • There is, however, considerable evidence in support of the view that Greek va representing the sound arising from Ky, xy, Ty, By was pronounced as sh (s), while representing gy, dy was pronounced in some districts zh (z).4 On an inscription of Halicarnassus, a town which stood in ancient Carian territory, the sound of vv in `AXoKapvaao-Ewv is represented by T, as it is also in the Carian name Panyassis (IIavvfiTcos, geni tive), though the ordinary is also found in the same inscription.

  • dy my mv~= mg sin = mg-~, ~--= mg cos ~+R.

  • The more important rules for initial mutation are the following: the soft mutation occurs in a feminine singular noun after the article, thus y fam, " the mother " (radical mam); in an adjective following a feminine singular noun, as in mam dda, " a good mother " (da, " good "); in a noun following a positive adjective, as in hen dd9n, " old man," because this order represents what was originally a compound; in a noun following dy, " thy," and ei, " his," thus dy ben," thy head," ei ben, " his head " (pen," head "); in the object after a verb; in a noun after a simple preposition; in a verb after the relative a.

  • dy, 3.

  • Zend asha for Sanskrit tha, Old Persian aria (in dy taxerxes); fravashi for Pahlavi fravardln, New Persian ferrer tn ie spirits of the dead).

  • The 18KT gold posts are stamped with the European 750 symbol (indicating 18KT gold) and the trademark initial DY.

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