This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

dwindled

dwindled Sentence Examples

  • As the afternoon dwindled, the Deans were content to rock and ruminate.

  • By 1913, the post office was closed and the town had dwindled to two dozen remaining souls, and before long, it was left to indigenous wildlife and the spirits of a boisterous past.

  • The laundry was one place she hadn't been yet and her wardrobe had dwindled down to a few clean items - none of them appropriate for a ride around the countryside with a man she hardly knew.

  • A salt basin underlies the city, and, next to the lumber industry, the salt industry was the first to be developed, but its importance has dwindled; the product value in 1905 being $20,098 out of $5,620,866 for all factory products.

  • In 1904, under the old system of three-years service with numerous total and partial exemptions, 324,253 men became liable to incorporation, of whom 25,432 were rejected as unfit, 55,265 were admitted as one-year volunteers, 62,160 were put back, 27,825 had already enlisted with a view to making the army a career, 5257 were taken for the navy, and thus, with a few extra details and casualties, the contingent for full service dwindled to 147,549 recruits.

  • In 1826-1828 the town became for a time the capital of Greece and the centre of a large commercial population (about Io,000), which has dwindled to about 4300.

  • The population, estimated by James Bruce in 1770 at 10,000 families, had dwindled in 1905 to about 7000.

  • From this time onward the village dwindled to the poor dirty place it is to-day.

  • The exports dwindled from 3600 bales in 1865 to 946 in 1905; great fluctuations occur, the export in 1904, for example, being only 338 bales.

  • Though the association brought about an extension and improvement of the Indian crop, in which result it was enormously assisted by the high prices consequent upon the American Civil War, it sank after a few years into obscurity, and soon passed out of existence altogether, while the effects of its work dwindled finally into insignificance.

  • The Heteronemertini thus appear to have developed an extra layer of longitudinal fibres internally to those which they inherited from more primitive ancestors, whereas the Metanemertini are no longer in possession of the internal circular layer, but have on the contrary largely developed the external circular one, which has dwindled away in the Heteronemertini.

  • Meanwhile Schwarzenberg's force opposing these had dwindled to a bare 30,000.

  • In Protestant countries casuistry shrank and dwindled, though works on the subject continued to be written both in Germany and England during the 17th century.

  • This dwindled to Rs.36,000 in 1892-1893, but the system was then adopted of letting for a term of three years and a higher rent was obtained.

  • The town, which obtained civic rights in 1200, also became the seat of the dukes of Schleswig, but its commerce gradually dwindled owing to the rivalry of Lubeck, the numerous wars in which the district was involved, and the silting up of the Schlei.

  • The imports to Jidda in the same year were £1,405,000, largely consisting of rice, wheat and other food stuffs from India; the exports, which have dwindled away in late years, amounted in 1904 to only £25,000.

  • The kingdom dwindled rapidly to its ancient limits between the Caucasus, the Volga and the Don, whilst the Russian traders of Novgorod and Kiev supplanted the Khazars as the carriers between Constantinople and the North.

  • When the Seljuk state broke up, and the Osmanli or Ottoman sovereignty arose, Konia decayed, its population dwindled and the splendid early Turkish buildings were suffered to go to ruin.

  • As years went on their estates dwindled, and by the beginning of the 17th century Gledstanes was sold.

  • The industry was threatened with extinction, and would certainly have dwindled to insignificant dimensions had not a few earnest artists, working in the face of many difficulties and discouragements, succeeded in striking out new lines and establishing new standar4s for excellence.

  • The romantic school was supported by Sin Otetchestva (1812), " Son of the Fatherland," united in 1825 to the Severnoi Arkhiv (1822), which dwindled and came to an end soon after 1839.

  • 1406), and though once a port of some importance it dwindled to a fishing hamlet.

  • Henceforward their Levantine commerce dwindled, and in the west the Athenians extended their rivalry even into the Corinthian Gulf.

  • It now sank to the level of a French provincial town, and its population dwindled from 60,000 to about 22,000.

  • Under the later Roman Empire the city dwindled into a mere village, which since the 6th century bore the Slavonic name of Goritza.

  • With his elder brother Wladislaus reigning over Bohemia and Hungary the credit of the Jagiellos in Europe had never been so great as it was now, and John Albert, bent upon military glory, eagerly placed himself at the head of what was to have been a great anti-Turkish league, but ultimately dwindled down to a raid upon Moldavia which ended in disaster.

  • With the decline of the Roman Empire the demand for parrots in Europe lessened, and so the supply dwindled, yet all knowledge of them was not wholly lost, and they are occasionally mentioned by one writer or another until in the i 5th century began that career of geographical discovery which has since proceeded uninterruptedly.

  • From 1411 to 1511 it grew in size and wealth; from 1512 to 1572 it declined with the decay of the dynasty of Gujarat; from 1572 to 1709 it renewed its greatness under the Mogul emperors; from 1709 to 1809 it dwindled with their decline; and from 1818 onwards it has again increased under British rule.

  • Arica at one time had a population of 30,000 and enjoyed much prosperity, but through civil war, earthquakes and conquest, its population had dwindled to 2853 in 1895 and 2824 in 1902.

  • Strategus), dwindled away into matters of routine.

  • Nearly all its old industries - the coal mines, salt works, linen manufacture, and even the making of iron girdles for the baking of scones - have dwindled, but its pleasant climate and picturesqueness make it a holiday resort.

  • Meanwhile Mary's party dwindled away; at a meeting in Perth (23rd of February 1573) her thanes fled from her, and Elizabeth at last reinforced Mary's enemies with men and artillery.

  • At first the orations of Henley drew great crowds, but, although he never discontinued his services, his audience latterly dwindled almost entirely away.

  • The panic of 1857 interrupted its growth, and the population dwindled so that in 1860 there were only a few hundred settlers on the town-site.

  • After Asoka the Mauryas dwindled away, and the last of them, Brihadratha, was treacherously assassinated in 184 B.C. by his commander-in-chief, Pushyamitra Sunga, who founded the Sunga dynasty.

  • On her death at Franeker, Friesland, on the 30th of October 1680, she left a large number of followers, who, however, dwindled rapidly away; but in the early 18th century her influence revived in Scotland sufficiently' to call forth several denunciations of her doctrines in the various Presbyterian general assemblies of 1701, 1709 and 1710.

  • With the rise of Dakar, c. 1860, on the adjacent coast, Goree lost its trade and its inhabitants, mostly Jolofs, had dwindled in 1905 to about 150o.

  • After serving in three parliaments, he resigned in 1841, by which time his party ("the philosophic Radicals") had dwindled away.

  • P. Badger visited the chief Jacobite centres, their numbers in all Turkey had dwindled to about ioo,000 souls, owing to vast secessions to Rome.

  • This tribe has the pleon dwindled into insignificance, whereas in the other two tribes it is powerfully developed.

  • The town has ceased to be important, and its inhabitants have dwindled to about 1500.

  • His later years were clouded with many sorrows and disappointments; his relations with Governor Joseph Dudley were unfriendly; he lost much of his former prestige in the Church - his own congregation dwindled - and in the college; his uncle John Cotton was expelled from his 8 8 4 _ Mather, Increase charge in the Plymouth Church; his son Increase turned out a ne'er-do-well; four of his children and his second wife died in November 1713; his wife's brothers and the husbands of his sisters were ungodly and violent men; his favourite daughter Katherine, who "understood Latin and read Hebrew fluently," died in 1716; his third wife went mad in 1719; his personal enemies circulated incredible scandals about him; and in 1724-1725 he saw a Liberal once more preferred to him as a new president of Harvard.

  • His slender prerogatives had gradually dwindled down to vanishing point.

  • On becoming the ruler of Spain at the beginning of September 1873, Castelar at once devoted his attention to the reorganization of the army, whose numbers had dwindled down to about 70,000 men.

  • In Pitt's case, too, it is to be borne in mind that the opposition with which he had acted gradually dwindled away, and that it ceased to have any organized existence after the death of the prince of Wales in 1751.

  • In Scotland and Ireland the pearl mussel fishery was also of importance, but has altogether dwindled into insignificance since the opening up of commercial intercourse with the East and with the islands of the Pacific Ocean, whence finer and more abundant pearls than those of Unio margaritiferus are derived.

  • Although the advantage at first rested with Alexander, he gradually lost it, and his supporters dwindled away.

  • From Origen's statement one might have thought that the Simonians would have dwindled out altogether by the time of Eusebius.

  • In 1688 the rich uncle, whose supposed riches had dwindled so much that at his death he was almost insolvent, died, having decayed, it would seem, not less in mind than in body and estate, and Swift sought counsel of his mother at Leicester.

  • The old questions which had divided them from the king and Pitt in 1783 had dwindled into nothing before the appalling question of the immediate present.

  • rhe government majorities in the House now rapidly dwindled;)n the 26th of April 1804, Addington resigned; and Pitt, after Iis attempt to form a national coalition ministry had broken down on the kings refusal to admit Fox, became head of a government constructed on a narrow Tory basis.

  • In Peripatus the prostomium of the Chaetopod-like ancestor is atrophied, but it is possible that two processes on the front of the head (FP) represent in the embryo the dwindled prostomial tentacles.

  • The army' of Dumouriez was left in such want that it dwindled rapidly.

  • The council gradually dwindled, and probably came to an end without formal abolition.

  • The trade has dwindled ever since and is now quite insignificant.

  • The export of wax, valued at £37,000 in 1843, had dwindled in 1907 to £2325.

  • The administrative machinery of the state still existed, but it worked in empty air: its taxpayers disappeared, those who were amenable to its legal jurisdiction slipped from its grasp, -and the number of those whose affairs it should have directed dwindled away.

  • Despite Charless resistance his royal power dwindled steadily: an appeal to Hincmar, archbishop of Reims, entailed concessions to the Church.

  • that enthusiasm is not as great for a war of policy and conquest as for a war of national defence; and the army dwindled, since a country cannot bleed itself to death.

  • While Omdurman grew to a huge size the population of the country generally dwindled enormously from constant warfare and the ravages of disease, small-pox being endemic. The Europeans in the country were kept prisoners at Omdurman.

  • As the afternoon dwindled, the Deans were content to rock and ruminate.

  • Kris.s two-to-one advantage had dwindled, and Darkyn didn.t hesitate to unleash every demon he could.

  • By 1913, the post office was closed and the town had dwindled to two dozen remaining souls, and before long, it was left to indigenous wildlife and the spirits of a boisterous past.

  • The laundry was one place she hadn't been yet and her wardrobe had dwindled down to a few clean items - none of them appropriate for a ride around the countryside with a man she hardly knew.

  • civil wars in parts of the empire further weakened the rule of Rome and respect for Roman law dwindled as a result.

  • dwindled over the last year.

  • The parent group gradually dwindled away in a series of obscure splits.

  • Academic attention to this issue, however, has considerably dwindled.

  • dwindled away during the two world wars.

  • dwindled down to a measuring cast.

  • dwindled away in a series of obscure splits.

  • dwindled in numbers to just seven people.

  • dwindled in subsequent years.

  • homo erectus seems to have dwindled greatly in its Asian homeland by 300,000 years.

  • languishing near the foot of the Third Division, gates have dwindled from 11,000 to less than 2,000.

  • Modern farming methods mean that the supply of natural food has dwindled in many parts of the country.

  • remnants of a financial empire which dwindled away during her final years.

  • In largely secular societies, it is not surprising that the concept of blessings has dwindled.

  • steeplechase races had dwindled in numbers.

  • A salt basin underlies the city, and, next to the lumber industry, the salt industry was the first to be developed, but its importance has dwindled; the product value in 1905 being $20,098 out of $5,620,866 for all factory products.

  • In the later 7th century this current of trade dwindled in face of the great commercial and colonizing activity of Miletus; it probably received further injury through the subsequent interference of Athens on the Hellespont.

  • In 1904, under the old system of three-years service with numerous total and partial exemptions, 324,253 men became liable to incorporation, of whom 25,432 were rejected as unfit, 55,265 were admitted as one-year volunteers, 62,160 were put back, 27,825 had already enlisted with a view to making the army a career, 5257 were taken for the navy, and thus, with a few extra details and casualties, the contingent for full service dwindled to 147,549 recruits.

  • In 1826-1828 the town became for a time the capital of Greece and the centre of a large commercial population (about Io,000), which has dwindled to about 4300.

  • The population henceforth dwindled in consequence of pestilence and emigration, and although the island recovered somewhat in the 18th century under a comparatively lenient rule it was brought to a very low ebb owing to the severity of its governor during the Greek revolution.

  • At Edgehill he had observed the inferiority of the parliamentary to the royalist horse, could not rally afterwards, "whereas Cromwell's troops if they prevailed, or though they were beaten and routed, presently rallied again and stood in good order till they received new orders"; and the king's military successes dwindled in proportion to the gradual preponderance of Cromwell's troops in the parliamentary army.

  • The population, estimated by James Bruce in 1770 at 10,000 families, had dwindled in 1905 to about 7000.

  • From this time onward the village dwindled to the poor dirty place it is to-day.

  • Its sanitary condition, though still defective, was improved by the drainage of the adjacent Almajar Marsh; and after 1870, when the population had dwindled to about 26,000, Cartagena advanced rapidly in size and wealth.

  • The Spanish monarchy at the same epoch dwindled with apparently less reason.

  • The main object of these was to invest the senate, which he recruited with a number of his own party, with full control over the state, over every magistrate and every province; and the mainstay of his political system was to be the military colonies which he had established with grants of land throughout every part of Italy, to the ruin of the old Italian freeholders and farmers, who from this time dwindled away, leaving whole districts waste and desolate.

  • The exports dwindled from 3600 bales in 1865 to 946 in 1905; great fluctuations occur, the export in 1904, for example, being only 338 bales.

  • Though the association brought about an extension and improvement of the Indian crop, in which result it was enormously assisted by the high prices consequent upon the American Civil War, it sank after a few years into obscurity, and soon passed out of existence altogether, while the effects of its work dwindled finally into insignificance.

  • The Heteronemertini thus appear to have developed an extra layer of longitudinal fibres internally to those which they inherited from more primitive ancestors, whereas the Metanemertini are no longer in possession of the internal circular layer, but have on the contrary largely developed the external circular one, which has dwindled away in the Heteronemertini.

  • In 1774 the number of electors (which by usage had been restricted to the mayor, aldermen and freemen elected by them) had dwindled to six, and in 1790 to one person only, whose return of two members, however, was rejected and that of the general body of the freemen accepted.

  • Meanwhile Schwarzenberg's force opposing these had dwindled to a bare 30,000.

  • In Protestant countries casuistry shrank and dwindled, though works on the subject continued to be written both in Germany and England during the 17th century.

  • This dwindled to Rs.36,000 in 1892-1893, but the system was then adopted of letting for a term of three years and a higher rent was obtained.

  • The town, which obtained civic rights in 1200, also became the seat of the dukes of Schleswig, but its commerce gradually dwindled owing to the rivalry of Lubeck, the numerous wars in which the district was involved, and the silting up of the Schlei.

  • The imports to Jidda in the same year were £1,405,000, largely consisting of rice, wheat and other food stuffs from India; the exports, which have dwindled away in late years, amounted in 1904 to only £25,000.

  • The kingdom dwindled rapidly to its ancient limits between the Caucasus, the Volga and the Don, whilst the Russian traders of Novgorod and Kiev supplanted the Khazars as the carriers between Constantinople and the North.

  • When the Seljuk state broke up, and the Osmanli or Ottoman sovereignty arose, Konia decayed, its population dwindled and the splendid early Turkish buildings were suffered to go to ruin.

  • As years went on their estates dwindled, and by the beginning of the 17th century Gledstanes was sold.

  • The industry was threatened with extinction, and would certainly have dwindled to insignificant dimensions had not a few earnest artists, working in the face of many difficulties and discouragements, succeeded in striking out new lines and establishing new standar4s for excellence.

  • The romantic school was supported by Sin Otetchestva (1812), " Son of the Fatherland," united in 1825 to the Severnoi Arkhiv (1822), which dwindled and came to an end soon after 1839.

  • 1406), and though once a port of some importance it dwindled to a fishing hamlet.

  • Henceforward their Levantine commerce dwindled, and in the west the Athenians extended their rivalry even into the Corinthian Gulf.

  • It now sank to the level of a French provincial town, and its population dwindled from 60,000 to about 22,000.

  • Under the later Roman Empire the city dwindled into a mere village, which since the 6th century bore the Slavonic name of Goritza.

  • With his elder brother Wladislaus reigning over Bohemia and Hungary the credit of the Jagiellos in Europe had never been so great as it was now, and John Albert, bent upon military glory, eagerly placed himself at the head of what was to have been a great anti-Turkish league, but ultimately dwindled down to a raid upon Moldavia which ended in disaster.

  • With the decline of the Roman Empire the demand for parrots in Europe lessened, and so the supply dwindled, yet all knowledge of them was not wholly lost, and they are occasionally mentioned by one writer or another until in the i 5th century began that career of geographical discovery which has since proceeded uninterruptedly.

  • From 1411 to 1511 it grew in size and wealth; from 1512 to 1572 it declined with the decay of the dynasty of Gujarat; from 1572 to 1709 it renewed its greatness under the Mogul emperors; from 1709 to 1809 it dwindled with their decline; and from 1818 onwards it has again increased under British rule.

  • Arica at one time had a population of 30,000 and enjoyed much prosperity, but through civil war, earthquakes and conquest, its population had dwindled to 2853 in 1895 and 2824 in 1902.

  • Brothers, however, had announced that on the 19th of November 1795 he was to be "revealed" as prince of the Hebrews and ruler of the world; and when this date passed without any such manifestation, what enthusiasm he had aroused rapidly dwindled, despite the fact that some of his earlier political predictions (e.g.

  • Strategus), dwindled away into matters of routine.

  • The great wealth of the old monastic orders exposed them, especially in France and Italy, to the vicious system of commendation, whereby a bishop, an ecclesiastic, or even a layman was appointed " commendatory abbot " of a monastery, merely for the purpose of drawing the revenues (see Abbot); the monasteries were often deprived even of necessary maintenance, the communities dwindled, and regular observance became impossible.

  • Nearly all its old industries - the coal mines, salt works, linen manufacture, and even the making of iron girdles for the baking of scones - have dwindled, but its pleasant climate and picturesqueness make it a holiday resort.

  • Meanwhile Mary's party dwindled away; at a meeting in Perth (23rd of February 1573) her thanes fled from her, and Elizabeth at last reinforced Mary's enemies with men and artillery.

  • At first the orations of Henley drew great crowds, but, although he never discontinued his services, his audience latterly dwindled almost entirely away.

  • The panic of 1857 interrupted its growth, and the population dwindled so that in 1860 there were only a few hundred settlers on the town-site.

  • After Asoka the Mauryas dwindled away, and the last of them, Brihadratha, was treacherously assassinated in 184 B.C. by his commander-in-chief, Pushyamitra Sunga, who founded the Sunga dynasty.

  • On her death at Franeker, Friesland, on the 30th of October 1680, she left a large number of followers, who, however, dwindled rapidly away; but in the early 18th century her influence revived in Scotland sufficiently' to call forth several denunciations of her doctrines in the various Presbyterian general assemblies of 1701, 1709 and 1710.

  • With the rise of Dakar, c. 1860, on the adjacent coast, Goree lost its trade and its inhabitants, mostly Jolofs, had dwindled in 1905 to about 150o.

  • After serving in three parliaments, he resigned in 1841, by which time his party ("the philosophic Radicals") had dwindled away.

  • P. Badger visited the chief Jacobite centres, their numbers in all Turkey had dwindled to about ioo,000 souls, owing to vast secessions to Rome.

  • This tribe has the pleon dwindled into insignificance, whereas in the other two tribes it is powerfully developed.

  • The town has ceased to be important, and its inhabitants have dwindled to about 1500.

  • His later years were clouded with many sorrows and disappointments; his relations with Governor Joseph Dudley were unfriendly; he lost much of his former prestige in the Church - his own congregation dwindled - and in the college; his uncle John Cotton was expelled from his 8 8 4 _ Mather, Increase charge in the Plymouth Church; his son Increase turned out a ne'er-do-well; four of his children and his second wife died in November 1713; his wife's brothers and the husbands of his sisters were ungodly and violent men; his favourite daughter Katherine, who "understood Latin and read Hebrew fluently," died in 1716; his third wife went mad in 1719; his personal enemies circulated incredible scandals about him; and in 1724-1725 he saw a Liberal once more preferred to him as a new president of Harvard.

  • His slender prerogatives had gradually dwindled down to vanishing point.

  • On becoming the ruler of Spain at the beginning of September 1873, Castelar at once devoted his attention to the reorganization of the army, whose numbers had dwindled down to about 70,000 men.

  • In Pitt's case, too, it is to be borne in mind that the opposition with which he had acted gradually dwindled away, and that it ceased to have any organized existence after the death of the prince of Wales in 1751.

  • In Scotland and Ireland the pearl mussel fishery was also of importance, but has altogether dwindled into insignificance since the opening up of commercial intercourse with the East and with the islands of the Pacific Ocean, whence finer and more abundant pearls than those of Unio margaritiferus are derived.

  • Although the advantage at first rested with Alexander, he gradually lost it, and his supporters dwindled away.

  • From Origen's statement one might have thought that the Simonians would have dwindled out altogether by the time of Eusebius.

  • In 1688 the rich uncle, whose supposed riches had dwindled so much that at his death he was almost insolvent, died, having decayed, it would seem, not less in mind than in body and estate, and Swift sought counsel of his mother at Leicester.

  • The old questions which had divided them from the king and Pitt in 1783 had dwindled into nothing before the appalling question of the immediate present.

  • rhe government majorities in the House now rapidly dwindled;)n the 26th of April 1804, Addington resigned; and Pitt, after Iis attempt to form a national coalition ministry had broken down on the kings refusal to admit Fox, became head of a government constructed on a narrow Tory basis.

  • In Peripatus the prostomium of the Chaetopod-like ancestor is atrophied, but it is possible that two processes on the front of the head (FP) represent in the embryo the dwindled prostomial tentacles.

  • The army' of Dumouriez was left in such want that it dwindled rapidly.

  • The council gradually dwindled, and probably came to an end without formal abolition.

  • The trade has dwindled ever since and is now quite insignificant.

  • The export of wax, valued at £37,000 in 1843, had dwindled in 1907 to £2325.

  • The administrative machinery of the state still existed, but it worked in empty air: its taxpayers disappeared, those who were amenable to its legal jurisdiction slipped from its grasp, -and the number of those whose affairs it should have directed dwindled away.

  • Despite Charless resistance his royal power dwindled steadily: an appeal to Hincmar, archbishop of Reims, entailed concessions to the Church.

  • that enthusiasm is not as great for a war of policy and conquest as for a war of national defence; and the army dwindled, since a country cannot bleed itself to death.

  • While Omdurman grew to a huge size the population of the country generally dwindled enormously from constant warfare and the ravages of disease, small-pox being endemic. The Europeans in the country were kept prisoners at Omdurman.

  • Kutuzov merely shrugged his shoulders when one after another they presented projects of maneuvers to be made with those soldiers-- ill-shod, insufficiently clad, and half starved--who within a month and without fighting a battle had dwindled to half their number, and who at the best if the flight continued would have to go a greater distance than they had already traversed, before they reached the frontier.

  • The Inheritance marks the last remnants of a financial empire which dwindled away during her final years.

  • In largely secular societies, it is not surprising that the concept of blessings has dwindled.

  • In 1926, there was the introduction of a hurdle race as the steeplechase races had dwindled in numbers.

  • Hope and Faith fared well the first two seasons on ABC, but ratings dwindled and the show was cancelled after its third season in 2006.

  • Popularity dwindled by the mid 1990s, but now they have made a resurgence in the world of fashion.

  • This was the case with Miracle Strip Amusement Park in Panama City, Florida, which closed in 2004 due to declining attendance, and the MGM Amusement Park in Las Vegas, which gradually shrank and closed as attendance dwindled.

  • A minimal amount of copies were every printed and this number has dwindled even further.

  • Although the Sutherland family dwindled, the show refocused and repurposed with Sally Fletcher taking center stage.

  • NBC's soap operas dwindled to Days of Our Lives only.

  • Towards the end of the decade interest in flamboyant pop dwindled.

  • When numbers dwindled, players began to compete individually rather than for the tribe.

  • The Weyrs, meanwhile, have dwindled; now only one Weyr remains operational, with few dragons and dragonriders available to protect the planet.

Browse other sentences examples →