How to use Durham in a sentence

durham
  • In 1657 he founded a new university at Durham, which was suppressed at the Restoration.

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  • His successor Alchred claimed descent from Ida, but Simeon of Durham appears to doubt the truth of his claim.

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  • Oswald, who is called patricius by Simeon of Durham, succeeded, but reigned only twenty-seven days, when he was expelled and eventually became a monk.

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  • Simeon of Durham makes his death occur about the same time, after he had been expelled from his country and had lost his reason as a punishment for his misdeeds.

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  • This was St Bernard's College, founded by Chicheley under licence in mortmain in 1437 for Cistercian monks, on the model of Gloucester Hall and Durham College for the southern and northern Benedictines.

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  • William Stevenson was born at Hunwick, Durham, matriculated in 1546, took his M.A.

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  • He was made prebendary of Durham in 1560-1561, and died in 1575.

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  • In 1856 he was translated to the see of Durham, and in 1860 he became archbishop of York.

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  • At the age of eighteen, on the 25th of February 1639, he married Margaret, daughter of Lord Coventry, with whom he and his wife lived at Durham House in the Strand, and at Canonbury House in Islington.

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  • Bernhardt Schmidt, better known in England as Father Smith, was invited about 1660 to build the organ for the Chapel Royal, Whitehall; two years later he built the organ in Durham Cathedral a' 474.1, difference a whole tone, and practically agreeing with the Cammerton of Praetorius.

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  • Latimer and Hooper maintained that Bishops and presbyters were identical; and Pilkington, bishop of Durham, and Bishop Jewel were of the same mind.

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  • Gradually Durham, Short horn, Hereford and other stock were introduced to improve the native breeds, with results so satisfactory that now herds of threequarters-bred cattle are to be found in all parts of the country.

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  • Other institutions belonging to the state are the national sheep-fold of Rambouillet (Seine-et-Oise) and the cow-house of Vieux-Pin (Orne) for the breeding of Durham cows.

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  • He was commended to the hospitality of Anne Boleyn's father, the earl of Wiltshire, in whose house at Durham Place he resided for some time; the king appointed him archdeacon of Taunton and one of his chaplains; and he also held a parochial benefice, the name of which is unknown.

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  • In 1724 he became rector of Houghton-leSpring, Durham, resigning in 1727 on his appointment to the rectory of Ryton, Durham, and to a canonry of Durham.

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  • Scarcely, however, was this great undertaking fairly commenced when he accepted the post of private secretary to Lord Durham on the latter's appointment as special commissioner to Canada.

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  • In the southern districts, where the farmers are Europeans, the breed of cattle is being steadily improved by the introduction of Durham and Hereford bulls.

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  • By making them in longer lengths a reduction was effected in the number of joints - always the weakest part of the line; and another advance consisted in the substitution of wrought iron for cast iron, though that material did not gain wide adoption until after the patent for an improved method of rolling rails granted in 1820 to John Birkinshaw, of the Bedlington Ironworks, Durham.

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  • In 1879 Lightfoot was consecrated bishop of Durham in succession to C. Baring.

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  • His unremitting labours impaired his health and shortened his splendid career at Durham.

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  • He was mayor 1903; and was made a magistrate for the county of Durham.

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  • He was a man of learning, writing in favour of Henry's divorce, and with Cuthbert Tunstall, bishop of Durham, a treatise against Cardinal Pole.

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  • The cotton mills are mostly in the Piedmont Plateau Region; durham|Durham, Durham county, and Winston, Forsyth county, are leading centres of tobacco manufacture; and High Point (pop. in 1900, 4163) in Randolph is noted for its manufacture of furniture.

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  • Johnston surrendered near Durham Station, in Durham county, on the 26th.

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  • For his son, before he was eighteen years old, he procured a deanery, four archdeaconries, five prebends and a chancellorship, and he sought to thrust him into the bishopric of Durham.

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  • For himself he obtained, in addition to his archbishopric and lord chancellorship, the abbey of St Albans, reputed to be the richest in England, and the bishopric first of Bath and Wells, then of Durham, and finally that of Winchester.

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  • In September of the same year the see of Durham fell vacant, and the king overruled the choice of the monks, who had elected and actually installed their sub-prior, Robert de Graystanes, in favour of Aungervyle.

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  • After being educated at the high school of Edinburgh and at Durham, he attended the literary and law classes at the university of Edinburgh, and becoming in 1810 a member of the Edinburgh faculty of advocates, he for some time enjoyed the intimate acquaintance of Cockburn, Jeffrey, Scott and other distinguished men whose talent then lent lustre to the Scottish bar.

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  • The Hull circuit during the next five years, through its Yorkshire, Western, NorthWestern and Northern Missions, carried on a vigorous campaign with great success, especially among the then semi-savage colliers of Durham and Northumberland.

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  • In the cases of Odo of Bayeux (1082) and of William of St Calais, bishop of Durham (1088), he used his legal ingenuity to justify the trial of bishops before a lay tribunal.

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  • It is not mentioned in Boldon Book as, being part of the royal manor of Sadberg held at this time by the family of Bruce, it did not become the property of the see of Durham until the purchase of that manor in 1189.

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  • An act of 1535 declared Hartlepool to be in Yorkshire, but in 1554 it was reinstated in the county of Durham.

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  • The repeal of the Test Act, the admission of Quakers to Parliament in consequence of their being allowed to affirm instead of taking the oath (1832, when Joseph Pease was elected for South Durham), the establishment of the University of London, and, more recently, the opening of the universities of Oxford and Cambridge to Nonconformists, have all had their effect upon the body.

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  • Its dedication recalls the transportation of the body of the saintly bishop of Lindisfarne from its shrine at Durham by the monks of that foundation to Lindisfarne, when in fear of attack from William the Conqueror.

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  • Bedlington (Betlingtun) and the hamlets belonging to it were bought by Cutheard, bishop of Durham, between 900 and 915, and although locally situated in the county of Northumberland became part of the county palatine of Durham over which Bishop Walcher was granted royal rights by William the Conqueror.

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  • When these rights were taken from Cuthbert Tunstall, bishop of Durham, in 1536, Bedlington among his other property lost its special privileges, but was confirmed to him in 1541 with the other property of his predecessors.

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  • Together with the other lands of the see of Durham, Bedlington was made over to the ecclesiastical commissioners in 1866.

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  • The diocese includes over half the parishes in Yorkshire, and also covers very small portions of Durham, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire.

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  • A bronze statue of the Prince Consort by Joseph Durham adorns the front terrace.

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  • Of the total importations of all kinds of coal to Hamburg, that of British coal, particularly from Northumberland and Durham, occupies the first place, and despite some falling off in late years, owing to the competition made by Westphalian coal, amounts to more than half the total import.

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  • Within the original territory of the town were included Newington, set off in 1713, Somersworth (1729), Durham (1732), Medbury (1755), Lee, set off from Durham in 1766, and Rollinsford, set off from Somersworth in 1849.

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  • The principal English lead mines are in Derbyshire; but there are also mines at Allandale and other parts of western Northumberland, at Alston Moor and other parts of Cumberland, in the western parts of Durham, in Swaledale and Arkendale and other parts of Yorkshire, in Salop, in Cornwall, in the Mendip Hills in Somersetshire, and in the Isle of Man.

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  • In Cumberland, Northumberland, Durham and latterly the United States, the reverberatory furnace is used only for roasting the ore, and the oxidized ore is then reduced by fusion in a low, square blastfurnace (a "Scottish hearth furnace") lined with cast iron, as is also the inclined sole-plate which is made to project beyond the furnace, the outside portion (the "work-stone") being provided with grooves guiding any molten metal that may be placed on the "stone" into a cast iron pot; the "tuyere" for the introduction of the wind was, in the earlier types, about half way down the furnace.

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  • Symeon of Durham (854) calls it Edwinesburch, and includes the church of St Cuthbert within the bishopric of Lindisfarne.

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  • In 1069 Robert of Comines, a Norman to whom William had given the earldom of Northumberland, was murdered by the English at Durham; the north declared for Edgar Atheling, the last male representative of the West-Saxon dynasty; and Sweyn Estrithson of Denmark sent a fleet to aid the rebels.

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  • The king ravaged the country as far north as Durham with such completeness that traces of devastation were still to be seen sixty years later.

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  • His first important preferment was as dean of Westminster (1605); afterwards he held successively the bishoprics of Rochester (1608),(1608), Lichfield (161o), Lincoln (1614),(1614), Durham (1617) and Winchester (1628),(1628), and the archbishopric of York (1631).

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  • His political activity while bishop of Durham was rewarded with a privy councillorship in 1627.

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  • He built other foundries at Ringwood, New Jersey, and at Durham, Pennsylvania; bought iron mines in northern New Jersey, and carried the ore thence by railways to his mills.

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  • He was buried in the island of Lindisfarne, but his remains were afterwards deposited at Chester-le-Street, and then at Durham.

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  • Lady Jane Grey was received at the Tower as queen, she having gone there by water from Durham House in the Strand.

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  • Simeon of Durham speaks of a submission of Scotland as a result; if it ever took place it was a mere form, for three years later we find a great confederacy formed in Scotland against Ethelstan.

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  • It trains young men for holy orders and is affiliated to the university of Durham.

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  • Those taken in open rebellion were deported by Lord Durham to save them from the scaffold; and although 90 were condemned to death only 12 were executed.

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  • In the latter year an amnesty was granted to those who had participated in the rebellion in Canada; and, although in June 1838 Lord Durham had issued a proclamation threatening Papineau with death if he returned to Canada, he was now admitted to the benefit of the amnesty.

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  • He also published two sermons and a handbook to his lectures on mechanics, &c., and projected a history of Northumberland and Durham, collections for which were found among his papers.

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  • He held honorary degrees at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Dublin, Edinburgh and Durham, was an Associate of the Institute of France; a Commander of the Legion of Honour, and of the Order of Leopold.

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  • North of the Tees, Sadberg in Durham is the only district which was called a wapentake, and the rest of the ancient administrative divisions of the three northern counties were called wards.

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  • In 1346, David, king of Scots, was also defeated and taken prisoner at Neville's Cross, near Durham.

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  • In 1869 Mr Gladstone offered him the deanery of Durham, but this he declined on the ground of his strong interest in Rugby.

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  • In the north of England are tion of co the rich field of Northumberland and Durham, and field als.

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  • Some of the earlier sinkings of this kind, when pumps had to be depended on for keeping down the water, were conducted at great cost, as, for instance, at South Hetton, and more recently Ryhope, near Sunderland, through the magnesian limestone of Durham.

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  • In the first, which is that generally used in Northumberland and Durham, a single line of rails is used, the loaded tubs being drawn " out bye," i.e.

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  • The latter observer found the gases given off tion of gas by coal from the district of Newcastle and Durham evolved by to contain carbonic acid, marsh gas or light carburetted coal.

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  • He was educated at Durham school and University, and in 1890 was called to the bar.

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  • The Scot obeyed, and calling at Durham on his southward journey was present at the foundation of Durham Cathedral.

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  • His SOH, George Friedrich Wilhelm (1832-1900), born on the 31st of December 1832, at Hamburg, was astronomer at the observatory at Durham, England, from 1853 to 1856.

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  • The mission of Lord Durham; the publication of his famous report; the union of the two Canadas; the administrations of Lord Sydenham, Sir Charles Bagot, and Sir Charles Metcalfe, filled the years immediately succeeding 1837 with intense political interest, and in their results have profoundly influenced the constitution of the British Empire.

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  • He studied law in Portsmouth, N.H., and practised at Berwick, Maine, and at Durham, N.H.

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  • From 1789 until his death at Durham, on the 23rd of January 1795, he was United States District Judge for New Hampshire.

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  • The life was largely used by subsequent chroniclers, among others by Florence of Worcester, Simeon of Durham, Roger of Hoveden, and William of Malmesbury.

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  • The palace of the bishops of Durham, which stands at the northeast end of the town, is a spacious and splendid, though irregular pile.

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  • Johnston surrendered to Sherman at Durham Station on the 26th, and soon afterwards all the remaining Confederate soldiers followed their example.

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  • Geoffrey of Monmouth and Simeon of Durham are Alured's chief sources.

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  • He profited largely by the tyranny of Rufus, farming for the king a large proportion of the ecclesiastical preferments which were illegaly kept vacant, and obtaining for himself the wealthy see of Durham (1099).

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  • At Durham he passed the remainder of his life.

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  • He all but completed the cathedral which his predecessor, William of St Carilef, had begun; fortified Durham; built Norham Castle; founded the priory of Mottisfout and endowed the college of Christchurch, Hampshire.

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  • Coming to England with William the Conqueror, he received lands in the north of England from William II., and his son, or grandson, Bernard or Barnard de Baliol, built a fortress in Durham called Castle Barnard, around which the town of Barnard Castle grew.

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  • The main road from Durham to Sunderland here passes through a remarkable cutting in the limestone 80 ft.

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  • The plan of 1821 to use the Literary Fund for founding and maintaining a state college for instruction in the higher branches of science and literature was abandoned in 1828 and the only state institutions of learning are the Plymouth Normal School (1870) at Plymouth, the Keene Normal School (1909) at Keene, and the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, organized as a department of Dartmouth College in 1866, but removed to Durham, Strafford county, as a separate institution in 1891.

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  • He cannot take a degree in divinity at Oxford, Cambridge or Durham (Universities Tests Act 1871), and so is debarred from holding any professorship of divinity in those universities.

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  • And in 1899 this practice received the sanction of Dr Westcott, then bishop of Durham.

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  • We may also call attention to the greatly lengthened choir, commenced by Abbot John of York, 1203-1211, and carried on by his successor, terminating, like Durham Cathedral, in an eastern transept, the work of Abbot John of Kent, 1220-1247, and to the tower (D), added not long before the dissolution by Abbot Huby, 1494-1526, in a very unusual position at the northern end of the north transept.

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  • Happening, as these revolts did, just at the time of Queen Victoria's accession, they attracted wide attention, and in 1838 the earl of Durham was sent to govern Canada and report on the affairs of British North America.

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  • To carry out Lord Durham's policy the British government passed in 1840 an Act of Union joining Upper and Lower Canada, and sent out as governor Charles Poulett Thompson, who was made Baron Sydenham and Toronto.

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  • He then lived as tutor in the family of Lord Stourton, but in October 1794 he settled along with seven other former members of the old Douai college at Crook Hall near Durham, where on the completion of his theological course he became vicepresident of the reorganized seminary.

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  • In 1808 he accompanied the community of Crook Hall to the new college at Ushaw, Durham, but in 1811, after declining the presidency of the college at Maynooth, he withdrew to the secluded mission at Hornby in Lancashire, where for the rest of his life he devoted himself to literary pursuits.

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  • The departure of Lightfoot to the see of Durham in 1879 was a great blow to Westcott.

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  • In March 1890 he was nominated to the see of Durham, there to follow in the steps of his beloved friend Lightfoot, who had died in December 1889.

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  • He was consecrated on the 1st of May at Westminster Abbey by Archbishop Thompson (of York), Hort being the preacher, and enthroned at Durham cathedral on the 15th of May.

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  • He surprised the world, which had supposed him to be a recluse and a mystic, by the practical interest he took in the mining population of Durham and in the great shipping and artisan industries of Sunderland and Gateshead.

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  • Upon one famous occasion in 1892 he succeeded in bringing to a peaceful solution a long and bitter strike which had divided the masters and men in the Durham collieries; and his success was due to the confidence which he inspired by the extraordinary moral energy of his strangely "prophetic" personality, at once thoughtful, vehement and affectionate.

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  • He preached a farewell sermon to the miners in Durham cathedral at their annual festival on the 29th of July.

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  • There are no traces of the fortified palace of the bishops of Durham, of the White Friars' monastery founded in 13J4, or of the Austin priory founded in 1341.

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  • Soon after his accession William Rufus gave it to the bishop of Durham, whose successors continued to hold it until it was taken over by the ecclesiastical commissioners in 1865.

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  • The first account of the borough and its privileges is contained in an inquisition taken in 1333 after the death of Anthony, bishop of Durham, which shows that the burgesses held the town with the markets and fairs at a fee-farm rent of 40 marks yearly, and that they had two reeves who sat in court with the bishop's bailiff to hear the disputes of the townspeople.

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  • Before 1226 Adam received the benefice of Wearmouth from his uncle, Richard Marsh, bishop of Durham; but between that year and 1230 he entered the Franciscan order.

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  • Since then (1904) Miss Florence Durham has shown that if the skins of young or embryonic mammals (rats, rabbits and guinea-pigs) be ground up and extracted in water, and the expressed juice be then incubated with solid tyrosin for twentyfour hours, with the addition of a very small amount of ferrous sulphate to act as an activator, a pigmentary substance is thrown down.

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  • Miss Durham interprets her results as indicating that the skin of these pigmented animals normally secretes one or more tyrosinases.

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  • Miss Durham's work suggests that they carry the latter.

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  • Durham, "Tyrosinases in the Skins of Pigmented Vertebrates," Proc. Roy.

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  • Most of the British iron works lie in and near the important coal-fields in Scotland between the mouth of the Clyde and the Forth, in Cleveland and Durham, in Cumberland and Lancashire, in south Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire, in Staffordshire and Northamptonshire, and in south Wales in spite of its lack of ore.

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  • The most important group is that of Cleveland and Durham, which makes about one-third of all the British pig iron.

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  • It has the great Cleveland ore bed and the excellent Durham coal near tidewater at Middlesbrough.

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  • Not long after the bishop and monks of Lindisfarne had settled at Durham in 995, Styr the son of Ulf gave them the vill of Darlington (Dearthington, Darnington), which by 1083 had grown into importance, probably owing to its situation on the road from Watling Street to the mouth of the Tees.

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  • Bishop William of St Carileph in that year changed the church to a collegiate church, and placed there certain canons whom he removed from Durham.

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  • Bishop Hugh de Puiset rebuilt the church and built a manor house which was for many years the occasional residence of the bishops of Durham.

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  • As part of the palatinate of Durham, Darlington sent no members to parliament until 1862, when it was allowed to return one member.

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  • According to Leland, Darlington was in his time the best market town in the bishopric with the exception of Durham.

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  • The animals are small, but Durham and Hereford bulls have been introduced from Argentina to improve the breed.

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  • The Confraternity Book of Durham is extant and embraces some 20,000 names in the course of eight centuries.

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  • The manuscript, which belonged to General Calderwood Durham, was presented to the British Museum.

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  • He was educated at Durham grammar school and at Merton College, Oxford, where he was elected to a postmastership in 1862.

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  • He wrote Brevis Annotatio, a short history of the church of Hexham from 674 to 1138, for which he borrowed from Bede, Eddius and Simeon of Durham.

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  • Richard was sent to Oxford at the expense of Thomas de Neville, afterwards archdeacon of Durham.

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  • Thus forcibly reminded of the existence of Canada, the British government sent out Lord Durham to investigate, and as a result of his report the two Canadas were in 1841 united in a legislative union.

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  • At Durham Cathedral, until the 16th century, every charity-boy had a monk to wash his feet.

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  • At the general election in 1841 Cobden was returned for Stockport, and in 1843 Bright was the Free Trade candidate at a by-election at Durham.

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  • He took his seat in the House of Commons as one of the members for Durham on 28th July 1843, and on 7th August delivered his maiden speech in support of a motion by Mr Ewart for reduction of import duties.

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  • He was there, he said, "not only as one of the representatives of the city of Durham, but also as one of the representatives of that benevolent organization, the Anti-Corn Law League."

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  • At a meeting of county members earlier in the day Peel had advised them not to be led into discussion by a violent speech from the member for Durham, but to let the committee be granted without debate.

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  • The borough probably obtained its charter during the following century, for Hugh de Puiset, bishop of Durham (1153-1195), confirmed to his burgesses similar rights to those of the burgesses of Newcastle, freedom of toll within the palatinate and other privileges.

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  • At another inquisition held in 1336 the men of Gateshead claimed liberty of trading and fishing along the coast of Durham, and freedom to sell their fish where they would.

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  • In 1552, on the temporary extinction of the diocese of Durham, Gateshead was attached to Newcastle, but in 1554 was regranted to Bishop Tunstall.

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  • As part of the palatinate of Durham, Gateshead was not represented in parliament until 1832.

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  • In 1805 he received the living of Stainton-le-Street, Durham, and in addition was appointed to Bishop Middleham, Durham, in the succeeding year.

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  • For twenty years he was chaplain to Shute Barrington, bishop of Durham.

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  • He was appoined vicar of Gateshead in 1808, prebendary of Durham in 1809, and vicar of St Margaret, Durham, in 1810.

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  • After holding the rich living of Stanhope, Durham from 1820, and the deanery of Chester from 1828, he was consecrated bishop of Exeter in 1831, holding with the see a residentiary canonry at Durham.

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  • Within the walls of this monastery the Venerable Bede spent his life from childhood; and his body was at first buried within the church, whither, until it was removed under Edward the Confessor to Durham, it attracted many pilgrims. The town is wholly industrial, devoted to ship-building, chemical works, paper mills and the neighbouring collieries.

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  • The name - which Bede (730) wrote Mailros and Simeon of Durham (1130) Melros - is derived from the Celtic maol ros, " bare moor," and the town figures in Sir Walter Scott's Abbot and Monastery as "Kennaquhair."

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  • Much salt is obtained from north Lancashire, as also from the brine pits of Staffordshire, Worcestershire, Yorkshire, Durham and the Isle of Man (Point of Ayre).

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  • Durham is regarded by some authorities as Permian, but that near Carrickfergus ir.

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  • The English domain comprised, roughly speaking, the modern counties of Selkirkshire, Peeblesshire, Berwickshire, Roxburghshire and most of the Lothians, while south of Tweed it contained Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire to the Humber.

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  • William the Conqueror's earl of Northumberland, Robert de Comines, was slain at Durham in 1069, and the houses of Gospatric (earls of Dunbar and March) and of de Comines (the Comyns of Badenoch) were long puissant in Scottish history.

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  • The towns of Northumberland and Cumberland opened their gates, but he and Stephen met in conference at Durham, and David's son Henry, prince of Scotland, received the Honour of Huntingdon, Carlisle, Doncaster " and all that pertains to them " (1135).

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  • For two years the north of England, as far south as Durham and Chester, was the prey of the Scots, and some English counties secured themselves by paying an indemnity.

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  • Near Durham he came into touch with English levies under Henry Percy and the archbishop of York.

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  • The bishop of Durham accuses them of plundering both sides.

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  • Of the prisoners an unknown number died of hunger in Durham cathedral, others were sold to slavery in the colonies.

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  • The house of Tarrant was founded by Ralph de Kahaines, and greatly enriched about 1230 by Richard Poor, bishop successively of Chichester, Salisbury and Durham, who was born at Tarrant and died there in 1237.

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  • Simeon of Durham states that a division of the kingdom was now made, whereby Edmund took England south of Watling Street and Anlaf the rest.

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  • The town was founded by the convent of Durham about the middle of the 13th century, but on account of the complaints of the burgesses of Newcastle an order was made in 1258, stipulating that no ships should be laden or unladen at Shields, and that no "shoars" or quays should be built there.

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  • He was elected a fellow of Eton in 1817, and in 1818 the college presented him to the living of Maple Durham, Oxfordshire.

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  • After holding a prebendaryship of Durham for some years, he was consecrated bishop of Chester in 1828.

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  • On his father's death in 1805 he was brought to Waterford, and in 1810 he was sent to Ushaw College, near Durham, where he was educated until the age of sixteen, when he proceeded to the English College in Rome, reopened in 1818 after having been closed by the Revolution for twenty years.

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  • Meanwhile in 1494 Fox had been translated to Durham, not merely because it was a richer see than Bath and Wells but because of its political importance as a palatine earldom and its position with regard to the Borders and relations with Scotland.

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  • Fox replied with some warmth, and Wolsey had to wait until Fox's death before he could add Winchester to his archbishopric of York and his abbey of St Albans, and thus leave Durham vacant as he hoped for the illegitimate son on whom (aged 18) he had already conferred a deanery, four archdeaconries, five prebends and a chancellorship.

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  • He was soon in the service of Ranulf Flambard, bishop of Durham; then, having entered the order of St Augustine, he became prior of the Augustinian foundation at St Osyth in Essex.

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  • In 1782 he was translated to Salisbury and in 1791 to Durham.

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  • Soon after his return to England he became involved in a quarrel with Richard de Hoton, prior of Durham.

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  • After his liberation Lockhart became a secret agent of the Pretender; but his correspondence with the prince fell into the hands of the government in 1727, compelling him to go into concealment at Durham until he was able to escape abroad.

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  • Durham, killed under the reign of Hisham for heretical opinions, had followers in Mesopotamia, and that, when Merwan became caliph, the Khorasanians called him a Ja`d, pretending that all'Ja`d had been his teacher.

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  • Of these the northwesterly portion, which had Carlisle for its head, was not conquered till some years after the survey was made; but the omission of Northumberland and Durham has not been satisfactorily explained.

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  • Though intended for the Church, his studies and tastes inclined him to astronomy, and with a view to gaining experience in the routine of an observatory he accepted the post of observer in the university of Durham.

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  • Sea-going vessels can navigate up to Blaydon, and collieries and large manufacturing towns line the banks - Newburn, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Wallsend and North Shields on the Northumberland side; Gateshead, Jarrow and South Shields on the Durham side, with many lesser centres, forming continuous lines of factories and shipbuilding yards.

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  • Adjacent to the city and also in the township are East Durham and West Durham (both unincorporated), which industrially are virtually part of the city.

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  • Durham is served by the Southern, the Seaboard Air Line, the Norfolk & Western, and the Durham & Southern railways, the last a short line at Apex and Dunn, N.C., connecting respectively with the main line of the Seaboard and the Atlantic Coast Line railways.

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  • Durham is nearly surrounded by hills.

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  • In 1852 the college was empowered to grant degrees; in 1856 it became the property of the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; in 1859 it received its present name; and in 1892 it was removed to a park near Durham, included in 1901 in the corporate limits of the city.

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  • The college has received many gifts from the Duke family of Durham.

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  • Although not officially connected with the college, the South Atlantic Quarterly, founded by a patriotic society of the college and published at Durham since 1902, is controlled and edited by members of the college faculty.

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  • Durham's chief economic interest is in the manufacture of granulated smoking tobacco, for which it became noted after the Civil War.

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  • Durham has a large trade with the surrounding region.

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  • The town of Durham was incorporated in 1869, and became the county-seat of the newly-erected county in 1881, and in 1899 was chartered as a city.

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  • But for his services in defence of the faith the bishop of London gave him a stall in St Paul's; the bishop of Lincoln made him subdean of that cathedral, and the bishop of Durham conferred upon him the rectory of Bishopwearmouth.

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  • In this he endeavoured, as he says in the dedication to the bishop of Durham, to repair in the study his deficiencies in the church.

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  • It was borne by one of the 'early settlers in Iceland, and a monk named Biuulf is commemorated in the Liber Vitae of the church of Durham.

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  • When Richard left England (Dec. 1189), he put the tower of London in his hands and chose him to share with Hugh de Puiset, the great bishop of Durham, the office of chief justiciar.

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  • During that time the church was the repository of the shrine of St Cuthbert, which was then removed to Durham.

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  • According to Simeon of Durham it extended from the Humber to the Tyne, but the land was waste north of the Tees.

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  • Thus it appears that of the coal raised in England the county of Durham contributes about 22%, Yorkshire 17%, Lancashire 16%, Stafford and Derbyshire each about 9%, and Northumberland 7%; while of the coal raised in Wales 85% is contributed by the county of Glamorgan; and that the coal production of England and Wales together constitutes, in quantity and value, 85% of the whole production of the United Kingdom.

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  • The most productive counties are Flint, Durham and Derby; the ore obtained in the Isle of Man is increased in value by the silver it contains.

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  • Their territory thus included most of Yorkshire, the whole of Lancashire, Durham, Westmorland, Cumberland and part of Northumberland.

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  • He was still secretary when the Canadian rebellion broke out in 1837; his wavering and feeble policy was fiercely attacked in parliament; he became involved in disputes with the earl of Durham, and the movement for his supercession found supporters even among his colleagues in the cabinet.

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  • Furah Bay College is affiliated to Durham University.

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  • The use of " wax lights and tapers " formed one of the indictments brought by P. Smart, a Puritan prebendary of Durham, against Dr Burgoyne, Cosin and others for setting up " superstitious ceremonies " in the cathedral " contrary to the Act of Uniformity."

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  • But he made a close friend in one of the resident fellows, Edward Talbot, son of William Talbot, then bishop of Oxford, and afterwards of Salisbury and Durham.

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  • In 1721 he had been given a prebend at Salisbury by Bishop Talbot, who on his translation to Durham gave Butler the living of Houghton-le-Skerne in that county, and in 1725 presented him to the wealthy rectory of Stanhope.

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  • The story has not the best authority, and though the desponding tone of some of Butler's writings may give it colour, it is not in harmony with the rest of his life, for in 1750 he accepted the see of Durham, vacant by the death of Edward Chandler.

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  • At Durham he was very charitable, and expended large sums in building and decorating his church and residence.

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  • In his view not only the religious life of the nation, but (what he regarded as synonymous) the church itself, was in an almost hopeless state of decay, as we see from his first and only charge to the diocese of Durham and from many passages in the Analogy.

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  • Here in 1640 the Scottish Covenanters planted guns to protect them while fording the river, after which they defeated the English on the Durham side at Stellaheugh, and subsequently occupied Newcastle.

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  • The head of this family in the beginning of the 18th century was a divine of some mark, William Talbot, who died bishop of Durham in 1730.

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  • As regards the mode of action of agglutinins, Gruber and Durham considered that it consists in a change in the envelopes of the bacteria, by which they swell up and become adhesive.

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  • Doubts having been raised whether a bishop of the Church of England, being a lord of parliament, could resign his seat in the Upper House, although several precedents to that effect are on record, a statute of the realm, which was confined to the case of the bishops of London and Durham, was passed in 1856, declaring that on the resignation of their sees being accepted by their respective metropolitans, those bishops should cease to sit as lords of parliament, and their sees should be filled up in the manner provided by law in the case of the avoidance of a bishopric. In 1869 the Bishops' Resignation Act was passed.

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  • In view of the necessity for increasing the episcopate in the 19th century and the objection to the consequent increase of the spiritual peers in the Upper House, it was finally enacted by the Bishoprics Act of 1878 that only the archbishops and the bishops of London, Winchester and Durham should be always entitled to writs summoning them to the House of Lords.

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  • Under this act the coadjutor bishop has the right of succession to the see, or in the case of the archiepiscopal sees and those of London, Winchester and Durham, to the see vacated by the bishop, translated from another diocese to fill the vacancy.

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  • He became prebendary of Gloucester in 1753, chaplain to the king in 1754, prebendary of Durham in 1755, dean of Bristol in 1757, and in 1 759 bishop of Gloucester.

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  • It includes the whole of Northumberland and Durham, the West Riding of Yorkshire, most of Lancashire and Derbyshire, the north of Staffordshire and the west of Nottinghamshire.

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  • The most striking of these dykes is the Great Whin Sill, which crosses the country from a short distance south of Durham almost to the source of the Tees, near Crossfell.

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  • On the north-east the great coal-field of Northumberland and Durham, traversed midway by the Tyne, supports the manufactures of Newcastle and its satellite towns, and leaves a great surplus for export from the Tyne ports.

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  • Essex and Suffolk, Suffolk and Norfolk, Cornwall and Devon, Durham and Yorkshire, Lancashire and Cheshire, are all separated by rivers, while rivers form some part of the boundaries of almost every county.

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  • The other most extensive centres of dense population are the coal-mining or manufacturing districts of Northumberland and Durham, of the midlands (parts of Warwickshire, Worcestershire and Leicestershire), and of South Wales and Monmouthshire; and it is in these districts, and others smaller, but of similar character, that the greatest increase of population has been recorded, since the extensive development of 'As in Bartholomew's Survey Atlas of England and Wales (1903).

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  • It is lowest, naturally, in the mining districts, as Glamorgan, Monmouth, Durham, Northumberland; but an exception may be noted in the case of Cornwall, where a high proportion of females is attributed to the emigration of miners consequent upon the relative decrease in importance of the tin-mines.

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  • Those with the smallest proportional cultivated area are Westmorland, Middlesex, Northumberland, Surrey, Cumberland, the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire, Lancashire, Durham and Cornwall.

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  • The railways having the heaviest coal traffic are the North-Eastern, which monopolizes the traffic of Northumberland and Durham; the Midland, commanding the Derbyshire, Yorkshire and East Midland traffic, and some of the Welsh; the London & North Western, whose principal sources are the Lancashire, Staffordshire 1 The figure 17.76 is the percentage for the whole of Yorkshire.

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  • For the production of lead the principal counties are Derbyshire, Durham and Stanhope, but the industry is not extensive, and is confined to a few places in each county.

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  • For limestone the principal localities are in Durham, Derbyshire and Yorkshire, while for chalk-quarrying Kent is pre-eminent among a group of southeastern counties, including Hampshire, Sussex and Surrey, with Essex.

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  • In Worcestershire, Durham and Yorkshire salt is also produced from brine.

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  • The metal-working industries also follow a geographical distribution, mainly governed by the incidence of the coal-fields, as well as by that of the chief districts for the production of - iron-ore already indicated, such as the Cleveland and Durham and the Furness districts.

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  • In1833-1834he was professor of divinity at Durham, a post which ill-health forced him to resign.

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  • Returning to England towards the close of Queen Mary's reign, he was invested by his mother's uncle, Tunstall, bishop of Durham, with the archdeaconry of Durham, to which the rectory of Easington was annexed.

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  • It is largely endowed, and possesses exhibitions tenable at Oxford, Cambridge and Durham universities.

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  • Barnard Castle was then seized by Anthony, bishop of Durham, as being within his palatinate of Durham.

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  • Cumberland and Durham, but its chief value is for crossing, when it is found to promote maturity and to improve the fattening propensity.

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  • His chosen instrument, a clerical lawyer named Ranuif Flambard (q.v.), whom he presently made bishop of Durham, was shameless in his methods of twisting feudal or national law to the detriment of the taxpayer.

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  • The earldom of Northumberland, with palatine rights, was bought by Hugh Puiset, bishop of Durham.

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  • In a short time the Invasion, whole of Northumberland and Durham were in the hands of the invaders.

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  • In all these matters the House showed little enough of the revolutionary temper; so little, indeed, that in March Lord Durham resigned.

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  • The rising was easily put down; but the condition of the colony was so grave that the ministry decided to suspend the constitution of lower Canada for three years, and to send out Lord Durham with almost dictatorial powers.

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  • A generation of copious chroniclers was, moreover, springing up, and among them were Florence of Worcester, Henry of Huntingdon, Simeon of Durham and William of Malmesbury.

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  • He was public orator in 1569, president of St John's College, Oxford, in 1572, dean of Christ Church in 1576, vice-chancellor of the university in 1579, dean of Durham in 1583, bishop of Durham in 1595, and archbishop of York in 1606.

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  • In 1611 she was placed in charge of the bishop of Durham.

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  • In Durham annals he is honourably remembered as the prelate who designed the existing cathedral, and also for his reform of ecclesiastical discipline.

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  • On taking orders he was appointed secretary to Bishop Overall of Lichfield, and then domestic chaplain to Bishop Neile of Durham.

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  • In December 1624 he was made a prebendary of Durham, and in the following year archdeacon of the East Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • At the Restoration he returned to England, was reinstated in the mastership, restored to all his benefices, and in a few months raised to the see of Durham (December 1660).

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  • From this same solitary outpost went forth the illustrious Aidan to plant another Iona at Lindisfarne, which, " long after the poor parent brotherhood had fallen to decay, expanded itself into the bishopric of Durham."

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  • The statute was not to extend to the counties of Westmorland, Cumberland, Northumberland or the bishopric of Durham.

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  • That dubious accolade goes to the nearby city of Durham.

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  • A dubious accolade goes to the nearby city of Durham.

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  • The building will extend the College's postgraduate provision, providing the most central catered en-suite accommodation in Durham City.

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  • As a gift King Canute returned some of the land that had been taken from the Bishops of Durham by his viking ancestors.

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  • A colonel of the Royal Army, he was both knighted and made baronet on the same day at Durham in 1642.

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  • At the time he was described as the richest commoner in England having made his fortune from Soldiering and Coal mining in Durham.

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  • Plans are well advanced for the annual conference, which is to be held in 2001 in Durham.

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  • She contested the constituency of North West Durham in the 1992 General Election and Barking in a 1994 by-election.

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  • The contract team is lead by Robin Widdison from Durham, an experienced first generation courseware developer.

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  • Durham City Center is to going to go food crazy on Saturday 8th October.

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  • The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 62.

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  • The living is a donative curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 93, in the patronage of Sir M. W. Ridley.

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  • Stephen Garland is a sport and exercise physiologist at Durham University and an international decathlete.

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  • A LOCAL BEAUTY SPOT WITH 75,000 VISITORS EACH YEAR The coastal denes of Durham are an important wildlife habitat.

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  • He was taken away to Durham Jail pending deportation.

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  • Houghton Le Spring Houghton le Spring sits at the foot of the magnesium limestone escarpment northeast of Durham.

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  • An excellent example is at Rey Cross near Bowes in County Durham.

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  • Centers are currently in Derby, Durham, Watford, Hertford, North West London and Oxford and are looking for suitable franchisees elsewhere.

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  • Having gained a degree in geology at Durham in 1958, Walter Holmes moved to Imperial College, London to study geophysics.

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  • Long associations with the old city guilds which were the regulatory bodies for various trades in Durham.

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  • He was in the Durham light infantry in the Great War.

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  • By rail intercity trains from most major centers in the country call at Durham daily including 14 trains from London.

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  • Juniper scrub in the Durham area What is the state of juniper scrub in the Durham area What is the state of juniper scrub in the Durham area?

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  • A fortnight after the murder a professor of medical jurisprudence at Durham University examined the prisoner's clothing.

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  • Stolen from boarding kennels in Durham during the night.

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  • On The North Door of Durham Cathedral is a bronze door knocker shaped like a lion's head.

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  • Aykley Heads House, Durham Aykley Heads is a rambling courtyard mansion of medieval origins on the edge of the City of Durham.

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  • The Durham also has a polyurethane midsole to suit heavier runners, which is bolstered with rear- and forefoot Air cushioning units.

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  • They are constructing a minster of wood called the White Church for St Cuthbert's remains at Durham.

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  • It became a College in 1919 (the second at Durham) and ceased to train ordinands almost 30 years ago.

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  • Flying Express Durham Tees Valley Airport is situated six miles east of Darlington and handles approximately one million passengers a year.

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  • Stanley Green Corridor in Derwentside, County Durham, a neighborhood management pathfinder, has found the results can be dramatic.

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  • Durham won the event, beating Cambridge B in the final, while Trinity beat Cambridge A in the 3rd/4th playoff.

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  • Only Durham is likely to remain outside what effectively amounts to an extortion racket by the end of the year.

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  • The Prince Bishops continued to be major investors in and exploiters of County Durham's coal reserves.

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  • Durham, however, has already introduced a small scheme.

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  • We believe it is now at Ushaw [Ushaw College, a catholic seminary at Durham] .

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  • Maybe those who manage Durham bus station could offer some advice for they seem to be handling a similar situation quite well.

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  • In addition Durham teaches subjects in an interdisciplinary way, to imitate real life situations.

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  • The material you would be using is cadmium zinc telluride CZT which is being manufactured at Durham University.

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  • How much do we know about the common toad in the Durham area?

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  • It was a bit like Durham Miners Gala with a bizarre twist.

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  • She has volunteered at numerous events including being the volunteer co-ordinator at Durham Sport Youth Games 2003.

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  • In their second innings, Durham lost all ten wickets within the space of just 58 minutes.

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  • He helped to arrange the marriage between Henry's son, Arthur, and Catherine of Aragon; he went to Scotland with Richard Foxe, then bishop of Durham, in 1497; and he was partly responsible for several commercial and other treaties with Flanders, Burgundy and the German king, Maximilian I.

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  • In 1867 he was elected member for West Durham in the Dominion parliament, and for South Bruce in the provincial legislature, in which he became leader of the Liberal opposition two years later.

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  • The lower vibration number is justified by due consideration of the three divisions of the male voice, bass, tenor and alto, as given by Praetorius, whose Cammerton very closely corresponds with Bernhardt Schmidt's Durham organ, 1663-1668, the original pitch of which has been proved by Professor Armes to have been a 1 474.1.

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  • What happened at Durham was that at some subsequent date the pipes were shifted up a semitone to bring the organ into conformity with this lower pitch, with which it is probable Schmidt's organs in St Paul's and the Temple, and also Trinity College, Cambridge, agreed.

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  • The Durham Report, the charter of constitutional government in the colonies, though drawn up by Charles Buller, embodied the ideas of Wakefield, and the latter was the means of its being given prematurely to the public through The Times, to prevent its being tampered with by the government.

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  • These, however, were ere long rivalled and afterwards superseded by the Shorthorn or Durham breed, which the brothers Charles and Robert Coiling obtained from the useful race of cattle that had long existed in the valley of the Tees, by applying to them the principle of breeding which Bakewell had already established.

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  • But the traditional account is that the books were sent to the Durham Benedictines at Oxford, and that on the dissolution of the foundation by Henry VIII.

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  • The buildings of a Benedictine abbey were uniformly arranged after one lan modified where Y g P necessary (as at Durham and Worcester, where the monasteries, stand close to the steep bank of a river) to accommodate the arrangement to local circumstances.

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  • The English right wing first appeared, tried the morass in vain, and then set out to turn it by a long detour; the main battle under the king halted in front of it, while the left wing under Antony Bec, bishop of Durham, was able to reach the head of the marsh without much delay.

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  • Traditional quilting had been successfully used to the same ends in County Durham.

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  • The Prince Bishops continued to be major investors in and exploiters of County Durham 's coal reserves.

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  • Haugh is the first element of the name and means riverside meadow and is a common feature of Northumberland and Durham place names.

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  • The area was developed as a seaport for the export of Durham coal.

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  • We believe it is now at Ushaw [Ushaw College, a Catholic seminary at Durham ].

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  • The lowest times for me in Durham were the clashes of cultures when it came to socializing with members of other cultures.

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  • Sociology graduates from Durham University have a good record of employability.

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  • He has since acted as a Business Angel to a spinout venture from the University of Durham ' s Physics Department.

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  • She trained for the stipendiary ministry at Cranmer Hall, Durham.

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  • How much do we know about the Common Toad in the Durham area?

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  • Aged 27, he trained for the priesthood at St Cuthbert 's College Durham.

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  • He was educated at the universities of Cambridge and Brussels - and is a Visiting Fellow at the Imperial and Durham Business Schools.

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  • Only Durham, whose chief constable is a vociferous critic will stay out.

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  • Located in the Piedmont area of North Carolina, the Burlington Outlet Village is within reasonable driving distance from the state's major cities like Greensboro, Raleigh, Durham and Winston-Salem.

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  • Raleigh, and the surrounding areas of Durham and Chapel Hill (known as "The Triangle" to locals), is home to many international pharmaceutical companies, in its famous Research Triangle Park.

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  • The couple first got together when filming the 1988 film Bull Durham and have been together ever since.

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  • Following that she played a woman with a knack for seducing baseball players in Bull Durham (thus began her run of playing sultry older women).

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  • Duke University in Durham and Charlotte, North Carolina, offers two versions of a paralegal certification program, a classroom-based version and an online global program.

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  • Durham's Bee Farm sells both bee pollen capsules and bee pollen granules.

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  • The Piedmont is home to major cities Raleigh, Durham, Greensboro, and Fayetteville.

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  • Yet CNN Money lists college towns like Durham, North Carolina and Hanover, New Hampshire as some of the best cities to retire.

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  • Durham, North Carolina offers a nice blend for retirees with numerous retirement communities and over-55 housing locations, as well as a college campus with many courses open to seniors.

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  • Durham the Donkey, Hooten Owl, and Kaylee Koala are just a few of the vast collection of animals representing all different parts of nature around the world in this ever-growing line.

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  • Old Durham Road features several styles of Victorian nightwear.

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  • Olympic gold medalist Crystal Cox, 29, of Durham, North Carolina is still in top form, and should be an obvious threat to competitors in lesser shape.

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  • It wasn't until King was 11 years old that he moved back to Durham, Maine with his mother and his grandparents.

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