How to use Dung in a sentence

dung
  • Maintain the heat in hotbeds and pits by means of fresh dung linings.

    22
    10
  • It has long been known that when organic materials such as the dung and urine of animals, or even the bodies of animals and plants, are applied to the soil, the nitrogen within them becomes oxidized, and ultimately appears in the form of nitrate of lime, potash or some other base.

    5
    3
  • Myxococcus digelatus,bright red fructification occurring on dung (X 120).

    2
    0
  • Many bacteria are known which are capable of denitrification, some of them being abundant in fresh dung and upon old straw.

    3
    2
  • Sometimes various lichens occur abnormally in such unexpected habitats as dried dung of sheep, bleached bones of reindeer and whales, old leather, iron and glass, in districts where the species are abundant.

    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • The further suggestion has been made that zebul itself in the sense of "dung" is a term for a heathen deity, cf.

    1
    0
  • Tracks of forest buffalo have also been seen once (and dung too ).

    1
    0
  • In the wild, tortoises are opportunistic feeders and they will on occasion tackle carrion and dung.

    1
    0
  • Most of it is finely comminuted and resembles sheep/goat dung.

    1
    0
  • You may find yourself gathering camel dung to put on the fire.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Toward evening of the third day we even found fairly fresh dung.

    1
    0
  • The floors, mostly of mud covered with dung, are fouled with spittle, vomit, and urine, and, being seldom or never cleaned out, foster a gradual accumulation of poison, to which infected rats and the concealment of illness contribute.

    0
    0
  • As a god of agriculture, especially connected with manuring the soil, he is called the son of Stercutus (from stercus, dung, a name of Saturn).

    0
    0
  • Provision is also made for enforcing the removal of accumulations of manure, dung, soil or filth from any premises in an urban district, and for the periodical removal of manure or other refuse from mews, stables or other premises.

    0
    0
  • Cattle dung is no longer stored in the home, but is fed directly to the biogas digester along with toilet waste.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the middle is a stove where they burn the yak dung.

    0
    0
  • A carefully constructed mound of dried dung provides fuel that would also once have come at the expense of local trees.

    0
    0
  • Players then have to spread the dung on their plants to see how much food they can produce for the village.

    0
    0
  • The cows were facing the wall and a large gutter served to collect both cow dung and bedding straw.

    0
    0
  • The cow dung attracts insects which provide a food source for the bats.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The largest party seen in 2003 was of 13 feeding among cattle dung on 4 October.

    0
    0
  • These pellets have been soaked in real lion dung - cats are terrified of lions.

    0
    0
  • Tomorrow I'm having a trailer full of horse dung delivered from a local farm.

    0
    0
  • But the African dung beetle seems to have even more remarkable skills.

    0
    0
  • My Annual Predictions based on the chi at dung gee, as written out above, follow shortly.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This means both the heap of dung and the coarse grasses that grow from that heap of dung and the coarse grasses that grow from that heap.

    0
    0
  • The word started life meaning dung heap, then later refuse or rubbish heap.

    0
    0
  • It should then be thrown together in ridges and frequently turned, so as to be kept in an incipient state of fermentation, a little dryish friable loam being mixed with it to retain the ammonia given off by the dung.

    0
    1
  • From the Valley Gate the wall took an easterly course for a distance of woo cubits to the Dung Gate, near which on the east was the Fountain Gate, not far from the lower pool of Siloam.

    2
    2
  • Some of the scavengers, like the burying beetles, inter the bodies of small vertebrates to supply food for themselves and their larvae, or, like the "sacred" beetle of Egypt, collect for the same purpose stores of dung.

    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • The chief and almost the only use of dung, he thinks, is to divide the earth, to dissolve " this terrestrial matter, which affords nutriment to the mouths of vegetable roots "; and this can be done more completely by tillage.

    3
    4
  • The phosphatic deposit has doubtless been produced by the long-continued action of a thick bed of sea-fowl dung, which converted the carbonate of the underlying limestone into phosphate.

    2
    2
  • The cultivation of vines in pots is very commonly practised with good results, and pot-vines are very useful to force for the earliest crop. The plants should be raised from eyes, and grown as strong as possible in the way already noted, in rich turfy loam mixed with about one-third of horse dung and a little bone dust.

    2
    2
  • Lime also assists in the decomposition of the organic matter or humus in the soil and promotes nitrification; hence it is of great value after green manuring or where the land contains much humus from the addition of bulky manures such as farm-yard dung.

    0
    1
  • The dried dung of the llama (taquia) is generally used as fuel, as in pre-Spanish times, for roasting ores, as also a species of grass called ichu (Stipa incana), and a singular woody fungus, called yareta (Azorella umbellifera), found growing on the rocks at elevations exceeding 12,000 ft.

    1
    2
    Advertisement
  • Of clay and earthenware there were many varieties of domestic dishes, cups and pipkins, and crucibles or melting pots made of clay and horse dung and still retaining the drossy coating of the melted bronze.

    1
    1
  • The dung of black cattle, horses, sheep, goats, &c., which contains sal ammoniac ready formed, is collected during the first four months of the year, when the animals feed on the spring grass, a kind of clover.

    1
    1
  • Nauseous flowers, dull and yellowish and dark purple in colour and often spotted, with a smell attractive to carrion flies and dung flies, e.g.

    1
    1
  • When the heat of the original bed subsides, linings of fermenting dung must be added, and these must be kept active by occasional turnings and the addition of fresh material as often as required.

    1
    1
  • When heat is required, it is sometimes supplied by means of fermenting dung, or dung and leaves, or tanner's bark, but it is much more economically provided by hot-water pipes.

    1
    1
    Advertisement
  • Plant houses were formerly heated in a variety of ways - by fermenting organic matter, such as dung, by smoke flues, by steam and by hot water circulating in iron pipes.

    1
    1
  • A single crock may be used in some cases, and in others no crock at all, but a handful of half-decayed leaves or half-decayed dung thrown into the bottom of the pot.

    1
    1
  • Shallow planting, whether of wall trees or standards, is generally to be preferred, a covering of a few inches of soil being sufficient for the roots, but a surface of at least equal size to, the surface of the hole should be covered with dung or litter so as to restrain evaporation and preserve moisture.

    1
    1
  • Force asparagus, rhubarb and sea-kale, in the mushroomhouse, in pits, or in the open border under boxes or cases surrounded and covered by well-fermented stable dung and leaves.

    0
    1
  • Numerous dung beetles were also recovered from the floor deposits.

    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • Scrape / remove dung from channel at least once daily.

    0
    1
  • Seventy fat hogs made in 4 months, 106 large loads of fine dung.

    0
    1
  • The infective oocysts or eggs are passed in the dung and develop quickly in warm situations to become infective oocysts or eggs are passed in the dung and develop quickly in warm situations to become infective.

    0
    1
  • Tapeworm eggs are passed out in the dung and eaten by a microscopic mite which lives on the pasture.

    0
    1
  • Characteristic for cows is their fluid dung, in contrast to the solid dung of other ruminants like sheep or deer.

    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • Occasionally we saw wide swathes of crushed forest where elephants had passed through, leaving giant piles of dung.

    0
    1
  • The dwelling is made from wood, heather, cow dung, mud, stones, straw and binder twine.

    0
    1
  • The next day we briefly searched the road and the nearby wadi, but found only one relatively fresh dung.

    0
    1
  • A suppose its better than the polished " cow dung " we hud before, bit wae nae satellite, lifes no worth livin!

    0
    1
  • The spores on germination make a white felted mat, more or less dense, of mycelium; this, when compacted with dry, half-decomposed dung, is the mushroom spawn of gardeners.

    0
    1
  • The steps in the breaking down of the highly complex nitrogenous proteid compounds contained in the humus of the soil, or applied to the latter by the farmer in the form of dung and organic refuse generally, are many and varied; most frequently the insoluble proteids are changed by various kinds of putrefactive bacteria into soluble proteids (peptones, &c.), these into simpler amido-bodies, and these again sooner or later into compounds of ammonia.

    0
    1
  • The soot from this fuel is carefully collected and sold to the sal ammoniac makers, who work only during the months of March and April, for it is only at that season of the year that the dung is fit for their purpose.

    0
    1
  • It was clear that under the layer of mud and dung lay a rather shabby coat of tawny hair.

    0
    1
  • The ovens provide for warmth and cooking, burning dried cakes of cattle dung mixed with straw, which will smolder for hours.

    0
    1
  • Dung spherulites constitute as much as 60% of the deposit.

    0
    1
  • A suppose its better than the polished " cow dung " we hud before, bit wae nae satellite, lifes no worth livin !

    0
    1
  • In the New England area, for example, the Shakers, a religious sect that flourished in the 1800's and was renowned for their gardening prowess, made hot beds lined with fresh animal dung to generate heat.

    0
    1
  • Included in their meal would be things like the stomach on the prey animal or even its dung.

    0
    1
  • The stable manure is taken into the tortuous passages of these cellars, and the spawn introduced from masses of dry dung where it occurs naturally.

    1
    3
  • In France mushroom-growers do not use the compact blocks or bricks of spawn so familiar in England, but much smaller flakes or "leaves" of dry dung in which the spawn or mycelium can be seen to exist.

    1
    3
  • The common mushroom (Agaricus campestris) is propagated by spores, the fine black dust seen to be thrown off when a mature specimen is laid on white paper or a white dish; these give rise to what is known as the "spawn" or mycelium, which consists of whitish threads permeating dried dung or similar substances, and which, when planted in a proper medium, runs through the mass, and eventually develops the fructification known as the mushroom.

    1
    3
  • With this or a mixture of horse-dung, loam, old mushroom-bed dung, and half-decayed leaves, the beds are built up in successive layers of about 3 in.

    1
    3
  • The beds made partly of old mushroom-bed dung often contain sufficient spawn to yield a crop, without the introduction of brick or cake spawn, but it is advisable to spawn them in the regular way.

    1
    3
  • The female beetle in spring-time collects dung, which she forms into a ball by continuous rolling, sometimes assisted by a companion.

    1
    3
  • Here again both capital and labour are short, and the cultivation of the soil suffers from the fact that, owing to the absence of timber, dry dung is used for fuel instead of being employed as manure.

    1
    3
  • Other genera of South American ants - A pterostigma and Cyphomyrmex - make similar fungal cultivations, but they use wood, grain or dung as the substratum instead of leaf fragments.

    1
    3
  • London street and stable dung was carried to a distance by water, and appears from later writers to have been got for the trouble of removing.

    1
    3
  • This is but an imitation of the hand-hoe, or a succenadeum to it, and can neither supply the use of dung nor fallow, and may be properly called scratch-hoeing."

    1
    3
  • One genus of Thomisidae (Phognarachne), which inhabits the Oriental region, adopts the clever device of spinning on the surface of a leaf a sheet of web resembling the fluid portions of a splash of bird's dung, the more solid central portions being represented by the spider itself, which waits in the middle of the patch to seize the butterflies or other insects that habitually feed on birds' excrement and are attracted to the patch mistaking it for their natural food.

    1
    3
  • It is only when these conditions are attended to that decay and nitrification of dung, guano, fish-meal, sulphate of ammonia and other manures take place, and the constituents which they contain become available to the crops for whose benefit they have been applied to the land.

    0
    2
  • His chapter on the flea, in which he not only describes its structure, but traces out the whole history of its metamorphoses from its first emergence from the egg, is full of interest - not so much for the exactness of his observations, as for its incidental revelation of the extraordinary ignorance then prevalent in regard to the origin and propagation of "this minute and despised creature," which some asserted to be produced from sand, others from dust, others from the dung of pigeons, and others from urine, but which he showed to be "endowed with as great perfection in its kind as any large animal," and proved to breed in the regular way of winged insects.

    0
    2
  • His corpse, after suffering every indignity, was quartered by the public hangman, and burnt with dung by the Romanist soldiers.

    0
    2
  • Horse dung is generally the principal ingredient in all hot bed manure; and, in its partially decomposed state, as afforded by exhausted hot beds, it is well adapted for garden use.

    0
    2
  • Cow dung is less fertilizing than horse dung, but being slower in its action it is more durable; it is also cooler, and therefore better for hot dry sandy soils.

    1
    3
  • Pig dung is very powerful, containing more nitrogen than horse dung; it is therefore desirable that it should undergo moderate fermentation, which will be secured by mixing it with litter and a portion of earth.

    0
    2
  • The dung of the domestic fowl is very similar in character.

    2
    4
  • Most of the forms in question are found growing on the dung of herbivorous animals, but the bacteria occur not only in the alimentary canal of the animal but also free in the air.

    0
    2
  • The huge courtyard of the Rostovs' house was littered with wisps of hay and with dung from the horses, and not a soul was to be seen there.

    1
    3
  • Pigeon dung approaches guano in its power as manure.

    0
    3
  • Bedding plants thrive best in a light loam, liberally manured with thoroughly rotten dung from an old hotbed or thoroughly decomposed cow droppings and leaf-mould.

    0
    3