This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

dunbar

Head Word icon
dunbar

dunbar Sentence Examples

  • Douglas is in all important respects even more of a medievalist than his contemporaries; and, like Henryson and Dunbar, strictly a member of the allegorical school and a follower, in the most generous way, of Chaucer's art.

    0
    0
  • Lord Stormont's family was Jacobite in its politics, and his second son James (c. 1690-1728), being apparently mixed up in some of the plots of the time, joined the court of the exiled Stuarts and in 1721 was created earl of Dunbar by James Edward, the Old Pretender.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Dunbar and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he took his M.A.

    0
    0
  • He urged Fairfax to attack the Scots at once in their own country and to forestall their The invasion; but Fairfax refused and resigned, and battles of Cromwell was appointed by parliament, on the 26th Dunbar of June 1650, commander-in-chief of all the forces and of the Commonwealth.

    0
    0
  • and after a campaign in the neighbourhood of Edinburgh which proved unsuccessful in drawing out the Scots from their fortresses, he retreated to Dunbar to await reinforcements from Berwick.

    0
    0
  • The Scots under Leslie followed him, occupied Doon Hill commanding the town, and seized the passes between Dunbar and Berwick which Cromwell had omitted to secure.

    0
    0
  • He died on the afternoon of the same day, his day of triumph, the anniversary both of Dunbar and of Worcester.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar attested his constancy and gave proof that Cromwell was a master of the tactics of all arms. Preston was an example like Austerlitz of the two stages of a battle as defined by Napoleon, the first flottante, the second foudroyante.

    0
    0
  • He now stood forth as her champion; Mary took refuge with him at Dunbar, presented him, among other estates, with the castle there and the chief lands of the earldom of March, and made him the most powerful noble in the south of Scotland.

    0
    0
  • In November she visited him at Dunbar, and in December took place the conference at Craigmillar at which both were present, and at which the disposal of Darnley was arranged, Bothwell with some others subsequently signing the bond to accomplish his murder.

    0
    0
  • On the 24th he seized Mary's willing person near Edinburgh, and carried her to his castle at Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • In June Mary and Bothwell fled from Holyrood to Borthwick Castle, whence Bothwell, on the place being surrounded by Morton and his followers, escaped to Dunbar, Mary subsequently joining him.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, during the negotiations, the queen's troops had been deserting; a surrender became inevitable, and Bothwell returned to Dunbar, parting from Mary for ever.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently Bothwell left Dunbar for the north, visited Orkney and Shetland, and in July placed himself at the head of a band of pirates, and after eluding all attempts to capture him, arrived at Karm Sound in Norway.

    0
    0
  • There is much material in the Encyclopaedia of Mississippi History (2 vols., Madison, Wisconsin, 1907), edited by Dunbar Rowland.

    0
    0
  • Mary retreated to Edinburgh and thence to Dunbar, while Edinburgh opened its gates to the reformers, who issued a proclamation (Oct.

    0
    0
  • He is alluded to by Dunbar in the fragmentary Interlude of the Droichis Part of the Play, where a "droich," or dwarf, personates "the nakit blynd Harry That lang has bene in the fary Farleis to find;" and again in Dunbar's Lament for the Makaris.

    0
    0
  • WILLIAM DUNBAR (c. 1460 - c. 1520), Scottish poet, was probably a native of East Lothian.

    0
    0
  • This is assumed from a satirical reference in the Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie, where, too, it is hinted that he was a member of the noble house of Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar had meanwhile (about 1 joo) returned to Scotland, and had become a priest at court, and a royal pensioner.

    0
    0
  • Other pieces such as the Orisoun (" Quhen the Gouernour past in France"), apropos of the setting out of the regent Albany, are of historical interest, but they tell us little more than that Dunbar was alive.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar's reputation among his immediate successors was considerable.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar's command of the medium was more certain.

    0
    0
  • One hundred and one poems have been ascribed to Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar's chief allegorical poems are The Goldyn Targe and The Thrissil and the Rois.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar works on the same theme in a shorter poem, known as Beauty and the Prisoner.

    0
    0
  • The greater part of Dunbar's work is occasional - personal and social satire, complaints (in the style familiar in the minor verse of Chaucer's English successors), orisons and pieces of a humorous character.

    0
    0
  • The last type shows Dunbar at his best, and points the difference between him and Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • This strain runs throughout many of the occasional poems, and is not wanting in odd passages in Dunbar's contemporaries; and it has the additional interest of showing a direct historical relationship with the work of later Scottish poets, and chiefly with that of Robert Burns.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar's satire is never the gentle funning of Chaucer: more often it becomes invective.

    0
    0
  • In the Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie, an outstanding specimen of a favourite northern form, analogous to the continental estrif, or tenzone, he and his rival reach a height of scurrility which is certainly without parallel in English literature.

    0
    0
  • There is little in Dunbar which may be called lyrical, and little of the dramatic. His Interlud of the Droichis [Dwarf's] part of the Play, one of the pieces attributed to him, is supposed to be a fragment of a dramatic composition.

    0
    0
  • The main value of the last is historical, but it too shows Dunbar's mastery of form, even when dealing with lists of poetic predecessors.

    0
    0
  • The chief authorities for the text of Dunbar's poems are :- (a) the Asloan MS. (c. 1515); (b) the Chepman and Myllar Prints (1508) preserved in the Advocates' library, Edinburgh; (c) Bannatyne MS. (156$) in the same; (d) the Maitland Folio MS. (c. 1570-1590) in the Pepysian library, Magdalene College, Cambridge.

    0
    0
  • Professor Schipper's William Dunbar, sein Leben and seine Gedichte (with German translations of several of the poems), appeared at Berlin in 1884.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar >>

    0
    0
  • The English archers were provided with a good target in the masses of the Scottish spearmen, and Hotspur was restrained from charging by his ally, George Dunbar, earl of March.

    0
    0
  • DUNBAR (Gaelic, "the fort on the point"), a royal, municipal and police burgh, and seaport of Haddingtonshire, Scotland.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar is said to have the smallest rainfall in Scotland and is a favourite summer resort.

    0
    0
  • The ruins, of the castle, and the remains of the Grey Friars' monastery, founded in 1218, at the west end of the town, and Dunbar House in High Street, formerly a mansion of the Lauderdales, but now used as barracks, are of historic interest.

    0
    0
  • high, is a landmark for sailors, dates only from 1819, but occupies the site of what was probably the first collegiate church in Scotland, and contains the large marble monument to Sir George Home, created earl of Dunbar and March by James VI.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar used to form one of the Haddington district group of parliamentary burghs, but its constituency was merged in that of the county in 1885.

    0
    0
  • is the village of Biel, where, according to some authorities, William Dunbar the poet was born.

    0
    0
  • The site of Dunbar is so commanding that a castle was built on the cliffs at least as early as 856.

    0
    0
  • In 1070 Malcolm Canmore gave it to Cospatric, earl of Northumberland, ancestor of the earls of Dunbar and March.

    0
    0
  • In 1336 it was besieged by the English under William, Lord Montacute, afterwards 1st earl of Salisbury, but was successfully defended by Black Agnes of Dunbar, countess of March, a member of the Murray family.

    0
    0
  • The Battle Of Dunbar was fought on the 3rd (13th) of September 1650 between the English army under Oliver Cromwell and the Scots under David Leslie, afterwards Lord Newark.

    0
    0
  • wide, through the middle of which the main road from Dunbar to Berwick runs.

    0
    0
  • Cromwell, after a war of manoeuvre near Edinburgh, had been compelled by want of supplies to withdraw to Dunbar; Leslie pursued and took up a position on Doon Hill, commanding the English line of retreat on Berwick.

    0
    0
  • The artillery was posted on the Dunbar side of the burn, directly opposite and north of Doon, the infantry and cavalry crossed where they could, and formed up gradually in a line south of and roughly parallel to the Berwick road, the extreme left of horse and foot, acting as a reserve, crossed at Brocksmouth House on the outer flank.

    0
    0
  • The account of the battle of Dunbar here followed is that of C. H.

    0
    0
  • After Dunbar Leslie fought a stubborn defensive campaign up to the crossing of the Forth by Cromwell, and then accompanied Charles to Worcester, where he was lieutenant-general under the king, who commanded in person.

    0
    0
  • and is dedicated to the wife of a Douglas "Thus for ane Dow of Dunbar drew I this Dyte, Dowit with ane Dowglass, and boith war thei dowis."

    0
    0
  • It has the incidental interest of showing (especially in stanzas 62 and 63) the antipathy of the "Inglis-speaking Scot" to the "Scots-speaking Gael" of the west, as is also shown in Dunbar's Flyting with Kennedy.

    0
    0
  • Its last prior, Alexander Dunbar, died in 7560.

    0
    0
  • From the first his professorial lectures were conspicuous for the unconventional enthusiasm with which he endeavoured to revivify the study of the classics; and his growing reputation, added to the attention excited by a translation of Aeschylus which he published in 1850, led to his appointment in 1852 to the professorship of Greek at Edinburgh University, in succession to George Dunbar, a post which he continued to hold for thirty years.

    0
    0
  • During the night she escaped with Darnley, whom she had already seduced from the party of his accomplices, and arrived at Dunbar on the third morning after the slaughter of her favourite.

    0
    0
  • It was well known in Edinburgh that Bothwell had a body of men ready to intercept her on the way back, and carry her to Dunbar - not, as was naturally inferred, without good assurance of her consent.

    0
    0
  • On the 24th of April, as she approached Edinburgh, Bothwell accordingly met her at the head of Boo spearmen, assured her (as she afterwards averred) that she was in the utmost peril, and escorted her, together with Huntly, Lethington and Melville, who were then in attendance, to Dunbar Castle.

    0
    0
  • Alone, in the disguise of a page, she slipped out of the castle at midnight, and rode off to meet him at a tower two miles distant, whence they fled together to Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • Mary meanwhile had passed from Dunbar to Haddington, and thence to Seton, where 1600 men rallied to her side.

    0
    0
  • At last it was agreed that the queen should yield herself prisoner, and Bothwell be allowed to retire in safety to Dunbar with the few followers who remained to him.

    0
    0
  • On the 10th a silver casket containing letters and French verses, miscalled sonnets, in the handwriting of the queen, was taken from the person of a servant who had been sent by Bothwell to bring it from Edinburgh to Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • Mary's followers had failed to retake Dunbar Castle from the regent, and made for Dumbarton instead, marching two miles south of Glasgow, by the village of Langside.

    0
    0
  • The young prince was educated at his father's miniature court in Rome, with James Murray, Jacobite earl of Dunbar, for his governor, and under various tutors, amongst whom were the learned Chevalier Ramsay, Sir Thomas Sheridan and the abbe Legoux.

    0
    0
  • Cope had by this time brought his disappointed forces by sea to Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • In 1649 he was appointed a governor of the Isle of Wight, and in 1650, as lieutenant-general of the horse, took part in Cromwell's campaign in Scotland and assisted in the victory of Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • Their power, however, which had been seriously weakened by Cromwell's victory at Dunbar in September 1651, was practically destroyed when Charles II.

    0
    0
  • In the 12th and 13th centuries the Lindsays and the earls of March and Dunbar were the chief baronial families.

    0
    0
  • Physically, Scotland is divided into three geographical regions - the " Highlands " (subdivided by Glen More into the NorthWestern and South-Eastern Highlands); the Central Plain or " Lowlands " (a tract of south-westerly to north-easterly trend, between a line drawn roughly from Girvan to Dunbar and a line drawn from Dumbarton to Stonehaven); and the Southern Uplands.

    0
    0
  • The Lowlands of Mid-Scotland, or the Central Plain, constitute a broad depression with south-westerly to north-easterly trend lying between the Highland line that runs from the head of the Firth of Clyde to Stonehaven and the pastoral uplands that stretch from Girvan to Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • William the Conqueror's earl of Northumberland, Robert de Comines, was slain at Durham in 1069, and the houses of Gospatric (earls of Dunbar and March) and of de Comines (the Comyns of Badenoch) were long puissant in Scottish history.

    0
    0
  • A disorderly levy of Scots, appearing on the hills above Dunbar, left their strong position (like Leslie later) and were defeated with heavy loss.

    0
    0
  • The Bannockburn was choked with the fallen, and it was only by hard spurring that Edward and his guards reached Dunbar, whence he sailed to Berwick.

    0
    0
  • Randolph's daughter, too, the famous Black Agnes of Dunbar, brought over her wavering husband, the earl of March, to the side of the patriots, and there was a war of partisans, while Edward III.

    0
    0
  • His rupture with France in October 1337, caused by his claims to the French crown, tended to withdraw his attention from Scotland, where, though the staunch Sir Andrew Murray died, Black Agnes drove the English besiegers from Dunbar (1338), while the Knight of Liddesdale recovered Perth.

    0
    0
  • By 1342 Roxburgh, Stirling and Edinburgh castles were again in Scottish hands, though the Knight of Liddesdale captured and starved to death, in Hermitage castle, his gallant companion in arms, Sir Alexander Ramsay, who had relieved the garrison of Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • While England was tuneless, with Dunbar and the other " Makers " Scotland was " a nest of singing birds."

    0
    0
  • On his assurances the lords, expecting an amnesty, withdrew their guards from the palace and next day found that the bird had flown to the strong castle of Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • At Dunbar Leslie held Cromwell in the hollow of his hand, but his army had been repeatedly " purged " of all Royalist men of the sword by the preachers; they are said, and Cromwell believed it, to have constrained Leslie to leave his impregnable position and attack on the lower levels.

    0
    0
  • The greater poets who represent this type are Robert Henryson, William Dunbar, Gavin Douglas, and, to a large extent, Sir David Lyndsay - whose united genius has given high literary reputation to the so-called Golden Age.

    0
    0
  • There is, of course, some historical significance in the drawing up of such lists as we have in Dunbar's Lament for the Makaris, or in Douglas's Palice of Honour, or in Lyndsay's Testament of the Papyngo, but it is at the same time clear that their critical importance has been exaggerated.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar often, and at times deliberately, recalls the older verse-habit, even in his vigorous shorter poems; and Douglas, in his Palice of Honour and King Hart, and even in his translation of Virgil, is unequivocally medieval.

    0
    0
  • Our knowledge of this non-Chaucerian material, as of the Chaucerian, is chiefly derived from the MS. collections of Asloan, Bannatyne (q.v.) and Maitland (q.v.), supplemented by the references to " fugitive " and " popular " literature in Dunbar, Douglas, Lyndsay and, in especial, the prose Complaynt of Scotlande.

    0
    0
  • The more imaginative, elfin quality, familiar in Dunbar's Ballad of Kynd Kittok and his Interlude of the Droichis Part appears in such pieces as Gyre Carling (the mother-witch), King Berdok, and Lichtounis Dreme.

    0
    0
  • The convivial verse, at its best in Dunbar's Testament of Mr Andrew Kennedy, may be studied in Quhy sould nocht Allane honorit be, one of the many eulogies of John Barleycorn anticipatory of Burns's well-known piece.

    0
    0
  • Among other aids should be mentioned the Index Homericus of Seber (Oxford, 1780); Prendergast's Concordance to the Iliad (London, 1875); Dunbar's id.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile Cromwell had advanced and had defeated the Presbyterians a Dunbar on the 3rd of September 1650, subsequently occupying Edinburgh.

    0
    0
  • He is said also to have carried out six invasions of Northumbria, in the course of which he burnt Dunbar and took Melrose.

    0
    0
  • Immediately afterwards, however, flattered and cajoled by the queen, he betrayed his associates to her, and assisted her to escape from Holyrood to Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • Gavin Dunbar, who followed him in 1518, was enabled to complete the structure by adding the two western spires and the southern transept.

    0
    0
  • high, and was built early in the 16th century by Bishops Elphinstone and Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • This last-named building was erected in 1879 to replace the old and famous grammar school, where John Knox, William Dunbar, John Major and possibly George Buchanan and Sir David Lindsay were educated.

    0
    0
  • In Hardgate Street is "Bothwell Castle," the town house of the earl of Bothwell, where Mary Queen of Scots rested on her way to Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • Berwick was Invasion stormed, the Scottish army was routed at Dunbar ~cotJand (April si), Edinburgh and Stirling were easily captured, and at last John Baliol, deserted by most of his adherents, surrendered at Brechin.

    0
    0
  • During the Civil War the Covenanters held the town, to which the committees of church and state adjourned after Cromwell's victory at Dunbar (1650), but in August next year the castle was taken by General Monk.

    0
    0
  • Of the Cistercian priory, founded about 1165 by Cospatric of Dunbar, and destroyed by the 1st earl of Hertford in 1545, which stood a little to the east of the present market-place, no trace remains; but for nearly four hundred years it was a centre of religious fervour.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar, Quarterly Journal of Economics, iii.

    0
    0
  • The chronicles mention the destruction of Dunbar, former Northumbrian bastion against the Picts, possibly as a naval base.

    0
    0
  • Save John Muir House Campaign Created to save the historic birthplace in Dunbar from destruction.

    0
    0
  • It was the head of a barony held by the Earls of Dunbar, who had the power of inflicting capital punishment.

    0
    0
  • Dunbar fishermen creel fishing Open For hundreds of years we have found ways to help keep fish from going off.

    0
    0
  • fateful encounter with the Scots at Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • The most numerous of these was the Ruston & Dunbar steam navvy, produced by Ruston & Proctor of Lincoln.

    0
    0
  • prebend of the collegiate church of Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • workshop led by a male professional dancer from Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • When Albany came from France and assumed the regency, these documents and the "purchase" of the bishopric from Rome contrary to statute were made the basis of an attack on Douglas, who was imprisoned in Edinburgh Castle, thereafter in the castle of St Andrews (under the charge of his old opponent, Archbishop Hepburn), and later in the castle of Dunbar, and again in Edinburgh.

    0
    0
  • Leslie appears to have intended a surprise, as at Philiphaugh, but " through our own laziness," he confesses, the surprise came from Cromwell's side, and few of the Scots except the mounted gentry escaped from the crushing defeat at Dunbar (3rd of September).

    0
    0
  • In 1748 a Protestant Episcopal Church was organized, and before and during the War of Independence its members belonged to the Loyalist party; their rector, Rev. James Nichols, was tarred and feathered by the Whigs, and Moses Dunbar, a member of the church, was hanged for treason by the Connecticut authorities.

    0
    0
  • In the afternoon all of the pupils take part in a dance workshop led by a male professional dancer from Dunbar.

    0
    0
  • Hudson graduated from Dunbar Vocational Career Academy in 1999.

    0
    0
  • Hawk married Cindy Dunbar in April 1990 and the two divorced in 1995.

    0
    0
  • Lure training - Developed by Dr. Ian Dunbar, lure training uses an object of attraction to teach obedience commands such as "Sit," "Down" or "Heel."

    0
    0
  • Ian Dunbar is a veterinarian, animal behaviorist, dog trainer and writer.

    0
    0
  • LoveToKnow recently caught up to Dr. Ian Dunbar to ask him to share his dog training expertise.

    0
    0
  • Ian Dunbar, Ph.D. is a leading authority on canine behavior and training.

    0
    0
  • Among Dr. Dunbar's other credits are numerous books, videos and a dog training television show in the UK.

    0
    0
  • Ian Dunbar is a "rock star" in the dog training and behavior profession; he is respected by his peers and revered by the dog owners he has helped.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →