Du sentence example

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  • The Correggio family never managed to keep possession of it for long, and in 1346 they sold it to the Visconti (who constructed a citadel, La Rocchetta, in 1356, of which some remains exist on the east bank of the river, while the later ate du Pont may be seen on the west bank), and from them it passed to the Sforza.

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  • Seaboard.The shore of the Mediterranean encircling the Gulf of the Lion (Golfe du Lion) from Cape Cerbera to Martigues is lowlying and unbroken, and characterized chiefly by lagoons separated from the sea by sand-dunes.

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  • The canal and river system attains its greatest utility in the north, northeast and north-centre of the country; traffic is thickest along the Seine below Paris; along the rivers and small canals of the rich departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais and along the Oise and the canal of St Quentin whereby they communicate with Paris; along the canal from the Marne to the Rhine and the succession of waterways which unite it with the Oise; along the Canal de lEst (departments of Meuse and Ardennes); and along the waterways uniting Paris with the Sane at Chalon (Seine, Canal du Loing, Canal de Briare, Lateral canal of the Loire and Canal du Centre) and along the Sane between Chalon and Lyons.

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  • The Direction gnrale de lenregistrement, des domasnes et du timbre, comprising a central department and a director and staff of agents in each department, combines the administration of state property (not including forests) with the exaction of registration and stamp duties.

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  • He selects for himself a staff of civilians (the cab-met du ministre), which is divided into bureaux for the despatch of business.

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  • He also held the offices of librarian of the Bibliotheque du Roi, and of perpetual secretary of the Academie des Inscriptions.

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  • At the southern end of the boulevard de la Republique is the square de la Republique, formerly the place Bresson, in which is the municipal theatre; at the other extremity of the boulevard is the place du Gouvernement, which is planted on three sides with a double row of plane trees and is the fashionable resort for evening promenade.

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  • In 1798 it was freed from Bernese rule and became part of the canton du Leman (renamed canton de Vaud in 1803) of the Helvetic Republic.

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  • It contains many mountains volcanic in origin (Plomb du Cantal, Puy de Dome, Mont Dore), fertile valleys such as that of Limagne, vast pasturelands, and numerous medicinal springs.

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  • By 1669 they were playing in Paris at the Theatre du Marais, her first appearance there being as Venus in Boyer's Fete de Venus.

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  • The lives of Giarda (1650), Maupas du Tour (1657) and Cotolendi (1687) add little to Charles Auguste.

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  • His first works, Theorie des lois criminelles (1781) and Bibliotheque philosophique du legislateur (1782), were on the philosophy of law, and showed how thoroughly Brissot was imbued with the ethical precepts of Rousseau.

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  • Ardently devoted to the service of humanity, he projected a scheme for a general concourse of all the savants in Europe, and started in London a paper, Journal du Lycee de Londres, which was to be the organ of their views.

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  • To the north of the Oudeburg, on the other side of the Lys, is the Marche du Vendredi, the principal square of the city.

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  • The archipelago is divided into two groups - the Leeward (lies sous le Vent) and the Windward Islands (Iles du Vent) - by a clear channel of 60 m.

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  • These rivers follow the general slope of the department, which is from south-east, where the Bois du Mont (1200 ft.), the highest point, is situated, to north-west.

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  • Esprit Flechier, bishop of Nimes, in this Histoire du cardinal Jimenes (Paris, 1693), says that Torquemada made her promise that when she became queen she would make it her principal business to chastise and destroy heretics.

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  • Henceforward he lived a life of unbroken seclusion at Vignay, his only subsequent public appearance being by means of a memoire which he addressed to the king in 1570 under the title Le But de la guerre et de la paix, ou discours du chancelier l'Hospital pour exhorter Charles IX.

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  • Many sources for the history of the Normans were collected by Andre Du Chesne in his Hist.

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  • In 1744 Alembert applied this principle to the theory of the equilibrium and the motion of fluids (Trcite de l'equilibre et du mouvement des fluides), and all the problems before solved by geometricians became in some measure its corollaries.

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  • His later years were saddened by circumstances connected with a romantic attachment he had formed for Mademoiselle de Lespinasse, whose acquaintance he made at the house of Madame du Deffand, a noted resort of literary men and savants.

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  • He was followed by Janus de Noir, le sieur du Roule, who was sent by Louis XIV.

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  • In foreign affairs Catherine devoted her attention mainly to pushing forward the Russian frontier westwards and south- Foreign wards, and as France was the traditional ally of policy of Sweden, Poland and Turkey, she adopted at first Cath- the so-called systeme du Nord, that is to say, a close erine.

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  • A commission for publishing the whole of the letters and memoirs was appointed by Guizot in 1834, and the result has been the issue of nine volumes of the Papiers d'Etat du cardinal de Granvelle, edited by C. Weiss (Paris, 1841-1852).

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  • Although Du Pin consented to a retractation, the book was suppressed in 1693; he was, however, allowed again to continue it on changing its title by substituting nouvelle for universelle.

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  • Du Pin was a voluminous author.

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  • He first visited Paris, where he saw a good deal of d'Alembert, Diderot, Barthelemy, Raynal, Helvetius, Baron d'Holbach and others of that circle, and was often a welcome guest in the saloons of Madame Geoffrin and Madame du Deffand.

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  • A biography was published by Le Laboureur, Histoire du mareschal de Guebriant, in 1656.

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  • A great part of them was published with the works of Gerson (by Ellies du Pin, Antwerp, 1706); another part appeared in the 15th century, probably at Brussels, and there are many treatises and sermons still unpublished.

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  • From this, in the same year, he extracted the versions of the Gospels and Epistles "a l'usage du diocese de Meaux."

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  • Du Bose, Francis Asbury (Nashville, Tenn., 1909); see also under Methodism.

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  • In Paris he frequented the salons, especially those of Mme Graffigny - whose niece, Mlle de Ligniville ("Minette"), afterwards Mme Helvetius and his lifelong friend, he is supposed at one time to have wished to marry - Mme Geoffrin, Mme du Deffand, Mlle de Lespinasse and the duchesse d'Enville.

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  • Between 1755 and 1756 he composed various articles for the Encyclopedic, and between 1757 and 1760 an article on Valeurs et monnaies, probably for the Dictionnaire du commerce of the abbe Morellet.

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  • It was in 1770 that he wrote his famous Lettres sur la liberte du commerce des grains, addressed to the comptroller-general, the abbe Terray.

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  • Written in 1766, it appeared in 1769-1770 in Dupont's journal, the Ephemerides du citoyen, and was published separately in 1776.

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  • Turgot at once set to work to establish free trade in corn, but his edict, which was signed on the 13th of September 1774, met with strong opposition even in the conseil du roi.

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  • His first French play, Les Engagements du hasard, was acted in 1647.

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  • In the same reign the Cour du Cheval Blanc, including the Chapelle de la Ste Trinite and the Galerie d'Ulysse, destroyed and rebuilt under Louis XV., was constructed by Pierre Chambiges.

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  • Thanks to the friendly intervention of the marechal du camp, baron Duteil, Bonaparte once more gained leave of absence for three months and reached Corsica in September 1791.

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  • This he had already begun at Auxonne under the inspiring guidance of the baron du Teil.

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  • General du Teil, younger brother of the baron, had recently published a work, L' Usage de l'artillerie nouvelle; and it is now known that Bonaparte derived from this work and from those of Guibert and Bourcet that leading principle, concentration of effort against one point of the enemy's line, which he had advocated at Toulon and which he everywhere put in force in his campaigns.

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  • Between 1666 and 1669 Perrault edited at Paris eight accounts of the dissection by du Verney of as many species of birds, which, translated into English, were published by the Royal Society in 1702, under the title of The Natural History of Animals.

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  • Simultaneously with this Du Bus began a work on a plan precisely similar, the Esquisses ornithoDu Bus.

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  • These terms were explained in his great work L' Organisation du regne animal, oiseaux, begun in 1855, to mean exactly the same as those applied by Merrem to his two primary divisions.

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  • The procession was followed, inside the church, by a curious combination of ritual office and mystery play, the text of which, according to the Ordo processionis asinorum secundum Rothomagensem usum, is given in Du Cange.

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  • Abich (Sur la structure et la geologic du Daghestan, 1862), the successive folds of Jurassic limestones and slates, all nearly parallel to the Caucasus, which form lofty, narrow plateaus.

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  • The piece was at first called Chant de guerre de l'armee du Rhin, and only received its name of Marseillaise from its adoption by the Provençal volunteers whom Barbaroux introduced into Paris, and who were prominent in the storming of the Tuileries.

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  • Spon brought back many valuable treasures, coins, inscriptions and manuscripts, and in later years published various important works on archaeology, notably his Voyage d'Italie, de Dalmatie, de Grece et du Levant (1678), and a Histoire de la republique de Geneve (1680).

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  • The earliest mention 'of American petroleum occurs in Sir Walter Raleigh's account of the Trinidad pitch-lake in 1595; whilst thirty-seven years later, the account of a visit of a Franciscan, Joseph de la Roche d'Allion, to the oil springs of New York was published in Sagard's Histoire du Canada.

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  • In his Histoire du gouvernement de Venise he undertook to explain, and above all to criticize, the administration of that republic, and to expose the causes of its decadence.

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  • The visit of the French physician Jacques Spon and the Englishman, Sir George Wheler or Wheeler (1650-1723), fortunately took place before the catastrophe of the Parthenon in 1687; Spon's Voyage d'Italie, de Dalmatie, de Grece et du Levant, which contained the first scientific description of the ruins of Athens, appeared in 1678; Wheler's Journey into Greece, in 1682.

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  • Labour questions were entrusted to a separate department, the Direction du Travail, and the pension and insurance office was also raised to the status of a "direction."

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  • He wrote a Notice historique sur la vie et les ouvrages du comte de Lanjuinais, which was prefixed to an edition of his father's Ouvres (4 vols., 1832).

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  • Langdon, ibid., X.; Poeme du Paradis (1919); King, loc. cit., p. 52, ff.; (40) Mittlg.

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  • The hotel-de-ville and the Cercle du Commerce are the chief modern buildings.

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  • Babeuf now returned to Paris, and on the 3rd of September 1794 published the first number of his Journal de la liberte de la presse, the title of which was altered on the 5th of October to Le Tribun du peuple.

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  • Here he came under the influence of certain terrorist prisoners, notably of Lebois, editor of the Journal de l'egalite, afterwards of the Ami du peuple, papers which carried on the traditions of Marat.

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  • In February 1795 he was again arrested, and the Tribun du peuple was solemnly burnt in the Theatre des Bergeres by the jeunesse doree, the young men whose mission it was to bludgeon Jacobinism out of the streets and cafes.

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  • In Ventose and Germinal he published, under the nom de plume of "Lalande, soldat de la patrie," a new paper, the Eclaireur du peuple, ou le defenseur de vingi-cinq millions d'opprimes, which was hawked clandestinely from group to group in the streets of Paris.

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  • The last number of the Tribun appeared on the 24th of April, but Lebois in the Ami du peuple tried to incite the soldiers to revolt, and for a while there were rumours of a military rising.

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  • Buache (1737) Dupain-Triel, acting on a suggestion of Du.

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  • Of Morocco there are many maps, among which several compiled by the French service geographique de 1'armee, including a Carte du Maroc (1;200,000), in progress since 1909.

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  • Le Page du Pratz, author of Histoire de la Louisiane (3 vols., Paris, 1758; 2 vols., London, 1763), was the first historian of Louisiana.

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  • Napoleon might have remembered his own saying, " La misere est 1'ecole du bon soldat."

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  • His early military education was the best and most practical then attainable, primarily because he had the good fortune to come under the influence of men of exceptional ability - Baron du Keile, Bois Roger and others.

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  • In 1850 he became a member of the Institute, and in the following year published an important work in favour of free trade, under the title of Examen du systeme commercial connu sous le nom de systeme protecteur.

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  • In 1679 Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut (Duluth), as agent for a company of Canadian merchants which sought to establish trading posts on the Lakes, explored the country from the head of Lake Superior to Mille Lacs and planted the arms of Louis XIV.

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  • The conseil du roi first divided the total sum among the various generalites (the higher financial divisions), again dividing the amount due from each generalite among the elections of which it was composed.

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  • He took his theological degree in March 1890, by the oral defence of forty Latin scholastic theses and by a French dissertation, Histoire du canon de l'ancien testament, published as his first book in that year.

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  • Under various local names (the Garrigues, the mountains of Espinouse and Lacaune) and with numerous offshoots the range extends south-east and then east to the Montagne Noire, which runs parallel to the Canal du Midi and comes to an end some 25 m.

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  • In the south the Orb, the Herault and the Vidourle are independent rivers flowing to the Golfe du Lion; farther north, the Gard - formed by the union of several streams named Gardon - the Ceze and the Ardeche flow to the Rhone.

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  • The Château du Milieu (1lth to 15th centuries) comprises the keep, the Pavillon de 1'Horloge and the Grand Logis, in the principal apartment of which the first meeting between Joan of Arc and Charles VII.

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  • Of the Château du Coudray, which is separated by a moat from the Château du Milieu, the chief remains are the Tour du Moulin (Tothce.ntury) and two less ancient towers.

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  • This was followed by the Debat du reveille-matin, La Belle Dame sans merci, and others.

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  • See the article by C. Kohler in La Grande Encyclopedic; Bibliographic du Velay (1902), 640-650.

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  • In the magnetic balance of du Bois (Magnetic Circuit, p. 346) the uncertainty arising from the presence of a joint is avoided, the force measured being that exerted between two pieces of iron separated from each other by a narrow air-gap of known width.

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  • For the practical measurement of field intensity du Bois has used plates of the densest Jena flint glass.

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  • Du Bois's results, which, as given in his papers, show the relation of H to the magnetic moment per unit of mass, have been reduced by Ewing to the usual form, and are indicated in fig.

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  • Du Bois believes this to be an important general law, applicable to the case of every paramagnetic substance, and suggests that the product KB should be known as " Curie's constant " for the substance.

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  • The first volume of its memoirs,' published in the following year, contained a paper by Lagrange entitled Recherches sur la nature et la propagation du son, in which the power of his analysis and his address in its application were equally conspicuous.

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  • He was assigned for duty to Jefferson Barracks at St Louis, and on reaching this post was ordered to Fort Crawford, near Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin.

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  • The famous "nebular hypothesis" of Laplace made its appearance in the Systeme du monde.

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  • Although relegated to a note (vii.), and propounded "Avec la defiance que doit inspirer tout ce qui n'est point un resultat de l'observation ou du calcul," it is plain, from the complacency with which he recurred to it 3 at a later date, that he regarded the speculation with considerable interest.

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  • Legendre, in 1783, extended Maclaurin's theorem concerning ellipsoids of revolution to the case of any spheroid of revolution where the attracted point, instead of being limited to the axis or equator, occupied any position in space; and Laplace, in his treatise Theorie du mouvement et de la figure elliptique des planetes (published in 1784), effected a still further generalization by proving, what had been suspected by Legendre, that the theorem was equally true for any confocal ellipsoids.

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  • Laplace's first separate work, Theorie du mouvement et de la figure elliptique des planetes (1784), was published at the expense of President Bochard de Saron.

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  • The Précis de l'histoire de l'astronomie (1821), formed the fifth book of the 5th edition of the Systeme du monde.

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  • Arago, Annuaire du Bureau des Long.

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  • The original name of the family was Du Plessis, but in the 15th century a younger branch obtained by marriage the estate of Richelieu with its strong castle surrounded by the waters of the Mable, and took the name of Du Plessis de Richelieu.

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  • The family produced not a few turbulent warriors during the Hundred Years' War, and the cardinal's father, Francois du Plessis, seigneur de Richelieu, began his career by killing the murderer of his elder brother and then fighting through the wars of religion, first as a favourite of Henry III., and after his death under Henry IV.

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  • The Parisian jewellers Boehmer and Bassenge had spent some years collecting stones for a necklace which they hoped to sell to Madame Du Barry, the favourite of Louis XV., and after his death to Marie Antoinette.

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  • The Canal du Midi, following the courses of the Fresquel and the Aude, traverses it for 76 m.; and a branch, the Canal de la Robine, which passes through Narbonne to the sea, has a length of 24 m.

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  • His Lettres galantes du chevalier d'Her..

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  • This office he actually held for the long period of forty-two years; and it was in this official capacity that he wrote the Histoire du renouvellement del' Academie des Sciences (Paris, 3 vols., 1708, 1717, 1722) containing extracts and analyses of the proceedings, and also the -loges of the members, written with great simplicity and delicacy.

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  • In 1732 there was born to him, by a certain Mlle du Bouchet, the son, Philip Stanhope, for whose advice and instruction were afterwards written the famous Letters.

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  • The buildings include the residence of the administrator, barracks, a government school for natives, a mosque and Hindu temple, and the establishment of the Mission du Sacre Caur, which possesses a large plantation of coco-nut palms. Bagamoyo is in telegraphic communication with Zanzibar and with the other coast towns of German East Africa, and has regular steamship communication with Zanzibar.

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  • Verdy du Vernois, Im Hauptquartiere des II.

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  • He was for a time virtually governor of half Egypt, and for three years was secretary of the Institut du Caire; he also delivered the funeral orations for Kleber and Desaix.

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  • The form in which certain of the references to him are couched favours the above view; the compiler of Guiron le Cortois says in his prologue that "maistre Gautier Map qui fu clers au roi Henrydevisa cil l'estoire de monseigneur Lancelot du Lac, que d'autre chose ne parla it mie gramment en son livre"; and in another place he refers to Map, "qui fit lou pro pre livre de monsoingnour Lancelot dou Lac."

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  • His family having been steady royalists, he entered the Gardes du corps at the return of the Bourbons, and during the Hundred Days he sought refuge first in Switzerland and then at Aix-en-Savoie, where he fell in love, with abundant results of the poetical kind.

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  • He availed himself of the reviving interest in legitimism and Catholicism which was represented by Bonald and Joseph de Maistre, of the nature worship of Rousseau and Bernardin de Saint Pierre, of the sentimentalism of Madame de Stael, of the medievalism and the romance of Chateaubriand and Scott, of the maladie du siecle of Chateaubriand and Byron.

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  • Giry took an energetic part in the Collection de textes relatifs a l'histoire du moyen dge, which was due in great measure to his initiative.

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  • He was now introduced to a less questionable and even more distinguished coterie than Vendome's, to the famous "court of Sceaux," the circle of the beautiful and ambitious duchesse du Maine.

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  • In the middle of this period, however, in 1733, two important books, the Lettres philosophiques sur les Anglais and the Temple du gout appeared.

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  • He himself was safe in the independent duchy of Lorraine with Emilie de Breteuil, marquise du Chatelet,' with whom he began to be intimate in 1733; he had now taken up his abode with her at the château of Cirey.

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  • If the English visit may be regarded as having finished 1 Gabrielle Emilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, marquise du Chatelet (1706-1749), was the daughter of the baron de Breteuil, and married the marquis du Chatelet-Lomont in 1725.

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  • She wrote Institutions dehysique (1740), Dissertation sur la nature et la propagation du feu (1 744), Doutes sur les religions reculees (1792), and in 1756 published a translation of Newton's Principia.

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  • The principal literary results of his early years here were the Discours en vers sur l'homme, the play of Alzire and L'Enfant prodigue (1736), and a long treatise on the Newtonian system which he and Madame du Chatelet wrote together.

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  • The best-known accounts of Cirey life, those of Madame de Grafigny, date from the winter of 1738-39; they are somewhat spiteful but very amusing, depicting the frequent quarrels between Madame du Chatelet and Voltaire, his intense suffering under criticism, his constant dread of the surreptitious publication of the Pucelle (which nevertheless he could not keep his hands from writing or his tongue from reciting to his visitors), and so forth.

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  • In April 1739 a journey was made to Brussels, to Paris, and then again to Brussels, which was the headquarters for a considerable time, owing to some law affairs, of the Du Chatelets.

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  • Frederick, now king of Prussia, made not a few efforts to get Voltaire away from Madame du Chatelet, but unsuccessfully, and the king earned the lady's cordial hatred by persistently refusing or omitting to invite her.

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  • He once lay in hiding for two months with the duchesse du Maine at Sceaux, where were produced the comedietta of La Prude and the tragedy of Rome sauvee, and afterwards for a time lived chiefly at Luneville; here Madame du Chatelet had established herself at the court of King Stanislaus, and carried on a liaison with Saint-Lambert, an officer in the king's guard.

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  • The death of Madame du Chatelet is another turning-point in the history of Voltaire.

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  • For some time, however, after Madame du Chatelet's death he was in a state of pitiable unsettlement.

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  • The heavy ridges over the brow, originally supposed to be distinctive of the gorilla, are particularly well marked in "Johanna," and they would doubtless be still more noticeable in the male of the same race, which seems to be undoubtedly du Chaillu's kulu-kamba.

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  • His Son, Auguste Arthur Beugnot (1797-1865), was an historian and scholar, who published an Essai sur les institutions de Saint Louis (1821), Histoire de la destruction du paganisme en occident (2 vols., 1885), and edited the Olim of the parlement of Paris, the Assizes of Jerusalem, and the Coutumes de Beauvoisis of Philippe de Beaumanoir.

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  • This was followed, next year, by translations of works on the Revolution by Mallet du Pan and Mounier, and at this time he also founded and edited a monthly journal, the Neue deutsche Monatsschrift, in which for five years he wrote, mainly on historical and political questions, maintaining the principles of British constitutionalism against those of revolutionary France.

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  • To Lorraine belong the well-known names Hennezel, de Thietry, du Thisac, de Houx; and to Normandy the names de Bongar, de Cacqueray le Vaillant and de Brossard.

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  • From this period began the records in England of the great glass-making families of Hennezel, de Thietry, du Thisac and du Houx from Lorraine, and of de Bongar and de Cacqueray from Normandy.

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  • The theorem of Torricelli was employed by many succeeding writers, but particularly by Edme Mariotte (1620-1684), whose Traite du mouvement des eaux, published after his death in the year 1686, is founded on a great variety of well-conducted experiments on the motion of fluids, performed at Versailles and Chantilly.

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  • In the equations of uniplanar motion = dx - du = dx + dy = -v 2 ?, suppose, so that in steady motion dx I +v24 ' x = ?'

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  • Thus if T is expressed as a quadratic function of U, V, W, P, Q, R, the components of momentum corresponding are dT dT dT (I) = dU + x2=dV, x3 =dW, dT dT dT Yi dp' dQ' y3=dR; but when it is expressed as a quadratic function of xi, 'x2, x3, yi, Y2, Y3, U = d, V= dx, ' w= ax dT Q_ dT dT dy 1 dy2 dy The second system of expression was chosen by Clebsch and adopted by Halphen in his Fonctions elliptiques; and thence the dynamical equations follow X = dt x2 dy +x3 d Y = ..., Z ..., (3) = dt1 -y2?y - '2dx3+x3 ' M =..

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  • Examples of his attempted historical writing are Histoire du siecle d'Alexandre le Grand (Amsterdam, 1762), and Histoire impartiale des Jesuites (Madrid, 1768), the latter condemned to be burned.

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  • On the ground that peace was not sufficiently assured by the Pouilly meeting, a fresh interview was proposed by the dauphin and took place on the 10th of September 1419 on the bridge of Montereau, when the duke of Burgundy was felled with an axe by Tanneguy du Chastel, one of the dauphin's companions, and done to death by the other members of the dauphin's escort.

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  • In the park is Llyn du (black pool), whence Welshpool is said to be named.

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  • Among his works of a more popular nature are La Poesie du moyen dge (1885 and 1895); Penseurs et poetes (1897); Poemes et legendes du moyen dge (1900); Francois Villon (Igor), an admirable monograph contributed to the "Grands Ecrivains Frangais" series; Legendes du moyen age (1903).

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  • The principal church, Notre Dame du Lac, begun in the 12th and enlarged in the 15th centuries, is still unfinished.

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  • Creton, Histoire du roy Richard II., ed.

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  • A short line, branching from the Tunis-Zaghwan line, was carried south-west to Pont du Fahs.

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  • In 1906 was opened a continuation of the line from Pont du Fahs to Kef and thence southwest to Kalaat-es-Senam, a place midway between Kef and Tebessa, the centre of the Algerian phosphate region.

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  • See Fernao Lopes, Chronica del Rey Dom Pedro (1735); Camoens, Os Lusiadas; Antonio Ferreira's Ines de Castro, - the first regular tragedy of the Renaissance after the Sofonisba of Trissino; Luis Velez de Guevara, Reinar despues de morir, an admirable play; and Ferdinand Denis, Chroniques chevaleresques de l'Espagne et du Portugal.

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  • Lagrange realized its powers and termed it " le principal fondement du calcul erentiel."

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  • The early death of this talented mathematician, of whom Legendre said "quelle tete celle du jeune Norvegien!", cut short a career of extraordinary brilliance and promise.

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  • He refers to de Maistre's memorable book, Du Pape, as the most profound, accurate and methodical account of the old spiritual organization, and starts from that as the model to be adapted to the changed intellectual and social conditions of the modern time.

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  • This distinguishes the story from that of Lancelot, with which some modern scholars have been inclined to identify it; for Lancelot's parentage is never in doubt, he is fis du roi.

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  • Acting upon that theory, the experts of TokyO and Nagoya have produced many very beautiful specimens of monochrome enamelyellow (canary or straw), rose du Barry, liquid-dawn, red, aubergine purple, green (grass or leaf), dove-grey and lapis lazuli bl,ue.

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  • Drawn between various influences, that of Marguerite d'Angouleme, the du Bellays, and the duchesse d'Etampes, who was in favour of the Reformation or at least of toleration, and the contrary influence of the uncompromising Catholics, Duprat, and then Montmorency and de Tournon, he gave pledges successively to both parties.

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  • His was the government " du bon plaisir."

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  • Close by is the Tour du Guet, or watch-tower, used as a lighthouse until 1848.

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  • The prototype of the historico-literary periodical may be discovered in La Clef du cabinet des princes de l'Europe (1704-1706), familiarly known as Journal de Verdun, and carried on under various titles down to 1794.

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  • The first, treating of agriculture and domestic economy, was the Journal economique (1751-1772); a Journal de commerce was founded in 1759; periodical biography may be first seen in the Necrologe des hommes celebres de France (1764-1782); the political economists established the Ephemerides du citoyen in 1765; the first Journal d'education was founded in 1768, and the Courrier de la mode in the same year; the theatre had its first organ in the Journal des theatres (1770); in the same year were produced a Journal de musique and the Encyclopedia militaire; the sister service was supplied with a Journal de marine in 1778.

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  • Chateaubriand quoted three or four passages in his Genie du christianisme.

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  • It was nevertheless proscribed in the next year at the instance of the Montagnard deputy Albitte, for an anti-anarchical hemistich (Des lois et non du sang!); Fenelon (1793) was suspended after a few representations; and in 1794 his Timoleon, set to Etienne Mehul's music, was also proscribed.

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  • In 1806 and 1807 he delivered a course of lectures at the Athenee on the language and literature of France from the earliest years; and in 1808 at the emperor's request, he prepared his Tableau historique de l'etat et du progres de la littrature francaise depuis 1789 jusqu'd 1808, a book containing some good criticism, though marred by the violent prejudices of its author.

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  • It produced in England the Roman du Saint Graal and the Roman de Merlin, both from the pen of Robert de Borron; the Roman de Lancelot; the Roman de Tristan, which is attributed to a fictitious Lucas de Gast.

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  • See La Fondation de la regence d'Alger, histoire des Barberousse, chronique arabe du X VI siecle published by Sander Rang and Ferdinand Denis, Paris, 1837 - for a curious Moslem version of their story.

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  • Nothing is positively known of his ancestry, for the supposition (originating with Du Cange) that a certain William, marshal of Champagne between 1163 and 1179, was his father appears to be erroneous.

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  • The charm of Villehardouin can escape no reader; but few readers will fail to derive some additional pleasure from the two essays which SainteBeuve devoted to him, reprinted in the ninth volume of the Causeries du lundi.

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  • Although not himself a courtier, he was backed at court by Sosthenes de la Rochefoucauld and Madame du Cayla, and in 1822 Louis XVIII.

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  • At the time of his death, on the 13th of March 1854, he had advanced as far as 1816 with his memoirs, which were completed from his correspondence by his family as Memoires et correspondance du comte de Villele (Paris, 5 vols., 1887-90).

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  • Prairie du Chien is one of the most interesting places, historically, in Wisconsin.

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  • The first white man known to have visited the site was Father Hennepin in 1680; later in the same year the trader Du Lhut (or Duluth) was here.

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  • In1779-1780Prairie du Chien was the scene of plots and counterplots of American and British sympathizers and of the activities of Godefrey Linctot,.

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  • Prairie du Chien was formally surrendered in 1796 to the United States.

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  • At the time of the Red Bird rising in 1827, Governor Lewis Cass of Michigan 'Territory made Prairie du Chien his temporary headquarters.

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  • The Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railroad was completed to Prairie du Chien in 1857.

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  • The retreating French troops belonged to Frossard's command, and as they were in considerable confusion Frossard called on du Preuil's brigade of the imperial guard cavalry to charge.

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  • Both corps took as their primary objective the farms of St Hubert and Point du Jour, standing just above the defile made by the Verdun-Metz road where it climbs out of the Mance ravine towards the French position.

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  • Corps succeeded in reaching the plateau between St Hubert and Point du Jour, where the debris of the VII.

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  • That night the German Seventeenth Army withdrew its two right corps in haste behind the Canal du Nord, where they again faced round for a renewed stand.

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  • Fortunately for the Germans the Canal du Nord proved a sufficiently formidable obstacle to give pause to the First Army's progress.

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  • In view of the fact that the First and Third British Armies were faced with strong positions in the Canal du Nord and the Scheldt canal, which it was advisable to carry prior to the general attack on the Hindenburg line behind the latter obstacle, it was decided that these two armies should open their operations a day earlier than the Fourth Army, so as to draw off the German reserves from the front of that army, which had to deliver the main attack and was faced with the most formidable defences.

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  • The positions held by them were formidable to a degree; the Canal du Nord, although not completed along all its length, was some ioo ft.

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  • By this means the latter, who were to make the main attack, were brought opposite a portion of the Canal du Nord, which was dry along a front of r a miles.

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  • Corps' zone of attack included the Canal du Nord and the defences on either side of Bellenglise, while that of the composite corps was the canal tunnel on either side of Bellicourt.

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  • He also published separately some juridical and physical theses, and a German translation of Memoires du philosophe de Merian.

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  • He was received at Brussels with extraordinary enthusiasm; he was appointed a minister of state, named in a national order of the day, and was elected a member of the Academie Royale de Belgique and vicepresident of the Conseil Superieur du Congo.

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  • Latreille, Familles naturelles du regne animal (Paris, 1825), who recognized the nature of the " median segment."

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  • The only work he published was his Reflexions sur la puissance motrice du feu et sur les machines propres a developper cette puissance (Paris, 1824).

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  • In 1876 a statue of Servetus was erected by Don Pedro Gonsalez de Velasco in front of his Instituto Antropologico at Madrid; in 1903 an expiatory block was erected at Champel; in 1907 a statue was erected in Paris (Place de la Mairie du XIV e Arrondissement); another is at Aramnese; another was prepared (1910) for erection at Vienne.

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  • But the two substances were generally confounded as "fixed alkali" (carbonate of ammonia being "volatile alkali"), till Duhamel du Monceau in 1736 established the fact that common salt and the ashes of seaplants contain the same base as is found in natural deposits of soda salts ("mineral alkali"), and that this body is different from the "vegetable alkali" obtained by incinerating land plants or wood (pot-ashes).

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  • Makaroff, The Yermak in the Ice (in Russian) (St Petersburg, 1901); The Norwegian North Atlantic Expedition (on the " Voringen "), 1876-1878 (Christiania, 1880-1900); Expeditions scientifiques du " Travailleur " et du " Talisman," 1880-1883 (Paris, 1891 et seq.); Die Ergebnisse der Plankton-Expedition, 1889 (Kiel, 1892 et seq.); Resultats des campagnes scientifiques accomplies sur son yacht par Albert I e ' Prince Souverain de Monaco (Monaco, from 1889); The Danish " Ingolf " Expedition, 1806 (Copenhagen, 1900); Prof. Luksch, Expeditionen S.M.

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  • Reports of many minor expeditions and researches have appeared in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland; the Marine Biological Association at Plymouth; the Kiel Commission for the Investigation of the Baltic; the Berlin Institut fur Meereskunde; the bluebooks of the Hydrographic Department; the various official reports to the British, German, Russian, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Belgian and Dutch governments on the respective work of these countries in connexion with the international cooperation in the North Sea; the Bulletin du musee oceanographique de Monaco (1903 seq.); the Scottish Geographical Magazine; the Geographical Journal; Petermanns Mitteilungen; Wagner's Geogi'aphisches Jahrbuch; the Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Societies of London and Edinburgh; the Annalen der Hydrographie; and the publications of the Swedish Academy of Sciences.

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  • In 1813 he was appointed professor of chemistry at the Lycee Charlemagne, and subsequently undertook the directorship of the Gobelins tapestry works, where he carried out his researches on colour contrasts (De la loi du contraste simultane des couleurs, 1839).

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  • In that year appeared Waddington's Mdmoire sur la chronologie de la vie du rheteur Aelius Aristide, in which it was shown from a most acute combination of circumstances that the Quadratus whose name is mentioned in the Martyrium was proconsul of Asia in 155-156, and that consequently Polycarp was martyred on the 23rd of February 155.

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  • The Cher itself becomes navigable when it receives the Arnon and Yevre, and the communications of the department are greatly facilitated by the Canal du Berry, which traverses it from east to west, the lateral canal of the Loire, which follows the left bank of that river, and the canal of the Sauldre.

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  • Pascal treated these numbers in his Traite du triangle arithmetique (1665), using them to develop a theory of combinations and to solve problems in proba-, bility.

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  • Lenfant's Histoire de la guerre des Hussites (1731) and the same writer's Histoire du concile de Constance (1714) should be consulted.

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  • After the death of his wife in 1507 Du Prat had taken orders; he received the bishoprics of Valence, Die, Meaux and Albi, and the archbishopric of Sens (1525); in 1527 he became cardinal, and in 1530 papal legate.

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  • Jansen ended by attaching himself strongly to the latter party, and presently made a momentous friendship with a like-minded fellow-student, Du Vergier de Hauranne, afterwards abbot of Saint Cyran.

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  • Eventually he joined Du Vergier at his country home near Bayonne, and spent some years teaching at the bishop's college.

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  • All his spare time was spent in studying the early Fathers with Du Vergier, and laying plans for a reformation of the Church.

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  • Du Bourg and others ventured warmly to defend the Protestants in the parlement of Paris in the very presence of the king and of the cardinal of Lorraine.

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  • Persecution was revived by the Guises; Du Bourg, the brave defender of the Protestants, was burned as a heretic; yet Calvin could in the closing years of his life form a cheerful estimate that some three hundred thousand of his countrymen had been won over to his views.

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  • See Lettres du roi Louis XII.

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  • Their colonists were not farmers but trappers, woodrangers, coureurs du bois, who married Indian women, and formed a mixed race known as the bois brutes.

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  • His Memoires du peuple francaise (1865-1873) and La France et les Frangais a travers les siecles (1882) at least have the merit of being among the first books written on the social history of France.

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  • The success of his sketch for the picture of the "Oath of the Tennis Court," and his pronounced republicanism, secured David's election to the Convention in September 1792, by the Section du Museum, and he quickly distinguished himself by the defence of two French artists in Rome who had fallen into the merciless hands of the Inquisition.

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  • The northern road, the Rue de Rome, led to the Gare du Nord, the station for Carthage, Goletta and La Marsa.

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  • The southern road, the Rue-es-Sadikia, leads to the Gare du Sud, the station for Susa, Kairawan, &c., and also for Algiers.

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  • About a mile and a half north of the centre of the European quarter, on the slopes of a hill rising 270 ft., is the Parc du Belvedere covering some 240 acres and commanding extensive views.

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  • On the other hand, if he struck straight at Charleroi - the allied junction point - he would drive the "Armee du Nord" like an armoured wedge between the allies, if only he caught them unsuspicious and unready.

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  • In these years he had published De la correlation des figures de geometrie (1801), Geometrie de position (1803), and Principes fondamentaux del' equilibre et du mouvement (1803), all of which were translated into German.

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  • When Rennes and Dinan were attacked by the duke of Lancaster in 1356, Du Guesclin fought continuously against the English, and at this time he engaged in a celebrated duel with Sir Thomas Canterbury.

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  • Shortly afterwards, in aiding Charles of Blois, Du Guesclin was taken prisoner by Sir John Chandos at the battle of Auray, in which Charles was killed.

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  • Du Guesclin was ransomed for ioo,000 crowns, and was charged to lead them out of France.

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  • War had just been declared against England, and Du Guesclin was called to take part in it.

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  • In 1373, when the duke of Brittany sought English aid against a threatened invasion by Charles V., Du Guesclin was sent at the head of a powerful army to seize the duchy, which he did; and two years later he frustrated the attempt of the duke with an English army to recover it.

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  • Du Guesclin lost his first wife in 1371, and married a second in 1373, but he left no legitimate children.

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  • A detailed bibliography of his works has been placed by Auguste Longnon at the beginning of the volume Les Croyances et legendes du moyen age.

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  • See the works of Amort and Du Molinet, mentioned under CANON.

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  • At North Fond du Lac, just beyond the city limits, are car-shops of the two last-mentioned railways, and in the city are manufactories of machinery, automobiles, wagons and carriages, awnings, leather, beer, flour, refrigerators, agricultural implements, toys and furniture.

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  • The first settlers on the site of Fond du Lac arrived about 1835.

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  • Schlosser Sudarabiens (2 parts, Vienna, 1879-1881) (especially for chronology and antiquities); Mordtmann and Muller, Sabdische Denkmdler (Vienna, 1883); Derenbourg, Etudes sur l'epigraphie du Yemen (Paris, 1884); Id., Nouv.

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  • This was the conception expressed by Bossuet, "Tout l'etat est en la personne du prince," or in Louis XIV.'s saying, "L'etat c'est moi."

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  • They were written at latest in 1804, and include some interesting fragments on the close of the consulate, Moreau, &c. Though anonymous, Lalanne, who published them (Les Derniers Jours du Consulat, 1886), proved them to be in the same handwriting as a letter of Fauriel's in 1803.

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  • West of the James River Valley lies an elevated table-land, known as the Coteau du Missouri, which marks the waterparting between the James and the Missouri rivers, and has a general elevation of about 1800 ft.

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  • The city's extensive street railway system connects with interurban electric lines leading to Waukesha, Oconomowoc and Watertown on the west, Sheboygan and Fond du Lac on the north, and Chicago and intermediate points along the lake shore on the south.

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  • Doubtless the coureurs du bois who at this time began to frequent the Wisconsin forests, touched at the bay many times within the succeeding years as the place was known to be a favourite rendezvous of the Fox (or Outagamie) Indians.

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  • Previous to this, however, in 1851, the first train ran over the Chicago Milwaukee & St Paul railway to Waukesha, and in 1857 through trains were run over the same road to the Mississippi at Prairie du Chien.

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  • It is bordered by old houses, among which is one built by Bertrand du Guesclin in 1366, and contains a parish church of the 15th century.

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  • In 1752 he brought out at Fontainebleau an operetta, the Devin du village, which was successful.

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  • His first opera, Les Muses galantes, privately prepared at the house of La Popeliniere, attracted very little attention; but Le Devin du village, given at Fontainebleau in 1752, and at the Academie in 1753, achieved a great and well-deserved success.

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  • Castil-Blaze has accused Rousseau of extensive plagiarisms (or worse) in Le Devin du village and Pygmalion, but apparently without sufficient cause.

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  • The Contrat social was obviously anti-monarchic; the Nouvelle Heloise was said to be immoral; the sentimental deism of the "Profession du vicaire Savoyard" in Emile irritated equally the philosophe party and the church.

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  • At first appeared a single number of the Moniteur patriote, followed on the 12th of September by the first number of the Publiciste parisien, which on the 16th of September took the title of L' Ami du peuple and which he edited, with some interruptions, until the 21st of September 1792.

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  • Whoever suspected any one had only to denounce him to the Ami du peuple, and the denounced was never let alone till he was proved innocent or guilty.

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  • There he wrote his Denonciation contre Necker, and in May dared to return to Paris and continue the Ami du peuple.

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  • He was embittered by persecution, and continued his vehement attacks against all in power, and at last, after the day of the Champs du Mars (July 17,1790), against the king himself.

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  • When almost despairing, in December 1791, he fled once more to London, where he wrote his Ecole du citoyen.

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  • At the declaration of the republic, he closed his Ami du peuple, and commenced, on the 25th, a new paper, the Journal de la republique francaise, which was to contain his sentiments as its predecessor had done, and to be always on the watch.

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  • The refusal of Lucien to put the vote of outlawry, for which the majority of the council clamoured, his opportune closing of the sitting, and his appeal to the soldiers outside to disperse les representants du poignard, turned the scale in favour of his brother.

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  • The southern boundary of this belt is formed by a great thrust-plane, the faille du midi, along which the Devonian beds of the south have been thrust over the carboniferous beds of the coalfield.

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  • The only other buildings of importance dating from medieval times are the three churches of Ste Gudule (often erroneously called the cathedral), Notre-Dame des Victoires or Church of the Sablon, and Notre-Dame de la Chapelle, or simply la Chapelle, and the hotel de ville and the Maison du Roi on the Grand Place.

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  • Opposite the town-hall is the smaller but extremely ornate Maison du Roi.

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  • Egmont and Horn were sentenced in the hotel de vile, and passed their last night in the Maison du Roi.

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  • The Senne was bricked in, and the fine boulevards du Nord, Anspach, Hainaut and Midi took the place of slums. The Bourse and the post-office are two fine modern buildings in this quarter of the city.

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  • The laborious enterprise of drawing up the famous Tables du Cadastre was entrusted to his direction in 1792, and in 1794 he was appointed professor of the mathematical sciences at the Ecole Polytechnique, becoming director at the Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees four years later.

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  • His principal works, besides the translation of Aristotle and a number of studies connected with the same subject, are Des Vedas (1854), Du Bouddhisme (1856) and Mahomet et le Coran (1865).

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  • In the Salle du Conseil d'Etat some curious 15th-century frescoes have lately been discovered, while the old Salle des Festins is now known as the Salle de l'Alabama, in memory of the arbitration tribunal of 1872.

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  • Geneva is well supplied with charitable institutions, hospitals, &c. Among other remarkable sights of the city may be mentioned the great hydraulic establishment (built 1882-1899) of the Forces Motrices du Rhone (turbines), the singular monument set up to the memory of the late duke of Brunswick who left his fortune to the city in 1873, and the tie Jean-Jacques Rousseau now connected with the Pont des Bergues.

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  • From 1792 to 1799 he was occupied with the measurement of the arc of the meridian extending from Dunkirk to Barcelona, and published a detailed account of the operations in Base du systeme metrique (3 vols., 1806, 1807, 1810), for which he was awarded in 181 o the decennial prize of the Institute.

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  • Beugnot, "Sur la spoliation des biens du clerge attribuee a Charles Martel," in the Mem.

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  • In the Revue du progres, which he founded, he published in 1839 his study on L'Organisation du travail.

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  • It was on his motion that, on the 25th of February, the government undertook "to guarantee the existence of the workmen by work"; and though his demand for the establishment of a ministry of labour was refused - as beyond the competence of a provisional government - he was appointed to preside over the government labour commission (Commission du Gouvernement pour les travailleurs) established at the Luxembourg to inquire into and report on the labour question.

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  • Its universal acceptance is perhaps du g to the fact that it exists in two forms (the variata and the invariata) which vary slightly in the way in which they state the doctrine of the sacrament of the Supper.

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  • The general reader will find Gaston Paris's study of the legend in Poemes et legendes du moyen age most interesting; also Joseph Bedier's popular retelling of the tale Tristan et Iseult.

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  • For further particulars as to his life and doctrines see Grimm's Correspondance litteraire, &c. (1813); Rousseau's Confessions; Morellet's Memoires (1, 821); Madame de Geniis, Les Diners du Baron Holbach; Madame d'Epinay's Memoires; Avezac-Lavigne, Diderot et la societe du Baron d'Holbach (1875), and Morley's Diderot (1878).

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  • Micas and other platy minerals (such as chlorite), which naturally grow most rapidly on their edges, would show this tendency best, and such minerals usually form a large part of the best slates; but even Sketch (by Du Noyer) of a block of variegated slate from Devil's Glen, Co.

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  • Among his own productions are a treatise, De la morale des peres, a history of ancient treaties contained in the Supplement au grand corps diplomatique, and the curious Traite du jeu (1709), in which he defends the morality of games of chance.

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  • In the 17th century the erudition of France is best represented by "Henricus Valesius," Du Cange and Mabillon.

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  • On the eve of the Revolution, France was enjoying the study of the institutions of Greece in the attractive pages of the P g Voyage du jeune Anacharsis (1789), but the study of Greek was menaced even more than that of Latin.

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  • Elles font partie du patrimoine national.

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  • His work at the Salpetriere exerted a great influence on the development of the science of neurology, and his classical maladies du.

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  • The work of Du Pont and Goldsborough on the Atlantic coast has been alluded to above.

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  • In the territoires du commandant the mixed commune is presided over by a military officer who fulfils the duties of mayor.

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  • Father Simon in his Histoire critique du Vieux Testament (1682) also argues that the Pentateuch is the work of more than one author, and makes an important advance towards a systematic analysis of the separate elements by observing that the style varies, being sometimes very curt and sometimes very copious " although the variety of the matter does not require it."

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  • In 1834 Dr Debell Bennett made scientific researches in the Society, Hawaiian and Marquesas Islands, in 1835 Captain Robert Fitzroy was accompanied by Charles Darwin, and in 1836 sqq., Abel Aubert du Petit-Thouars was carrying on the work of the French in the Pacific. During his voyage of 1837-1840, Dumont d'Urville was again in Polynesia, working westward from the Paumotu and Marquesas Islands by Fiji and the Solomon, Loyalty and Louisiade groups to New Guinea.

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  • It is formed by two torrents, one of which has a subterranean course of 21 m., disappearing in the sink known as the Trou du Taureau ("bull's hole") and reappearing at the Goueil de Joueou.

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  • At Toulouse the canal connects with the Canal du Midi, which runs to the Mediterranean.

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  • The word occurs in the Regula Columbani (c. 7), and du Cange gives a few other cases of its use in Latin documents, but it never came into vogue in the West.

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  • The tables have never been published, and are generally known as the Tables du Cadastre, or, in England, as the great French manuscript tables.

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  • Babbage compared his table with the Tables du Cadastre, and Lefort has given in his paper just referred to most important lists of errors in Vlacq's and Briggs's logarithms of numbers which were obtained by comparing the manuscript tables with those contained in the Arithmetica logarithmica of 1624 and of 1628.

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  • As the Tables du Cadastre remained unpublished, other tables appeared in which the quadrant was divided centesimally, the most important of these being Hobert and Ideler's Nouvelles tables trigonometriques (1799), and Borda and Delambre's Tables trigonometriques decimates (1800-1801), both of which are seven-figure tables.

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  • The latter work, which was much used, being difficult to procure, and greater accuracy being required, the French government in 1891 published an eight-figure centesimal table, for every ten seconds, derived from the Tables du Cadastre.

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  • We shall pass over here the labours of Adam Sedgwick (1785-1873) and Sir Roderick Murchison (1792-1871) in the Palaeozoic of England, which because of their close relation to stratigraphy more properly concern geology; but must mention the grand contributions of Joachim Barrande (1799-1883), published in his Systeme silurien du centre de la Boheme, the first volume of which appeared in 1852.

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  • Another early explorer was the French artist Frederic de Waldeck, who published Voyage pittoresque et archeologique dans la province d'Yucatan (Paris, 1838), and whose collection of drawings appeared in 1866, with the descriptive text by Brasseur de Bourbourg, under the title Monuments anciens du Mexique.

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  • One of his most important publications was La Geographie du moyen age (5 vols., Brussels, 1852-1857), with an atlas (1849) of fifty plates entirely engraved by himself, for he rightly attached such importance to the accuracy of his maps that he would not allow them to be executed by any one else.

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  • He now had little to do with politics for some years, and spent his 'time on his Histoire du Consulat et de l'Empire, the first volume of which appeared in 1845.

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  • The armistice having been arranged, and the opportunity having been thus obtained of electing a National Assembly, Thiers was chosen deputy by more than twenty constituencies (of which he preferred Paris), and was at once elected by the Assembly itself practically president, nominally chef du pouvoir executif.

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  • He edited at different times Les Droits de l'homme, Le Cri du peuple, Le Socialiste, but his best-known organ was the weekly Egalite.

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  • The Souvenirs du comte de Caylus, published in 1805, is of very doubtful authenticity.

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  • By this time he had already entered into politics; he had been chef du cabinet of Jules Ferry (1879-1881), though this did not distract him from his literary work.

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  • Macquer (1718-1784) as lecturer in chemistry at the college of the Jardin du Roi, where his lectures attained great popularity.

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  • Both his parents died while he was still a child, and he was left to the guardianship of his elder brother, Rene du Bellay, who neglected his education, leaving him to run wild at La Turmeliere.

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  • When he was twentythree, however, he received permission to go to Poitiers to study law, no doubt with a view to his obtaining perferment through his kinsman the Cardinal Jean du Bellay.

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  • There too he probably met Jacques Peletier du Mans, who had published a translation of the Ars poetica of Horace, with a preface in which much of the programme advocated later by the Pleiade is to be found in outline.

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  • It was probably in 1547 that du Bellay met Ronsard in an inn on the way to Poitiers, an event which may justly be regarded as the starting-point of the French school of Renaissance poetry.

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  • Du Bellay returned with Ronsard to Paris to join the circle of students of the humanities attached to Jean Daurat at the College de Coqueret.

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  • While Ronsard and Antoine de Bail were most influenced by Greek models, du Bellay was more especially a Latinist, and perhaps his preference for a language so nearly connected with his own had some part in determining the more national and familiar note of his poetry.

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  • This book was the expression of the literary principles of the Pleiade as a whole, but although Ronsard was the chosen leader, its redaction was entrusted to du Bellay.

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  • Du Bellay maintained that the French language as it was then constituted was too poor to serve as a medium for the higher forms of poetry, but he contended that by proper cultivation it might be brought on a level with the classical tongues.

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  • Both du Bellay and Ronsard laid stress on the necessity of prudence in these borrowings, and both repudiated the charge of wishing to latinize their mother tongue.

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  • The violent attacks made by du Bellay on Marot and his followers, and on Sibilet, did not go unanswered.

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  • Du Bellay replied to his various assailants in a preface to the second edition (1550) of his sonnet sequence Olive, with which he also published two polemical poems, the Musagnaeomachie, and an ode addressed to Ronsard, Contre les envieux poetes.

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  • Du Bellay did not actually introduce the sonnet into French poetry, but he acclimatized it; and when the fashion of sonneteering became a mania he was one of the first to ridicule its excesses.

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  • About this time du Bellay had a serious illness of two years' duration, from which dates the beginning of his deafness.

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  • This passion finds its clearest expression in the Latin poems. Faustine was guarded by an old and jealous husband, and du Bellay's eventual conquest may have had something to do with his departure for Paris at the end of August 1557.

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  • In 1559 du Bellay published at Poitiers La Nouvelle Maniere de faire son profit des lettres, a satirical epistle translated from the Latin of Adrien Turnebe, and with it Le Poete courtisan, which introduced the formal satire into French poetry.

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  • Quintil du Troussay, and the courtier-poet was generally supposed to be Melin de Saint-Gelais, with whom du Bellay had always, however, been on friendly terms.

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  • In the exercise of these functions Joachim quarrelled with Eustache du Bellay, bishop of Paris, who prejudiced his relations with the cardinal, less cordial since the publication of the outspoken Regrets.

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  • Du Bellay's health was weak; his deafness seriously hindered his official duties; and on the ist of January 1560 he died.

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  • With the exception of his description of the French Revolution, which was chiefly a political manifesto, all his early works refer to the middle ages - De La feodalite, des institutions de Saint Louis et de l'influence de la legislation de ce prince (1822); La Germanic au vin e et au ix' siecle, sa conversion au christianisme, et son introduction dans la societe civilisee de l'Europe occidentale (1834); Essai sur la formation territoriale et politique de la France depuis la fin du xi e siècle jusqu'et la fin du xv e (1836); all of these are rough sketches showing only the outlines of the subject.

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  • His assumed memoir was printed for English readers in 1597 by William Ponsonby under the title of a Historie of the Great Emperor Tamerlan, drawn from the ancient monuments by Messire Jean du Bec, Abbot of Mortimer; and another version of the same book is to be found in the Histoire du Grand Tamerlan, by De Sainctyon, published at Amsterdam in 1678.

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  • But Jean du Bec's account of Timur's appearance is quite different.

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  • The first English translation of Jean du Bec is dated in 1595, the Life by Perondinus in 1600, and Petis de la Croix did not introduce Sharifu 'd-Din or 'Ali Yazdi to European readers till .1722.

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  • Meanwhile he published a book, Les Elements du republicanisme, in which he demanded a division of property, if not equally, at least proportionally among the citizens.

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  • An interesting autobiographical sketch of his youth, Tableau du premier dge, composed in 1786, was published in 1888 in the review, La Revolution francaise.

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  • William Duer (1747-1799) and others in 1787 and officially organized in 1789 as the Compagnie du Scioto in Paris by Joel Barlow, the agent of Duer and his associates abroad, William Playfair, an Englishman, and six Frenchmen.

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  • It has two facades, one overlooking the Place du Palais and the town, the other, more imposing, facing towards a fine park and the forest, which is chiefly of oak and beech and covers over 36,000 acres.

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  • Only 360 Volumes Had Been Published During So Years, When, In 1845, The First Famous Book Appeared Francois Xavier Garneau'S (1809-1866) Histoire Du Canada.

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  • De Montmorency Laval, First Bishop Of Quebec, Brings Him Nearer To His Proper Themes, Which Are Found In Full Perfection In The Chant Du Vieux Soldat Canadien, Composed In 1856 To Honour The First French Man Of War That Visited British Quebec, And Le Drapeau De Carillon (1858), A Centennial Paean For Montcalm'S Canadians At Ticonderoga.

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  • David, Laurier et son temps (Montreal, 1905); see also Henri Moreau, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Premier Ministre du Canada (Paris, 1902); and the collection of Laurier's speeches from 1871 to 1890, compiled by Ulric Barthe (Quebec, 1890).

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  • In addition to the notices in Wadding, du Moustier, Sbaraglia and Fabricius, see C. Siegfried, in Archiv.

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  • It is formed of several streams having their origin in the massifs of the Pic d'Arbizon and the Pic du Midi de Bigorre, but during the first half of its course remains an inconsiderable river.

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  • In the archives of Paris Du Cange was able to consult charters, diplomas, manuscripts and a multitude of printed documents, which were not to be met.

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  • His last work, Chronicon Paschale a mundo condito ad Heraclii imperatoris annum vigesimum (Paris, 1689), was passing through the press when Du Cange died, and consequently it was edited by Etienne Baluze, and published with an eloge of the author prefixed.

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  • His autograph manuscripts and his large and valuable library passed to his eldest son, Philippe du Fresne, who died unmarried in 1692.

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  • They then came to his second son, Francois du Fresne, who sold the collection, the greater part of the manuscripts being purchased by the abbe du Champs.

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  • The French government, however, aware of the importance of all the writings of Du Cange, succeeded, after much trouble, in collecting the greater portion of the manuscripts, which were preserved in the imperial library at Paris.

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  • Lastly, mention should be made of a remarkable but scarce little tract by Gabriel Sacy, printed at Cairo in June 1902, and entitled Du regne de Dieu et de l'Agneau, connu sous le nom de Babysme.

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  • At the outset of the Revolution he foresaw its importance, and in the Voix du citoyen, which he published in 1789, predicted the course which events would take.

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  • It contains all the literary works, the Aventures du baron de Faeneste (1617), and the Memoires (6 vols., 1873-1892).

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  • Its eggs were first sent to Europe by Duchene du Bellecourt, French consulgeneral in Japan in 1861; but early in March following they hatched out, when no leaves on which the larvae would feed were to be found.

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  • After protracted experimenting Sir Thomas Wardle was able in 1873 to show a series of tussurs well dyed in all the darker shades of colour, but the lighter and bright blues, pinks, scarlets, &c., he could not produce, Subsequently Tessie du Motay found that the fawn colour of natural tussur could be discharged by solution of permanganate of potash, but the oxidizing action was so rapid and violent that it destroyed the fibre itself.

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  • The Lay of Orpheus is known to us only through an English imitation; the Lai du cor was composed by Robert Biket, an Anglo-Norman poet of the 12th century (Wulff, Lund, 1888).

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  • These congresses have been supplemented by national congresses in ' See Annuaire du mouvement pacifaste pour l'anne'e 1910, published by the Bureau International de la Paix, at Bern.

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  • Its Correspondance bimensuelle and Annuaire du mouvement pacifiste are well known, and its obliging hon.

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  • On the breaking up of the gardes du corps Biran retired to his patrimonial inheritance of Grateloup, near Bergerac, where his retired life preserved him from the horrors of the Revolution.

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  • Raimond Balthazar Phelypeaux, seigneur du Verger, a member of the La Vrilliere branch, was sent as ambassador to Savoy in 1700, where he discovered the intrigues of the duke of Savoy, Victor Amadeus II., against France; and when war was declared he was kept a close prisoner by the duke (1703-1704).

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  • Besides a number of archaeological works, especially in the department of numismatics, he published a compilation from the Arabic, Persian and Turkish, entitled Paroles remarquables, bons mots et maximes des orientaux (1694), and a translation from an Arabic manuscript, De l'origine et du progres du café (1699).

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  • He agrees with du Bois-Reymond in refusing to regard the universe as a vast brain animated by conscious mind.

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  • Among famous residents are found the first earl of Chatham, John Constable, George Romney, George du Maurier, Joseph Butler, author of the Analogy, Sir Richard Steele, John Keats, the sisters Joanna and Agnes Baillie, Leigh Hunt and many others.

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  • His great reputation and his diplomatic experience gave a special weight to the attacks which he published on the policy of the continental allies, two of his works attracting special attention, Du Congres de Troppau ou Examen des pretentions des monarchies absolues a l'egard de la monarchie constitutionelle de Naples (Paris, 1821), and Les Cabinets et les peuples depuis 1815 jusqu'd la fin de 1822 (Paris, 1822).

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  • See, for information specially relating to the whole subject, the Abbe Desgodin's Mission du Thibet de 1855 a 1870 (Verdun, 1872); and "Account of the Pundit's Journey in Great Tibet," in the Royal Geographical Society's Journal for 1877.

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  • On April 21st, 1798, occurred the famous duel of the "Mars" with the "Hercule," fought in the dusk near the Bec du Raz.

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  • The Romantic movement helped, with its idealization of a past but vaguely realized and imperfectly understood, and Chateaubriand heralded in the Catholic reaction with his Genie du Christianisme (1801) a brilliant if superficial attack on the encyclopaedists and their neo-Paganism, and a glorification of the Christian Church as supreme not only in the regions of faith and morals, but also in those of intellect and art.

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  • More weighty was the Du Pape of Joseph de Maistre (1819), closely reasoned and fortified with a wealth of learning, which had an enormous influence upon all those who thought that they saw in the union of " altar and throne " the palladium of society.

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  • In 1796 he published two pamphlets in defence of the Directory and against the counter-revolution, "De la force du gouvernement actuel et de la necessite de se Tallier" and "Des reactions politiques."

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  • The history of the Foraes of the Portuguese towns, and of the Fors du Beam, is precisely analogous to that of the fueros of Castile.

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  • In 1685 he published Sentimens de quelques theologiens de Hollande sur l'histoire critique du Vieux Testament composee par le P. Richard Simon, in which, while pointing out what he believed to be the faults of that author, he undertook to make some positive contributions towards a right understanding of the Bible.

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  • See Rhode, Res Lemnicae; Conze, Reise auf den Inseln des Thrakischen Meeres (from which the above-mentioned facts about the present state of the island are taken); also Hunt in Walpole's Travels; Belon du Mans, Observations de plusieurs singularitez, &c.; Finlay, Greece under the Romans; von Hammer, Gesch.

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  • Forbes, with Agassiz, Desor and Du Chatelier, made the fourth ascent by the 1812 route.

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  • He was the son of a cutler, and at the age of twenty-two was made a master in the College du Plessis.

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  • Soon after this he published his first work, Examen de livre de la reunion du Christianisme (1671).

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  • On the suppression of the academy of Sedan in 1681, Jurieu received an invitation to a church at Rouen, but, afraid to remain in France on account of his forthcoming work, La Politique du clerge de France, he went to Holland and was pastor of the Walloon church of Rotterdam till his death on the 11th of January 1713.

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  • Jurieu defended the doctrines of Protestantism with great ability against the attacks of Antoine Arnauld, Pierre Nicole and Bossuet, but was equally ready to enter into dispute with his fellow Protestant divines (with Louis Du Moulin and Claude Payon, for instance) when their opinions differed from his own even on minor matters.

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  • The thegn, the ealdorman, the king himself, fought on foot; the horse might bear him to the field, but when the fighting 2 Du Cange, Gloss., s.v.

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  • The bachelor and the banneret were both equally knights, only the one was of greater distinction and authority 3 Du Cange, Dissertation, xxi., and Lancelot du Lac, among other romances.

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  • The derivation of " adouber," corresponding to " dub," from " adoptare," which is given by Du Cange, and would connect the ceremony with " adoptio per arma," is certainly inaccurate.

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  • In England all the barons or greater nobility were entitled to bear banners, and therefore Du Cange's observations would apply to them as well as to the barons or greater nobility of France and Spain.

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  • But in the French Gesta Romanorum the warlike form alone is given, and it is quoted by both Selden and Du Cange.

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