Dryden sentence examples

dryden
  • I will not say, ` the zeal of God's house has eaten him up '; but I am sure it has devoured some part of his good manners and civility" (Dryden, Works, ed.

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  • Dryden, while compelled to honour him as an upright judge, overwhelmed his memory with scathing, if venal, satire; and Dryden's satire has been accepted as truth by later historians.

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  • "He once more joined us to the continent," wrote Marvell, while Dryden describes him as teaching the British lion to roar.

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  • Comparetti's Edipo and Jebb's introduction for the Oedipus of Dryden, Corneille and Voltaire; A.

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  • Oldham's verse is rugged, and his rhymes often defective, but he met with a generous appreciation from Dryden, whose own satiric bent was perhaps influenced by his efforts.

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  • The real wit and rigour of Oldham's satirical poetry are undeniable, while its faults - its frenzied extravagance and lack of metrical polish - might, as Dryden suggests, have been cured with time, for Oldham was only thirty when he died.

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  • Among the more illustrious of his pupils may be mentioned South, Dryden, Locke, Prior and Bishop Atterbury.

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  • These were written in their author's chosen vein of light satire, and Dryden praised them as highly effective within their own range.

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  • Cecilia, whose musical fame rests on a passing notice in her legend that she praised God by instrumental as well as vocal music, has inspired many a masterpiece in art, including the Raphael at Bologna, the Rubens in Berlin, the Domenichino in Paris, and in literature, where she is commemorated especially by Chaucer's "Seconde Nonnes Tale," and by Dryden's famous ode, set to music by Handel in 1736, and later by Sir Hubert Parry (1889).

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  • In 1673 the poet Dryden produced his tragedy of Amboyna, or the Cruelties of the Dutch to the English Merchants.

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  • Brydone, Teonge, John Dryden jun., W.

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  • Hallam's earliest literary work was undertaken in connexion with the great organ of the Whig party, the Edinburgh Review, where his review of Scott's Dryden attracted much notice.

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  • In 1670 the owner was the celebrated Thomas Thynne satirized in Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel, and Bishop Ken found a home at Longleat for twenty years after the loss of his bishopric.

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  • This anecdote forms the subject of Dryden's Ode to Saint Cecilia's Day.

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  • Her first recorded appearance on the stage was in 1665 as Cydaria, Montezuma's daughter, in Dryden's Indian Emperor, a serious part ill-suited to her.

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  • Her last appearance was as Almahide to the Almanzor of Hart, in Dryden's The Conquest of Granada (1670), the production of which had been postponed some months for her return to the stage after the birth of her first son by the king.

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  • As an actress Nell Gwyn was largely indebted to Dryden, who seems to have made a special study of her airy, irresponsible personality, and who kept her supplied with parts which suited her.

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  • Among the Lives the best are perhaps those of Cowley, Dryden and Pope.

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  • He was laid, a week later, in Westminster Abbey, among the eminent men of whom he had been the historian - Cowley and Denham, Dryden and Congreve, Gay, Prior and Addison.

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  • In November Dryden published Absalom and Achitophel.

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  • Hunting the Le Art de venerie, translated with preface and notes by Sir Henry Dryden (1893), new edition by Miss A.

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  • Dryden (5909), including The Craft of Venerie from a 15th-century MS. and a 13thcentury poem La Chasse d'on cerf.

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  • Both his collegiate and editorial duties stimulated his critical powers, and the publication in the two magazines, followed by republication in book form, of a series of studies of great authors, gave him an important place as a critic. Shakespeare, Dryden, Lessing, Rousseau, Dante, Spenser, Wordsworth, Milton, Keats, Carlyle, Thoreau, Swinburne, Chaucer, Emerson, Pope, Gray - these are the principal subjects of his prose, and the range of topics indicates the catholicity of his taste.

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  • He was deeply implicated in the rising of 1715, the preparations for which he assisted at Carnwath and at Dryden, his Edinburgh residence.

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  • Of the former kind were Homer, Lucretius, Burns, Scott; of the latter were Euripides, Dryden, Milton.

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  • She was the daughter of a clergyman named Francis Marbury, and, according to tradition, was a cousin of John Dryden.

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  • J/n==Authorities== - Oates's, Dangerfield's and Bedloe's Narratives; State Trials; Journals of Houses of Parliament; North's Examen; the various memoirs and diaries of the period; Fuller's Narrative; Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel; Burnet's History; Narcissus Luttrell's Relation.

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  • In dealing with atheism Cudworth's method is to marshal the atheistic arguments elaborately, so elaborately that Dryden remarked "he has raised such objections against the being of a God and Providence that many think he has not answered them"; then in his last chapter, which by itself is as long as an ordinary treatise, he confutes them with all the reasons that his reading could supply.

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  • There are various makes of perfecting machines of which the Dryden & Foord is shown in fig.

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  • - Dryden & Foord's Perfecting (two-cylinders) Machine.

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  • Samuel von Triewald (1688-1743) played a very imperfect Dryden to Dalin's Pope.

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  • At the close of the 17th century Dryden greatly excelled in this class of poetry, and his epistles to Congreve (1694) and to the duchess of Ormond (1700) are among the most graceful and eloquent that we possess.

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  • Dryden translated i., iii., vi., x.

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  • They were excessively admired by his own and the next generation, praised by Dryden, paraphrased by Pope, and then entirely neglected for a whole century.

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  • To the odd terminology of Donne's poetic philosophy Dryden gave the name of "metaphysics," and Johnson, borrowing the suggestion, invented the title of the "metaphysical school" to describe, not Donne only, but all the amorous and philosophical poets who succeeded him, and who employed a similarly fantastic language, and who affected odd figurative inversions.

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  • Though his favourite author was Dryden, whose prose is uniformly manly and simple, and though he had a keen eye for faults of taste in the style of others, Canning had himself a leaning to preciosity and tinsel.

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  • He married Elizabeth, niece of Sir Erasmus Dryden, the poet's grandfather.

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  • That Corneille was by no means destitute of the critical faculty his Discourses and the Examens of his plays (often admirably acute, and, with Dryden's subsequent prefaces, the originals to a great extent of specially modern criticism) show well enough.

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  • From the heroine who is, in a phrase of Dryden's, "one of the coolest and most insignificant" heroines ever drawn, to the undignified Valens, the termagant Marcelle, and the peevish Placide, there is hardly a good character.

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  • In the deathless volume of Chatiments, which appeared in 1853, his indignation, his genius, and his faith found such utterance and such expression as must recall to the student alternately the lyric inspiration of Coleridge and Shelley, the prophetic inspiration of Dante and Isaiah, the satiric inspiration of Juvenal and Dryden.

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  • allowed an indenture whereby John Dryden a poor Child of the Parish of S t.

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  • thus miscellaneous works by Milton, Dryden, Defoe and Swift, among others, were excluded by the corpus team.

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  • John Dryden (1631-1700) also wrote epic poetry, on classical and biblical subjects.

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  • He dealt with the immodesty of the contemporary stage, supporting his contentions by a long series of references attesting the comparative decency of Latin and Greek drama; with the profane language indulged in by the players; the abuse of the clergy common in the drama; the encouragement of vice by representing the vicious characters as admirable and successful; and finally he supported his general position by the analysis of particular plays, Dryden's Amphitryon, Vanbrugh's Relapse and D'Urfey's Don Quixote.

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  • Dryden acknowledged, in the preface to his Fables, the justice of Collier's strictures, though he protested against the manner of the onslaught; 1 but Congreve made an angry reply; Vanbrugh and others followed.

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  • Dryden's Amphitryon or the two Sosias (1690) is based partly on the Amphitruo, partly on Moliere's adaptation thereof; Fielding's Miser (acted 1732) on Moliere's L'Avare rather than on the Aulularia, and his Intriguing Chambermaid (acted 1733) on Regnard's Le Retour imprevu rather than on the Mostellaria.

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  • By the common methods of discipline, at the expense of many tears and some blood, I purchased the knowledge of the Latin syntax," but manifestly, in his own opinion, the Arabian Nights, Pope's Homer, and Dryden's Virgil, eagerly read, had at this period exercised a much more powerful influence on his intellectual development than Phaedrus and Cornelius Nepos, "painfully construed and darkly understood."

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  • Le Feint Astrologue, imitated from the Spanish, and imitated by Dryden, came next year.

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  • Pepys was delighted with the playing of "pretty, witty Nell," but when he saw her as Florimel in Dryden's Secret Love, or the Maiden Queen, he wrote "so great a performance of a comical part was never, I believe, in the world before" and, "so done by Nell her merry part as cannot be better done in nature" (Diary, March 25, 1667).

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  • Earlier translations in verse are those in Dryden's Miscellany (vol.

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  • A good example of this is the Dryden High School in New York.

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  • While the Dryden H.S. site has the best of intentions, the many broken links are an indication of the difficulty of maintaining art department school websites.

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