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dry

dry

dry Sentence Examples

  • With so many people at their house, it was fortunate that the weather was warm and dry so they could utilize the courtyard for the children.

  • Carmen's mouth went dry with fear.

  • Her mouth felt dry and her voice was barely a whisper.

  • Her mouth went dry and her stomach lurched violently.

  • "That wasn't exactly what I had in mind," she answered in a dry tone.

  • The money would dry, and her clothes could be washed.

  • By the time he set her down safe and dry on the other side, her hands were going numb and her shoulders were aching.

  • His smile was dry, but his eyes twinkled with mirth.

  • Her mouth went dry and she involuntarily licked her lips.

  • It's almost dry and I hate it when it gets all wrinkled.

  • Her mouth felt dry and her knees weak.

  • As she watched, the horses plunged down a dune, sending a spray of white sand into the dry air.

  • Warmth deserted her face and her mouth went dry.

  • They were running low on water, so it was a dry camp.

  • Her throat was dry and her lips swollen.

  • Her head was pounding and her throat was dry.

  • He waded out of the water and laid his socks and shirt on a rock in the sun to dry.

  • It wouldn't take long to dry in this heat.

  • In dry gourds, they were served a hot tea made from the ground leaves of something Bordeaux called the lip fern.

  • Mary's tone became dry again.

  • The fingers ceased their massage and he took her arm, leading her to a dry rock.

  • She laughed at his dry humor.

  • He returned to the kitchen after a few minutes in dry clothes, his hair freshly combed.

  • He nodded, continuing to dry the pan.

  • We shook ourselves dry on the porch and returned to the warmth of the cabin.

  • When Howie ran dry, we began discussing reasonable explanations for what he was seeing.

  • If they succeeded, they'd stick your guy... or girl, in a box in McLean and pump 'em dry.

  • Just pretend it's a really dry martini.

  • It was, however, incredibly dry.

  • She tugged off her shirt and wrapped it in towels to dry it before tossing it in the dryer.

  • She blotted herself dry and wrapped herself in the towel.

  • It was almost dry.

  • Didn't stop to think we might be in the middle of helping when you sucked us dry?

  • Jonny looked healthy and rested, his dark eyes swirling, his clothing dry and neat despite the storm.

  • She leaned back against the door, mouth dry and legs shaky.

  • He touched her face, and her mouth went dry.

  • She shook her head, mouth too dry to speak.

  • It was dry and her gums irritated.

  • Her mouth was dry.

  • Despite the water, her mouth was dry and aching almost to the point of pain.

  • The air was hot and dry, the two suns too dim to shed much light into the black fortress.

  • It would cost more than seven dollars to have them dry cleaned and pressed.

  • A few feet further, in a dry grotto scooped out from the main walkway, something glinted in Dean's flashlight.

  • "It shouldn't be much of a load," he said as he ate his dry toast—butter was fattening.

  • That's been a dry hole for sixty years, Roger said.

  • You're just as mad at him because you think he hung you out to dry when he didn't answer your call the night Billy was killed.

  • You would bleed her dry the first night.

  • While she looked healthy, she bore blood on her neck that made him feel ill at the thought that Darkyn was bleeding her dry.

  • Not at all like Darkyn was bleeding her dry or torturing her.

  • She shut the cabinet door and hung the towel over the oven door handle to dry.

  • Carmen's mouth went dry.

  • Her mouth was so dry it was hard to speak, but she managed.

  • She attempted to wet her dry lips with an equally dry tongue.

  • As she entered the kitchen, it was obvious he had made coffee and eaten a bowl of dry cereal.

  • The dry note in his voice made her think he had his own inside joke.

  • Wynn was brilliant at small talk, distracting her and making her laugh with his dry, morbid humor.

  • She pulled her keys out of her purse and clicked the unlock button, mouth dry as the vehicle's lights blinked.

  • Deidre's mouth was dry and her hands shaking, but she nodded.

  • His dark, dry humor left her entertained – and baffled.

  • She'd fallen asleep in Kris's library after half a bottle of whiskey and awoken in her own bed with a throbbing headache and dry mouth.

  • She trailed the robed man through two doors and into a hot, dry night.

  • He didn't care that Hell would suck him dry.

  • He got off on it as he dry humped her and sucked her life from her.

  • She knew he could've taken so much more, made himself stronger by bleeding her dry.

  • She changed quickly into dry clothing before hurrying down the back stairwell.

  • The feel of several sets of eyes assessing her made her heart beat harder and her mouth dry.

  • It was a planet, dusty red, as if it were nothing but dry desert.

  • The air was dry and hot, as if she were in a sauna.

  • In the center of the chamber was a small fountain whose waters had long gone dry.

  • Ouray County was perfect for invigorating outdoor activity, with its crystal clear air and dry, windless temperatures just below freezing.

  • A real tree is the only way to go but they sure are a mess, especially out here in the dry air.

  • Cynthia carefully hand washed the articles of clothing from Fred's box of historical goodies and hung them outside in the sun to dry.

  • Edith looked up, rubbed a sleeve across her eyes to dry them, then brushed her hands down the white dress, smoothing the fabric against her legs.

  • The air was dry and windless.

  • Your tent has to protect against wind, water and snow to maintain a warm and dry climate inside.

  • Here the road was dry and only a few cars passed him before he drifted past a private hot spring, along the wide curve and by the County fairgrounds before entering Ridgway.

  • He prided himself on the fact that he had never killed a human by sucking them dry.

  • Delivery people scurried about situating floral arrangements and dry ice.

  • Carmen ran bluntly manicured fingers through her cropped off curls as her tongue explored a new crack in her dry lips.

  • Carmen eyed Katie coolly and responded in a dry tone.

  • "He wasn't so gentle this morning," he replied in a dry tone.

  • A cold feeling constricted her throat and she convulsed in a dry heave.

  • As soon as I dry her off.

  • As soon as I dry Tessa off and get the kid in here, I'll go in and change.

  • She lit the stove in the house and went to the bedroom for some dry clothes.

  • The dry weather was perfect for building.

  • She hacked at the dry earth with her hoe.

  • "Okay," Gerald's said in a dry tone.

  • Her mouth felt dry.

  • The angel looked up at him doubtfully then picked his way across roots to the pocket in the tree trunk.  Rhyn scavenged for what dry wood he could find and took the armful back to the tree.  Toby was huddled in the small cave, shaking with cold.

  • The angel was still shivering despite the fire.  He needed dry clothes and probably, human food.  There was one place where Rhyn could find them.

  • He retraced his steps a few paces to assure he was on the soft dry sand above the high-tide line, carefully placed his towel down, sat on it and removed his shoes and socks.

  • When he replayed his dictated first draft, the report seemed dry but the evidence produced an overwhelming endorsement that there was no logical reason why Jeffrey Byrne might skip.

  • The bag contained a dress, a slip, under­wear and a two-piece pajama set but no robe or flannel running suit or anything dry and warm.

  • He shrugged off the raincoat and stepped out of the wet trousers, using one of his smaller towels to partially dry off before slipping on pajama bottoms and a long-sleeved shirt.

  • After patting her body as dry as he dared, Dean reached over and grabbed her night bag, pulling out her pajamas.

  • There was nary a dry eye in the place.

  • As luck would have it, as he was leaving the place, he nearly knocked over Cora Abernathy, who had just left the dry cleaners next door.

  • They been kinda dry lately but I've got credit too, you know.

  • "Well Sean," Alex replied in a dry tone, "I hope some of it was good."

  • "This should be good," Carmen remarked in a dry tone that sent another bout of laughter around the room.

  • Katie's tone was dry.

  • We'll get a bed out of your house and put it in one of the rooms here so you'll have a dry place to sleep.

  • It's been so hot and dry – I'm surprised you're getting anything out of it.

  • His voice was dry.

  • She was living in a warm dry house with all the food she could eat and no worries.

  • Carmen's mouth went dry and her face flamed.

  • It was a dry county, so he'd have to drive a ways to do that.

  • "I'm still here," came the dry reply.

  • The snow had melted on the mountain trail, and the dry gray rocks provided sufficient traction for Ed's hooves as they climbed higher into the hills.

  • "That's amazing," Alex said in a dry tone.

  • The air was clear and dry, the sand dotted with small shrubs.

  • The dry desert heat gave way to cool sea breeze, and a massive apple tree protected her from the sun overhead.

  • Pulling a knife free, she dug into the dry ground, not expecting to find the treasure she'd buried so long ago.

  • Jenn gazed in his direction for a long moment, unable to place the dry humor in his voice.

  • Her mouth was too dry to respond.

  • Her mouth went dry and her heart skipped several beats.

  • "A poor brother I'd have made," Vara said with a dry chuckle.

  • "Oh, that's why I came out here," he responded in a dry tone.

  • Her stomach felt tight and she licked dry lips.

  • The nausea returned suddenly and she leaned over the sink with a dry heave.

  • She placed the skillet on the stove and turned the burner on to dry it thoroughly.

  • She tried to moisten her lips with a dry tongue.

  • He dodged the spray of dry earth and stared at the clump that fell at his feet.

  • After a breakfast of dry cereal, she donned the work gloves she had brought and retrieved the weed whip from the shed.

  • You need to dry off.

  • Her mouth felt suddenly dry and goose bumps sprang up all over her bare arms.

  • At the cabin, she washed a dress in the sink and hung it on the line to dry, taking pride in the fact that she was making do with what was available.

  • She staggered and wiped an arm across her hot dry forehead.

  • She shrugged nonchalantly, snapping a dry vine off and examining it as though unaware of the mockery of his question.

  • I drank him dry.

  • Just bleed you dry, Xander assured her.

  • The former vamp jerked and clutched at his hands at the pain but soon went still as Xander bled him close to dry.

  • I bleed people dry.

  • No. Just bleeds them dry or vamps them.

  • She smiled at the dry note in his voice.

  • The Traveling was quick and transported them from the quiet, dry heat of Texas to the heavy, warm ocean air.

  • It is permanent in dry air, but in the finely divided state it rapidly combines with oxygen, the compact metal requiring a strong heating to bring about this combination.

  • By dry distillation it gives ammonium cyanide.

  • Cold dry winds, often of great violence, occur in the Rhone valley (the Mistral), in Istria, and Dalmatia (the Bora), and in the western Caucasus.

  • In Sicily and southern Italy the Sirocco occurs at all seasons; it is a dry, dusty wind from south-east or south-west.

  • In dry weather the electric potential in the atmosphere is normally positive relative to the earth, and increases with the height.

  • It is thus customary in calculating diurnal inequalities either to take no account of days on which there is an appreciable rainfall, or else to form separate tables for " dry " or " fine " days and for " all " days.

  • and noon during westerly winds, which at Madras are usually very dry and dusty.

  • With certain dry winds, notably Fan winds in Austria and Switzerland, dissipation becomes very high.

  • The stable manure is taken into the tortuous passages of these cellars, and the spawn introduced from masses of dry dung where it occurs naturally.

  • In France mushroom-growers do not use the compact blocks or bricks of spawn so familiar in England, but much smaller flakes or "leaves" of dry dung in which the spawn or mycelium can be seen to exist.

  • The droppings of stall-fed horses, or of such as have been kept on dry food, should be made use of.

  • The material employed in all cases is the droppings of horses, which should be collected fresh, and spread out in thin layers in a dry place, a portion of the short litter being retained well moistened by horse-urine.

  • This fungus, Marasmius Oreades, is more universally used in France and Italy than in England, although it is well known and frequently used both in a fresh and in a dry state in England.

  • Even into his mythological learning he breathes a life to which these dry scholars are strangers.

  • On the highlands, however, which contain extensive open campos, the climate, though dry and hot, is considered healthy.

  • over the sill at average water-level, the tidal range at Malta being but slight; and opening into French creek a dry dock of more modern construction, known as No.

  • By reason of its dry and bracing climate, Aliwal North is also a favourite residence of sufferers from chest complaints.

  • It has a dry and equable climate and beautiful scenery.

  • It has post and telegraph offices and a lively trade in wool, cotton and dry fruits (almonds, pistachios).

  • The spores differ from those of ferns in their outer coat (exospore) being split up into four club-shaped hygroscopic threads (elaters) which are curled when moist, but become straightened when dry.

  • A fire without light, compared to the heat which gathers in a haystack when the hay has been stored before it was properly dry - heat, in short, as an agitation of the particles - is the motive cause of the contraction and dilatations of the heart.

  • Ormsby, in 1852, also reported a river, the Asas Amir, as coming down from the Sinjar hills and joining the Tigris near Kal-'at Shergat, about 35° 30' N.; but this seems now to be a dry bed.

  • The herm is a dry work and the head upon the coins shows various degrees of idealization.

  • To prevent the atmosphere from becoming unduly dry a pan of water is fitted to the stove; this serves to moisten the air before it passes into the distributing flues.

  • The flood water brought down by the Shari in December and January causes the lake to rise to a maximum of 24 ft., the water spreading over low-lying ground, left dry again in May or June.

  • The elevated plateaus between these ranges are semiarid and inhospitable, and are covered with extensive saline basins, which become lagoons in the wet season and morasses or dry saltpans in the dry season.

  • In the Andean region, a dry, hot wind from the north or north-west, called the Zonda, blows with great intensity, especially in September - October, and causes much discomfort and suffering.

  • Its greatest defect is the cold southerly and westerly storms, which cause great losses in cattle and sheep. The Patagonian coast-line and mountainous region are also healthy, having a dry and bracing climate.

  • In the north, however, the hot lowlands are malarial and unsuited to north European settlement, while the dry, elevated plateaus are celebrated for their healthiness, those of Catamarca having an excellent reputation as a sanatorium for sufferers from pulmonary and bronchial diseases.

  • The so-called " pampas-grass " (Gynerium argenteum) is not found at all on the dry lands, but in the wet grounds of the south and south-west.

  • In the dry, saline regions of the west and north-west, where the rainfall is slight, there are large thickets of low-growing, thorny bushes, poor in foliage.

  • The naval arsenal is situated on the " north basin " of the Buenos Aires port, and the military port at Bahia Blanca is provided with a dry dock of the largest size, and extensive repair shops.

  • During the later part of the Cretaceous period the sea gradually retreated and left the whole country dry.

  • From July to November the clouds hang low on the mountains, and give moisture to the upper zone, while the climate of the lower is dry.

  • Berzelius by the dry distillation of tartaric or racemic acids (Pogg.

  • It is subject, however, to extreme and rapid variations in temperature, to alternations of dry and humid winds (the latter, called catias, being irritating and oppressive), to chilling night mists brought up from the coast by the westerly winds, and to other influences productive of malaria, catarrh, fevers, bilious disorders and rheumatism.

  • They may be prepared by the dry distillation of the ammonium salts.

  • A dry season, which lasts from May to October, is followed by a rainy season, divided into the early winter and latter rains.

  • Boron nitride BN is formed when boron is burned either in air or in nitrogen, but can be obtained more readily by heating to redness in a platinum crucible a mixture of one part of anhydrous borax with two parts of dry ammonium chloride.

  • There is, besides, a powerful determining cause in the uniform character and undivided extent of its dry interior.

  • The weather on the whole is remarkably dry.

  • Western Australia has practically only two seasons, the winter or wet season, which commences in April and ends in October, and Western the summer or dry season, which comprises the remainder of the year.

  • The saurians or lizards are numerous, chiefly on dry sandy or rocky ground in the tropical region.

  • Many of the gumtrees throw off their bark, so that it hangs in long dry strips from the trunk and branches, a feature familiar in " bush " pictures.

  • The order is easily distinguished by the hard, dry, woody texture of the leaves and the dehiscent fruits.

  • The chief complaint which Europeans make concerning it is the extreme humidity, which causes the heat to be more oppressive than is the case where the air is dry.

  • Pictet and P. Crepieux (Comptes rendus, 1903, 137, p. 860) and Pictet and Rotschy (Ber., 1904, 37, p. 1225):, -aminopyridine is converted into its mucate, which by dry distillation gives N-13-pyridylpyrrol.

  • Two government dry docks are available for merchant vessels.

  • It is then carefully dried by the free action of the air, and when dry built into long narrow stacks until needed for use.

  • "To read Plautus is to be once for all disabused of the impression that Latin is a dry and uninteresting language" (Skutsch, in Die Cultur der Gegenwart; 1905).

  • The dry wind from the Sahara called harmattan, which carries great quantities of fine red sand, causes a fall of temperature in the (European) summer.

  • In the time of Bach such writing was beautifully suited to enliven the dry glitter of the harpsichord, and Bach's duets for clavier and violin seem to have been sometimes played as trios with a violoncello playing from the clavier bass.

  • The climate throughout Rajputana is very dry and hot during the summer; while in the winter it is much colder in the north than in the lower districts, with hard frost and ice on the Bikanir borders.

  • It is essential that the paper covering be loose, so as to ensure that each wire is enclosed in a coating not of paper only, but also of air; the wires in fact are really insulated from each other by the dry air, the loose paper acting merely as a separator to prevent them from coming into contact.

  • The metal is quite permanent in dry air, but in moist air it becomes coated with a superficial layer of the oxide; it burns on heating to redness, forming a brown coloured oxide; and is readily soluble in mineral acids with formation of the corresponding salts.

  • The climate is hot and humid in the lowlands and along the lower Parnahyba, but in the uplands it is dry with high sun temperatures and cool nights.

  • The food of the camel consists chiefly of the leaves of trees, shrubs and dry hard vegetables, which it is enabled to tear down and masticate by means of its powerful front teeth.

  • That city, like Ravenna, originally stood in the midst of a lagoon; and the coast east of it to near Monfalcone, where it meets the mountains, is occupied by similar expanses of water, which are, however, becoming gradually converted into dry land.

  • From the proximity of the mountains to the sea none of the rivers in this part of Italy has a long course, and they are generally mere mountain torrents, rapid and swollen in winter and spring, and almost dry in summer.

  • While the rugged and mountainous district of Calabria, extending nearly due south for a distance of more than 150 m., thus derives its character and configuration almost wholly from the range of the Apennines, the long spur-like promontory which projects towards the east to Brindisi and Otranto is merely a continuation of the low tract of Apulia, with a dry calcareous soil of Tertiary origin.

  • The results areaa lack of water-supply and of water-power, the streams becoming mere torrents for a short period and perfectly dry for the rest of the year; lack of a sufficient supply of timber; the denudation of the soil on the hills, and, where the valleys below have insufficient drainage, the formation of swamps.

  • Of the surplus 1,000,000 was allocated to the improvement of posts, telegraphs and telephones; 1,000,000 to public works (~72o,ooo for harbour improvement and 280,000 for internal navigation); 200,000 to the navy (~I32,ooo for a second dry dock at Taranto and 68,000 for coal purchase); and 200,000 as a nucleus of a fund for the purchase of valuable works of art which are in danger of exportation.

  • His language was antiquated and his style dry, but his work was considered important.

  • Possibly, fuller study of religions may help theologians to formulate the imperial claims of Christianity more happily than in the dry contrast between what is " revealed " and what is " natural."

  • Of the dry antiseptics iodoform is constantly used in septic or tuberculous wounds, and it appears to have an inhibitory action on Bacillus tuberculosis.

  • The growth of an organic being is simply a process of enlargement, as a particle of dry gelatine may be swelled up by the intussusception of water; its death is a shrinkage, such as the swelled jelly might undergo on desiccation.

  • All yield a soft, easily-worked timber, which, though very perishable when exposed to weather, possesses sufficient durability when kept dry to give the trees a certain economic value.

  • Galen believed in the doctrine of humours originated by Hippocrates, which supposes the condition of the body to depend upon the proper mixture of the four elements, hot, cold, moist and dry, and that drugs possess the same elementary qualities, and that on the principle of contraries one or other was indicated, e.g.

  • Molybdenum pentachloride, MoC1 5r is obtained when molybdenum is gently heated in dry chlorine (L.

  • The limit of each years increment of secondary wood, in those plants whose yearly activity is interrupted by a regular winter or dry season, is marked by a more or less distinct line, which is produced by the sharp contrast between the wood formed in the late summer of one year (characterized by the sparseness or small diameter of the tracheal elements, or by the preponderance of fibres, or by a combination of these characters, giving a denseness to the wood) and the loose spring wood of the next year, with its absence of fibres, or its numerous large tracheae.

  • The cortical tissues gradually shrink and dry up, turning brown and black in patches or all over, and when at length the cambium and medullary ray tissues dry up the whole twig dies off.

  • Drought and consequent defoliation result in the same, and these considerations help us to understand how old-established trees in parks, &c., apparently in good general health, become stag-headed by the necrosis of their upper twigs and smaller branches: the roots have here penetrated into subsoil or other unsuitable medium, or some drainage scheme has deprived them of water, &c., and a dry summer just turns the scale.

  • Xerophytes.These are plants which live in very dry places, where the substratum has less than 10% of water.

  • Mesophytes.-These are plants which live in localities which are neither specially dry nor specially wet nor specially salty.

  • A soil may be physically wet; but if the plants absorb the water only with difficulty, as in a salt marsh, then the soil is, as regards plants, physiologically dry.

  • All soils which are physically dry are also physiologically dry; and hence only the physiological dryness or wetness of soils need be considered in ecology.

  • Schimper used the term xerophytes to include plants which live in soils which are physiologically dry, and the term hygrophytes those which live in soils which are physiologically wet or damp. Schimper recognized that the two classes are connected by transitional forms, and that it is useless to attempt to give the matter a statistical basis.

  • The soil is physiologically dry.

  • frbs which occur on particular dry kinds of soil, such as lime- rf one rocks, stiff clay, and so forth (Warming, 1909: 289).

  • The climate is very dry, and the properties of the soil are 0

  • The soil is physically or physiologically dry.

  • Xerophytes.Plants which grow in very dry soils; e.g., most hens, Ammophila (Psamma) arenaria, Elymus arenarius, Anasis aretioides, Zilla macro ptera, Sedum acre, Bupleurum spinosum, rtemisia herba-alba, Zollikofferia arborescens.

  • Physically wet but physiologically dry ha bit ats,f with the accompanying plant communities of fens, moors, and salt marshes.

  • Physically and physiologically dry habitats, with the accompanying plant communities of sand dunes and sandy heaths with little humus in the soil.

  • Bog Xerophytes live in the peaty soil of fens and moors which are physically wet, but which are said to be physiologically dry.

  • The xerophytic characters being present, it is not surprising that many marsh plants, like Juncus effusus and Iris pseudacorus, are able to survive in dry situations, such as banks and even garden rockeries.

  • The rows of cells from which the laticiferous vessels are formed can be distinguished in many cases in the young embryo while still in the dry seed (Scott), but the latex vessels in process of formation are more easily seen when germination has begun.

  • For instance, some xerophytes are dry and hard in structure, whilst others are succulent and fleshy.

  • The western dry areas have the old-world leguminous Astragalus and Prosopis (Mesquit), but are especially characterized by the northward extension of the new-world tropical Cactaceae, Mgmmillaria, Cereus and Opuntia, by succulent Amar llideae such as A gave (of which the so-called American aloe is a type), and by arborescent Liliaceae (Yucca).

  • area containing all dry land, the transitional area including the submarine slopes down to 1000 fathoms, and the abysmal area consisting of the floor of the ocean beyond that depth; and Mill proposed to take the line of mean-sphere level, instead of the empirical depth of moo fathoms, as the boundary between the transitional and abysmal areas.

  • The area of the dry land was taken as 28.3% of the surface of the globe, and that of the oceans as 71.7%.

  • The forms of the dry land are of infinite variety, and have been studied in great detail.'

  • Thus the scenery of a limestone country depends on the solubility and permeability of the rocks, leading to the typical Karst-formations of caverns, swallowholes and underground stream courses, with the contingent phenomena of dry valleys and natural bridges.

  • Thus, for example, in a mountain range at right angles to a prevailing sea-wind, it is the land forms which determine that one side of the range shall be richly watered and deeply dissected by a complete system of valleys, while the other side is dry, indefinite in its valley systems, and sends none of its scanty drainage to the sea.

  • In the case of a large hollow in a very dry climate the rate of g evaporation may be sufficient to prevent the water from ever rising to the lip, so that there is no outflow to the sea, and a basin of internal drainage is the result.

  • The only other important term which requires to be noted here is talweg, a word introduced from the German into French and English, and meaning the deepest line along the valley, which is necessarily occupied by a stream unless the valley is dry.

  • Beryllium and magnesium are permanent in dry air; calcium, strontium and barium, however, oxidize rapidly on exposure.

  • From the bottom of this sea they have been raised to form the dry lands along the shores of Suffolk, whence they are now extracted as articles of commercial value, being ground to powder in the mills of Mr [afterwards Sir John] Lawes, at Deptford, to supply our farms with a valuable substitute for guano, under the accepted name of coprolite manure."

  • high and a broad dry ditch which is 40 ft.

  • The inland region, called the sertao, is high, stony, and dry, and frequently devastated by prolonged droughts (seccas).

  • There are two clearly defined seasons, a rainy season from March to June, and a dry season for the remaining months.

  • The rivers of the state include a number of small plateau streams flowing southward to the Sao Francisco River, and several large streams in the eastern part flowing eastward to the Atlantic. The former are the Moxoto, Ema, Pajehu, Terra Nova, Brigida, Boa Vista and Pontai, and are dry channels the greater part of the year.

  • The pyrites is subjected to dry distillation from out of iron or fire-clay tubular retorts at a bright red heat.

  • When perfectly dry this oxide has no caustic properties; it combines rapidly, however, with water to form sulphuric acid, with the development of much heat.

  • Disulphuryl chloride, S 2 O 5 C1 2, corresponding to pyrosulphuric acid, is obtained by the action of sulphur trioxide on sulphur dichloride, phosphorus oxychloride, sulphuryl chloride or dry sodium chloride: 650 3- + 2POC1 3 = P 2 O 5 + 3S 2 O 5 C1 2; S2C12+ 5503 = S 2 0 5 C1 2 + 550 2; SO 3 + SO 2 C1 2 = S 2 0 5 C1 2; 2NaC1 + 3SO 3 = S 2 0 5 C1 2 -1 Na 2 SO 4.

  • rend., 1902, 135, p. 647) has also obtained salts by the action of dry sulphur dioxide on various metallic hydrides.

  • By means of similar head-jerks the skins of insects sucked dry of their contents are thrown out of the pit, which is then kept clear of refuse.

  • inland the climate is not quite so rainy, and the weather is much cooler during the dry season.

  • long, the three main branches of which are themselves pinnately divided; it is found in dry, shady places in mountain districts in Great Britain, but is very rare in Ireland.

  • Some of the sandbanks are dry; and no part of the shoal has a greater depth than 3 or 4 ft.

  • Its climate is the healthiest in mid-Scotland, the air being pure and dry.

  • The flat lands which extend from the base of the Alpine foothills to the shores of the Arctic Ocean, assume the character either of dry deserts, as in the Aral-Caspian depression, or of low tablelands, as in central Russia and E.

  • They freeze in winter and dry up in summer, and most of them are navigable only during the spring floods; even the Volga becomes so shallow during the hot season that none but boats of light draught can pass over its shoals.

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