Dry sentence example

dry
  • Her mouth felt dry and her knees weak.
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  • The air was dry and hot, as if she were in a sauna.
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  • Mary's tone became dry again.
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  • Her mouth was so dry it was hard to speak, but she managed.
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  • With so many people at their house, it was fortunate that the weather was warm and dry so they could utilize the courtyard for the children.
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  • Deidre's mouth was dry and her hands shaking, but she nodded.
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  • His voice was dry.
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  • Carmen's mouth went dry with fear.
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  • The air was hot and dry, the two suns too dim to shed much light into the black fortress.
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  • Carmen ran bluntly manicured fingers through her cropped off curls as her tongue explored a new crack in her dry lips.
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  • The dry weather was perfect for building.
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  • The side horses, pressing against the shafts of the middle horse, sank in the snow, which was dry and glittered like sugar, and threw it up.
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  • Carmen eyed Katie coolly and responded in a dry tone.
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  • A cold feeling constricted her throat and she convulsed in a dry heave.
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  • As soon as I dry Tessa off and get the kid in here, I'll go in and change.
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  • She lit the stove in the house and went to the bedroom for some dry clothes.
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  • She hacked at the dry earth with her hoe.
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  • Her mouth felt dry.
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  • The summer had been very dry and the corn crop had failed.
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  • The angel looked up at him doubtfully then picked his way across roots to the pocket in the tree trunk.  Rhyn scavenged for what dry wood he could find and took the armful back to the tree.  Toby was huddled in the small cave, shaking with cold.
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  • The angel was still shivering despite the fire.  He needed dry clothes and probably, human food.  There was one place where Rhyn could find them.
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  • He retraced his steps a few paces to assure he was on the soft dry sand above the high-tide line, carefully placed his towel down, sat on it and removed his shoes and socks.
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  • It was a dry county, so he'd have to drive a ways to do that.
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  • As soon as I dry her off.
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  • When he replayed his dictated first draft, the report seemed dry but the evidence produced an overwhelming endorsement that there was no logical reason why Jeffrey Byrne might skip.
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  • The bag contained a dress, a slip, under­wear and a two-piece pajama set but no robe or flannel running suit or anything dry and warm.
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  • He shrugged off the raincoat and stepped out of the wet trousers, using one of his smaller towels to partially dry off before slipping on pajama bottoms and a long-sleeved shirt.
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  • After patting her body as dry as he dared, Dean reached over and grabbed her night bag, pulling out her pajamas.
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  • There was nary a dry eye in the place.
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  • As luck would have it, as he was leaving the place, he nearly knocked over Cora Abernathy, who had just left the dry cleaners next door.
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  • It's been so hot and dry – I'm surprised you're getting anything out of it.
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  • She was living in a warm dry house with all the food she could eat and no worries.
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  • Carmen's mouth went dry and her face flamed.
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  • You need to dry off.
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  • Katie's tone was dry.
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  • The snow had melted on the mountain trail, and the dry gray rocks provided sufficient traction for Ed's hooves as they climbed higher into the hills.
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  • The air was clear and dry, the sand dotted with small shrubs.
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  • The dry desert heat gave way to cool sea breeze, and a massive apple tree protected her from the sun overhead.
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  • Pulling a knife free, she dug into the dry ground, not expecting to find the treasure she'd buried so long ago.
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  • Her mouth felt suddenly dry and goose bumps sprang up all over her bare arms.
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  • At the cabin, she washed a dress in the sink and hung it on the line to dry, taking pride in the fact that she was making do with what was available.
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  • She staggered and wiped an arm across her hot dry forehead.
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  • She shrugged nonchalantly, snapping a dry vine off and examining it as though unaware of the mockery of his question.
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  • Just bleed you dry, Xander assured her.
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  • The former vamp jerked and clutched at his hands at the pain but soon went still as Xander bled him close to dry.
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  • I bleed people dry.
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  • No. Just bleeds them dry or vamps them.
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  • She smiled at the dry note in his voice.
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  • The Traveling was quick and transported them from the quiet, dry heat of Texas to the heavy, warm ocean air.
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  • It is permanent in dry air, but in the finely divided state it rapidly combines with oxygen, the compact metal requiring a strong heating to bring about this combination.
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  • By dry distillation it gives ammonium cyanide.
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  • Cold dry winds, often of great violence, occur in the Rhone valley (the Mistral), in Istria, and Dalmatia (the Bora), and in the western Caucasus.
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  • In Sicily and southern Italy the Sirocco occurs at all seasons; it is a dry, dusty wind from south-east or south-west.
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  • It is thus customary in calculating diurnal inequalities either to take no account of days on which there is an appreciable rainfall, or else to form separate tables for " dry " or " fine " days and for " all " days.
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  • The stable manure is taken into the tortuous passages of these cellars, and the spawn introduced from masses of dry dung where it occurs naturally.
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  • In France mushroom-growers do not use the compact blocks or bricks of spawn so familiar in England, but much smaller flakes or "leaves" of dry dung in which the spawn or mycelium can be seen to exist.
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  • The droppings of stall-fed horses, or of such as have been kept on dry food, should be made use of.
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  • The material employed in all cases is the droppings of horses, which should be collected fresh, and spread out in thin layers in a dry place, a portion of the short litter being retained well moistened by horse-urine.
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  • This fungus, Marasmius Oreades, is more universally used in France and Italy than in England, although it is well known and frequently used both in a fresh and in a dry state in England.
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  • Even into his mythological learning he breathes a life to which these dry scholars are strangers.
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  • On the highlands, however, which contain extensive open campos, the climate, though dry and hot, is considered healthy.
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  • By reason of its dry and bracing climate, Aliwal North is also a favourite residence of sufferers from chest complaints.
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  • It has a dry and equable climate and beautiful scenery.
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  • It has post and telegraph offices and a lively trade in wool, cotton and dry fruits (almonds, pistachios).
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  • The spores differ from those of ferns in their outer coat (exospore) being split up into four club-shaped hygroscopic threads (elaters) which are curled when moist, but become straightened when dry.
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  • A fire without light, compared to the heat which gathers in a haystack when the hay has been stored before it was properly dry - heat, in short, as an agitation of the particles - is the motive cause of the contraction and dilatations of the heart.
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  • Ormsby, in 1852, also reported a river, the Asas Amir, as coming down from the Sinjar hills and joining the Tigris near Kal-'at Shergat, about 35° 30' N.; but this seems now to be a dry bed.
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  • The herm is a dry work and the head upon the coins shows various degrees of idealization.
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  • To prevent the atmosphere from becoming unduly dry a pan of water is fitted to the stove; this serves to moisten the air before it passes into the distributing flues.
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  • The flood water brought down by the Shari in December and January causes the lake to rise to a maximum of 24 ft., the water spreading over low-lying ground, left dry again in May or June.
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  • The elevated plateaus between these ranges are semiarid and inhospitable, and are covered with extensive saline basins, which become lagoons in the wet season and morasses or dry saltpans in the dry season.
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  • Its greatest defect is the cold southerly and westerly storms, which cause great losses in cattle and sheep. The Patagonian coast-line and mountainous region are also healthy, having a dry and bracing climate.
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  • In the north, however, the hot lowlands are malarial and unsuited to north European settlement, while the dry, elevated plateaus are celebrated for their healthiness, those of Catamarca having an excellent reputation as a sanatorium for sufferers from pulmonary and bronchial diseases.
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  • The so-called " pampas-grass " (Gynerium argenteum) is not found at all on the dry lands, but in the wet grounds of the south and south-west.
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  • In the dry, saline regions of the west and north-west, where the rainfall is slight, there are large thickets of low-growing, thorny bushes, poor in foliage.
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  • The naval arsenal is situated on the " north basin " of the Buenos Aires port, and the military port at Bahia Blanca is provided with a dry dock of the largest size, and extensive repair shops.
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  • During the later part of the Cretaceous period the sea gradually retreated and left the whole country dry.
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  • From July to November the clouds hang low on the mountains, and give moisture to the upper zone, while the climate of the lower is dry.
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  • It is subject, however, to extreme and rapid variations in temperature, to alternations of dry and humid winds (the latter, called catias, being irritating and oppressive), to chilling night mists brought up from the coast by the westerly winds, and to other influences productive of malaria, catarrh, fevers, bilious disorders and rheumatism.
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  • They may be prepared by the dry distillation of the ammonium salts.
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  • A dry season, which lasts from May to October, is followed by a rainy season, divided into the early winter and latter rains.
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  • In hot dry districts such as Arabia and north-east tropical Africa, genera have been developed with a low, much-branched, dense, shrubby habit, with small hairy leaves and very small flowers.
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  • The climate is hot and dry, and generally healthy.
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  • The plants are admirably adapted for climates in which a season favourable to growth alternates with a hot or dry season;.
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  • Metallic uranium, as shown by Peligot, can be obtained by the reduction of a mixture of dry chloride of potassium and dry uranous chloride, UC1 4, with sodium at a red heat.
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  • Uranous chloride, UC14, was first prepared by Peligot by heating an intimate mixture of the green oxide and charcoal to redness in a current of dry chlorine; it is obtained as sublimate of black-green metallic-looking octahedra.
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  • Folkestone inner harbour is dry at low water, but there is a deep water pier for use at low tide by the Channel steamers, by which not only the passenger traffic, but also a large general trade are carried on.
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  • The low veld is everywhere covered with scrub, and water is scarce, the rivers being often dry in the winter season.
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  • They carry an immense volume of water during the summer rains, but are very small streams in the winter, when several of their tributaries are completely dry.
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  • The air is unusually dry, owing to the proximity of the Kalahari Desert on the west and to the interception on the east by the Drakensberg of the moisture bearing clouds from the Indian Ocean.
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  • The winds in winter are uniformly dry while dust storms are frequent at all seasons - a fact which renders the country unsuitable for persons suffering from chest complaints.
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  • The climate is warm and dry, but often sudden in its alterations.
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  • Dry stannous oxide, if touched with a glowing body, catches fire and burns to stannic oxide, Sn02.
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  • Stannous Chloride, SnC1 2, can only be obtained pure by heating pure tin in a current of pure dry hydrochloric acid gas.
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  • Stannic Chloride, SnC1 4, named by Andreas Libavius in 1605 Spiritus argenti vivi sublimate from its preparation by distilling tin or its amalgam with corrosive sublimate, and afterwards termed Spiritus fumans Libavii, is obtained by passing dry chlorine over granulated tin contained in a retort; the tetrachloride distils over as a heavy liquid, from which the excess of chlorine is easily removed by shaking with a small quantity of tin filings and re-distilling.
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  • The southwest monsoon which brings rain in Cochin-China coincides with the dry season in Annam, the reason probably being that the mountains and lofty plateaus separating the two countries retain the precipitation.
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  • Harrismith has a dry, bracing climate and enjoys a high reputation in South Africa as a health resort.
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  • When quite dry guncotton is easily detonated by a blow on an anvil or hard surface.
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  • Compressed dry guncotton is easily detonated by an initiative detonator such as mercuric fulminate.
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  • A small charge of dry guncotton will, however, detonate the wet material, and this peculiarity is made use of in the employment of guncotton for blasting purposes.
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  • A charge of compressed wet guncotton may be exploded, even under water, by the detonation of a small primer of the dry and waterproofed material, which in turn can be started by a small fulminate detonator.
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  • The explosive wave from the dry guncotton primer is in fact better responded to by the wet compressed material than the dry, and its detonation is somewhat sharper than that of the dry.
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  • Dry guncotton heated in ammonia gas detonates at about 70°, and ammonium hydroxide solutions of all strengths slowly decompose it, yielding somewhat complex products.
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  • There are numerous lagoons in the Llano districts caused by the periodical floods of the rivers, and extensive esteros and cienagas, in part due to the same causes, but these either dry up in the dry season or are greatly reduced in area.
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  • The year is divided into two seasons, the dry and wet, the latter occurring from April to October, when the temperature is also the highest.
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  • On the llanos the dry season destroys the pasturage completely, dries up the small streams and lagoons, and compels many animals of semi-aquatic habits to aestivate.
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  • The long dry season of the llanos and surrounding slopes, which have not as yet been devoted to cultivation, will require a different system of agriculture with systematic irrigation.
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  • If the amount of liquid contained in the tissue be small in quantity the part mummifies, giving rise to what is known as " dry gangrene."
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  • The smaller tributaries of these rivers of Sonora are often only dry canyons in the dry season.
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  • Generally it is either dried, after being separated from the wash water, by means of common salt, upon a layer of which the moist nitroglycerin is gently run and allowed to drain or filter through, or it is filtered through a mass of dry sponge or similar dry and porous material.
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  • The normal condition or temperament of the body depended upon a proper mixture or proportion of the four elements - hot, cold, wet and dry.
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  • In drugs were to be recognized the same elementary qualities - hot, cold, moist, dry, &c. - as in the human body; and, on the principle of curing by contraries, the use of one or other was indicated.
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  • Their mouths are blocked by sand bars, which in the dry season check their flow and produce the lagoons and marshes which characterize the coast.
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  • The air issuing from these pipes was dry and warm, and served to keep the temperature of the air below 120°, at which temperature it was possible for men to work continuously for half an hour at a time, and for four hours in the day.
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  • Deep mines, however, are generally dry, so that in most cases it will be possible to realize the more favourable conditions of the Comstock mines.
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  • In dry and dusty mines the danger may be greatly lessened by sprinkling the working places and passages, and the removal of the accumulated dust and fine coal.
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  • This seems to be due to the dust abundantly produced in mining operations, and especially by machine drills when boring " dry " (rising) blast holes.
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  • The water question caused no great difficulty at Helles, but the very limited local supply found within the contracted area occupied by Birdwood's force gave out almost entirely when the dry season set definitely in, and much of that which was brought by sea or condensed had to be conveyed up steep inclines to the trenches.
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  • Close to the bay there is a lake - a marsh in dry weather - which necessarily cramped the movements of troops landed at or near the bay.
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  • The apparatus, after having been carefully cleaned and dried, is charged with pure and dry mercury which must next be worked backwards and forwards between A and B to remove all the air-bells.
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  • With the exceptions of two, these streams dry up after the rains, and their influence is only felt for a few miles below the hills.
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  • The second tract is that known as the dry zone of Burma, and includes thewhole of the lowlands lying between the Arakan Yomas and the western fringe of the Southern Shan States.
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  • In the heart of the delta numerous large lakes or marshes abounding in fish are formed by the overflow of the Irrawaddy river during the rainy season, but these either assume very diminutive proportions or disappear altogether in the dry season.
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  • In the extreme north of Upper Burma the rainfall is rather less than in the country adjoining Rangoon, and in the dry zone the annual average falls as low as 20 and 30 in.
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  • In some parts of Lower Burma and in the dry districts of Upper Burma a hot season crop is also grown with the assistance of irrigation during the spring months.
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  • The vessels of the Irrawaddy Flotilla Company now ply to Bassein and to all points on the Irrawaddy as far north as Bhamo, and in the dry weather to Myitkyina, and also on the Chindwin as far north as Kindat, and to Homalin during the rains.
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  • It combines directly with ammonia to form the compound SiF 4 2NH,, and is absorbed by dry boric acid and by many metallic oxides.
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  • Of the heavy metals, copper is the one which exhibits by far the greatest avidity for sulphur, its subsulphide Cu 2 S being the stablest of all heavy metallic sulphides in opposition to dry reactions.
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  • When the vines are in flower, and when the fruit is colouring, the evaporating troughs should be kept dry, but the aridity must not be excessive, lest the red spider and other pests should attack the leaves.
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  • Outside borders require watering in very dry summer weather only.
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  • The grapes which are attacked cease to grow, turn brown or white, and ultimately dry up and fall off.
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  • As a preventive to its attacks the copper sulphate sprays and a solution (50%) of iron sulphate have been found very useful, as well as care in planting on well-drained soil that does not lie too low, the disease seldom appearing in dry, well-exposed vineyards.
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  • The country is dry and sandy, and entirely depends on well irrigation for its water supply.
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  • A modification of the system of double-bottom defecators has lately been introduced with considerable success in San Domingo and in Cuba, by which a continuous and steady discharge of clear defecated juice is obtained on the one hand, and on the other a comparatively hard dry cake of scum or cachaza, and without the use of filter presses.
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  • The scums forming on the top of the continuous defecator become so hard and dry that they have to be removed from time to time with a specially constructed instrument like a flat spade with three flat prongs in front.
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  • From the centrifugal the sugar is either turned out without washing as raw sugar, only fit for the refinery, or else it is well washed with a spray of water and air until white and dry, and it is then offered in the market as refined sugar, although it has never passed through animal charcoal (bone-black).
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  • The dry sugar then passes into a rotating screen fitted with two meshes, so that three grades of sugar are obtained, the coarsest being that which falls out at the lower end of the revolving screen.
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  • In a dry state it becomes hard and bakes to a brick.
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  • Without a sufficient supply plants remain stunted and the crop yield is seriously reduced, as we see in dry seasons when the rainfall is much below the average.
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  • In the case of fair average farm crops it has been shown that for the production of one ton of dry matter contained in them from 300 to 500 tons of water has been absorbed and utilized by the plants.
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  • The hoe and harrow are therefore excellent tools for use in dry weather.
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  • Of course care must be exercised in the selection of plants - such as sorghum, maize, wheat, and alfalfa or lucerne - which are adapted to dry conditions and a warm climate.
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  • If the soil is allowed to become dry and pulverized, rain is likely to run off or " puddle the surface without penetrating it more than a very short distance.
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  • This substance absorbs and combines with water very greedily, at the same time becoming very hot, and falling into a fine dry powder,' calcium hydroxide or slaked lime, which when left in the open slowly combines with the carbon dioxide of the air and becomes calcium carbonate, from which we began.
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  • When used on light dry land it tends to make the land drier, since it destroys the humus which so largely assists in keeping water in the soil.
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  • When dry and in a crumbly state it is harrowed and spread and finally ploughed in and mixed with the soil.
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  • After being pared off the turf is allowed to dry for a fortnight or so and is then placed in small heaps a yard or two wide at the base, a little straw or wood being put in the middle of each heap, which is then lighted.
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  • The new warp is allowed to lie fallow during the winter after being laid out in four-yard " lands " and becomes dry enough to be sown with oats and grass and clover seeds in the following spring.
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  • Experiments show that pure cultures, when mixed with garden soil constantly moistened short of saturation and kept in the dark at a temperature of 14° C., will retain their vitality for more than ten months; from moist soil kept at 26° C. they die out in about two months; from moist soil at 30° C. in seventeen days; and in dry soil at the same temperature within a week.
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  • Saltpetre may be made to act as a nitrite by dissolving it in water in the strength of about fifty grains to the ounce, soaking blotting-paper in the solution and letting the paper dry.
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  • In general, tropical and semitropical conditions as to temperature, with a comparatively dry climate, give the best results.
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  • The tobacco is hung in a barn in which there is a free circulation of air during dry weather.
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  • Hybridization can also be readily controlled in the case of tobaccos, and in this connexion it is useful to note that, if pollen is desired of some variety growing at a distance, it will retain its vitality for several weeks if kept perfectly dry, and so can readily be sent by post from one place to another.
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  • The highest class of Cuban-made cigars, called " vegueras," are prepared from the very finest Vuelta Abajo leaf, rolled when it is just half dry, and consequently never damped with water at all.
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  • The cigars, when dry, are carefully sorted according to strength, which is estimated by their colour, and classed in a scale of increasing strength as claro, colorado claro, maduro and oscuro.
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  • The charge of the retorts consists of a mixture of 1100 lb of roasted calamine and 550 lb of dry powdered coal per furnace.
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  • When hydraulic pressure to the amount of 2000 to 3000 lb per square inch is applied, the saving is unquestioned, since less time is required to dry the pressed retort, its life in the furnaces is longer, its absorption of zinc is less, and the loss of zinc by passage through its walls in the form of vapour is reduced.
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  • Disk ploughs are unsuitable for heavy sticky soils and for stony land, but may be used with effect on stubbles and on land in a dry hard state.
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  • The seasons are divided into wet and dry, the latter (extending from December to the end of May) being also the cold season.
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  • Its mountains are insufficient in elevation and extent to attract their full share of the monsoon rains, which fall so abundantly on the Abyssinian highlands on the other side of the Red Sea; for this reason Arabia has neither lakes nor forests to control the water-supply and prevent its too rapid dissipation, and the rivers are mere torrent beds sweeping down occasionally in heavy floods, but otherwise dry.
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  • The central zone includes Hejaz (or Hijaz), Nejd and El Hasa; much of it is a dry, stony or sandy steppe, with few wells or watering-places, and only occupied by nomad tribes; but the great wadis which intersect it contain many fertile stretches of alluvial soil, where cultivation is possible and which support a considerable settled population, with several large towns and numerous villages.
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  • The scenery in this mountain region is of the most varied description; bare precipitous hill-sides seamed with dry, rocky watercourses give place with almost startling rapidity to fertile slopes, terraced literally for thousands of feet.
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  • The climate is extremely dry, but this is compensated for by the heavy mists which sweep up from the plains during the rainless months and exercise a most beneficial effect in the coffee-growing districts.
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  • The stony plains which cover so large a part of the country are often covered with acacia jungle, and in the dry water-courses a kind of wild palm, the dom, abounds, from the leaves of which baskets and mats are woven.
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  • It is a fairly prosperous city, supplied with admirable water by an underground aqueduct from the Hindieh canal, a few miles to the north, which also serves to water the gardens in the deep dry bed of the former lake.
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  • But though a liberal theologian, he was no dry rationalist.
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  • The roots are dug up in Mexico throughout the year, and are suspended to dry in a net over the hearth of the Indians' huts, and hence acquire a smoky odour.
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  • The large tubers are often gashed to cause them to dry more quickly.
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  • In tropical climates with a well-marked dry season mosquitoes pass into a semi-dormant condition during the period when there is little water in which to deposit their eggs.
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  • On dry distillation it is resolved into trimethylamine and methyl alcohol.
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  • Other towns of Tunisia are, on the east coast, Nabeul, pop. about 5000, the ancient Neapolis, noted for the mildness of its climate and its pottery manufactures; Hammamet with 37 00 inhabitants; Monastir (the Ruspina of the Romans), a walled town with 5600 inhabitants and a trade in cereals and oils; Mandiya or Mandia (q.v.; in ancient chronicles called the city of Africa and sometimes the capital of the country) with 8500 inhabitants, the fallen city of the Fatimites, which since the French occupation has risen from its ruins, and has a new harbour (the ancient Cothon or harbour, of Phoenician origin, cut out of the rock is nearly dry but in excellent preservation); and Gabes (Tacape of the Romans, Qabis of the Arabs) on the Syrtis, a group of small villages, with an aggregate population of 16,000, the port of the Shat country and a depot of the esparto trade.
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  • The de facto line is that of the Sama river (usually dry), which opens on the coast a little south of Sama point, near 18° S., Chile retaining possession of the two above-mentioned provinces in violation of the treaty of Ancon, which she forced upon her defeated antagonist.
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  • The others, rising in the outer range, which does not reach the snow-line and receives less moisture, carry a volume of water to the sea during the rainy season, but for the rest of the year are nearly dry.
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  • Passing the summit of that range, it rushes down as a cool and dry wind on the Pacific slopes beyond.
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  • The Nepena, Casma, Huarmey, Fortaleza and Supe rivers rise on the slope of an outer range called the Cordillera Negra, and are consequently dry during the great part of the year.
    1
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  • Dittmar showed that this may be avoided by leading a fine, steady stream of dry gas - air, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, &c., according to the substance operated upon - through the liquid by means of a fine capillary tube, the lower end of which reaches to nearly the bottom of the flask.
    1
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  • Dry distillation is extremely wasteful even when definite substances or mixtures, such as calcium acetate which yields acetone, are dealt with, valueless by-products being obtained and the condensate usually requiring much purification.
    1
    0
  • For dry distillations the retorts are generally horizontal cylinders, the bottom or lower surface being sometimes flattened.
    1
    0
  • During the dry season the climate is healthy, but dysentery and intermittent fever are not uncommon.
    1
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  • The climate is dry and healthy, and there are occasional rains.
    1
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  • Conflagrations are frequent, particularly in the months of January and December, when hot, dry winds resembling the Fdhn of the Alps come down from the snow-capped Elburz.
    1
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  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.
    1
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  • The climate is extremely hot and dry in summer, but the winter temperature is mild and pleasant.
    1
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  • Such sympathy with youthful hope, in union with industry and intelligence, shows that Comte's dry and austere manner veiled the fires of a generous social emotion.
    1
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  • Their volumes make profoundly dry reading.
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  • The general character of the surface is mountainous, though the western and south-western sides are level and dry as in the adjoining state of Coahuila.
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  • The higher elevations have a dry, temperate, healthful climate.
    1
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  • According to the latest calculations, the length of the main stream of the Ganges is 1540 m., or with its longest affluent, 1680; breadth at true entrance into the sea, 20 m.; breadth of channel in dry season, 14 to 21 m.; depth in dry season, 30 ft.;.
    1
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  • Many decayed or ruined cities attest the changes in the river-bed in ancient times; and within our own times the main channel which formerly passed Rajmahal has turned away from it, and left the town high and dry, 7 m.
    1
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  • Some are more or less aquatic, others are absolutely arboreal, others again prefer dry, sandy or rocky localities according to their food.
    1
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  • During the greater part of the year it is either dry or occupied in part by a string of saline lakes (limans or ilmens); but in spring when the streams swell which empty into it, the water flows in two opposite directions from the highest point (near Shara-Khulusun).
    1
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  • Bondu is traversed by torrents, which flow rapidly during the rains but are empty in the dry season, such streams being known in this part of West Africa as marigots.
    1
    0
  • It is remarkable that the dry season (October to April) is coincident with the period of the west monsoon.
    1
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  • The climate is hot and dry, the rainfall being too small to influence climatic conditions.
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  • The harbour, with wet and slip dock, occupies both sides of the river from the New Bridge to the sea, and is protected on the south by a pier projecting some distance into the sea, and on the north by a breakwater with a commodious dry dock.
    1
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  • Gold is permanent in both dry and moist air at ordinary or high temperatures.
    1
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  • Auric sulphide, Au 2 S 31 is an amorphous powder formed when lithium aurichloride is treated with dry sulphuretted hydrogen at - 10°.
    1
    0
  • The methods of parting can be classified into "dry," "wet" and electrolytic methods.
    1
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  • In the " dry " methods the silver is converted into sulphide or chloride, the gold remaining unaltered; in the " wet " methods the silver is dissolved by nitric acid or boiling sulphuric acid; and in the electrolytic processes advantage is taken of the fact that under certain current densities and other circumstances silver passes from an anode composed of a gold-silver alloy to the cathode more readily than gold.
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  • The hotel is close to several chain restaurants, major grocery stores, and dry cleaners.
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  • We'll get a bed out of your house and put it in one of the rooms here so you'll have a dry place to sleep.
    0
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  • In dry weather the electric potential in the atmosphere is normally positive relative to the earth, and increases with the height.
    0
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  • In the Andean region, a dry, hot wind from the north or north-west, called the Zonda, blows with great intensity, especially in September - October, and causes much discomfort and suffering.
    0
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  • Boron nitride BN is formed when boron is burned either in air or in nitrogen, but can be obtained more readily by heating to redness in a platinum crucible a mixture of one part of anhydrous borax with two parts of dry ammonium chloride.
    0
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  • There is, besides, a powerful determining cause in the uniform character and undivided extent of its dry interior.
    0
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  • The weather on the whole is remarkably dry.
    0
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  • Western Australia has practically only two seasons, the winter or wet season, which commences in April and ends in October, and Western the summer or dry season, which comprises the remainder of the year.
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  • The saurians or lizards are numerous, chiefly on dry sandy or rocky ground in the tropical region.
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  • Many of the gumtrees throw off their bark, so that it hangs in long dry strips from the trunk and branches, a feature familiar in " bush " pictures.
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  • The order is easily distinguished by the hard, dry, woody texture of the leaves and the dehiscent fruits.
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  • The chief complaint which Europeans make concerning it is the extreme humidity, which causes the heat to be more oppressive than is the case where the air is dry.
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  • Two government dry docks are available for merchant vessels.
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  • It is then carefully dried by the free action of the air, and when dry built into long narrow stacks until needed for use.
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  • The dry wind from the Sahara called harmattan, which carries great quantities of fine red sand, causes a fall of temperature in the (European) summer.
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  • In the time of Bach such writing was beautifully suited to enliven the dry glitter of the harpsichord, and Bach's duets for clavier and violin seem to have been sometimes played as trios with a violoncello playing from the clavier bass.
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  • The climate throughout Rajputana is very dry and hot during the summer; while in the winter it is much colder in the north than in the lower districts, with hard frost and ice on the Bikanir borders.
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  • It is essential that the paper covering be loose, so as to ensure that each wire is enclosed in a coating not of paper only, but also of air; the wires in fact are really insulated from each other by the dry air, the loose paper acting merely as a separator to prevent them from coming into contact.
    0
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  • The metal is quite permanent in dry air, but in moist air it becomes coated with a superficial layer of the oxide; it burns on heating to redness, forming a brown coloured oxide; and is readily soluble in mineral acids with formation of the corresponding salts.
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  • The climate is hot and humid in the lowlands and along the lower Parnahyba, but in the uplands it is dry with high sun temperatures and cool nights.
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  • The food of the camel consists chiefly of the leaves of trees, shrubs and dry hard vegetables, which it is enabled to tear down and masticate by means of its powerful front teeth.
    0
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  • That city, like Ravenna, originally stood in the midst of a lagoon; and the coast east of it to near Monfalcone, where it meets the mountains, is occupied by similar expanses of water, which are, however, becoming gradually converted into dry land.
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  • From the proximity of the mountains to the sea none of the rivers in this part of Italy has a long course, and they are generally mere mountain torrents, rapid and swollen in winter and spring, and almost dry in summer.
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  • While the rugged and mountainous district of Calabria, extending nearly due south for a distance of more than 150 m., thus derives its character and configuration almost wholly from the range of the Apennines, the long spur-like promontory which projects towards the east to Brindisi and Otranto is merely a continuation of the low tract of Apulia, with a dry calcareous soil of Tertiary origin.
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  • The results areaa lack of water-supply and of water-power, the streams becoming mere torrents for a short period and perfectly dry for the rest of the year; lack of a sufficient supply of timber; the denudation of the soil on the hills, and, where the valleys below have insufficient drainage, the formation of swamps.
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  • His language was antiquated and his style dry, but his work was considered important.
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  • Possibly, fuller study of religions may help theologians to formulate the imperial claims of Christianity more happily than in the dry contrast between what is " revealed " and what is " natural."
    0
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  • Of the dry antiseptics iodoform is constantly used in septic or tuberculous wounds, and it appears to have an inhibitory action on Bacillus tuberculosis.
    0
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  • The growth of an organic being is simply a process of enlargement, as a particle of dry gelatine may be swelled up by the intussusception of water; its death is a shrinkage, such as the swelled jelly might undergo on desiccation.
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  • All yield a soft, easily-worked timber, which, though very perishable when exposed to weather, possesses sufficient durability when kept dry to give the trees a certain economic value.
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  • Galen believed in the doctrine of humours originated by Hippocrates, which supposes the condition of the body to depend upon the proper mixture of the four elements, hot, cold, moist and dry, and that drugs possess the same elementary qualities, and that on the principle of contraries one or other was indicated, e.g.
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  • The limit of each years increment of secondary wood, in those plants whose yearly activity is interrupted by a regular winter or dry season, is marked by a more or less distinct line, which is produced by the sharp contrast between the wood formed in the late summer of one year (characterized by the sparseness or small diameter of the tracheal elements, or by the preponderance of fibres, or by a combination of these characters, giving a denseness to the wood) and the loose spring wood of the next year, with its absence of fibres, or its numerous large tracheae.
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  • The cortical tissues gradually shrink and dry up, turning brown and black in patches or all over, and when at length the cambium and medullary ray tissues dry up the whole twig dies off.
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  • Xerophytes.These are plants which live in very dry places, where the substratum has less than 10% of water.
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  • Mesophytes.-These are plants which live in localities which are neither specially dry nor specially wet nor specially salty.
    0
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  • A soil may be physically wet; but if the plants absorb the water only with difficulty, as in a salt marsh, then the soil is, as regards plants, physiologically dry.
    0
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  • All soils which are physically dry are also physiologically dry; and hence only the physiological dryness or wetness of soils need be considered in ecology.
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  • Schimper used the term xerophytes to include plants which live in soils which are physiologically dry, and the term hygrophytes those which live in soils which are physiologically wet or damp. Schimper recognized that the two classes are connected by transitional forms, and that it is useless to attempt to give the matter a statistical basis.
    0
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  • The soil is physiologically dry.
    0
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  • The climate is very dry, and the properties of the soil are 0
    0
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  • The soil is physically or physiologically dry.
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  • Xerophytes.Plants which grow in very dry soils; e.g., most hens, Ammophila (Psamma) arenaria, Elymus arenarius, Anasis aretioides, Zilla macro ptera, Sedum acre, Bupleurum spinosum, rtemisia herba-alba, Zollikofferia arborescens.
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  • Physically wet but physiologically dry ha bit ats,f with the accompanying plant communities of fens, moors, and salt marshes.
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  • Physically and physiologically dry habitats, with the accompanying plant communities of sand dunes and sandy heaths with little humus in the soil.
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  • Bog Xerophytes live in the peaty soil of fens and moors which are physically wet, but which are said to be physiologically dry.
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  • The xerophytic characters being present, it is not surprising that many marsh plants, like Juncus effusus and Iris pseudacorus, are able to survive in dry situations, such as banks and even garden rockeries.
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  • The rows of cells from which the laticiferous vessels are formed can be distinguished in many cases in the young embryo while still in the dry seed (Scott), but the latex vessels in process of formation are more easily seen when germination has begun.
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  • For instance, some xerophytes are dry and hard in structure, whilst others are succulent and fleshy.
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  • The western dry areas have the old-world leguminous Astragalus and Prosopis (Mesquit), but are especially characterized by the northward extension of the new-world tropical Cactaceae, Mgmmillaria, Cereus and Opuntia, by succulent Amar llideae such as A gave (of which the so-called American aloe is a type), and by arborescent Liliaceae (Yucca).
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  • The area of the dry land was taken as 28.3% of the surface of the globe, and that of the oceans as 71.7%.
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  • The forms of the dry land are of infinite variety, and have been studied in great detail.'
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  • Thus the scenery of a limestone country depends on the solubility and permeability of the rocks, leading to the typical Karst-formations of caverns, swallowholes and underground stream courses, with the contingent phenomena of dry valleys and natural bridges.
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  • Thus, for example, in a mountain range at right angles to a prevailing sea-wind, it is the land forms which determine that one side of the range shall be richly watered and deeply dissected by a complete system of valleys, while the other side is dry, indefinite in its valley systems, and sends none of its scanty drainage to the sea.
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  • In the case of a large hollow in a very dry climate the rate of g evaporation may be sufficient to prevent the water from ever rising to the lip, so that there is no outflow to the sea, and a basin of internal drainage is the result.
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  • The only other important term which requires to be noted here is talweg, a word introduced from the German into French and English, and meaning the deepest line along the valley, which is necessarily occupied by a stream unless the valley is dry.
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  • Beryllium and magnesium are permanent in dry air; calcium, strontium and barium, however, oxidize rapidly on exposure.
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  • From the bottom of this sea they have been raised to form the dry lands along the shores of Suffolk, whence they are now extracted as articles of commercial value, being ground to powder in the mills of Mr [afterwards Sir John] Lawes, at Deptford, to supply our farms with a valuable substitute for guano, under the accepted name of coprolite manure."
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  • The inland region, called the sertao, is high, stony, and dry, and frequently devastated by prolonged droughts (seccas).
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  • There are two clearly defined seasons, a rainy season from March to June, and a dry season for the remaining months.
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  • The rivers of the state include a number of small plateau streams flowing southward to the Sao Francisco River, and several large streams in the eastern part flowing eastward to the Atlantic. The former are the Moxoto, Ema, Pajehu, Terra Nova, Brigida, Boa Vista and Pontai, and are dry channels the greater part of the year.
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  • The pyrites is subjected to dry distillation from out of iron or fire-clay tubular retorts at a bright red heat.
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  • When perfectly dry this oxide has no caustic properties; it combines rapidly, however, with water to form sulphuric acid, with the development of much heat.
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  • By means of similar head-jerks the skins of insects sucked dry of their contents are thrown out of the pit, which is then kept clear of refuse.
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  • Some of the sandbanks are dry; and no part of the shoal has a greater depth than 3 or 4 ft.
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  • Its climate is the healthiest in mid-Scotland, the air being pure and dry.
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  • They freeze in winter and dry up in summer, and most of them are navigable only during the spring floods; even the Volga becomes so shallow during the hot season that none but boats of light draught can pass over its shoals.
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  • Vast and impenetrable forests, impassable marches and thickets, numerous lakes, swampy meadows, with cleared and dry spaces here and there occupied by villages, are the leading features of this region.
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  • The forests are composed of the birch, oak and other deciduous trees, the soil is dry, and the woodlands are divided by green prairies.
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  • The steppes proper are very fertile, elevated plains, slightly undulating, and intersected by numerous ravines which are dry in summer.
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  • For days together the traveller sees no other vegetation; even this, however, disappears as he approaches the regions recently left dry by the Caspian, where saline clays, bearing a few Salsolaceae, or mere sand, take the place of the black earth.
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  • Here again both capital and labour are short, and the cultivation of the soil suffers from the fact that, owing to the absence of timber, dry dung is used for fuel instead of being employed as manure.
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  • Where the way was formed on the level, drains were cut on each side of the intended line, and were intersected here and there by cross drains, by which the upper part of the moss was rendered dry and firm.
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  • The maximum gradient possible depends on climatic conditions, a dry climate being the most favourable.
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  • This soil is spongy, and, undergoing alternate contraction and expansion from being alternately comparatively dry and saturated with moisture, allows the heavy blocks to slip down by their own weight into the valley, where they become piled up, the valley stream afterwards removing the soil from among and over them.
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  • November is considered the only dry month.
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  • It thrives best on a dry, deep, sandy loam, on airy sheltered sites at no great elevation above the sea.
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  • The cypress, as the olive, is found everywhere in the dry hollows and high eastern slopes of Corfu, of the scenery of which it is characteristic. As an ornamental tree in Britain the cypress is useful to break the outline formed by roundheaded low shrubs and trees.
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  • Further inland the year is divided into wet and dry seasons with occasional prolonged droughts.
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  • It is followed by the stage of dry heat, which will be prolonged in proportion as the previous stage is curtailed.
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  • The feeling of heat is at first an internal one, but it spreads outwards to the surface and to the extremities; the skin becomes warm and red, but remains dry; the pulse becomes softer and more full, but still quick; and the throbbings occur in exposed arteries, such as the temporal.
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  • For instance, the swampy character of malarial areas is explained by their breeding in stagnant water; the effect of drainage, and the general immunity of high-lying, dry localities, by the lack of breeding facilities; the danger of the night air, by their nocturnal habits; the comparative immunity of the upper storeys of houses, by the fact that they fly low; the confinement of malaria to well-marked areas and the diminution of danger with distance, by their habit of clinging to the breeding-grounds and not flying far.
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  • The planting of eucalyptus trees is out of favour at present, but it appears to have been successful in Portugal, not from any prophylactic virtues in the plant, but through the great absorption of moisture by its deep roots, which tends to dry the subsoil.
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  • The climate is healthy for Europeans, being dry and cool as compared with that of Samoa and Fiji.
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  • It is covered with a layer of thin, dry soil, through the slow weathering of the coral rocks.
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  • The dry season lasts from October to May, the hottest months appear to be in March and April, when the heat is increased by the burning of the corn and henequen fields.
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  • Other remains which bear witness to tlae civilization of, the Mayas are the paved highways and the artificial reservoirs (aguadas) designed for the preservation of water for towns through the long dry season.
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  • Beside the harbour are engineering works, dry docks and barracks, stores and workshops belonging to the Russian Caspian fleet.
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  • The year is divided into two seasons - wet and dry - the former lasting from November to May.
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  • The greater part of western Asia, including the basin of the Obi, the drainage area of the Aral Sea, together with Afghanistan, Baluchistan, Persia and Arabia, was covered by the sea during the later stages of the Cretaceous period; but a considerable part 3f this region was probably dry land in Jurassic times.
    0
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  • In the summer a great accumulation of solar heat takes place on the dry surface soil, from which it cannot be released upwards by evaporation, as might be the case were the soil moist or covered with vegetation, nor can it be readily conveyed away downwards as happens on the ocean.
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  • The extremely dry and hot tracts which constitute an almost unbroken desert from Arabia, through south Persia and Baluchistan, to Sind, are characterized by considerable uniformity in the types of life, which closely approach to those of the neighbouring hot and dry regions of Africa.
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  • The vegetation of the hot and dry region of the south-west of the continent consists largely of plants which are diffused over Africa, Baluchistan and Sind; many of these extend into the hotter parts of India, and not a few common Egyptian plants are to be met with in the Indian peninsula.
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  • Prickly forms of Statice and Astragalus cover the dry hills.
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  • The vegetation of the dry region of central Asia is remarkable for the great relative number of Chenopodiaceae, Salicornia and other Central salt plants being common; Polygonaceae also are abun Asia.
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  • The horse is produced, in the highest perfection in Arabia and the hot and dry countries of western Asia.
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  • The city is attractively situated, has a dry, healthful climate, and is a summer resort.
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  • Its viscid character, and its non-liability to dry and harden by exposure to air, also fit it for various other uses, such as lubrication, &c., whilst its peculiar physical characters, enabling it to blend with either aqueous or oily matters under certain circumstances, render it a useful ingredient in a large number of products of varied kinds.
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  • The steppes along the bottom of the principal valley are for the most part too dry to be cultivated without irrigation.
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  • The slopes of the Armenian highlands are clothed with fine forests, and the vine is grown at their base, while on the wide-stretching steppes the Turko-Tatars pasture cattle, horses and sheep. The lower part of the Kura valley assumes the character of a dry steppe, the rainfall not reaching 54 in.
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  • None of the rivers is navigable and all are fordable during the dry season.
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  • Five well-contrasted types of scenery in Derbyshire are clearly traceable to as many varieties of rock; the bleak dry uplands of the north and east, with deep-cut ravines and swift clear streams, are due to the great mass of Mountain Limestone; round the limestone boundary are the valleys with soft outlines in the Pendleside Shales; these are succeeded by the rugged moorlands, covered with heather and peat, which are due to the Millstone Grit series; eastward lies the Derbyshire Coalfield with its gently moulded grasscovered hills; southward is the more level tract of red Triassic rocks.
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  • The pear-stock, having an inclination to send its roots down deeper into the soil, is the best for light dry soils, as the plants are not then so likely to suffer in dry seasons.
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  • It is quite possible for a hot dry season to be associated with a large yield of corn, provided the drought is confined to a suitable period, as was the case in 1896 and still more so in 1898; the English wheat crops in those years were probably the biggest in yield per acre that had been harvested since 1868, which is always looked back upon as a remarkable year for wheat.
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  • The hemlock prefers rather dry and elevated situations, often forming woods on the declivities of mountains.
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  • Grapes, barley, esparto grass, dry figs, almonds and zinc are exported.
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  • The climate is severe on the plateaus, hot towards the Caspian, and dry everywhere.
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  • It now has a large stone dry dock.
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  • The nature of the integument and its hairy clothing in all spiders enables them to be plunged under water and withdrawn perfectly dry, and many species, even as large as the common English house-spider (Tegenaria), are so lightly built that they can run with speed over the surface of standing water, and this faculty has been perfected in genera like Pirata, Dolomedes and Triclaria, which are always found in the vicinity of lakes or on the edges of rivers and streams, readily taking to the water or running down the stems of water plants beneath its surface when pursued.
    0
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  • Picking takes place normally during September and October, and during these months dry weather is essential.
    0
    0
  • In the tropics the essential requirements are very similar, but there the dry season checks production in much the same way as do the frosts in temperate climates.
    0
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  • In either case an adequate but not excessive rainfall, increasing from the time of sowing to the period of active growth, and then decreasing as the bolls ripen, with a dry picking season, combined with sunny days and warm nights, provide the ideal conditions for successful cotton cultivation.
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  • Sandy soils are made thereby too dry and leachy, and it is a questionable proceeding to turn the heavy clays upon the top. Planters are, as a result, divided in opinion as to the wisdom of subsoiling.
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  • The damage may be only slight, or the entire boll may ripen prematurely and become dry and dead.
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  • Beside the local trade of a rich surrounding farming country, the railway facilities of St Joseph have enabled it to build up a great jobbing trade (especially in dry goods), and this is still the greatest economic interest of the city.
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  • The steppe region, whose flora begins to appear east of the western ridge, is distinguished by the variety of its species, the dry and thorny character of its shrubs, and great poverty in trees.
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  • The heat of summer (December-March, which is the rainy season) is tempered by cool breezes; winter (MaySeptember, inclusive) is dry, cold and bracing, and frost prevails for prolonged periods.
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  • This, when cast into forms and allowed to harden and dry slowly, comes out as transparent soap. A class of transparent soap may also be made by the cold process, with the use of coco-nut oil, castor oil and sugar.
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  • The Cephisus, rising in Pentelicus, enters the sea at New Phalerum; in summer it dwindles to an insignificant stream, while the Ilissus, descending from Hymettus, is totally dry, probably owing to the destruction of the ancient forests on both mountains, and the consequent denudation of the soil.
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  • The harbour, in which ships of all nations may be seen, as well as great numbers of the picturesque sailing craft engaged in the coasting trade, is somewhat difficult of access to larger vessels, but has been improved by the construction of new breakwaters and dry docks.
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  • The per-ruthenate, KRuO 4, formed by the action of chlorine on the ruthenate, or of alkalis on the peroxide at 50° C., is a black crystalline solid which is stable in dry air but decomposes when heated strongly.
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  • The product is ground and levigated; and when dry it is ready for use.
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  • In the semi-arid districts on the south slope of the mountains the flora consists chiefly of dry grasses, acacias, yuccas and cactuses.
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  • Some of the largest items of wholesale trade in 1920 were dry goods, $240,000,000; carpets, rugs and linoleums, also $240,000,000; boots and shoes, $175,000,000; groceries, $175,000,000; railway supplies, $210,000,000; hardware, $115,000,000; foundry products, $125,000,000.
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  • Cedar Rapids has also a large grain trade and a large jobbing business, especially in dry goods, millinery, groceries, paper and drugs.
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  • Notwithstanding the inconsistency of his allocation of substances to the different groups (for instance, acetic acid was placed in the vegetable class, while the acetates and the products of their dry distillation, acetone, &c., were placed in the mineral class), this classification came into favour.
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  • The introduction of the blowpipe into dry qualitative analysis by Axel Fredrik Cronstedt marks an important innovation.
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  • Having completed the dry analysis we may now pass on to the wet and more accurate investigation.
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  • The oxidation, which is effected by chromic acid and sulphuric acid, is conducted in a flask provided with a funnel and escape tube, and the carbon dioxide formed is swept by a current of dry air, previously freed from carbon dioxide, through a drying tube to a set of potash bulbs and a tube containing soda-lime; if halogens are present, a small wash bottle containing potassium iodide, and a U tube containing glass wool moistened with silver nitrate on one side and strong sulphuric acid on the other, must be inserted between the flask and the drying tube.
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  • If nitrogen be present, a boat containing dry lead peroxide and heated to 320° is inserted, the oxide decomposing any nitrogen peroxide which may be formed.
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  • If the flow of arterial blood only is arrested, the part depending upon it for nutrition becomes numb, cold and shrivelled, and the form of mortification known as dry gangrene occurs.
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  • Methyl Salicylate, C,H 4 (OH) CO 2 CH 31 found in oil of wintergreen, in the oil of Viola tricolor and in the root of varieties of Polygala, is a pleasant-smelling liquid which boils at 222° C. On passing dry ammonia into the boiling ester, it gives salicylamide and dimethylamine.
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  • The docks, accessible only at high water, include a wet basin and a dry dock.
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  • The air is pure, the climate mild, dry and not subject to sudden changes.
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  • In general the climate is dry and bracing all over the plateau.
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  • Four seasons are recognized - January - April, very dry and great heat; May - June, cooler and the " heavy " rains; July - September, the season of extreme heat and the south-west monsoon; October - December, the " light " rains.
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  • Overcoming in a remarkable manner the difficulties of operating in the dry season, Colonel Swayne harried the mullah incessantly, and followed him across the Haud into the more fertile region of Mudug in Italian territory, permission so to do being granted by Italy.
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  • In 1903 a beginning was made in the cultivation of cotton in the dry river beds, where water can always be obtained at a depth of 10 ft.
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  • The northern shore, along the Gulf of Aden, is backed by tablelands separated by the beds of mountain torrents - generally dry.
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  • A little south is the mouth of the Darror, a usually dry watercourse with a length of over 200 m., which rises, as the Gebi, in the north-east of the British protectorate.
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  • Dry steam is steam free from mechanically mixed water particles; wet steam, on the other hand, contains water particles in suspension.
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  • From the southern boundary line for two and a half degrees north the prairie is dry, but of good soil, which grows excellent crops when irrigated.
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  • Through the mountain passes come at times dry winds from the Pacific coast, which lick up the snow in a few hours.
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  • The gopher is a resident of the dry plains.
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  • The ancient Canopic mouth of the Nile (now dry) was 12 m.
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  • Specimens intended for the herbarium should be collected when possible in dry weather, care being taken to select plants or portions of plants in sufficient number and of a size adequate to illustrate all the characteristic features of the species.
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  • Succulent specimens, as many of the Orchidaceae and seduins and various other Crassulaceous plants, require to be killed by immersion in boiling water before being placed in drying paper, or, instead of becoming dry, they will grow between the sheets.
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  • Another mode of drying is to keep the specimens in a box of dry sand in a warm place for ten or twelve hours, and then press them in drying paper.
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  • A light but strong portfolio, to which pressure by means of straps can be applied, and a few quires of this paper, if the paper be changed night and morning, will be usually sufficient to dry all except very succulent plants.
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  • When a specimen is too large for one sheet, and it is necessary, in order to show its habit, &c., to dry the whole of it, it may be divided into two or three portions, and each placed on a separate sheet for drying.
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  • Specimens may be judged to be dry when they no longer cause a cold sensation when applied to the cheek, or assume a rigidity not evident in the earlier stages of preparation.
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  • The pressure is increased, and the papers are changed less frequently as the specimens become dry, which usually takes place in thirty-six hours.
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  • Other species of a gelatinous nature, like Nemalion and Dudresnaya, may be allowed to dry on the paper, and need not be submitted to pressure until they no longer present a gelatinous appearance.
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  • For the more delicate species, such as the Callithamnia and Ectocarpi, it is an excellent plan to place a small fruiting fragment, carefully floated out in water, on a slip of mica of the size of an ordinary microscopical slide, and allow it to dry.
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  • Many of the freshwater algae which form a mere crust, such as Palmella cruenta, may be placed in a vessel of water, where after a time they float like a scum, the earthy matter settling down to the bottom, and may then be mounted by slipping a piece of mica under them and allowing it to dry.
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