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drunkard

drunkard

drunkard Sentence Examples

  • His route to Philly looked like a drunkard's path, zigzagging a series of country roads that were at times crowded with local traffic.

  • Yet this eminent, this superior personage was an habitual drunkard, an uncouth savage who intruded upon the hospitality of wealthy foreigners, and was not ashamed to seize upon any dish he took a fancy to, and send it home to his wife.

  • Thus a drunkard's or a madman's sacraments would only be mockery, even though the recipients received them in good faith and devoutly.

  • MICHAEL (839-867), "the drunkard," was grandson of Michael II., and succeeded his father Theophilus when three years old (842).

  • Qahir was a drunkard, and derived the money for his excesses from promiscuous confiscation.

  • When left to his own devices he became a drunkard and a murderer, and is accused of the death of his mother, sister and favorite queen.

  • But he was a drunkard and a debauchee, and chroniclers are divided in opinion as to whether he died from the effects of drink or licentious living.

  • Hitherto few perhaps had divined in the unprincipled adventurer, who shared in the debauches of the imperial drunkard, the talents of a born ruler.

  • Panurge has almost all intellectual accomplishments, but is totally devoid of morality: he is a coward, a drunkard, a lecher, a spiteful trickster, a spendthrift, but all the while infinitely amusing.

  • The submerged "bells of Aberdovey" (since Seithennin "the drunkard" caused the formation of Cardigan Bay) are famous in a Welsh song.

  • He is specially chosen for good character, and Azan must not be recited by any one unclean, by a drunkard, by the insane, or by a woman.

  • Drusus was a man of violent passions, a drunkard and a debauchee, but not entirely devoid of better feelings, as is shown by his undoubtedly sincere grief at the death of Germanicus.

  • His route to Philly looked like a drunkard's path, zigzagging a series of country roads that were at times crowded with local traffic.

  • drunkard's walk.

  • Think of a confirmed drunkard, or a confirmed thief, or a confirmed liar.

  • drunkard seen, among them.

  • We see him change from being a chubby, loud mouthed drunkard to being a lean, mean, laconic, vengeance machine.

  • The Clerk: He charges you with being an habitual drunkard.

  • Take the case of the poor drunkard, for instance.

  • A scruffy old drunkard comes to the hospital looking for his son.

  • And then the new cook had proved to be a violent, intermittent drunkard.

  • Shortly Tom came upon the juvenile pariah of the village, Huckleberry Finn, son of the town drunkard.

  • habitual drunkard.

  • Not bad for a drunkard with ' shot ' knees who was deemed unworthy to play for the self-styled biggest club in the world.

  • Yet this eminent, this superior personage was an habitual drunkard, an uncouth savage who intruded upon the hospitality of wealthy foreigners, and was not ashamed to seize upon any dish he took a fancy to, and send it home to his wife.

  • In 1890 "General" Booth attracted further public attention by the publication of a work entitled In Darkest England, and the Way Out, in which he proposed to remedy pauperism and vice by a series of ten expedients: (1) the city colony; (2) the farm colony; (3) the over-sea colony; (4) the household salvage brigade; (5) the rescue homes for fallen women; (6) deliverance for the drunkard; (7) the prison-gate brigade; (8) the poor man's bank; (9)(9) the poor man's lawyer; (io) Whitechapel-bythe-Sea.

  • Thus a drunkard's or a madman's sacraments would only be mockery, even though the recipients received them in good faith and devoutly.

  • MICHAEL (839-867), "the drunkard," was grandson of Michael II., and succeeded his father Theophilus when three years old (842).

  • A law enacted in 1909 forbids a marriage in which either of the parties is a common drunkard, habitual criminal, epileptic, imbecile, feeble-minded person, idiot or insane person, a person who has been afflicted with hereditary insanity, a person who is afflicted with pulmonary tuberculosis in its advanced stages, or a person who is afflicted with any contagious venereal disease, unless the woman is at least forty-five years of age.

  • There were numbers of lesser deities, such as Tlazolteotl, goddess of pleasure, worshipped by courtesans, Tezcatzoncatl, god of strong drink, whose garment in grim irony clothed - the drunkard's corpse, and Xipe, patron of the goldsmiths.

  • The medicine is so simple in application and so easily available that it is served out almost automatically and indifferently, to every law-breaker; the pickpocket and the burglar are locked up next door to the clergyman at variance with his bishop; the weak-kneed and self-indulgent drunkard rubs shoulders with the political zealot who has endangered the peace of nations.

  • Qahir was a drunkard, and derived the money for his excesses from promiscuous confiscation.

  • When left to his own devices he became a drunkard and a murderer, and is accused of the death of his mother, sister and favorite queen.

  • But he was a drunkard and a debauchee, and chroniclers are divided in opinion as to whether he died from the effects of drink or licentious living.

  • Hitherto few perhaps had divined in the unprincipled adventurer, who shared in the debauches of the imperial drunkard, the talents of a born ruler.

  • Panurge has almost all intellectual accomplishments, but is totally devoid of morality: he is a coward, a drunkard, a lecher, a spiteful trickster, a spendthrift, but all the while infinitely amusing.

  • The submerged "bells of Aberdovey" (since Seithennin "the drunkard" caused the formation of Cardigan Bay) are famous in a Welsh song.

  • He is specially chosen for good character, and Azan must not be recited by any one unclean, by a drunkard, by the insane, or by a woman.

  • Drusus was a man of violent passions, a drunkard and a debauchee, but not entirely devoid of better feelings, as is shown by his undoubtedly sincere grief at the death of Germanicus.

  • In that world, the handsome drunkard Number One of the second gun's crew was "uncle"; Tushin looked at him more often than at anyone else and took delight in his every movement.

  • Hearing the yell the officer turned round, and at the same moment Pierre threw himself on the drunkard.

  • Not bad for a drunkard with ' shot ' knees who was deemed unworthy to play for the self-styled biggest club in the world.

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