Domesticated sentence example

domesticated
  • Indigenous animals are not well-suited to be domesticated and assist in farming.
    57
    28
  • The cats … they're domesticated and really very nice.
    38
    22
  • The principal domesticated animal is the yak.
    30
    19
  • The rabbit has been domesticated from an early period.
    14
    10
  • In view of these differences from the domesticated breed, and the resemblance of the skull or lower jaw to that of the extinct European species, it becomes practically impossible to regard the wild camels as the offspring of animals that have escaped from captivity.
    11
    9
    Advertisement
  • of the origin of our domesticated breeds has not yet been determined.
    15
    14
  • The milk of various domesticated animals is more or less used by man for food.
    1
    0
  • In addition to wild animals it usually contains many domesticated creatures of commercial value.
    0
    0
  • FERRET, a domesticated, and frequently albino breed of quadruped, derived from the wild polecat (Putorius foetidus, or P. putorius), which it closely resembles in size, form, and habits, and with which it interbreeds.
    0
    0
  • Of the indigenous birds, the turkey has been fully domesticated, and the musk-duck and " chachalaca " are easily reared.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Though never really domesticated, quaggas have occasionally been trained to harness.
    0
    0
  • Such a state of affairs is produced by the march of civilization into the " hinterlands " of the various colonies, when man, together with the numerous domesticated animals which accompany him, is brought into proximity to big game, &c., and, what is equally important, into the zone of the particular blood-sucking insects which prey upon the same.
    0
    0
  • In the wild state its colours do not differ from those of a Crucian carp, and like that fish it is tenacious of life and easily domesticated.
    0
    0
  • The Chinese have domesticated these albinos for a long time, and by careful selection have succeeded in propagating all those strange varieties, and even monstrosities, which appear in every domestic animal.
    0
    0
  • haedus, a kid), properly the name of the well-known domesticated European ruminant (Capra hircus), which has for all time been regarded as the emblem of everything that is evil, in contradistinction to the sheep, which is the symbol of excellence and purity.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Although the more typical goats are markedly distinct from sheep, there is, both as regards wild and domesticated forms, an almost complete gradation from goats to sheep, so that it is exceedingly difficult to define either group. The position of the genus Capra (to all the members of which, as well as some allied species, the name "goat" in its wider sense is applicable) in the family Bovidae is indicated in the article Bovidae, and some of the distinctions between goats and sheep are mentioned in the article Sheep. Here then it will suffice to mention that goats are characterized by the strong and offensive odour of the males, which are furnished with a beard on the chin; while as a general rule glands are present between the middle toes of the fore feet only.
    0
    0
  • 6 more or less mingled with domesticated breeds, the Cretan animal being distinguished as Capra hircus creticus; but the large typical race C. h.
    0
    0
  • Domesticated goats have run wild in many islands, such as the Hebrides, Shetland, Canaries, Azores, Ascension and Juan Fernandez.
    0
    0
  • Although there have in all probability been more or less important local crosses with other wild species, there can be no doubt that domesticated goats generally are descended from the wild goat.
    0
    0
  • Among the domesticated breeds the following are some of the more important.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • They, like the British brownies (a kind of domesticated fairy), are the causes of strange disappearances of things.
    0
    0
  • Archaeological discoveries in India, Persia, Assyria and Egypt show that in the polished stone age quaternary man had domesticated the horse, while a Chinese treatise, the Goei-leaotse, the fifth book of the Vouking, a sort of military code dating from the reign of the emperor Hoang-Ti (2637 years B.C.), places the cavalry on the wings of the army.
    0
    0
  • Swine is a name properly applicable to the domesticated pig, but also includes its wild relatives.
    0
    0
  • Another character by which the European domesticated pig differs from any of the wild species is the concave outline of the frontal region of the skull.
    0
    0
  • The art of sericulture concerns itself with the rearing of silkworms under artificial or domesticated conditions, their feeding, the formation of cocoons, the securing of these before they are injured and pierced by the moths, and the maturing of a sufficient number of moths to supply eggs for the cultivation of the following year.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Next in promising qualities is the muga or moonga worm of Assam, Antheraea assaina, a species to some extent domesticated in its native country.
    0
    0
  • The Cynthia moth, Attacus cynthia, is domesticated as a source of silk in certain provinces of China, where it feeds on the Ailanthus glandulosa.
    0
    0
  • Among domesticated animals are to be found the horse, mule, donkey, cattle, sheep and goats, dogs, fowls and pigs, ducks and geese.
    0
    0
  • Some domesticated mice are entirely white with the exception that they have black eyeballs; and individuals of this type are known in which there is a reduction of pigment in the eyeballs, and since the colour of the blood is then partially visible these appear of a reddish-black colour.
    0
    0
  • The wild mouse, rat and rabbit are self-coloured, but the domesticated forms include various piebald patterns, such as spotted forms among mice, and the familiar black and white hooded and dorsal-striped pattern of some tame rats.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Massachusetts, and it is not likely to have been domesticated by the Indian tribes there, as, according to Hernandez, it seems to have been by the Mexicans.
    0
    0
  • When captured by them shortly after being hatched, and reared by the hand, it soon becomes tame and familiar; all the specimens which have reached Europe alive have been thus domesticated by the natives.
    0
    0
  • word of the same meaning, bigge), a common name given to the domesticated swine of agricultural use.
    0
    0
  • Reindeer are domesticated by the Lapps and other nationalities of northern Europe and Asia, to whom these animals are all-important.
    0
    0
  • Domesticated reindeer have also been introduced into Alaska.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A multitude of varieties of cultivated plants and domesticated animals existed, and these differed amongst themselves and from their nearest wild allies to an extent that, but for the fact of their domestication, would entitle them to the systematic rank of species.
    0
    0
  • No doubt such domesticated species might revert, and it has been shown that many do revert when restored to wild conditions, but such reversion is natural if we reflect that the domestic varieties are under the guardianship of man and have been selected according to his whim and advantage.
    0
    0
  • Comparing domesticated varieties with species and varieties in nature, Darwin showed that the distinction between varieties and species was chiefly a matter of opinion, and that the discovery of new linking forms often degraded species to varieties.
    0
    0
  • He pointed to the changes wrought on domesticated organisms by the artificial selection of similar variations, and drew the inference that there must be parallel occurrences under wild nature.
    0
    0
  • Although the name llama properly applies only to one of the domesticated breeds, zoologically it is taken to include all the South American representatives of the Camelidae, which form the genus Lama.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The dogs, which prowl in large numbers round the streets of towns and villages, are scarcely domesticated; much the same is true of the cats.
    0
    0
  • people lived in caves or rude huts, and had domesticated animals (sheep, cow, pig, goat), the bones of which they fashioned into various implements.
    0
    0
  • The regular mode of catching elephants is by means of a keddah, or gigantic stockade, into which a wild herd is driven, then starved into submission, and tamed by animals already domesticated.
    0
    0
  • Ogilvy in a Catalogue of Australian Mammals, published at Sydney in 1892; the writer going however one step further and expressing the belief that the dingo is the ancestor of all domesticated dogs.
    0
    0
  • That the animal now occurs in a wild state is no argument whatever as to its being indigenous, seeing that a domesticated breed introduced by man into a new country abounding in game would almost certainly revert to the wild state.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • If, on the other hand, pariahs, and consequently the dingo, cannot be separated specifically from the domesticated dogs of western Europe, then the dingo should be designated Canis familiaris dingo.
    0
    0
  • The animals, domesticated or wild, like the horse or cow, the guardian dog, the bird of omen, naturally share the same life, and are approached with the same invocation.
    0
    0
  • A domesticated animal or a cultivated plant need not necessarily be acclimatized; that is, it need not be capable of enduring the severity of the seasons without protection.
    0
    0
  • The canary bird is domesticated but not acclimatized, and many of our most extensively cultivated plants are in the same category.
    0
    0
  • A number of foreign animals have been introduced, and more or less domesticated, and some useful exotics have been cultivated for the purpose of testing their applicability to French agriculture or horticulture; but neither in the case of animals nor of plants has there been any systematic effort to modify the constitution of the species, by breeding largely and selecting the favourable variations that appeared.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • To check the increase of the rabbit, stoats, weasels and polecats (the last in the form of the domesticated ferret) were introduced into New Zealand on a very large scale in the last quarter of the 19th century.
    0
    0
  • ALPACA, one of two domesticated breeds of South American camel-like ungulates, derived from the wild huanaco or guanaco.
    0
    0
  • The four species of indigenous South American wool-bearing animals are the llama, the alpaca, the guanaco and the vicu�The llama and the alpaca are domesticated; the guanaco and the vicuna run wild.
    0
    0
  • There may also be mentioned the wild reindeer, which is rare, though large domesticated herds are kept by the Lapps.
    0
    0
  • The llama and alpaca were domesticated long before the discovery of America, but the guanaco and vicuña are found in a wild state only.
    0
    0
  • The domesticated Indians profess the Roman Catholic faith, but it is tinged with the superstitions of their ancestors.
    0
    0
  • Jackals are readily tamed; and domesticated individuals are said, when called by their masters, to wag their tails, crouch and throw themselves on the ground, and otherwise behave in a dog-like fashion.
    0
    0
  • The red fox is widely distributed, and the white or Arctic fox is very common along the eastern coast of Bering Sea; a blue fox, once wild, is now domesticated on Kodiak and the Aleutians, and on the southern continental coast, and a black fox, very rare, occurs in south-eastern Alaska; the silver fox is very rare.
    0
    0
  • Among other remarkable discoveries were those of the wild camel, ancestor of the domesticated species, and of the early type of horse, now known by his name (Equus prjewalskii).
    0
    0
  • The number of domesticated ostriches in 1904 was 357,000, showing an increase of over 200,000 since 1891.
    0
    0
  • the German Schaf), a name originally bestowed in all probability on the familiar domesticated ruminant (Ovis aries), but now extended to include its immediate wild relatives.
    0
    0
  • Although many of the domesticated breeds are hornless, sheep belong to the family of hollow-horned ruminants or Bovidae.
    0
    0
  • The sheep was domesticated in Asia and Europe before the dawn of history, though unknown in this state in the New World until after the Spanish conquest.
    0
    0
  • Both breeds, which have short tails and small horns (present only in the rams), were regarded by the German naturalist Fitzinger as specifically distinct from the domesticated Ovis cries of Europe; and for the first type he proposed the name 0.
    0
    0
  • Guanaco are readily domesticated, and in this state become very bold and will attack man, striking him from behind with both knees.
    0
    0
  • OX, strictly speaking, the Saxon name for the males of domesticated cattle (Bos taurus), but in a zoological sense employed so as to include not only the extinct wild ox of Europe but likewise bovine animals of every description, that is to say true oxen, bison and buffaloes.
    0
    0
  • Whether humped cattle are of Indian or African origin cannot be determined, and the species is known only in the domesticated condition.
    0
    0
  • LLAMA, the Spanish modification of the Peruvian name of the larger of the two domesticated members of the cameltribe indigenous to South America.
    0
    0
  • The llama (Lama huanacus glama) is a domesticated derivative of the wild guanaco, which has been bred as a beast of burden.
    0
    0
  • ross), a name properly restricted to the domesticated horse (Equus caballus) and its wild or halfwild representatives, but in a zoological sense used as a general term for all the members of the family Equidae.
    0
    0
  • These horses were domesticated by the inhabitants of Europe before the dawn of history.
    0
    0
  • asinus) is the parent of the domesticated breed, and is a long-eared grey animal, with no forelock, and either a shoulder-stripe or dark barrings on the legs.
    0
    0
  • In some instances, however, the feet of such polydactyle horses bear little resemblance to those of the extinct Hipparion or Anchitherium, but look rather as if due to that tendency to reduplication of parts which occurs so frequently as a monstrous condition, especially among domesticated animals, and which, whatever its origin, certainly cannot in many instances, as the cases of entire limbs superadded, or of six digits in man, be attributed to reversion.
    0
    0
  • They were still hunters, but had domesticated animals; they were fairly skilful metallurgists, casting bronze in moulds of stone and clay; they were also agriculturists, cultivating beans, the vine, wheat and flax.
    0
    0
  • All the existing members of the family, such as the domesticated horse (Equus caballus) and its wild or half-wild relatives, the asses and the zebras, are included in the typical genus.
    0
    0
  • The cats … they're domesticated and really very nice.
    0
    0
  • The domesticated animals inject their hooves onto depraved and overgrazed fields.
    0
    0
  • It's a strange brew, but try and imagine CANNIBAL APOCALYPSE tamed and domesticated by Ken Loach.
    0
    0
  • Barley breeding: believing in what is best Over 10,000 years ago, barley was domesticated in the fertile crescent of the Near East.
    0
    0
  • domesticated animals in human care in several respects.
    0
    0
  • domesticated livestock took a very mild course with no mortalities being recorded.
    0
    0
  • domesticated elephants are still being used to clear forests illegally.
    0
    0
  • domesticated mammals the retina is the reflective area at the back of the eye which responds to light.
    0
    0
  • domesticated, moreover, sheep had no wool suitable for textile purposes.
    0
    0
  • domesticated cattle, sheep, pigs, wheat and barley.
    0
    0
  • domesticated by the ancient Egyptians and has spread all over the world in many different domestic strains.
    0
    0
  • domesticated animals such as cats, chickens and pigs.
    0
    0
  • But today, the patchwork of land around has been thoroughly domesticated by its sale for ranch-style housing.
    0
    0
  • Wild animals are those that are not normally domesticated in Great Britain.
    0
    0
  • These gardens are tended patches of vegetation of intermediate status between fully wild and fully domesticated.
    0
    0
  • Cats were first domesticated 8,000 years ago by people in the Far East who considered them to be good luck.
    0
    0
  • He is also very domesticated with great skill in cooking and textiles!
    0
    0
  • I am not domesticated, as I told him.
    0
    0
  • domesticated including many rare breeds.
    0
    0
  • domesticated in other parts of the world.
    0
    0
  • domesticated from the wolf.
    0
    0
  • domesticated from the guanaco, a wild camelid living primarily in Patagonia.
    0
    0
  • domesticated for this purpose.
    0
    0
  • However, the Malamute is a domesticated dog and is not a wolf hybrid.
    0
    0
  • Probably the first cultivated legume, sometimes linked with wheat and barley, which may have been domesticated at around the same time.
    0
    0
  • An understanding of the natural behavior or ethology is a requirement in the assessment of the welfare of domesticated livestock.
    0
    0
  • In domesticated mammals the retina is the reflective area at the back of the eye which responds to light.
    0
    0
  • pastoralist peoples who, having acquired lactose tolerance, domesticated the horse and discovered metallurgy.
    0
    0
  • She has written to us to highlight the plight of domesticated Pet Rats in South Africa... .
    0
    0
  • Queen Annes Lace is the wild progenitor of the domesticated carrot.
    0
    0
  • Origins: European polecat; the ferret was domesticated by the Egyptians and originally bred to hunt rabbits.
    0
    0
  • As regards the origin of the domesticated cats of western Europe, it is well known that the ancient Egyptians were in the habit of domesticating (at least in some degree) the Egyptian race of the African wild cat (Felis ocreata maniculata), and also of embalming its remains, of which vast numbers have been found in tombs at Beni Hasan and elsewhere in Egypt.
    0
    0
  • One of the features by which the Egyptian differs from the European wild cat is the longer and less bushy tail; and it has been very generally considered that the same feature is characteristic of European domesticated cats.
    0
    0
  • Before proceeding to notice some of the different types of domesticated cats, a few lines may be devoted to the wild European species, F.
    0
    0
  • Among the domesticated cats of India a spotted type of colouring, with a more or less decided tendency for the spots to coalesce into stripes, is very noticeable; and it is probable that these cats are derived from the spotted Indian desert-cat (F.
    0
    0
  • By far the most remarkable of all the Old World domesticated breeds is, however, the royal Siamese cat, which almost certainly has an origin quite distinct from that of the ordinary European breeds; this being rendered evident not only by the peculiar type of colouring, but likewise by the cry, which is quite unmistakable.
    0
    0
  • Although definite information on this point is required, it seems probable that the southern part of North America and South America possessed certain native domesticated breeds of cats previous to the European conquest of the country; and if this be so, it will be obvious that these breeds must be derived from indigenous wild species.
    0
    0
  • He regards the Australians as representing the lowest and most primitive examples of this primitive Caucasic type, and he urges that they must have arrived in Australia at a time when their ancestors had no pottery, knew no agriculture, domesticated no animals, had no houses and used no bows and arrows.
    0
    0
  • The Arabian camel, which is used not only in the country from which it takes its name, but also in North Africa and India, and has been introduced into Australia and North America, is known only as a domesticated animal.
    0
    0
  • That the Arabian species was one of the earliest animals to be domesticated is evident from the record of Scripture, where six thousand camels are said to have formed part of the wealth of the patriarch Job.
    0
    0
  • Amelioration in all breeds of domesticated animals was manifested, not so much in the production of individual specimens of high merit as in the diffusion of these and other good breeds over the country, and in the improved quality of live stock as a whole.
    0
    0
  • DOG, the English generic term for the quadruped of the domesticated variety of Canis (Fr.
    0
    0
  • Cuvier gives an interesting account of a young wolf which, having been trained to follow his master, showed affection and submission scarcely inferior to the domesticated dog.
    0
    0
  • The increase of many animals in size (becoming twice as large as in Europe); the appearance of white varieties among both mammals and birds, and their great prevalence among domesticated animals (Yakut horses); the migrations of birds and mammals over immense regions, from the Central Asian steppes to the arctic coast, not only in the usual rotation of the seasons but also as a result of occasional climacteric conditions are not yet fully understood (e.g.
    0
    0
  • The species cannot, however, be completely domesticated, and never displays the affectionate traits of the dog.
    0
    0
  • CAVY, a name commonly applied to several South American rodent animals included in the family Caviidae (see Rodentia), but perhaps properly applicable only to those belonging to the typical genus Cavia, of which the most familiar representative is the domesticated guinea-pig.
    0
    0
  • Of domesticated animals the camel is far the most useful to the Arab.
    0
    0
  • deal in a similar way with domesticated and wild animals, including the dog, serpents, bees and insects; they also include a general treatise on animal physiology spread over books xxi.
    0
    0
  • In Europe a false impression of the yak is prevalent, owing to the fact that all the specimens imported have belonged either to a small domesticated breed from Darjiling, or to half-breeds; the latter being generally black and white, instead of the uniform Domesticated Yak, Bos (Poephagus) grunniens.
    0
    0
  • SWINE, a name properly applicable to the domesticated pig (Sus scrofa), but also including its wild relatives.
    0
    0
  • In the typical genus Sus, as exemplified by domesticated pigs (see PIG) and the wild boar (see Boar), the dentition is i.
    0
    0
  • frontalis), confined to the hills of the north-east frontier, where it is domesticated for sacrificial purposes by the aboriginal tribes, and the tsine or banting (B.
    0
    0
  • The domesticated waterbuffalo is sluggish in its movements, and will not work through the heat of the day; but it is a wonderful swimmer, and makes its way through the worst quagmire with ease.
    0
    0
  • The four species of indigenous South American wool-bearing animals are the llama, the alpaca, the guanaco and the vicu�The llama and the alpaca are domesticated; the guanaco and the vicuna run wild.
    0
    0
  • Although the many attempts that have been made to break in and train zebras for riding and driving have sometimes been rewarded with partial success, the animal has never been domesticated in the true sense of the word (see Horse).
    0
    0
  • The llama and alpaca were domesticated long before the discovery of America, but the guanaco and vicuña are found in a wild state only.
    0
    0
  • In the typical oxen, as represented by the existing domesticated breeds (see Cattle) and the extinct aurochs, the horns are cylindrical and placed on an elevated crest at the very vertex of the skull, which has the frontal region of great length.
    0
    0
  • Wild animals have stronger responses to stress than domesticated animals like cats and dogs.
    0
    0
  • Domesticated cats evolved from desert cats where little water is available, so their bodies are adapted to extracting water from prey as their primary source of hydration.
    0
    0
  • Others, more reasonably believe that Maine Coons originally came from domesticated cats that mated with bobcats.
    0
    0
  • Maintaining routine vaccinations against feline AIDS, rabies, distemper, feline leukemia, rhinotracheitis and other regional diseases and viruses is essential to the health of any domesticated cat.
    0
    0
  • In the wild, the safest time to give birth is during the night when many other predators are sleeping, and this remains the case with most domesticated cats today.
    0
    0
  • While cats have long been domesticated, their genetics reflect a time when they would be hunting for food.
    0
    0
  • The diet for a domesticated cat must reflect her true nature.
    0
    0
  • Domesticated dogs still have the instinct to den, and a crate can be a great substitution for that space.
    0
    0
  • It works with the theory that although pets are domesticated, their ancestry still best governs the type of food they need to thrive.
    0
    0
  • Never let him wander or leave him unattended; you never know what animal (wild or domesticated) could be nearby.
    0
    0
  • Since humans have domesticated the dog, it is now up to us to help our canine companions through this important time.
    0
    0
  • Domesticated animals such as dogs, cattle, and mink are affected by botulism C toxin, which also affects birds and has caused massive die-offs in domestic bird flocks and wild waterfowl.
    0
    0
  • Domesticated animals, including household pets, should be vaccinated against rabies.
    0
    0
  • Dogs were first domesticated by humans as early as 10,000 B.C. for hunting and as guard or attack dogs.
    0
    0
  • Unlike dogs, cats were not domesticated until about 3000 B.C., and were important to ancient civilizations as rodent catchers and household companions rather than as protectors or hunters of wild game.
    0
    0
  • Chupacabra translates to goat-sucker, and the creature has the reputation of sucking the blood from farm and domesticated animals.
    0
    0
  • Humankind has been making cheese for thousands of years, a process that was discovered when people domesticated sheep.
    0
    0
  • This domesticated daggit was a living pet, with a heart and functioning organs.
    0
    0
  • This usage, coupled with the existence of a distinct term in Gaelic for the wild species, leaves little doubt that the word "cat" properly denotes only the domesticated species.
    0
    1
  • The ordinary domesticated cats of Europe are, however, mainly of African origin, although they have largely crossed, especially in Germany (and probably also in Great Britain), with the wild cat.
    10
    11
  • Ameghino argues that this creature is still living, while Dr Moreno advances the theory that the animal has been extinct for a long period, and that it was domesticated by a people of great antiquity, who dwelt there prior to the Indians.
    0
    1
  • It has indeed been suggested that the figure of the aurochs was taken from a domesticated ox, but this is a mistaken idea.
    0
    1
  • As a wild animal, then, the aurochs appears to have ceased to exist in the early part of the 17th century; but as a species it survives, for the majority of the domesticated breeds of European cattle are its descendants, all diminished in point of size, and some departing more widely from the original type than others.
    1
    2
  • It was first domesticated in Italy during the 16th century, and soon spread over Europe, where it is now the most common of cage-birds.
    1
    2
  • In ' For results of a comparison of the skulls of wild and domesticated turkeys, see Dr Shufeldt, in Journ.
    1
    2
  • The collection is not usually very rich in species, but there have been great and long-continued successes in the breeding of large animals such as hippopotamuses, lions and antelopes, and a very large business is done in domesticated birds, water-fowl and cage birds.
    0
    1
  • CAT,' properly the name of the well-known domesticated feline animal usually termed by naturalists Felis domestics, but in a wider sense employed to denote all the more typical members of the family Felidae.
    10
    13
  • Naturfor., Berlin, 1887) to the colour of the soles of the hind-feet as a means of determining the relationship of the domesticated cat of Europe.
    5
    8
  • Beyond stating that in colour it conforms very closely to the striped phase of domesticated tabby, it will be unnecessary to describe the species.
    1
    4
  • Leche shows that the wild Bactrian camel differs from the domesticated breed of central Asia in the following external characters: the humps are smaller; the long hair does not occupy nearly so much of the body; the colour is much more rufous; and the ears and muzzle are shorter.
    4
    7
  • Of the domesticated animals of Asia may first be mentioned the elephant.
    2
    5
  • Their services to their owners and to Arctic explorers are well known, but Eskimo dogs are so rapacious that it is impossible to train them to refrain from attacking sheep, goats or any small domesticated animals.
    0
    3
  • GAYAL, a domesticated ox allied to the Gaur, but distinguished, among other features, by the more conical and straighter horns, and the straight line between them.
    0
    3
  • Although it has received a distinct name, Bos (Bibos) frontalis, there can be little doubt that the gayal is merely a domesticated breed of the gaur, many gayal-skulls showing characters approximating to those of the gaur.
    0
    3
  • The wild animals of Cambodia include the elephant, which is also domesticated, the rhinoceros, buffalo and some species of wild ox; also the tiger, panther, leopard and honey-bear.
    0
    3
  • Rabbits, hares, domesticated poultry, game-birds, and, when these run short, rats, mice and even insects, form the chief diet of the fox.
    0
    3
  • helias) which is easily domesticated; and on the dry elevated cameos the ceriema (Dicholophus cristatus) which is prized for its flesh, and the jacamin (Psophia crepitans) which is frequently domesticated.
    0
    3
  • - The following works are the most important: Denny, Monographia Anoplurorum Britanniae (London, 18 43); Giebel, Insecta Epizoa (which contains the working-up of Nitzsch's posthumous materials; Leipzig, 1874); van Beneden, Animal Parasites (London, 1876); Piaget, Les Pediculines (Leiden, 1880); Megnin, Les Parasites et les maladies parasitaires (Paris, 1880); Neumann, Parasites and Parasitic Diseases of Domesticated Animals (1892); Osborn, Pediculi and Mallophaga affecting Man and the Lower Animals (Washington, 1891; U.S. Dept.
    0
    3
  • True cavies, or couies (Cavia), are best known by the guineapig, a domesticated and parti-coloured race derived from one of the wild species, all of which are uniformly coloured.
    0
    3
  • The chief breeding industry is that of the llama, alpaca and vicuiiaanimals of the Auchenia family domesticated by the Indians and bred, the first as a pack animal, and the other two for their wool, hides and meat.
    0
    3
  • YAK, the wild (and domesticated) ox of the Tibetan plateau; a species nearly allied to the bison group. The yak, Bos (POephagus) grunniens, is one of the finest and largest of the wild oxen, characterized by the growth of long shaggy hair on the flanks and under parts of the body and the well-known bushy tail.
    0
    3
  • Every one who has visited India is familiar with the pretty little striped palm-squirrel, which is to a considerable extent a partially domesticated animal, or, rather, an animal which has taken to quarter itself in the immediate neighbourhood of human habitations.
    0
    3
  • In India elephants seldom breed in captivity, though they do so more frequently in Burma and Siam; the domesticated stock is therefore replenished by fresh captures.
    3
    7
  • This is confirmed by the employment in Byzantine Greek of the term thTros or ioirra to designate domesticated cats brought from Egypt.
    4
    8
  • It should be added that the aiXovpos of the Greeks, frequently translated by the older writers as "cat," really refers to the marten-cat, which appears to have been partially domesticated by the ancients and employed for mousing.
    2
    6
  • Possibly those domesticated cats with unusually short and bushy tails may have a larger share of European wild-cat blood; while, conversely, such wild cats as show long tails may have a cross of domesticated blood.
    1
    5
  • The earliest written record of the introduction of domesticated cats into Great Britain dates from about A.D.
    4
    8
  • Apart from the above-mentioned division of the striped members of both groups into two types according to the pattern of their markings, the domesticated cats of western Europe are divided into a short-haired and a long-haired group. Of these, the former is the one which bears the closest relationship to the wild cats of Africa and of Europe, the latter being an importation from the East.
    0
    4
  • jaguarondi), a chestnut-coloured wild species; but information appears to be lacking with regard to the colouring of the domesticated breed.
    0
    4
  • On the other hand, the Bactrian species, which is employed throughout a large tract of central Asia in the domesticated condition, appears, according to recent researches, to exist in the wild state in some of the central Asian deserts.
    1
    5
  • On the latter hypothesis it has been generally assumed that the wild camels are the descendants of droves of the domesticated breed which escaped when certain central Asian cities were overwhelmed by sand-storms. This theory, according to Professor Leche, is rendered improbable by Dr Sven Hedin's observations on the habits and mode of life of the wild camel.
    1
    5
  • There are a raven (Corvus), a coot (Fulica), the well-known Sandwich island goose (Bernicla sandvicensis), now very commonly domesticated in Europe; and some flycatchers and thrushlike birds.
    1
    5
  • It spread rapidly over the country, affecting all domesticated animals except horses, and although seldom attended by fatal results, caused everywhere great alarm and loss.
    1
    5
  • Osiris and Isis are closely connected with Syria and the Lebanon in legend; the Ded or sacred pillar of Osiris is doubtless really a representation of a great cedar with its horizontally outspreading branches; 8 another of the sacred Egyptian trees is obviously a cypress; corn and wine are traditionally associated with Osiris, and it is probable that corn and wine were first domesticated in Syria, and came thence with the gods Osiris and Re (the sun god of Heliopolis) into the Delta.
    2
    6
  • The title of "grunting ox" properly belongs only to the domesticated breed.
    10
    14
  • The pine-marten appears to have been partially domesticated by the Greeks and Romans, and used to keep houses clear from rats and mice.
    1
    5
  • Since in all domesticated cats retaining the colouring of the wild species the soles of the hind-feet correspond in this particular with the Egyptian rather than with the European wild cat, the presumption is in favour of their descent from the former rather than from the latter.
    1
    6
  • The foregoing opinion as to the dual parentage of our domesticated cats receives support from observations made many years ago by E.
    3
    8
  • It is added that the remains of cats from Roman villas at Silchester and Dursley are probably referable to the domesticated breed.
    1
    6
  • They never, in any situation, cultivated the soil for any kind of food-crop. They never reared any kind of cattle, or kept any domesticated animal except the dog, which probably came over with them in their canoes.
    1
    6
  • The common domesticated fowl is not indigenous.
    7
    12
  • As to the introduction of domesticated cats into Europe, the opinion is very generally held that tame cats from Egypt were imported at a relatively early date into Etruria by Phoenician traders; and there is decisive evidence that these animals were established in Italy long before the Christian era.
    2
    10
  • 1889) came to the conclusion that the domesticated cat has a dual parentage, one stock coming from south-eastern Asia and the other from north-eastern Africa; in other words, from a domesticated Chinese cat (itself derived from a wild Chinese species) on the one hand, and from the Egyptian cat on the other.
    4
    13
  • This comparison leads to the important conclusion that the wild Bactrian Camelus bactrianus ferus comes much nearer to the fossil species than it does to the domesticated breed, the resemblance being specially noticeable in the absolutely and relatively small size of the last molar.
    2
    11
  • The note of this once wild Indian pheasant is certainly the most remarkable of any bird's, and if they could be naturalized without being domesticated, it would soon become the most famous sound in our woods, surpassing the clangor of the goose and the hooting of the owl; and then imagine the cackling of the hens to fill the pauses when their lords' clarions rested!
    1
    13