This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

divining

divining Sentence Examples

  • But the same divining imagination which showed him these things also showed him the near time when it would be too late to speak of them, and when not to have spoken would leave him irredeemably in the common herd of hand-tomouth politicians.

    3
    1
  • ASTROLOGY, the ancient art or science of divining the fate and future of human beings from indications given by the positions of the stars (sun, moon and planets).

    3
    1
  • ASTROLOGY, the ancient art or science of divining the fate and future of human beings from indications given by the positions of the stars (sun, moon and planets).

    3
    1
  • Great use was made of a curious divining drum, oval in shape and made of wood, 1 to 4 ft.

    3
    2
  • Its greatest gift was not the romantic imagination which he possessed abundantly and employed overmuch, but the perceptive, interpretative, judicial or divining imagination, without which there can be no great man of affairs.

    3
    6
  • (ii.) The divining rod is the best-known example of this class; divination depending on automatic movements of this sort is found at all stages of culture; in Australia it is used to detect the magician who has caused the death of a native; in medieval and modern times water-divining or dowsing has been largely and successfully used.

    2
    1
  • Similar in principle is coscinomancy, or divining by a sieve held suspended, which gives indications by turning; and the equally common divination by a suspended ring, both of which are found from Europe in the west to China and Japan in the east.

    2
    1
  • Talleyrand, personally impressed when in America with Hamilton's brilliant qualities, declared that he had the power of divining without reasoning, and compared him to Fox and Napoleon because he had " devine l'Europe."

    2
    1
  • Talleyrand, personally impressed when in America with Hamilton's brilliant qualities, declared that he had the power of divining without reasoning, and compared him to Fox and Napoleon because he had " devine l'Europe."

    2
    1
  • He was a model steward, possessing in the highest degree the faculty of divining the needs and instincts of those he dealt with.

    2
    1
  • She caught the unfinished word in its flight and took it straight into her open heart, divining the secret meaning of all Pierre's mental travail.

    2
    1
  • These more specialized actions are most typically seen in the Divining Rod (q.v.; see also Table-Turning), which indicates the presence of water and is used among the uncivilized to trace criminals.

    2
    2
  • Tacitus says that certain marks were inscribed on the divining chips, but it cannot be determined with certainty whether these were really letters or not.

    2
    2
  • The most noteworthy outcome of this system in the realm of religious practice was, as already intimated, the growth of an elaborate and complicated method of divining the future by the observation of the phenomena in the heavens.

    2
    2
  • According to Cornish tradition, the divining or dowsing rod is guided to lodes by the pixies, the guardians of the treasures of the earth.

    2
    2
  • (i.) Crystal-gazing is a world-wide method of divining, which is analogous to dreams, save that the vision is voluntarily initiated, though little, if at all, under the control of the scryer.

    2
    2
  • It seems that opinions may be formed of inquiry and study alone, which are then constructive; but where intuitive perception or the perceptive imagination is a robust possession, the fruits of research become assimilative - the food of a divining faculty which needs more or less of it according to the power of divination.

    2
    2
  • Yet so far was Wellington from divining Napoleon's object that he stationed 17,000 men (including Colville's British division) at Hal and Tubize, 8 m.

    2
    3
  • One of the chief names for the priest was baru - literally the "inspector" - which was given to him because of the prominence of his function as an inspector of livers for the purpose of divining the intention of the gods.

    2
    5
  • Rightly divining as much, the church condemned the doctrine as early as 1276.

    2
    5
  • One of the oldest and most widespread methods of divining the future, both among primitive people and among several of the civilizations of antiquity, was the reading of omens in the signs noted on the liver of the animal offered as a sacrifice to some deity.

    2
    7
  • § 186), furnishing the date (274 B.C.) when the examination of the heart was for the first time introduced by the side of the liver as a means of divining the future, while the lungs are not mentioned till we reach the days of Cicero (de Divinatione, i.

    2
    7
  • divinepathological sensitivity to brands makes her the perfect divining rod for an ad agency that wants to test a new logo.

    0
    0
  • Dave stared intently at his own, divining the future in the brown flecks, he claimed.

    0
    0
  • Intoxicants and games of chance, and idols and divining arrows are an abomination of Satan's handiwork.

    0
    0
  • rowan twigs were used for divining, particularly for metals.

    0
    0
  • One of the oldest and most widespread methods of divining the future, both among primitive people and among several of the civilizations of antiquity, was the reading of omens in the signs noted on the liver of the animal offered as a sacrifice to some deity.

    0
    0
  • One of the chief names for the priest was baru - literally the "inspector" - which was given to him because of the prominence of his function as an inspector of livers for the purpose of divining the intention of the gods.

    0
    0
  • § 186), furnishing the date (274 B.C.) when the examination of the heart was for the first time introduced by the side of the liver as a means of divining the future, while the lungs are not mentioned till we reach the days of Cicero (de Divinatione, i.

    0
    0
  • He was better skilled in investigating the past than in divining the future.

    0
    0
  • Yet so far was Wellington from divining Napoleon's object that he stationed 17,000 men (including Colville's British division) at Hal and Tubize, 8 m.

    0
    0
  • Rightly divining as much, the church condemned the doctrine as early as 1276.

    0
    0
  • These more specialized actions are most typically seen in the Divining Rod (q.v.; see also Table-Turning), which indicates the presence of water and is used among the uncivilized to trace criminals.

    0
    0
  • Tacitus says that certain marks were inscribed on the divining chips, but it cannot be determined with certainty whether these were really letters or not.

    0
    0
  • In 1768, recognized as a man who had both the ability and the means for a scientific career, he was nominated adjoint chimiste to the Academy, and in that capacity made numerous reports on the most diverse subjects, from the theory of colours to water-supply and from invalid chairs to mesmerism and the divining rod.

    0
    0
  • The most noteworthy outcome of this system in the realm of religious practice was, as already intimated, the growth of an elaborate and complicated method of divining the future by the observation of the phenomena in the heavens.

    0
    0
  • According to Cornish tradition, the divining or dowsing rod is guided to lodes by the pixies, the guardians of the treasures of the earth.

    0
    0
  • (i.) Crystal-gazing is a world-wide method of divining, which is analogous to dreams, save that the vision is voluntarily initiated, though little, if at all, under the control of the scryer.

    0
    0
  • (ii.) The divining rod is the best-known example of this class; divination depending on automatic movements of this sort is found at all stages of culture; in Australia it is used to detect the magician who has caused the death of a native; in medieval and modern times water-divining or dowsing has been largely and successfully used.

    0
    0
  • Similar in principle is coscinomancy, or divining by a sieve held suspended, which gives indications by turning; and the equally common divination by a suspended ring, both of which are found from Europe in the west to China and Japan in the east.

    0
    0
  • It seems that opinions may be formed of inquiry and study alone, which are then constructive; but where intuitive perception or the perceptive imagination is a robust possession, the fruits of research become assimilative - the food of a divining faculty which needs more or less of it according to the power of divination.

    0
    0
  • Its greatest gift was not the romantic imagination which he possessed abundantly and employed overmuch, but the perceptive, interpretative, judicial or divining imagination, without which there can be no great man of affairs.

    0
    0
  • But the same divining imagination which showed him these things also showed him the near time when it would be too late to speak of them, and when not to have spoken would leave him irredeemably in the common herd of hand-tomouth politicians.

    0
    0
  • Great use was made of a curious divining drum, oval in shape and made of wood, 1 to 4 ft.

    0
    0
  • Rowan twigs were used for divining, particularly for metals.

    0
    0
  • When a hexagram is created from six coin tosses in the most common method of divining, there is a chance that one or more of the lines will a moving or changing line.

    0
    0
  • It's a sensible approach to divining for the beginner.

    0
    0
  • An ancient art of divining, this category sheds light and brings clarity with easy to understand tips of this practice.

    0
    0
  • Read on to discover where you fall in this ancient divining art.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →