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divergence

divergence

divergence Sentence Examples

  • Kirche), shows considerable divergence from the first edition (1850), and reveals an entire emancipation from F.

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  • In some passages, however, the divergence is on a larger scale.

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  • In fact, we may neglect the divergence, and may regard them as " plane waves."

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  • In all the above cases there is no divergence among the MSS.

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  • Brown is the first investigator to determine the theoretical motions with this degree of precision; and he finds that there is no such divergence between the actual and the computed motion.

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  • Hence pleasure is, on the whole, good, and asceticism reprehensible, although in man's case there has arisen (owing to the rapidity of evolution) a certain derangement and divergence between the pleasant and the salutary (§ 39).

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  • room for considerable divergence m, Nectocalyx.

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  • The divergence of policy of that state from that pursued by the other states was caused by the inability of the government to construct lines, when the extension of the railway system was urgently needed in the interests of settlement.

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  • The divergence of policy of that state from that pursued by the other states was caused by the inability of the government to construct lines, when the extension of the railway system was urgently needed in the interests of settlement.

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  • The great variety of views amongst competent critics is significant of the difficulty of the problem, which can hardly be regarded as yet solved; this divergence of opinion perhaps points to the impossibility of maintaining the unity of chs.

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  • All modern theologians of the Roman Church answer these questions in the affirmative, but from the 8th to the beginning of the 13th century they were fiercely agitated with the utmost divergence of opinion and practice.

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  • All modern theologians of the Roman Church answer these questions in the affirmative, but from the 8th to the beginning of the 13th century they were fiercely agitated with the utmost divergence of opinion and practice.

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  • 10.9 I.-Industrial Development and Sectional Divergence, 1829-1850.

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  • In spite of this divergence, Hippasus is always regarded as a Pythagorean.

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  • The difference between the theories of Haeckel and Chun is connected with a further divergence in the interpretation of the stem or axis of the cormus.

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  • A further divergence of opinion arises from differences in the interpretation of the persons composing the colony.

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  • The Arabic writer Shahrastani endeavours to bridge the divergence between the two traditions by means of the following.

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  • It is found that divergence has begun before the concentration has become great enough to enable freezing points to be measured with any ordinary apparatus.

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  • In the Protestant Churches 2 the custom as to vestments differs widely, corresponding to a similar divergence in tradition and teaching.

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  • But their constitution is not yet solved, there even being some divergence of opinion as to their empirical formulae.

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  • The general conception of the physician's aim and task remained the same, though, as knowledge increased, there was much divergence both in theory and practice - even opposing schools were found to be developing some part of the Hippocratic system.

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  • Starting with the stem forms the descendants of which have passed through either persistent or changed habitats, we reach the underlying idea of the branching law of Lamarck or the law of divergence of Darwin, and find it perhaps most clearly expressed in the words "adaptive radiation" (Osborn), which convey the idea of radii in many directions.

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  • This deep metaphysical divergence was the prime cause of the transition from Platonism to Aristotelianism.

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  • I seq.) strikingly exhibits the origin of Aristotle's divergence from Platonism, and that too in Plato's lifetime.

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  • Five Centuries After The Time Of Bede, The Divergence Of The True Equinox From The 21St Of March, Which Now Amounted To Seven Or Eight Days, Was Pointed Out By Johannes De Sacro Bosco (John Holywood, Fl.

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  • From this point, alas, divergence begins.

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  • I seq.) strikingly exhibits the origin of Aristotle's divergence from Platonism, and that too in Plato's lifetime.

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  • Five Centuries After The Time Of Bede, The Divergence Of The True Equinox From The 21St Of March, Which Now Amounted To Seven Or Eight Days, Was Pointed Out By Johannes De Sacro Bosco (John Holywood, Fl.

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  • But with all these often opposed conditions, we find less variation than might be expected, the main and really important divergence being due to the necessity of transposition, which added a very high pitch to the primarily convenient low one.

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  • A divergence was already manifest, which rapidly increased to serious difference and dissension.

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  • In this family there is often a marked divergence between the sexes; the terminal antennal segments are larger in the male than in the female, and the males may carry large spinous processes on the head or prothorax, or both.

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  • There are, of course, numerous problems relating to the nature, limits and dates of the two recensions, of the incorporated sources, and of other sources (whether early or late) of independent origin; and here there is naturally room for much divergence of opinion.

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  • He submitted to the opinion of the episcopate in the various parts of Christendom the divergence between the Easter usage of Rome and that of the bishops of Asia.

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  • It is noteworthy that British representatives assented to Canon I., providing that Easter be everywhere celebrated on the same day: the later divergence between Rome and the Celtic church is due to improvements in the supputatio Romana adopted at Rome in 343 and subsequently.

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  • Sharp (1898), the marked divergence among the Hexapoda, as regards life-history, is between insects whose wings develop outside the cuticle (Exopterygota) and those whose wings develop inside the cuticle (Endopterygota), becoming visible only when the casting of the last larval cuticle reveals the pupa.

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  • The exact delimitation of inorganic and organic chemistry engrossed many minds for many years; and on this point there existed considerable divergence of opinion for several decades.

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  • The chief divergence is in the presence of silver and copper objects, but the great quantity of gold is the most striking fact, and to say that there was nothing but gold seems merely an exaggeration.

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  • One great divergence is manifest: Tertullian never himself deviated from orthodoxy and vehemently asserts the orthodoxy of all Montanists, but both Montanus ("I am the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost") and Maximilla ("I am Word and Spirit and Power") used language which has a distinctly "monarchian" flavour.

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  • This local divergence may proceed as rapidly as through wide geographical segregation or isolation.

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  • In other cases there is more divergence, but in some of them this is accounted for by the consideration that in Matthew passages from the source now in question have been interwoven with parallels in the other chief common source before mentioned.

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  • The exact delimitation of inorganic and organic chemistry engrossed many minds for many years; and on this point there existed considerable divergence of opinion for several decades.

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  • Schwenkfeld's mysticism was the cause of his divergence from Protestant orthodoxy and the root of his peculiar religious and theological position.

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  • Indeed, there still existed on the statute a provision that "Masters and Bachelors who did not follow Aristotle faithfully were liable to a fine of five shillings for every point of divergence, and for every fault committed against the logic of the Organon."

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  • Standard solutions are prepared by weighing out the exact amount of the pure substance and dissolving it in water, or by forming a solution of approximate normality, determining its exact strength by gravimetric or other means, and then correcting it for any divergence.

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  • Lucius Junius Brutus, her husband's cousin, put himself at the head of the people, drove out the Tarquins, and established a republic. The accounts of this tradition in later writers present many points of divergence.

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  • In May 1852 he was translated to Dublin, and soon a divergence of opinion broke out between him and the more ardent Nationalists under Archbishop MacHale.

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  • Newton assumed the possibility of choosing a base such that, relatively to it, the motion of any particle would have only such divergence from uniform velocity in a straight line as could be expressed by laws of acceleration dependent on its relation to other bodies.

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  • The divergence in a fall of zoo ft.

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  • eny very unlike the parent, or a mixed progeny showing various degrees of divergence.

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  • This divergence is partly explained by the difference of soil - which in Drente comprises the maximum of waste lands, and in South Holland the minimum - and partly also by the greater facilities which the seaward provinces enjoy of earning a subsistence, and the greater variety of their industries.

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  • PREVARICATION, a divergence from the truth, equivocation, quibbling, a want of plain-dealing or straightforwardness, especially a deliberate misrepresentation by evasive answers, often used as a less offensive synonym for a lie.

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  • The size of the angle between the median planes of two consecutive leaves in an alternate arrangement is their divergence; and it is expressed in fractions of the circumference of the axis which is supposed to be a circle.

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  • If this arrangement is expressed by a fraction, the numerator of which indicates the number of turns, and the denominator the number of internodes in the spiral cycle, the fraction will be found to represent the angle of divergence of the consecutive leaves on the axis.

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  • In other words, the distance or divergence between the first and second leaf, expressed in parts of a circle, is of a circle or 360° In fig.

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  • one turn and two leaves; the third leaf being placed vertically over the first, and the divergence between the first and second leaf being one-half the circumference of a circle, 360/2==180°.

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  • Again, in a tristichous arrangement the number is or one turn and three leaves, the angular divergence being 120°.

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  • But the divergence between leaf and leaf 2 is equal to tths of the circumference, and the same is the case between 2 and 3, 3 and 4, &c. The divergence, then, is and from this we learn that, starting from any leaf on the axis, we must pass twice round the stem in a spiral through five leaves before reaching one directly over that with which we started.

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  • divergence may alter either a, The branch, with the leaves abruptly or gradually, and the numbered in order; b, a magnified phyllotaxis thus becomes very representation of the branch, complicated.

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  • The divergence is expressed left to right, the other is right to left, in the altered laminae or of the enlarged petiolary sheath, or of stipules, as in the fig and magnolia, or of one or two of these parts combined.

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  • The extreme divergence of the resulting values of the diffusivity, including eight independent series of measurements on different days, was less than I %.

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  • Owing to the difficulty of measuring the gradient, the order of divergence of individual observations averaged 2 or 3%, but occasionally reached 5 or io %.

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  • On account of the divergence of its style from that of the History of Armenia, Armenian scholars have hesitated to ascribe the Rhetoric to Moses of Khor`ni; but, from what has been said above, this is rather to be regarded as a proof of its authenticity.

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  • The various schools of " readers " differed very widely from one another; although for the most part there was no important divergence as to the sense of words.

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  • Within each class the flower-characters as the essential feature of Angiosperms supply the clue to phylogeny, but the uncertainty regarding the construction of the primitive angiospermous flower gives a fundamental point of divergence in attempts to construct progressive sequences of the families.

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  • A fundamental divergence of principle, however, existed and was soon indicated by his speedy separation from the party and alienation from Mill himself.

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  • A difference in calibre, elasticity or branching of a blood vessel, the smallest variation in a nerve or group of vessel-cells, any anatomical or physiological divergence, is reflected throughout the organism.

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  • To this study he looked for the best hope of such a progressive development of Christian theology as should avert the danger arising from " the apparently increasing divergence between the intelligence and the faith of our time."

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  • -Biblical scholars are in agreement regarding the preliminary literary questions of the book, but there is divergence of opinion on points of detail, and on the precise growth of the book (e.g.

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  • The divergence appears when plates are substituted for sheets.

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  • The lowest Gondwanas are very constant in character, wherever they are found; the upper members of the lower division show more variation, and this divergence of character in different districts becomes more marked in the Upper Gondwana series.

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  • In this irreversible catena proceeding from ground to consequent, we have left far behind such things as the formal parity of genus and differentia considered as falling under the same predicable, 3 and hence justified in part Porphyry's divergence from the scheme of predicables.

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  • If there is conscious and purposed divergence from Aristotle, inquiry moves, on the whole, within the circle of ideas where Aristotelianism had fought its fight and won its victory.

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  • Agreement in the use of a common watchword had masked as it seems a real divergence of meaning and purpose.

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  • The invaluable tractate De Intellectus emendatione, in which the agreement with and divergence from Descartes on the question of method could have been fully elucidated, is unhappily not finished.

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  • The comparison of Sigwart with Lotze is instructive, in regard both to their agreement and their divergence as showing the range of the epistemological formula.

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  • In part because of historical circumstances, the divergence from the older systems is more marked in some Protestant churches than in others, yet on the The Reformation.

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  • Moreover, in the early days of the Reformation the Catholic Church charged it with a lawless individualism, a charge which was seemingly made good by an extreme divergence in theological opinion and by riots in various parts of the Protestant world.

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  • In a general survey of the life of this period, as it is revealed by the fossils, three outstanding facts are apparent: (I) the great divergence between the Cambrian fauna and that of the present day; (2) the Cambrian life assemblage differs in no marked manner from that of the succeeding Ordovician and Silurian periods; there is a certain family likeness which unites all of them; (3) the extraordinary complexity and diversity not only in the assemblage as a whole but within certain limited groups of organisms. Although in the Cambrian strata we have the oldest known fossiliferous rocks - if we leave out of account the very few and very obscure organic remains hitherto recorded from the pre-Cambrian - yet we appear to enter suddenly into the presence of a world richly peopled with a suite of organisms already far advanced in differentiation; the Cambrian fauna seems to be as far removed from what must have been the first forms of life, as the living forms of this remote period are distant from the creatures of to-day.

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  • Leaves of aluminium foil may with advantage be substituted for gold-leaf, and a scale is sometimes added to indicate the angular divergence of the leaves.

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  • it must be such that the leaves will remain for hours or days in a state of steady divergence when an electrical charge has been given to them.

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  • Any divergence or collapse of the gold-leaf can be viewed by a microscope through an aperture in the side of the case.

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  • Considering that the divergence of two alphabets (like the difference of two dialects) requires both time and familiar use, we may gather from these facts that writing was well known in Greece early in the 7th century B.e.2 The rise of prose composition in the 6th century B.C. has been thought to mark the time when memory was practically superseded by writing as a means of preserving literature - the earlier use of letters being confined to short documents, such as lists of names, treaties, laws, &c. This conclusion, however, is by no means necessary.

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  • These are not, speaking generally, the differences that are produced by the gradual divergence of dialects in a language.

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  • The amount of generic divergence exhibited by the members of this family is not great in the mass, but is of singular interest in detail.

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  • In the case of the Old World, the divergence from the standard which most deserves notice is the remarkable preponderance of the young in all the countries of eastern Europe, as well as in India, accompanied by an equally notable deficiency of the older elements in the population.

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  • On the continent of Europe, however, looking at the divergence in direction between the crude marriage-rate and that corrected to an age-basis, it is not improbable that the decline in the former may be attributable to some cause mentioned in connexion with the marriage-rate, and in the figures relating to some 30 years back some traces can be found of a connexion between a high birth-rate and a high proportion of young wives.

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  • From the Protestant communities which were the outcome of the Reformation the divergence is more profound, though the central dogmas of the faith are common to Roman Catholics.

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  • Southern leaders generally were now beginning to perceive, as Calhoun had already seen, that there was a permanent conflict between the North and the South, not only a divergence of interests between manufacturing and agricultural sections, but an inevitable struggle between free and slave labour.

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  • On the other hand, the divergence in some cases between the square of the optical refractive index and the dielectric constant was very marked.

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  • The insistence on the validity of personal experience leads Renouvier to a yet more important divergence from Kant in his treatment of volition.

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  • below the point of divergence, bearing with it the additional waters of the Subansiri, flowing from Tibet.

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  • Her increasing tendency towards socialism of the more revolutionary type occasioned a divergence between them after 1885, which was completed in 1889 by her adhesion to the Theosophical Society.

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  • This divergence of views manifested itself on Christmas Day 1895, and although, under pressure, Rhodes did not insist on the British flag, it was determined to postpone the rising.

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  • The divergence of views was so great that shortly after the union had been established private schools were opened in opposition to those of the provincial administration.

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  • The change in the use of particles and the comparative rarity of the definite article form, together with the startling divergence in vocabulary, the chief ground of our perplexity" (Church Quarterly Review, 1903, pp. 428 seq.).

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  • of this divergence it strikes the Kadanai river, turning the northern spurs of the Toba plateau (the base of the Kwaja Amran (Kojak) Range, and winds through the open plains west of the Kojak.

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  • Accordingly Aristo, holding to Cynicism when Zeno himself had got beyond it, rejected two of these parts of philosophy as useless and out of reach - a divergence which excluded him from the school, but strictly consistent with his view that ethics alone is scientific knowledge.

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  • gods and men, leaving room for a divergence, or rather development, of Stoic opinion.

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  • Later on much evidence goes to show that (by a divergence from the orthodox standard perhaps due to Platonic influence) it was a Stoic tenet to concede a soul, though not a rational soul, throughout the animal kingdom.

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  • Empoli is on the main railway line from Florence to Pisa, and is the point of divergence of a line to Siena.

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  • At the point of divergence between Scyphozoa and Hydromedusae (II.

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  • The expression of his opinion on both these points of divergence from Darwin will be found in Darwinism (1889), a most valuable and lucid exposition of natural selection, as suited to the later period at which it appeared as the Essays were to the ealier.

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  • Although a High Churchman Wilberforce held aloof from the Oxford movement, and in 1838 his divergence from the "Tract" writers became so marked that J.

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  • Huxley acknowledged an immeasurable and practically infinite divergence, ending in the present enormous psychological gulf between ape and man.

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  • These remains were,referred by their discoverer to an animal intermediate between man and ape, to which he gave the name of Pithecanthropus erectus, but the interesting discussions on the subject have shown divergence of opinion among anatomists.

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  • However moralists may differ on first principles, there seems to be remarkably little practical divergence when they come to lay down the particular laws of morality.

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  • During his absence from England Whitefield found that a divergence of doctrine from Calvinism had been introduced by Wesley; and notwithstanding Wesley's exhortations to brotherly kindness and forbearance he withdrew from the Wesleyan connexion.

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  • Between himself and a son of his instructor there sprang up a close and affectionate friendship, and, unlike so many of the exquisite attachments of youth, this was not choked by the dust of life, nor parted by divergence of pursuit.

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  • This divergence of opinion destroyed all the elation that Burke might well have felt at his compliments from kings, his gold medals, his twelve editions.

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  • Nor did the unity of Protestant theology - Lutheran and Calvinist - confine itself to the period before the great divergence.

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  • It has been suggested that the Sphenophyllales may have sprung from a-very old stock which existed prior to the divergence of the latter groups.

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  • or divergence in form of the apOriginal.

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  • This view, however, was too violent a divergence from Socratism for Plato to remain in it.

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  • For though Aristotle's divergence from Plato is very conspicuous when we consider either his general conception of the subject of ethics, or the details of his system of virtues, still his agreement with his master is almost complete as regards the main outline of his theory of human good; the difference between the two practically vanishes when we view them in relation to the later controversy between Stoics and Epicureans.

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  • No doubt, too, Aristotle's attribution of pleasure to the Divine Existence shows a profound metaphysical divergence from Plato; but it is a divergence which has no practical importance.

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  • Nor, again, is Aristotle's divergence from the Socratic principle that all " virtue is knowledge "substantially greater than Plato's, though it is more plainly expressed.

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  • We may observe, too, that the Stoics rejected the divergence which we have seen gradually taking place in Platonic-Aristotelian thought from the position of Socrates, " that no one aims at what he knows to be bad."

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  • Now, Aristotle's divergence from Socrates had not led him so far as to deny this; while for the Stoics who had receded to the original Socratic position, the difficulty was still more patent.

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  • There is, however, a yet higher point to be reached in the upward ascent of the Neoplatonist from matter; and here the divergence of Plotinus from Platonic idealism is none the less striking, because it is a bona fide result of reverent reflection on Plato's teaching.

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  • school; the latter method, with considerably more divergence of view and treatment, was employed independently and almost simultaneously by Paley and Bentham in both ethics and politics, and is at the present time widely maintained under the name of Utilitarianism.

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  • Meanwhile he had begun to differ from Lauderdale, whose policy after the failure of the scheme of "Accommodation" moved in the direction of absolutism and repression, and during Lauderdale's visit to Scotland in 1672 the divergence rapidly developed into opposition.

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  • The act of 1870, ad n u ttin the divergence between theory andpractice, League.

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  • But all did not go the same length in their divergence from the popular creed.

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  • Since the two circular streams have different speeds, Fresnel argued that it would be possible to separate them by oblique refraction, and though the divergence is small, since the difference of their refractive indices in the case of quartz is only about o 00007, he succeeded by a suitable arrangement of alternately rightand left-handed prisms of quartz in resolving a plane-polarized stream into two distinct circularly polarized streams. A similar arrangement was used by Ernst v.

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  • The divergence of these views has led to a large number of experimental investigations, instituted with the idea of deciding between them.

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  • In the case of the negative eyepiece, on the other hand, the divergence of the principal rays through the eyepiece is also further augmented, but their point of intersection is not accessible to the eye.

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  • At the point of the divergence of the Gerger from the Karun, 600 yds.

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  • But a defect was soon found in the latter, the correction of which reconciled the divergence.

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  • 19-27, and a fundamental divergence in the traditions may be assumed.

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  • - Stamen of a species of Nightshade (Solanum), showing the divergence of the anther-lobes at the base, and the dehiscence by pores at the apex.

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  • The jurisprudence of Connecticut, since the 17th century, has been notable for its divergence from the common law of England.

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  • This visit, in spite of the favourable personal impression made by the emperor, was the starting-point of a fresh and fateful divergence; for it was now that the tsar first openly raised the question of the eventual partition of the inheritance of the " Sick Man," as he called Turkey.

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  • And after the Congress this divergence grew ever more acute.

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  • The effects of the area ratio, the divergence angle and the cross-section aspect ratio are taken into account.

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  • In the first half of the book Roland is careful to elaborate his own divergence from a traditional, purely associative dream analysis.

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  • bearish divergence.

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  • decomposed locally into three generic parts, related to vorticity, divergence and deformation.

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  • It is not economically efficient nor socially equitable to have such a divergence of circumstances and it is environmentally disastrous.

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  • This consistent approach aims to reveal the divergence in their processes.

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  • This growing divergence was mostly caused by the Royal Navy's demands.

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  • This lack of training may go some way to explaining that divergence.

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  • Working together It is important that eLib projects work together in relevant areas to ensure interoperability and avoid unnecessary divergence.

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  • For instance, the method by which parallel examples of social customs were established showed little real divergence.

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  • Each edge of the tree has a certain amount of evolutionary divergence associated with it, defined by the distance between the data items.

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  • Within the responses there was a marked divergence of views on most issues.

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  • There is considerable divergence in the other receptor binding domain.

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  • By measuring genetic divergence between populations using molecular markers, I hope to relate this host specificity to the process of incipient speciation.

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  • With Level 8 theses, cases of wide divergence of marking were noted.

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  • The most significant divergence has been the use of singular object names.

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  • divergence theorem we obtain where is a unit vector normal to the surface, .

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  • divergence angle on transmit allows the units to be used without a tripod.

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  • Limited littoral drift is reported on beaches between the rivers Hamble and Itchen, with a drift divergence between Victoria Park and Hamble Common.

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  • Prevent the use of any external optics that could decrease the beam divergence or its diameter.

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  • We found evidence that recombination contributed to sequence divergence within at least one gene locus.

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  • divergence of opinion is allowed.

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  • divergence of views among young people.

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  • As speculative computations may be infinite, while mandatory ones remain finite, while mandatory ones remain finite, divergence should be defined with the greatest care.

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  • However, he errs when arguing that new nationalism is based on cultural divergence and not on cultural superiority.

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  • The geometric parameters taken into account are area ratio, diffuser length to annular gap ratio, and divergence angle.

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  • The beam expanders had reduced the divergence to just less than 0.4 milli radians.

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  • This divergence would likely continue if crude oil continues to lag behind the newly resurgent agricultural sector.

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  • The biggest worry for me is the huge divergence between the sentence for murder and the sentence for manslaughter.

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  • stimulusrd and deviant stimuli were within each set identical up to the divergence point, which was their last phoneme.

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  • underestimate the extent of regional divergence during the 1980s.

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  • But this doctrine was a criticism and a divergence, no less than a consequence, from the principles in Descartes; and it brought upon Malebranche the opposition, not merely of the Cartesian physicists, but also of Arnauld, Fenelon and Bossuet, who found, or hoped to find, in the Meditations, as properly understood, an ally for theology.

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  • Kirche), shows considerable divergence from the first edition (1850), and reveals an entire emancipation from F.

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  • But with all these often opposed conditions, we find less variation than might be expected, the main and really important divergence being due to the necessity of transposition, which added a very high pitch to the primarily convenient low one.

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  • The fourth section, which was made particularly difficult of solution by the extension inland of the Pacific coast inlets and sounds and by the Chilean colonies located there, was adjusted by running the line eastward from the point of divergence in 50° 50' S.

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  • Save for the consequences of these phonetic changes, Umbrian morphology and syntax exhibit no divergence from Oscan that need be mentioned here, save perhaps two peculiar perfect-formations with -1- and -nci-; as in ampelust, fut.

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  • The difference between the theories of Haeckel and Chun is connected with a further divergence in the interpretation of the stem or axis of the cormus.

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  • room for considerable divergence m, Nectocalyx.

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  • A further divergence of opinion arises from differences in the interpretation of the persons composing the colony.

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  • (2) In logic there is considerable divergence of opinion as to the best definition.

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  • A divergence was already manifest, which rapidly increased to serious difference and dissension.

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    0
  • In this family there is often a marked divergence between the sexes; the terminal antennal segments are larger in the male than in the female, and the males may carry large spinous processes on the head or prothorax, or both.

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    0
  • Schwenkfeld's mysticism was the cause of his divergence from Protestant orthodoxy and the root of his peculiar religious and theological position.

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  • from the heat-capacity of the water contained in it, the divergence being sometimes in one sense, sometimes in the other.

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    0
  • There are, of course, numerous problems relating to the nature, limits and dates of the two recensions, of the incorporated sources, and of other sources (whether early or late) of independent origin; and here there is naturally room for much divergence of opinion.

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    0
  • External research constantly justifies the cautious attitude which has its logical basis in the internal conflicting character of the written traditions or in their divergence from ascertained facts; at the same time it has clearly shown that the internal study of the Old Testament has its limits.

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    0
  • But they are now softened and often bereft of their earlier significance, and it is this and their divergence from common Oriental thought which make Old Testament thought so profound and unique.

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    0
  • He submitted to the opinion of the episcopate in the various parts of Christendom the divergence between the Easter usage of Rome and that of the bishops of Asia.

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    0
  • It is noteworthy that British representatives assented to Canon I., providing that Easter be everywhere celebrated on the same day: the later divergence between Rome and the Celtic church is due to improvements in the supputatio Romana adopted at Rome in 343 and subsequently.

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    0
  • Sharp (1898), the marked divergence among the Hexapoda, as regards life-history, is between insects whose wings develop outside the cuticle (Exopterygota) and those whose wings develop inside the cuticle (Endopterygota), becoming visible only when the casting of the last larval cuticle reveals the pupa.

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  • Standard solutions are prepared by weighing out the exact amount of the pure substance and dissolving it in water, or by forming a solution of approximate normality, determining its exact strength by gravimetric or other means, and then correcting it for any divergence.

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  • In all the above cases there is no divergence among the MSS.

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    0
  • In some passages, however, the divergence is on a larger scale.

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    0
  • The Arabic writer Shahrastani endeavours to bridge the divergence between the two traditions by means of the following.

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    0
  • In the conference of the five powers of the Grand Alliance opened at London in the early summer of 1827, however, a divergence of views at once became apparent.

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    0
  • It is found that divergence has begun before the concentration has become great enough to enable freezing points to be measured with any ordinary apparatus.

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    0
  • In the Protestant Churches 2 the custom as to vestments differs widely, corresponding to a similar divergence in tradition and teaching.

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    0
  • This difference was still further accentuated by strong divergence in religious creed.

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    0
  • The great variety of views amongst competent critics is significant of the difficulty of the problem, which can hardly be regarded as yet solved; this divergence of opinion perhaps points to the impossibility of maintaining the unity of chs.

    0
    0
  • But their constitution is not yet solved, there even being some divergence of opinion as to their empirical formulae.

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  • 8.818" The question of the possible or probable error of these results is one on which there is a marked divergence of opinion among investigators.

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    0
  • The two opposing theories express at bottom, in the phraseology of their own time, the radical divergence of pantheism and individualism - the two extremes between which philosophy seems pendulum-wise to oscillate, and which may be said still to await their perfect reconciliation.

    0
    0
  • These glosses, it should be added, however, have been attributed by Prantl and Kaulich, on the ground of divergence from doctrines contained in the published works of Hrabanus, to some disciple of his rather than to Hrabanus himself.

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  • The chief divergence is in the presence of silver and copper objects, but the great quantity of gold is the most striking fact, and to say that there was nothing but gold seems merely an exaggeration.

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  • Osiander's divergence from Luther's doctrine of justification by faith involved him in a violent quarrel with Melanchthon, who had adherents in Konigsberg, and these theological disputes soon created an uproar in the town.

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  • The general conception of the physician's aim and task remained the same, though, as knowledge increased, there was much divergence both in theory and practice - even opposing schools were found to be developing some part of the Hippocratic system.

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  • Beyond Utrecht, where it is again diminished by the divergence of the Vecht to the Zuider Zee, the river under the name of the "Oude Rijn," or Old Rhine, degenerates into a sluggish and almost stagnant stream, which requires the artificial aid of a canal and of sluices in finding its way to the sea.

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  • Chronological Systems. - The extreme divergence in the chronological schemes employed by different writers on the history of Babylonia and Assyria has frequently caused no small perplexity to readers who have no special knowledge of the subject.

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  • Lucius Junius Brutus, her husband's cousin, put himself at the head of the people, drove out the Tarquins, and established a republic. The accounts of this tradition in later writers present many points of divergence.

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  • Brown is the first investigator to determine the theoretical motions with this degree of precision; and he finds that there is no such divergence between the actual and the computed motion.

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  • All objects, therefore, which lie beyond a certain point (the conjugate focus of the dioptric system of the eye, the far point) are indistinctly seen; rays from them have not the necessary divergence to be focused in the retina, but may obtain it by the interposition of suitable concave lenses.

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  • Hence pleasure is, on the whole, good, and asceticism reprehensible, although in man's case there has arisen (owing to the rapidity of evolution) a certain derangement and divergence between the pleasant and the salutary (§ 39).

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  • One great divergence is manifest: Tertullian never himself deviated from orthodoxy and vehemently asserts the orthodoxy of all Montanists, but both Montanus ("I am the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost") and Maximilla ("I am Word and Spirit and Power") used language which has a distinctly "monarchian" flavour.

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  • The council sat at intervals from 1545-1563, but there was a marked divergence between the opinions advocated by prominent members of the council and its final decrees.

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  • Indeed, there still existed on the statute a provision that "Masters and Bachelors who did not follow Aristotle faithfully were liable to a fine of five shillings for every point of divergence, and for every fault committed against the logic of the Organon."

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    0
  • Besides the invention of the prism known by his name ("A method of increasing the divergence of the two rays in calcareous spar, so as to produce a single image," New Edin.

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  • In fact, we may neglect the divergence, and may regard them as " plane waves."

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  • Thus history shows how readily the term has been used in the most haphazard manner to describe even the most trivial divergence of opinion concerning points of dogma.

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  • puritas, purity), the name given - originally perhaps in a hostile sense on the analogy of Catharism (see Cathars) - tO the movement for greater strictness of life and simplicity in worship which grew up in the Church of England in the 16th century among those who thought that there had not been a sufficient divergence from the Roman Church, and which ultimately led to the rise of a number of separatist denominations.

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  • The extreme divergence in doctrinal position is fostered by the fact that the theology taught in the universities is in a great measure divorced from the practical religious life of the people, and the theological opinions uttered in the theological literature of the country cannot be held to express the thoughts of the members of the churches.

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  • Of these, it may be mentioned, there is a vast number, owing in some cases to divergence of spelling in the representation of native names, in others to European discoverers naming islands (sometimes twice or thrice successively) of which the native names subsequently came into use also.

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  • Starting with the stem forms the descendants of which have passed through either persistent or changed habitats, we reach the underlying idea of the branching law of Lamarck or the law of divergence of Darwin, and find it perhaps most clearly expressed in the words "adaptive radiation" (Osborn), which convey the idea of radii in many directions.

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  • This local divergence may proceed as rapidly as through wide geographical segregation or isolation.

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  • 10.9 I.-Industrial Development and Sectional Divergence, 1829-1850.

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  • In spite of this divergence, Hippasus is always regarded as a Pythagorean.

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    0
  • The clause on which there was the widest divergence of opinion was one providing that a trans-continental railway, connecting the Pacific province with the eastern part of the Dominion, should be begun within two, and completed within ten years.

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  • On several of these points much progress was made towards a settlement, but a divergence of opinion as to the methods by which the Alaskan boundary should be determined put an end for the time to the negotiations.

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  • Another question with which the textual critic of modern authors must be prepared to deal is the relative importance of different editions, each of which may have a prima facie claim to be considered authentic. Thus Shakespearean criticism must decide between the evidence of the first folio and the quartos: the critic of Shelley's poems must consider what weight is to be attached to the readings in the posthumous edition by Mrs Shelley, and in unpublished transcripts of various poems. Where there is great or complicated divergence between the editions, as in the case of Marlowe's Faustus, the production of a resultant text which may be relied upon to represent the ultimate intention of the author is well-nigh impossible.

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  • But here begins a divergence which has done more than anything else to discredit the study with the outside world.

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  • This deep metaphysical divergence was the prime cause of the transition from Platonism to Aristotelianism.

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    0
  • In other cases there is more divergence, but in some of them this is accounted for by the consideration that in Matthew passages from the source now in question have been interwoven with parallels in the other chief common source before mentioned.

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  • From this point, alas, divergence begins.

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  • In May 1852 he was translated to Dublin, and soon a divergence of opinion broke out between him and the more ardent Nationalists under Archbishop MacHale.

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  • Newton assumed the possibility of choosing a base such that, relatively to it, the motion of any particle would have only such divergence from uniform velocity in a straight line as could be expressed by laws of acceleration dependent on its relation to other bodies.

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  • The divergence in a fall of zoo ft.

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  • eny very unlike the parent, or a mixed progeny showing various degrees of divergence.

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  • This divergence is partly explained by the difference of soil - which in Drente comprises the maximum of waste lands, and in South Holland the minimum - and partly also by the greater facilities which the seaward provinces enjoy of earning a subsistence, and the greater variety of their industries.

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  • PREVARICATION, a divergence from the truth, equivocation, quibbling, a want of plain-dealing or straightforwardness, especially a deliberate misrepresentation by evasive answers, often used as a less offensive synonym for a lie.

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  • The size of the angle between the median planes of two consecutive leaves in an alternate arrangement is their divergence; and it is expressed in fractions of the circumference of the axis which is supposed to be a circle.

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    0
  • If this arrangement is expressed by a fraction, the numerator of which indicates the number of turns, and the denominator the number of internodes in the spiral cycle, the fraction will be found to represent the angle of divergence of the consecutive leaves on the axis.

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  • In other words, the distance or divergence between the first and second leaf, expressed in parts of a circle, is of a circle or 360° In fig.

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  • one turn and two leaves; the third leaf being placed vertically over the first, and the divergence between the first and second leaf being one-half the circumference of a circle, 360/2==180°.

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    0
  • Again, in a tristichous arrangement the number is or one turn and three leaves, the angular divergence being 120°.

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  • But the divergence between leaf and leaf 2 is equal to tths of the circumference, and the same is the case between 2 and 3, 3 and 4, &c. The divergence, then, is and from this we learn that, starting from any leaf on the axis, we must pass twice round the stem in a spiral through five leaves before reaching one directly over that with which we started.

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  • divergence may alter either a, The branch, with the leaves abruptly or gradually, and the numbered in order; b, a magnified phyllotaxis thus becomes very representation of the branch, complicated.

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  • The divergence is expressed left to right, the other is right to left, in the altered laminae or of the enlarged petiolary sheath, or of stipules, as in the fig and magnolia, or of one or two of these parts combined.

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    0
  • The extreme divergence of the resulting values of the diffusivity, including eight independent series of measurements on different days, was less than I %.

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  • Owing to the difficulty of measuring the gradient, the order of divergence of individual observations averaged 2 or 3%, but occasionally reached 5 or io %.

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  • On account of the divergence of its style from that of the History of Armenia, Armenian scholars have hesitated to ascribe the Rhetoric to Moses of Khor`ni; but, from what has been said above, this is rather to be regarded as a proof of its authenticity.

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  • The various schools of " readers " differed very widely from one another; although for the most part there was no important divergence as to the sense of words.

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  • Within each class the flower-characters as the essential feature of Angiosperms supply the clue to phylogeny, but the uncertainty regarding the construction of the primitive angiospermous flower gives a fundamental point of divergence in attempts to construct progressive sequences of the families.

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  • A fundamental divergence of principle, however, existed and was soon indicated by his speedy separation from the party and alienation from Mill himself.

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  • A difference in calibre, elasticity or branching of a blood vessel, the smallest variation in a nerve or group of vessel-cells, any anatomical or physiological divergence, is reflected throughout the organism.

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  • To this study he looked for the best hope of such a progressive development of Christian theology as should avert the danger arising from " the apparently increasing divergence between the intelligence and the faith of our time."

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  • -Biblical scholars are in agreement regarding the preliminary literary questions of the book, but there is divergence of opinion on points of detail, and on the precise growth of the book (e.g.

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  • The divergence appears when plates are substituted for sheets.

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  • The lowest Gondwanas are very constant in character, wherever they are found; the upper members of the lower division show more variation, and this divergence of character in different districts becomes more marked in the Upper Gondwana series.

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  • In this irreversible catena proceeding from ground to consequent, we have left far behind such things as the formal parity of genus and differentia considered as falling under the same predicable, 3 and hence justified in part Porphyry's divergence from the scheme of predicables.

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  • If there is conscious and purposed divergence from Aristotle, inquiry moves, on the whole, within the circle of ideas where Aristotelianism had fought its fight and won its victory.

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  • Agreement in the use of a common watchword had masked as it seems a real divergence of meaning and purpose.

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  • The invaluable tractate De Intellectus emendatione, in which the agreement with and divergence from Descartes on the question of method could have been fully elucidated, is unhappily not finished.

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  • The comparison of Sigwart with Lotze is instructive, in regard both to their agreement and their divergence as showing the range of the epistemological formula.

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  • In part because of historical circumstances, the divergence from the older systems is more marked in some Protestant churches than in others, yet on the The Reformation.

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  • Moreover, in the early days of the Reformation the Catholic Church charged it with a lawless individualism, a charge which was seemingly made good by an extreme divergence in theological opinion and by riots in various parts of the Protestant world.

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  • In a general survey of the life of this period, as it is revealed by the fossils, three outstanding facts are apparent: (I) the great divergence between the Cambrian fauna and that of the present day; (2) the Cambrian life assemblage differs in no marked manner from that of the succeeding Ordovician and Silurian periods; there is a certain family likeness which unites all of them; (3) the extraordinary complexity and diversity not only in the assemblage as a whole but within certain limited groups of organisms. Although in the Cambrian strata we have the oldest known fossiliferous rocks - if we leave out of account the very few and very obscure organic remains hitherto recorded from the pre-Cambrian - yet we appear to enter suddenly into the presence of a world richly peopled with a suite of organisms already far advanced in differentiation; the Cambrian fauna seems to be as far removed from what must have been the first forms of life, as the living forms of this remote period are distant from the creatures of to-day.

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  • Leaves of aluminium foil may with advantage be substituted for gold-leaf, and a scale is sometimes added to indicate the angular divergence of the leaves.

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  • it must be such that the leaves will remain for hours or days in a state of steady divergence when an electrical charge has been given to them.

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  • Any divergence or collapse of the gold-leaf can be viewed by a microscope through an aperture in the side of the case.

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  • Considering that the divergence of two alphabets (like the difference of two dialects) requires both time and familiar use, we may gather from these facts that writing was well known in Greece early in the 7th century B.e.2 The rise of prose composition in the 6th century B.C. has been thought to mark the time when memory was practically superseded by writing as a means of preserving literature - the earlier use of letters being confined to short documents, such as lists of names, treaties, laws, &c. This conclusion, however, is by no means necessary.

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  • These are not, speaking generally, the differences that are produced by the gradual divergence of dialects in a language.

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  • The amount of generic divergence exhibited by the members of this family is not great in the mass, but is of singular interest in detail.

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    0
  • In the case of the Old World, the divergence from the standard which most deserves notice is the remarkable preponderance of the young in all the countries of eastern Europe, as well as in India, accompanied by an equally notable deficiency of the older elements in the population.

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    0
  • On the continent of Europe, however, looking at the divergence in direction between the crude marriage-rate and that corrected to an age-basis, it is not improbable that the decline in the former may be attributable to some cause mentioned in connexion with the marriage-rate, and in the figures relating to some 30 years back some traces can be found of a connexion between a high birth-rate and a high proportion of young wives.

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  • From the Protestant communities which were the outcome of the Reformation the divergence is more profound, though the central dogmas of the faith are common to Roman Catholics.

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  • Southern leaders generally were now beginning to perceive, as Calhoun had already seen, that there was a permanent conflict between the North and the South, not only a divergence of interests between manufacturing and agricultural sections, but an inevitable struggle between free and slave labour.

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    0
  • On the other hand, the divergence in some cases between the square of the optical refractive index and the dielectric constant was very marked.

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  • - In dealing with a development of culture that has no immutable essence, but is intrinsically fluid and changing, definition must consist either in a definition of type, which indicates prevalence of relevant resemblance as between specimens more or less divergent, or in exterior definition, which delimits the field of inquiry by laying down within what extreme limits this divergence holds.

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  • The insistence on the validity of personal experience leads Renouvier to a yet more important divergence from Kant in his treatment of volition.

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  • below the point of divergence, bearing with it the additional waters of the Subansiri, flowing from Tibet.

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    0
  • The gold-leaf electroscope invented by Abraham Bennet (see Electroscope) can in like manner, by the addition of a scale to observe the divergence of the gold-leaves, be made a repulsion electrometer.

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    0
  • It stood at the point of divergence of the Via Postumia (see LIGURIA) and the Via Aemilia, while a branch road ran hence to Pollentia.

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    0
  • Her increasing tendency towards socialism of the more revolutionary type occasioned a divergence between them after 1885, which was completed in 1889 by her adhesion to the Theosophical Society.

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    0
  • This divergence of views manifested itself on Christmas Day 1895, and although, under pressure, Rhodes did not insist on the British flag, it was determined to postpone the rising.

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    0
  • The divergence of views was so great that shortly after the union had been established private schools were opened in opposition to those of the provincial administration.

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    0
  • The change in the use of particles and the comparative rarity of the definite article form, together with the startling divergence in vocabulary, the chief ground of our perplexity" (Church Quarterly Review, 1903, pp. 428 seq.).

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  • of this divergence it strikes the Kadanai river, turning the northern spurs of the Toba plateau (the base of the Kwaja Amran (Kojak) Range, and winds through the open plains west of the Kojak.

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  • Accordingly Aristo, holding to Cynicism when Zeno himself had got beyond it, rejected two of these parts of philosophy as useless and out of reach - a divergence which excluded him from the school, but strictly consistent with his view that ethics alone is scientific knowledge.

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  • gods and men, leaving room for a divergence, or rather development, of Stoic opinion.

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  • Later on much evidence goes to show that (by a divergence from the orthodox standard perhaps due to Platonic influence) it was a Stoic tenet to concede a soul, though not a rational soul, throughout the animal kingdom.

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    0
  • Empoli is on the main railway line from Florence to Pisa, and is the point of divergence of a line to Siena.

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    0
  • At the point of divergence between Scyphozoa and Hydromedusae (II.

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    0
  • The expression of his opinion on both these points of divergence from Darwin will be found in Darwinism (1889), a most valuable and lucid exposition of natural selection, as suited to the later period at which it appeared as the Essays were to the ealier.

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    0
  • Although a High Churchman Wilberforce held aloof from the Oxford movement, and in 1838 his divergence from the "Tract" writers became so marked that J.

    0
    0
  • Huxley acknowledged an immeasurable and practically infinite divergence, ending in the present enormous psychological gulf between ape and man.

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    0
  • These remains were,referred by their discoverer to an animal intermediate between man and ape, to which he gave the name of Pithecanthropus erectus, but the interesting discussions on the subject have shown divergence of opinion among anatomists.

    0
    0
  • However moralists may differ on first principles, there seems to be remarkably little practical divergence when they come to lay down the particular laws of morality.

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    0
  • During his absence from England Whitefield found that a divergence of doctrine from Calvinism had been introduced by Wesley; and notwithstanding Wesley's exhortations to brotherly kindness and forbearance he withdrew from the Wesleyan connexion.

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    0
  • Between himself and a son of his instructor there sprang up a close and affectionate friendship, and, unlike so many of the exquisite attachments of youth, this was not choked by the dust of life, nor parted by divergence of pursuit.

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    0
  • This divergence of opinion destroyed all the elation that Burke might well have felt at his compliments from kings, his gold medals, his twelve editions.

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    0
  • Nor did the unity of Protestant theology - Lutheran and Calvinist - confine itself to the period before the great divergence.

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    0
  • It has been suggested that the Sphenophyllales may have sprung from a-very old stock which existed prior to the divergence of the latter groups.

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    0
  • or divergence in form of the apOriginal.

    0
    0
  • This view, however, was too violent a divergence from Socratism for Plato to remain in it.

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    0
  • For though Aristotle's divergence from Plato is very conspicuous when we consider either his general conception of the subject of ethics, or the details of his system of virtues, still his agreement with his master is almost complete as regards the main outline of his theory of human good; the difference between the two practically vanishes when we view them in relation to the later controversy between Stoics and Epicureans.

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  • No doubt, too, Aristotle's attribution of pleasure to the Divine Existence shows a profound metaphysical divergence from Plato; but it is a divergence which has no practical importance.

    0
    0
  • Nor, again, is Aristotle's divergence from the Socratic principle that all " virtue is knowledge "substantially greater than Plato's, though it is more plainly expressed.

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    0
  • We may observe, too, that the Stoics rejected the divergence which we have seen gradually taking place in Platonic-Aristotelian thought from the position of Socrates, " that no one aims at what he knows to be bad."

    0
    0
  • Now, Aristotle's divergence from Socrates had not led him so far as to deny this; while for the Stoics who had receded to the original Socratic position, the difficulty was still more patent.

    0
    0
  • There is, however, a yet higher point to be reached in the upward ascent of the Neoplatonist from matter; and here the divergence of Plotinus from Platonic idealism is none the less striking, because it is a bona fide result of reverent reflection on Plato's teaching.

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  • school; the latter method, with considerably more divergence of view and treatment, was employed independently and almost simultaneously by Paley and Bentham in both ethics and politics, and is at the present time widely maintained under the name of Utilitarianism.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile he had begun to differ from Lauderdale, whose policy after the failure of the scheme of "Accommodation" moved in the direction of absolutism and repression, and during Lauderdale's visit to Scotland in 1672 the divergence rapidly developed into opposition.

    0
    0
  • The act of 1870, ad n u ttin the divergence between theory andpractice, League.

    0
    0
  • But all did not go the same length in their divergence from the popular creed.

    0
    0
  • Since the two circular streams have different speeds, Fresnel argued that it would be possible to separate them by oblique refraction, and though the divergence is small, since the difference of their refractive indices in the case of quartz is only about o 00007, he succeeded by a suitable arrangement of alternately rightand left-handed prisms of quartz in resolving a plane-polarized stream into two distinct circularly polarized streams. A similar arrangement was used by Ernst v.

    0
    0
  • The divergence of these views has led to a large number of experimental investigations, instituted with the idea of deciding between them.

    0
    0
  • In the case of the negative eyepiece, on the other hand, the divergence of the principal rays through the eyepiece is also further augmented, but their point of intersection is not accessible to the eye.

    0
    0
  • At the point of the divergence of the Gerger from the Karun, 600 yds.

    0
    0
  • But a defect was soon found in the latter, the correction of which reconciled the divergence.

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    0
  • 19-27, and a fundamental divergence in the traditions may be assumed.

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    0
  • - Stamen of a species of Nightshade (Solanum), showing the divergence of the anther-lobes at the base, and the dehiscence by pores at the apex.

    0
    0
  • The jurisprudence of Connecticut, since the 17th century, has been notable for its divergence from the common law of England.

    0
    0
  • 170-171) that Ewald and Ryle assumed identity of authorship. But their points of divergence are so weighty (see op. cit.

    0
    0
  • This visit, in spite of the favourable personal impression made by the emperor, was the starting-point of a fresh and fateful divergence; for it was now that the tsar first openly raised the question of the eventual partition of the inheritance of the " Sick Man," as he called Turkey.

    0
    0
  • The beam expanders had reduced the divergence to just less than 0.4 milli radians.

    0
    0
  • This divergence would likely continue if crude oil continues to lag behind the newly resurgent agricultural sector.

    0
    0
  • The biggest worry for me is the huge divergence between the sentence for murder and the sentence for manslaughter.

    0
    0
  • Standard and deviant stimuli were within each set identical up to the divergence point, which was their last phoneme.

    0
    0
  • First, it has led people to underestimate the extent of regional divergence during the 1980s.

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    0
  • Decker. "Girls, guys, and gangs: Convergence or divergence in the gendered construction of gangs and groups."

    0
    0
  • Although the following item hardly qualifies as "wild", the Case Logic Lifestyle Messenger Bag is just a prime example of one designer's divergence from the black nylon norm.

    0
    0
  • In the conference of the five powers of the Grand Alliance opened at London in the early summer of 1827, however, a divergence of views at once became apparent.

    0
    1
  • This difference was still further accentuated by strong divergence in religious creed.

    0
    1
  • 8.818" The question of the possible or probable error of these results is one on which there is a marked divergence of opinion among investigators.

    0
    1
  • The two opposing theories express at bottom, in the phraseology of their own time, the radical divergence of pantheism and individualism - the two extremes between which philosophy seems pendulum-wise to oscillate, and which may be said still to await their perfect reconciliation.

    0
    1
  • These glosses, it should be added, however, have been attributed by Prantl and Kaulich, on the ground of divergence from doctrines contained in the published works of Hrabanus, to some disciple of his rather than to Hrabanus himself.

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  • All objects, therefore, which lie beyond a certain point (the conjugate focus of the dioptric system of the eye, the far point) are indistinctly seen; rays from them have not the necessary divergence to be focused in the retina, but may obtain it by the interposition of suitable concave lenses.

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  • The council sat at intervals from 1545-1563, but there was a marked divergence between the opinions advocated by prominent members of the council and its final decrees.

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  • Besides the invention of the prism known by his name ("A method of increasing the divergence of the two rays in calcareous spar, so as to produce a single image," New Edin.

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  • There was an important divergence of opinion between Austria and Hungary concerning the constitution of the bank.

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  • The extreme divergence in doctrinal position is fostered by the fact that the theology taught in the universities is in a great measure divorced from the practical religious life of the people, and the theological opinions uttered in the theological literature of the country cannot be held to express the thoughts of the members of the churches.

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  • Of these, it may be mentioned, there is a vast number, owing in some cases to divergence of spelling in the representation of native names, in others to European discoverers naming islands (sometimes twice or thrice successively) of which the native names subsequently came into use also.

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  • The clause on which there was the widest divergence of opinion was one providing that a trans-continental railway, connecting the Pacific province with the eastern part of the Dominion, should be begun within two, and completed within ten years.

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  • On several of these points much progress was made towards a settlement, but a divergence of opinion as to the methods by which the Alaskan boundary should be determined put an end for the time to the negotiations.

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  • Another question with which the textual critic of modern authors must be prepared to deal is the relative importance of different editions, each of which may have a prima facie claim to be considered authentic. Thus Shakespearean criticism must decide between the evidence of the first folio and the quartos: the critic of Shelley's poems must consider what weight is to be attached to the readings in the posthumous edition by Mrs Shelley, and in unpublished transcripts of various poems. Where there is great or complicated divergence between the editions, as in the case of Marlowe's Faustus, the production of a resultant text which may be relied upon to represent the ultimate intention of the author is well-nigh impossible.

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  • There was an important divergence of opinion between Austria and Hungary concerning the constitution of the bank.

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  • (2) In logic there is considerable divergence of opinion as to the best definition.

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  • The strictness of the principle of admission or exclusion differs at the various German courts, and has tended to be modified by the growth of a new aristocracy of wealth; but a single instance known to the present writer may serve to illustrate the fundamental divergence of German (a fortiori Austrian) ideas from English in this matter.

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  • from the heat-capacity of the water contained in it, the divergence being sometimes in one sense, sometimes in the other.

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  • External research constantly justifies the cautious attitude which has its logical basis in the internal conflicting character of the written traditions or in their divergence from ascertained facts; at the same time it has clearly shown that the internal study of the Old Testament has its limits.

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  • The strictness of the principle of admission or exclusion differs at the various German courts, and has tended to be modified by the growth of a new aristocracy of wealth; but a single instance known to the present writer may serve to illustrate the fundamental divergence of German (a fortiori Austrian) ideas from English in this matter.

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