Ditches Sentence Examples

ditches
  • The ditches may be filled in one or other of several different ways.

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  • The ditches of Sung-Shu and Erh-Lung were partially filled.

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  • One of these ditches can be traced over 2 m.

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  • The main ditches, or canals, afterwards also serve as a means of navigation.

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  • It is surrounded with a palisade and ditches.

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  • In the ordinary English system of upward or drainage irrigation, ditches are dug all round the field.

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  • The construction of irrigation canals and ditches was for the most part brought about by farmers joining to plough out or dig ditches from the rivers, descending on a gentle grade.

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  • The works had no deep ditches or sunk wire entanglements.

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  • In the case of small plantations the difficulties of adjusting a right-of-way for outlet ditches have interfered seriously with this plan.

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  • To increase the reservoir capacity of the polder, as well as to conduct the water to the windmills or engines, it is intersected by a network of ditches cut at right angles to each other, the amount of ditching required being usually one-twelfth of the area to be drained.

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  • On the better farms this is done with a spirit-level or compass from time to time and hillside ditches put in at the proper places.

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  • The most fertile districts lie on the banks of the Elbe and near the North Sea, where, as in Holland, rich meadows are preserved from encroachment of the sea by broad dikes and deep ditches, kept in repair at great expense.

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  • The level at which it is desired to keep the water in these ditches constitutes the unit of water measurement for the polder, and is called the polder's zomer peil (Z.P.) or summer water-level.

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  • In the ditches and pools common yellow and white water-lilies are seen, as well as water-soldier (Stratiotes aloides), great and lesser reed-mace, sweet flag and bur-reed.

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  • The water flows from the ditches as conductors into built conduits formed at right angles to them in parallel lines through the fields; it rises upwards in them as high as the surface of the ground, and again subsides through the soil and the conduits into the ditches as main drains, and thence it passes at a lower level either into a stream or other suitable outfall.

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  • The water should be made to run completely off and the ditches should become dry before the influx of the next tide, otherwise the silt will not incrust and the tide not have the same effect.

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  • It grows in marshes, ditches, pools and drains in meadows, and sometimes obstructs the flow of water with its dense matted roots.

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  • He was exceedingly fond of horses and hunting, leaping ditches prudently avoided by the foreign ambassadors.

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  • The cost of bringing water to the land averaged about $8 per acre where the ordinary ditches were built.

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  • Look for signs of discoloring or staining to indicate blocked outfalls or flooded ditches.

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  • I am not saying if you love digging ditches, you should do something else.

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  • The species of Hydra, however, are extremely common and familiar inhabitants of ponds and ditches.

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  • The upper town is built on seven hills, each crowned by a church, while the lower, still partially surrounded by walls and ditches, is divided by the river and Ludwigskanal into three districts.

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  • Before the close of the 18th century, and during the first quarter of the 19th, a good deal had been done in the way of draining the land, either by open ditches or by James Elkington's system of deep covered drains.

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  • In front of the castle proper are three ditches, the innermost of which can be reached from the interior of the castle by a complicated system of underground passages.

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  • Long ditches with stone-paved sluices for washing this mineral-bearing material have long been used by the Indians, who also construct stone bars across the beds of the streams to make riffles and hold the deposited grains of gold.

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  • Of military antiquities the most remarkable are Tyrone's ditches, near Poyntzpass; and the pass of Moyry, the entry into the county from the south, which was fiercely contested by the Irish in 1595 and 1600, is defended by a castle.

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  • Down, Ireland, about 1836, and appeared in England in 1841, spreading through the country in ponds, ditches' and streams, which were often choked with its rank growth.

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  • Mexico was formerly one of the worst drained large cities of the New World, its subsoil being permanently saturated and its artificial drainage being through open ditches into the San Lazaro Canal which nominally discharged into Lake Texcoco.

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  • The forget-me-not, a favourite with poets, and the symbol of constancy, is a frequent ornament of brooks, rivers and ditches, and, according to an old German tradition, received its name from the last words of a knight who was drowned in the attempt to procure the flower for his lady.

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  • They are for the most part marine in habitat, but a familiar fresh-water form is the common Hydra of ponds and ditches, which gives origin to the name of the class.

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  • It is made sufficiently strong to bear the weight of the animals, which are confined within their bounds by undercut overhanging ridges, and by deep and wide ditches, masked by rockwork.

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  • Fortification was well understood, as may still be seen in the remains of walled and escarped strongholds on hills and in steep ravines, while lagoon-cities like Mexico had the water approaches defended by fleets of boats and the causeways protected by towers and ditches; even after the town was entered, the pyramid-temples with their surrounding walls were forts capable of stubborn resistance.

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  • The cultivation of the cane was greatly encouraged by the Reciprocity Treaty of 1875, which established practically free trade between the islands and the United States, and since 1879 it has been widely extended by means of irrigation, the water being obtained both by pumping from numerous artesian wells and by conducting surface water through canals and ditches.

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  • The Japanese and Koreans, and in less measure the Chinese, act as domestic servants, work under white contractors on irrigating ditches and reservoirs, do most of the plantation labour and compete successfully with whites and native islanders in all save skilled urban occupations, such as printing and the manufacture of machinery.

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  • Some of the old fortifications of the town remain, but the ramparts and ditches have been laid out as promenades.

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  • Monoblepharidaceae consists of a very small group of aquatic forms living on fallen twigs in ponds and ditches.

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  • The ancient walls and ditches, which formerly environed the city, were dismantled between 1881 and 1885, and the site of the old fortifications, bought from the government by the municipality, were converted into a fine boulevard, the Ring, nearly 4 m.

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  • The greater part of these lands was irrigated by canals or ditches built by individuals acting singly or in co-operation with their neighbours, or by corporations.

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  • The national and state governments had not built any works of reclamation excepting where the federal government, through the Indian department, had constructed irrigation ditches for Indian tribes, notably the Crow Indians of Montana.

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  • This is effected by means of drainage canals cut at regular intervals and connected by means of cross ditches.

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  • These draining ditches all have their issue in a main drainage canal, along which the transport of the peat and peatlitter takes place and the houses of the colonists are built.

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  • The remains of the acropolis fortifications are very interesting, including roads and ditches hewn in the rock; but beyond ruins of two churches and a fine tower built by Thoros I.

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  • Then came innumerable varieties of manual work for the erection and keeping up of hedges, the preservation of dykes, canals and ditches, the threshing and garnering of corn, the tending and shearing of sheep and so forth.

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  • The strong fortifications which, with ramparts, bastions and wet ditches, formerly entirely surrounded the city, were removed on the north and west sides in 1895-1896, the trenches filled in, and the area thus freed laid out on a spacious plan.

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  • The plant has a wide distribution, growing in wet situations in the Himalayas, North America, Siberia and various parts of Europe, including England, and has been naturalized in Scotland and Ireland., Though regarded as a native in most counties of England at the present day, where it is now found thoroughly wild on sides of ditches, ponds and rivers, and very abundantly in some districts, it is probably not indigenous.

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  • The roads were until then, as a rule, merely tracks, deeply worn by ages of traffic into the semblance of ditches, and, under adverse weather conditions, impassable.

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  • The entrenchments surrounding this building covered some 60 acres of ground, and included a number of detached houses and buildings, knit together by ditches and stockades.

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  • Mediterranean plant which spreads to the south of England, where it is sometimes found in gravelly ditches and pools.

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  • Surface drainage is usually effected by ploughing the land into convex ridges off which the water runs into intervening furrows and is conveyed into ditches.

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  • There was no more wayside preaching, but instead there were conventicula occulta in houses, in peasants' huts, in sawpits and in field ditches, where the Bible was read and exhortations were given, and so Lollardy continued..

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  • In the first phase a round barrow was created with material dug from two ditches to either side of the mound.

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  • The water in these ditches is often brackish - a mixture of salt and fresh water.

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  • On the north bank of the Thames these ditches provide habitat for the nationally scarce emerald damselfly.

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  • Twelve ring ditches excavated are interpreted as Bronze Age by association with the ring ditches excavated during the 1980's.

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  • But instead of two flanking ditches you have a raised path.

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  • Nearby were north-south aligned ditches which may represent a fluid boundary.

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  • Settlement was also found between the inner and outer ditches as well as further downhill.

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  • Later, when the tank became a serious tactical weapon, anti-tank ditches were added to the first line of defense.

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  • The castle is protected by limestone cliffs to the south and rock-cut ditches to the west.

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  • Linked to this roadside ditch, a series of parallel ditches were also found, running downslope toward the river.

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  • It will also carry fascines to drop into ditches and tow a trailer-mounted BAE Systems, RO Defense Python rocket-propelled mine-clearing system.

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  • He says how he almost fainted when he saw the geysers of blood coming out of the bodies in the ditches.

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  • Wet flushes, shallow ditches and small scrapes also benefit lapwing by providing additional sources of invertebrate food.

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  • The troops returned, leveled the center of town and built in its place an internal earthen rampart with three defensive ditches.

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  • Excavations during the 1960s discovered a box rampart on top of the main scarp and two outer ditches.

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  • In summer he used a scythe to keep the ditches and banks clear of brambles and grass.

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  • These consisted of ditches with the earth piled up to form a bank into which wooden stakes were driven.

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  • Water voles like to make their homes along densely vegetated river banks or ditches where the current is slow.

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  • An allied genus Zannichellia (named after Zanichelli, a Venetian botanist), occurring in fresh and brackish ditches and.

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  • The Metz forts, though neither sufficiently armed nor even completely finished in some cases, were nevertheless, with their deep ditches and self-protecting bastion trace, far too formidable for any field army to attempt without the aid of a siege train of some 200 guns, which for the moment were not available.

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  • Irrigation ditches having been exempted from taxation in 1872, extensive systems of canals were soon developed, especially after 1880.

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  • Schizomycetes are ubiquitous as saprophytes in still ponds and ditches, in running streams and rivers, and in the sea, and especially in drains, bogs, refuse heaps, and in the soil, and wherever organic infusions are allowed to stand for a short time.

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  • A number of the gullies drain into roadside ditches which, in general, are not our responsibility to maintain.

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  • A well-bred horse is required, clever at banks and blind ditches and able to gallop through the deep.

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  • This finite nature, coupled with the lack of personalization, makes some businesses a little wary of getting left holding the bag if some slick person manages to rack up more than he should and then simply ditches the card.

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  • Thunberg first found this plant in Japan, growing in great abundance in ditches by the wayside.

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  • The Siberian Iris is very hardy and spare plants are easily established in ditches or damp spots.

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  • P. aquatica is a stout native grass, 4 to 6 feet high, usually occurring in wet ditches, by rivers, and in marshes.

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  • Both are adapted for wet ditches, margins of pools, and lakes.

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  • Brawl also marks the debut of Zero Suit Samus, where she ditches her spacesuit in favor of an energy whip.

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  • The road runs through heavily wooded areas complete with bridges, ditches, and other hazards.

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  • The nature of the breeding-place varies greatly according to the species, and while many of the mosquitoes that infest houses will breed even in the smallest accidental accumulation of water such as may have collected in a discarded bottle or tin, the larvae of other species less closely associated with man are found in natural pools or ditches, at the margins of slow-moving streams, in collections of water in hollow trees and bamboo-stumps, or even in the water-receptacles of certain plants.

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  • Picturesquely situated on the slope of a hill, the town has remains of ramparts of the 12th and 13th centuries, with ditches hewn in the rock, and several medieval buildings.

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  • The sweet-flag Acorus Calamus, which occurs apparently wild in England in ditches, ponds, &c., is supposed to have been introduced.

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  • It is found in pools and ditches in the British Isles, and is widely distributed in the north temperate zone.

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  • The old prince used to approve of them for their endurance at work when they came to Bald Hills to help with the harvest or to dig ponds, and ditches, but he disliked them for their boorishness.

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