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disuse

disuse

disuse Sentence Examples

  • Motives drawn from homoeopathic magic may thus explain the occasional disuse and prohibition of pictorial and plastic Xiv.

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  • This sport was allowed to fall into disuse, and was not again prevalent until it was introduced from Holland after the Restoration.

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  • (February 26, 1538) and again in 1550 under Edward VI.; but it had fallen into complete disuse by the beginning of the r 7th century.

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  • Darwin died some years before the controversy upon the possibility of the hereditary transmission of acquired characters arose over the writings of Weismann, but Wallace has freely accepted the general results of the German zoologist's teaching, and in Darwinism has presented a complete theory of the causes of evolution unmixed with any trace of Lamarck's use or disuse of inheritance, or Buffon's hereditary effect of the direct influence of surroundings.

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  • His Proposal for the Universal Use of Irish Manufactures, published anonymously in 1720, urging the Irish to disuse English goods, became the subject of a prosecution, which at length had to be dropped.

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  • But the rights which the Latin Church had thus obtained had practically fallen into disuse, while the Greek branch of the Christian Church had occupied and repaired the shrines which the Latins had neglected.

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  • Sodium chloride, characteristic of the Augustin process in which the ores, after a chloridizing roast, were extracted with brine, and the silver precipitated by copper, has almost wholly fallen into disuse; and potassium cyanide, which has become a very important solvent for finely divided gold, is rarely used in leaching silver ores.

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  • The disuse implied no doctrinal change; the main motive was that the stiff vestment, high in the neck, was incompatible with a full-bottomed wig.

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  • And though Spencer's general position - that it is absurd to suppose that organisms after being modified by their life should give birth to offspring showing no traces of such modifications - seems the more philosophic, yet it does not dispose of the facts which go to show that most of the evidence for the direct transmission of adaptations is illusory, and that beings are organised to minimize the effects of life on the reproductive tissues, so that the transmission of the effects of use and disuse, if it occurs, must be both difficult and rare - far more so than is convenient for Spencer's psychology.

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  • In the national migration period, however, it fell into disuse among most of the continental Teutonic peoples, even before their conversion, though it seems to have been still practised by the Heruli in the 5th century and by the Old Saxons probably till a much later period.

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  • During the Macedonian period Greek influences had been steadily gaining ground in Phoenicia; relations with the Greek world grew closer; the native language fell into disuse, and from the beginning of the Roman occupation Greek appears regularly in inscriptions and on coins, though on the latter Phoenician legends do not .entirely vanish till the 2nd century A.D.; while the extent to which Hellenic ideas penetrated the native traditions and mythologies is seen in the writings of Philo of Byblus.

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  • The name Biafra - as indicating the country - fell into disuse in the later part of the 19th century.

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  • Its alkalo-saline springs, especially efficacious in pulmonary and urinary complaints, were known as early as 1316, but fell into disuse until rediscovered early in the 19th century.

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  • The history of some of the alphabetic signs is still very obscure but a sufficient number of them have been explained to make it nearly certain that the values of all were obtained on the same principles.i Some of the ancient words from which the phonetic values were derived probably fell very early into disuse, and may, never be discoverable in the texts that have come down to us.

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  • He doubted, but did not exclude, the importance of the direct effect of differences of climate and food and of increased use and disuse, except so far as the individual was concerned, but his opinion as to these Lamarckian factors changed from time to time.

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  • Among the Jews the preaching of the prophets had been a constant protest against the grosser forms of sacrifice, and there are indications that when Christianity arose bloody sacrifices were already beginning to fall into disuse; a saying which was attributed by the Ebionites to Christ repeats this protest in a strong form, "I.

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  • Freeman advances the theory that the right of all the freemen to attend the genzot had for practical purposes fallen into disuse, and thus the assembly had come to be confined to the wise men.

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  • Their testimony is not primarily against these outward observances; their disuse of them is due to a sense of the danger of substituting the shadow for the reality.

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  • organization, disuse of the outward ordinances (this point is subject to some slight exception, principally in Ohio), and women's ministry, they do not differ from English Friends.

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  • Atrophy may follow primary arrest of function - disuse atrophy.

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  • It seems probable from the silence of the records that they had already fallen into disuse early in the 13th century.

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  • This is at once connected with the nebular hypothesis, and subsequently deduced "from the ultimate law of the" persistence of force,"and finally supplemented by a counter-process of dissolution, all of which appears to Spencer only as" the addition of Von Baer's law to a number of ideas that were in harmony with it."It is clear, however, that Spencer's ideas as to the nature of evolution were already pretty definite when Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) revolutionized the subject of organic evolution by adding natural selection to the direct adaptation by use and disuse, and so suggesting an intelligible method of producing modifications in the forms of life.

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  • The Mahmal, a kind of covered litter, first originated by Queen Sheger-ed-Dur, is brought into the city in procession, though not with as much pomp as when it leaves with the pilgrims. These and other processions have lost much of their effect since the extinction of the Mamelukes, and the gradual disuse of gorgeous dress for the retainers of the,, officers of state.

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  • The augures were originally called auspices, but, while auspex 1 fell into disuse and was replaced by augur, auspicium was retained as the scientific term for the observation of signs.

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  • It seems probable from the silence of the records that they had already fallen into disuse early in the 13th century.

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  • The Mahmal, a kind of covered litter, first originated by Queen Sheger-ed-Dur, is brought into the city in procession, though not with as much pomp as when it leaves with the pilgrims. These and other processions have lost much of their effect since the extinction of the Mamelukes, and the gradual disuse of gorgeous dress for the retainers of the,, officers of state.

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  • The classic term "camelopard," probably introduced when these animals were brought from North Africa to the Roman amphitheatre, has fallen into complete disuse.

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  • There seems but little doubt that Napier was the first to make use of a decimal separator, and it is curious that the separator which he used, the point, should be that which has been ultimately adopted, and after a long period of partial disuse.

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  • Unlike the latter, they reproduced the institution of district conciliation boards in addition to the arbitration court; but these boards were a failure here as they were in New Zealand, and after 1903 they fell into disuse.

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  • There are pleasant promenades and good golf links, also a small spa which has fallen into disuse.

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  • But in spite of statutes and proclamations, of occasional severities and of the patriotic example of Queen Elizabeth, the practice of fasting fell more and more into disuse.

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  • Almost immediately after the Norman Conquest the word fell into disuse.

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  • His original treatises (the best of which are his Greek and Latin grammars), as well as those which he edited, have, however, long since fallen into disuse.

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  • The chasuble and the rest, whatever their origin, had become associated during the middle ages with certain doctrines the rejection of which at the Reformation was symbolized by their disuse.

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  • Knox also provided the Church of Scotland with superintendents or visitors, as well as readers and exhorters, offices which soon fell into disuse.

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  • Though he added some new provisions, Charlemagne respected the ancient ones, even those which had long fallen into disuse.

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  • was much used by the philosophers of the middle of the 19th century, and has since fallen largely into disuse.

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  • In the Protestant churches of continental Europe the title of archbishop has fallen into almost complete disuse.

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  • On the one hand, worship passed into formalism and formalism into disuse.

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  • Since ale and beer have become excisable commodities the custom of appointing ale-tasters has in most places fallen into disuse.

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  • When the colleges of freedmen and slaves, who assisted the presidents of the festival, were abolished by Julius Caesar, it fell into disuse.

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  • Owing to the cost and trouble of weighing a large number of zinc plates, this type of meter fell into disuse.

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  • The tramway was converted into a railway, and in 1865 opened for passenger traffic. In 1866 a dock (71 acres) and tidal basin (21 acres) were constructed, but since about 1902 they have fallen into disuse and the coal is diverged to other ports, chiefly Port Talbot.

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  • This custom, long fallen into disuse, has largely been revived during recent years, the children going to church for a special afternoon service of which catechizing is the chief feature.

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  • It was compiled between 685 and 751, and was constantly employed until the 11th century, when, owing to the changed circumstances of the Church, it fell into disuse, and was soon forgotten and lost.

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  • Their stricter leaders, however, objected to a custom which so easily led to the worship of relics and the continuance of pagan observances; and with the advent of Islam embalming fell into disuse.

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  • The aborted condition of this process can hardly be regarded but in connexion with the incapacity of the bird for flight, and may very likely be the result of disuse.

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  • practical disuse of the distinctively Christian means of grace, as compared with those recognized by Judaism, and such conformity to the latter as would make the reproach of the Cross to cease (xiii.

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  • The shallow strait separating it from the mainland is liable to be blocked by sand-banks; a canal was cut through these in the 7th century B.C. by the Corinthians, and was again after a long period of disuse opened up by the Romans.

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  • The first named schools being mainly intended for those engaged in industrial or agricultural pursuits, the day classes gradually fell into disuse.

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  • With the gradual disuse of the old barbarous punishments so universal in medieval times came also a reversal of opinion as to the magnitude of the crime involved in killing a child not yet born.

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  • The same kind of apparent vacillation was found in his action in other cases; e.g., in the Colenso case (1863), and in the controversy as to the use or disuse of the Athanasian symbol (1872).

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  • Three points here require explanation: (1) Why K fell into disuse; (2) why C took the place of K; (3) why the new symbol G was put in the place of the lost Z.

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  • The former soon fell into disuse for ordinary purposes and was retained only for inscriptions, coins, &c.; the latter, which is more cursive in character, is the parent of the Arabic writing of the present day.

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  • The site was occupied in 1823 by the county prison, now known as the castle, a castellated structure which gradually fell into disuse and was acquired by the corporation in 1890.

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  • Such remedies are termed antiphlogistic. Venesection (blood-letting) at one time was highly esteemed as an antiphlogistic measure, and while it is possible that it has now fallen too much into disuse, there can be no doubt that at one time it was very greatly abused, and was carried to such an excess as to kill many patients who would have recovered perfectly had they been let alone.

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  • The use of the mitre, pastoral staff and pectoral cross, which had fallen into complete disuse by the end of the 18th century, has been now very commonly, though not universally, revived; and, in some cases, the interpretation put upon the "Ornaments rubric" by the modern High Church school has led to a more complete revival of the pre-Reformation vestments.

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  • The more conservative temper of the Anglican and Lutheran communions, however, suffered the retention of such processions as did not conflict with the reformed doctrines, though even in these Churches they met with opposition and tended after a while to fall into disuse.

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  • One of Aidan's successors, Kenneth, became king of the Picts about 843, and gradually the name Dalriada both in Ireland and Scotland fell into disuse.

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  • Those reserved benefices only were to pay the annalia which were rated above twentyfour gold florins; and as none were so rated, whatever their annual value may have been, the annalia fell into disuse.

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  • He is chargeable, however, with the condemnation and execution of two poor women tried before him for witchcraft in 1664, a kind of judicial murder then falling under disuse.

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  • The forest laws, since the Revolution, have fallen into complete disuse.

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  • Conrad's son Frederick took the title of duke of Rothenburg instead of duke of Franconia, but in 1196, on the death of Conrad of Hohenstaufen, son of the emperor Frederick I., the title fell into disuse.

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  • He passed the recently restored Beaumont Hotel, a beautiful structure that after several decades of disuse and deterioration had finally been returned to its past glory.

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  • disrepair through neglect, ignorance or disuse.

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  • A long disuse of my native tongue will apologize to the learned reader for any inaccuracies.

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  • apparent disuse and later activity formed brought prehistoric activity to a close.

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  • There is no need for a sudden changeover from using it, just a gradual disuse.

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  • These wells have, with few exceptions, sunk into total disuse.

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  • The date of its original excavation and final disuse is not clear.

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  • All, until he came to Alan's chamber, were locked from without, and bore the marks of a prolonged disuse.

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  • disuse atrophy!

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  • disuse weakness, overuse weakness, weight gain, and chronic weakness.

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  • muscle disuse can also be a contributing factor to the onset of PPS.

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  • After 15 years disuse, passenger services are being reintroduced in stages from 2004.

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  • disuse after the reformation.

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  • disuse before the 12th century when some burials were disturbed by four pits containing quantities of metalworking slag.

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  • disuse in the late 19th century.

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  • disuse of parts.

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  • Backfilling of ditch F288F appears to post-date the disuse of the cemetery, since the ditch in disuse of the cemetery, since the ditch in disuse is not cut by burials.

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  • disuse by the sixteenth century (VCH Somerset, iii, pp.

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  • fallen into disuse by 1915.

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  • furlongs of the canal were in disuse around 1867 and the whole by about 1939.

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  • These are good reasons to explain why the term ' chronic pyelonephritis ' has fallen into disuse.

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  • This assembly by the intrusion of strangers became so tumultuous that it grew into disuse.

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  • The classic term "camelopard," probably introduced when these animals were brought from North Africa to the Roman amphitheatre, has fallen into complete disuse.

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  • Even when, on the invention of gunpowder and firearms, the bow had fallen into disuse as a weapon of war, the prohibition was continued.

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  • There seems but little doubt that Napier was the first to make use of a decimal separator, and it is curious that the separator which he used, the point, should be that which has been ultimately adopted, and after a long period of partial disuse.

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  • Unlike the latter, they reproduced the institution of district conciliation boards in addition to the arbitration court; but these boards were a failure here as they were in New Zealand, and after 1903 they fell into disuse.

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  • Several ingenious applications of his method were proposed and practically worked, as, for example, the copying telegraph of Bakewell and of Cros, by means of which a telegram may be transmitted in the sender's own handwriting; the pantelegraph of Caselli; the autographic telegraphs of Meyer, Lenoir, Sawyer and others; and the autographic typo-telegraph of Bonelli; all forms of the apparatus have, however, fallen into disuse.

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  • There are pleasant promenades and good golf links, also a small spa which has fallen into disuse.

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  • But in spite of statutes and proclamations, of occasional severities and of the patriotic example of Queen Elizabeth, the practice of fasting fell more and more into disuse.

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  • Rules may also be made in respect to other matters besides those mentioned in the schedule, and companies may be called upon to adopt or reject, as the case may be, any appliance, the use or disuse of which may be considered desirable in the interest of the men.

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  • Among the Jews the preaching of the prophets had been a constant protest against the grosser forms of sacrifice, and there are indications that when Christianity arose bloody sacrifices were already beginning to fall into disuse; a saying which was attributed by the Ebionites to Christ repeats this protest in a strong form, "I.

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  • Minucius with Fabius, which heralded its disuse (see Punic WARs).

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  • Freeman advances the theory that the right of all the freemen to attend the genzot had for practical purposes fallen into disuse, and thus the assembly had come to be confined to the wise men.

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  • Almost immediately after the Norman Conquest the word fell into disuse.

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  • (o) That subsequent to that period organic changes in the industries affected, coupled with the incompetence of parliament to adapt the old legislation to new conditions, and the growing acceptance of the doctrine of laissez faire, brought about a general disuse of the statute, though isolated attempts to enforce it were made and new acts applicable to certain trades were passed in the 18th century.

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  • His original treatises (the best of which are his Greek and Latin grammars), as well as those which he edited, have, however, long since fallen into disuse.

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  • their refusal to take oaths, their testimony against war, their disuse of a professional ministry, and their recognition of women's ministry) were being put forward in England, by various individuals or sects, in the strife which raged during the intense religious excitement of the middle of the 17th century.

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  • Their testimony is not primarily against these outward observances; their disuse of them is due to a sense of the danger of substituting the shadow for the reality.

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  • At the same time their avoidance of exact definition embodied in a rig i d creed, together with their disuse of the outward ordinances of Baptism and the Supper, has laid them open to considerable misunderstanding.

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  • organization, disuse of the outward ordinances (this point is subject to some slight exception, principally in Ohio), and women's ministry, they do not differ from English Friends.

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  • The chasuble and the rest, whatever their origin, had become associated during the middle ages with certain doctrines the rejection of which at the Reformation was symbolized by their disuse.

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  • Nor is the argument that they are a visible manifestation of the continuity of the Church anything but a doubleedged weapon; for, as Father Braun pertinently asks, if these be their symbolism, of what was their disuse in the Church of England for nigh on 3 00 years a symbol?

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  • To find the effect of linear transformation on the symbolic form of quantic we will disuse the coefficients a 111 a 12, a21, a22, and employ A1, I�1, A2, �2.

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  • Fine white freestone abounds in the immediate vicinity (as at Craigleith, from the vast quarry of which, now passing into disuse, the stone for much of the New Town was obtained) and furnishes excellent building material; while the hard trap rock, with which the stratified sandstones of the Coal formation have been extensively broken up and overlaid, supplies good materials for paving and road-making.

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  • 7) has fallen into disuse, partly by the right of confirmation allowed to the bishops of the province, partly by the influence of Christian emperors, who controlled the elections in the capital where they resided, most of all by the authority exercised by kings after the invasion of the northern tribes and the dissolution of the empire (see Church History).

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  • Knox also provided the Church of Scotland with superintendents or visitors, as well as readers and exhorters, offices which soon fell into disuse.

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  • consequent disuse, and the transmission (as Lamarck would have supposed) of a more and more weakened and structurally impaired eye to the offspring in successive generations, until the eye finally disappeared.

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  • Eight of them, it is true, fell into disuse; but the medieval Ionian and Hypo-ionian modes are absolutely identical with the modern natural scale of C; and the Aeolian and Hypoaeolian modes differ from our minor scale, not in constitution, but in treatment only.

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  • Atrophy may follow primary arrest of function - disuse atrophy.

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  • The loss of an eye will be followed by atrophy of the optic nerve; the tissues in a stump of an amputated limb show atrophic changes; a paralysed limb from long disuse shows much wasting; and one finds at great depths of the sea fishes and marine animals, which have almost completely lost the organs of sight, having been cut off for long ages from the stimuli (light) essential for these organs, and so brought into an atrophic condition from disuse.

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  • This sport was allowed to fall into disuse, and was not again prevalent until it was introduced from Holland after the Restoration.

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  • Though he added some new provisions, Charlemagne respected the ancient ones, even those which had long fallen into disuse.

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  • was much used by the philosophers of the middle of the 19th century, and has since fallen largely into disuse.

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  • This is at once connected with the nebular hypothesis, and subsequently deduced "from the ultimate law of the" persistence of force,"and finally supplemented by a counter-process of dissolution, all of which appears to Spencer only as" the addition of Von Baer's law to a number of ideas that were in harmony with it."It is clear, however, that Spencer's ideas as to the nature of evolution were already pretty definite when Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) revolutionized the subject of organic evolution by adding natural selection to the direct adaptation by use and disuse, and so suggesting an intelligible method of producing modifications in the forms of life.

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  • On the other hand, he advances too easily from the maxim that function is prior to, and makes, structure to the conclusion that the results of use and disuse are therefore immediately incarnated in structural adaptations capable of hereditary transmission.

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  • And though Spencer's general position - that it is absurd to suppose that organisms after being modified by their life should give birth to offspring showing no traces of such modifications - seems the more philosophic, yet it does not dispose of the facts which go to show that most of the evidence for the direct transmission of adaptations is illusory, and that beings are organised to minimize the effects of life on the reproductive tissues, so that the transmission of the effects of use and disuse, if it occurs, must be both difficult and rare - far more so than is convenient for Spencer's psychology.

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  • In the Protestant churches of continental Europe the title of archbishop has fallen into almost complete disuse.

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  • On the one hand, worship passed into formalism and formalism into disuse.

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  • Motives drawn from homoeopathic magic may thus explain the occasional disuse and prohibition of pictorial and plastic Xiv.

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  • Since ale and beer have become excisable commodities the custom of appointing ale-tasters has in most places fallen into disuse.

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  • It is noteworthy that the word av6.9E1.ta had fallen into disuse about the beginning of the 4th century, and that, throughout the same period, no instance of the judicial use of the phrase rapaSovvat T(i) larava can be found.

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  • It subsequently fell into disuse, but was revived in the 19th century when the Tractarian movement had brought the term "High Churchman" into vogue again in a modified sense, i.e.

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  • When the colleges of freedmen and slaves, who assisted the presidents of the festival, were abolished by Julius Caesar, it fell into disuse.

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  • The funerary cult of Khufu and Khafre was practised under the twenty-sixth dynasty, when so much that had fallen into disuse and been forgotten was revived.

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  • Owing to the cost and trouble of weighing a large number of zinc plates, this type of meter fell into disuse.

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  • Chinese have been established in the archipelago from a very early date: the first Dutch invaders found them settled at Jacatra; and many of them, as, for instance, the colony of Ternate, have taken so kindly to their new home that they have acquired Malay to the disuse of their native tongue.

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  • The tramway was converted into a railway, and in 1865 opened for passenger traffic. In 1866 a dock (71 acres) and tidal basin (21 acres) were constructed, but since about 1902 they have fallen into disuse and the coal is diverged to other ports, chiefly Port Talbot.

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  • This custom, long fallen into disuse, has largely been revived during recent years, the children going to church for a special afternoon service of which catechizing is the chief feature.

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  • It was compiled between 685 and 751, and was constantly employed until the 11th century, when, owing to the changed circumstances of the Church, it fell into disuse, and was soon forgotten and lost.

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  • Their stricter leaders, however, objected to a custom which so easily led to the worship of relics and the continuance of pagan observances; and with the advent of Islam embalming fell into disuse.

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  • The aborted condition of this process can hardly be regarded but in connexion with the incapacity of the bird for flight, and may very likely be the result of disuse.

    0
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  • practical disuse of the distinctively Christian means of grace, as compared with those recognized by Judaism, and such conformity to the latter as would make the reproach of the Cross to cease (xiii.

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  • (February 26, 1538) and again in 1550 under Edward VI.; but it had fallen into complete disuse by the beginning of the r 7th century.

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  • In the national migration period, however, it fell into disuse among most of the continental Teutonic peoples, even before their conversion, though it seems to have been still practised by the Heruli in the 5th century and by the Old Saxons probably till a much later period.

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  • During the Macedonian period Greek influences had been steadily gaining ground in Phoenicia; relations with the Greek world grew closer; the native language fell into disuse, and from the beginning of the Roman occupation Greek appears regularly in inscriptions and on coins, though on the latter Phoenician legends do not .entirely vanish till the 2nd century A.D.; while the extent to which Hellenic ideas penetrated the native traditions and mythologies is seen in the writings of Philo of Byblus.

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  • The name Biafra - as indicating the country - fell into disuse in the later part of the 19th century.

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  • The shallow strait separating it from the mainland is liable to be blocked by sand-banks; a canal was cut through these in the 7th century B.C. by the Corinthians, and was again after a long period of disuse opened up by the Romans.

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    0
  • The first named schools being mainly intended for those engaged in industrial or agricultural pursuits, the day classes gradually fell into disuse.

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  • With the gradual disuse of the old barbarous punishments so universal in medieval times came also a reversal of opinion as to the magnitude of the crime involved in killing a child not yet born.

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  • Its alkalo-saline springs, especially efficacious in pulmonary and urinary complaints, were known as early as 1316, but fell into disuse until rediscovered early in the 19th century.

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  • The history of some of the alphabetic signs is still very obscure but a sufficient number of them have been explained to make it nearly certain that the values of all were obtained on the same principles.i Some of the ancient words from which the phonetic values were derived probably fell very early into disuse, and may, never be discoverable in the texts that have come down to us.

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  • He doubted, but did not exclude, the importance of the direct effect of differences of climate and food and of increased use and disuse, except so far as the individual was concerned, but his opinion as to these Lamarckian factors changed from time to time.

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  • The same kind of apparent vacillation was found in his action in other cases; e.g., in the Colenso case (1863), and in the controversy as to the use or disuse of the Athanasian symbol (1872).

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  • Three points here require explanation: (1) Why K fell into disuse; (2) why C took the place of K; (3) why the new symbol G was put in the place of the lost Z.

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  • The former soon fell into disuse for ordinary purposes and was retained only for inscriptions, coins, &c.; the latter, which is more cursive in character, is the parent of the Arabic writing of the present day.

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  • It can only have fallen into disuse by degrees, as the sound which it denoted ceased to be pronounced.

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  • The site was occupied in 1823 by the county prison, now known as the castle, a castellated structure which gradually fell into disuse and was acquired by the corporation in 1890.

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  • Such remedies are termed antiphlogistic. Venesection (blood-letting) at one time was highly esteemed as an antiphlogistic measure, and while it is possible that it has now fallen too much into disuse, there can be no doubt that at one time it was very greatly abused, and was carried to such an excess as to kill many patients who would have recovered perfectly had they been let alone.

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  • The use of the mitre, pastoral staff and pectoral cross, which had fallen into complete disuse by the end of the 18th century, has been now very commonly, though not universally, revived; and, in some cases, the interpretation put upon the "Ornaments rubric" by the modern High Church school has led to a more complete revival of the pre-Reformation vestments.

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  • Sodium chloride, characteristic of the Augustin process in which the ores, after a chloridizing roast, were extracted with brine, and the silver precipitated by copper, has almost wholly fallen into disuse; and potassium cyanide, which has become a very important solvent for finely divided gold, is rarely used in leaching silver ores.

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  • Darwin died some years before the controversy upon the possibility of the hereditary transmission of acquired characters arose over the writings of Weismann, but Wallace has freely accepted the general results of the German zoologist's teaching, and in Darwinism has presented a complete theory of the causes of evolution unmixed with any trace of Lamarck's use or disuse of inheritance, or Buffon's hereditary effect of the direct influence of surroundings.

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  • His Proposal for the Universal Use of Irish Manufactures, published anonymously in 1720, urging the Irish to disuse English goods, became the subject of a prosecution, which at length had to be dropped.

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  • The more conservative temper of the Anglican and Lutheran communions, however, suffered the retention of such processions as did not conflict with the reformed doctrines, though even in these Churches they met with opposition and tended after a while to fall into disuse.

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  • One of Aidan's successors, Kenneth, became king of the Picts about 843, and gradually the name Dalriada both in Ireland and Scotland fell into disuse.

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  • Those reserved benefices only were to pay the annalia which were rated above twentyfour gold florins; and as none were so rated, whatever their annual value may have been, the annalia fell into disuse.

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  • He is chargeable, however, with the condemnation and execution of two poor women tried before him for witchcraft in 1664, a kind of judicial murder then falling under disuse.

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  • The forest laws, since the Revolution, have fallen into complete disuse.

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  • Mention may here be made of an old Italian deity Furina (or Furrina), whose worship fell early into disuse, and who was almost forgotten in the time of Varro.

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  • In the first place, owing to the general disuse of such ministrations, there were none among the English clergy who had experience in delicate questions of conscience; and there had been no treatment of casuistry since Sanderson and Jeremy Taylor (see Casuistry).

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  • The sentence passed by the Lords vindicated the right of parliament to punish officials who had enjoyed the favor of the crown, which had fallen into disuse since the accession of the house of York.

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  • But the rights which the Latin Church had thus obtained had practically fallen into disuse, while the Greek branch of the Christian Church had occupied and repaired the shrines which the Latins had neglected.

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  • The augures were originally called auspices, but, while auspex 1 fell into disuse and was replaced by augur, auspicium was retained as the scientific term for the observation of signs.

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  • The disuse implied no doctrinal change; the main motive was that the stiff vestment, high in the neck, was incompatible with a full-bottomed wig.

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  • Conrad's son Frederick took the title of duke of Rothenburg instead of duke of Franconia, but in 1196, on the death of Conrad of Hohenstaufen, son of the emperor Frederick I., the title fell into disuse.

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  • From petitions presented to parliament in 1376 it seems that the view of frankpledge was in active operation at this time, but it soon began to fall into disuse, and its complete decay coincides with the new ideas of government introduced by the Tudors.

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  • It does not seem that the barons were ever summoned to parliament, and the title, like all parliamentary titles, has fallen into disuse since the abolition of feudal tenures.

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  • These are good reasons to explain why the term ' chronic pyelonephritis ' has fallen into disuse.

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  • The platform itself also showed signs of many years of disuse, with tufts of grass growing from cracks.

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  • This assembly by the intrusion of strangers became so tumultuous that it grew into disuse.

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  • Specific diseases causing an increased risk for fractures include Paget's disease, rickets, osteogenesis imperfecta, osteoporosis, bone cancer and tumors, and prolonged disuse of a nonfunctional body part such as after a stroke.

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  • The negative connotations of the term "idiot" have led to the disuse of idiot savant.

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  • When the child tries to avoid moving a painful joint, the muscle may begin to shorten from disuse.

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  • Batteries are subject to stress from changing temperatures and long periods of disuse.

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  • Your body is made to move, and disuse can lead to health issues.

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  • One reason is that the treated muscles become weaker with disuse.

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  • Even when, on the invention of gunpowder and firearms, the bow had fallen into disuse as a weapon of war, the prohibition was continued.

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  • Rules may also be made in respect to other matters besides those mentioned in the schedule, and companies may be called upon to adopt or reject, as the case may be, any appliance, the use or disuse of which may be considered desirable in the interest of the men.

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  • To find the effect of linear transformation on the symbolic form of quantic we will disuse the coefficients a 111 a 12, a21, a22, and employ A1, I�1, A2, �2.

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  • Fine white freestone abounds in the immediate vicinity (as at Craigleith, from the vast quarry of which, now passing into disuse, the stone for much of the New Town was obtained) and furnishes excellent building material; while the hard trap rock, with which the stratified sandstones of the Coal formation have been extensively broken up and overlaid, supplies good materials for paving and road-making.

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  • consequent disuse, and the transmission (as Lamarck would have supposed) of a more and more weakened and structurally impaired eye to the offspring in successive generations, until the eye finally disappeared.

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  • Eight of them, it is true, fell into disuse; but the medieval Ionian and Hypo-ionian modes are absolutely identical with the modern natural scale of C; and the Aeolian and Hypoaeolian modes differ from our minor scale, not in constitution, but in treatment only.

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  • The loss of an eye will be followed by atrophy of the optic nerve; the tissues in a stump of an amputated limb show atrophic changes; a paralysed limb from long disuse shows much wasting; and one finds at great depths of the sea fishes and marine animals, which have almost completely lost the organs of sight, having been cut off for long ages from the stimuli (light) essential for these organs, and so brought into an atrophic condition from disuse.

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  • On the other hand, he advances too easily from the maxim that function is prior to, and makes, structure to the conclusion that the results of use and disuse are therefore immediately incarnated in structural adaptations capable of hereditary transmission.

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  • It is noteworthy that the word av6.9E1.ta had fallen into disuse about the beginning of the 4th century, and that, throughout the same period, no instance of the judicial use of the phrase rapaSovvat T(i) larava can be found.

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  • It subsequently fell into disuse, but was revived in the 19th century when the Tractarian movement had brought the term "High Churchman" into vogue again in a modified sense, i.e.

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  • The funerary cult of Khufu and Khafre was practised under the twenty-sixth dynasty, when so much that had fallen into disuse and been forgotten was revived.

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  • Chinese have been established in the archipelago from a very early date: the first Dutch invaders found them settled at Jacatra; and many of them, as, for instance, the colony of Ternate, have taken so kindly to their new home that they have acquired Malay to the disuse of their native tongue.

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  • It can only have fallen into disuse by degrees, as the sound which it denoted ceased to be pronounced.

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  • Mention may here be made of an old Italian deity Furina (or Furrina), whose worship fell early into disuse, and who was almost forgotten in the time of Varro.

    0
    1
  • The sentence passed by the Lords vindicated the right of parliament to punish officials who had enjoyed the favor of the crown, which had fallen into disuse since the accession of the house of York.

    0
    1
  • From petitions presented to parliament in 1376 it seems that the view of frankpledge was in active operation at this time, but it soon began to fall into disuse, and its complete decay coincides with the new ideas of government introduced by the Tudors.

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    1
  • It does not seem that the barons were ever summoned to parliament, and the title, like all parliamentary titles, has fallen into disuse since the abolition of feudal tenures.

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  • He passed the recently restored Beaumont Hotel, a beautiful structure that after several decades of disuse and deterioration had finally been returned to its past glory.

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  • Nor is the argument that they are a visible manifestation of the continuity of the Church anything but a doubleedged weapon; for, as Father Braun pertinently asks, if these be their symbolism, of what was their disuse in the Church of England for nigh on 3 00 years a symbol?

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