Distinctive sentence examples

distinctive
  • In these works his distinctive qualities were already revealed.

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  • There appear to be no true distinctive characteristics for these two types.

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  • The relatively small size of the ear is one of the most distinctive characteristics of the dwarf race.

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  • Distinctive non-Judaean features are included, as in the Samaritan liturgical office (Deut.

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  • The skull of the driver bore the distinctive damage Howie had received in his earlier accident.

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  • But it has few distinctive botanical features.

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  • Leibnitz, in accord with the distinctive principle of his philosophy, affirmed the absolute independence of mind and body as distinct monads, the parallelism of their functions in life being due to the pre-established harmony.

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  • Helen Keller became so rapidly a distinctive personality that she kept her teacher in a breathless race to meet the needs of her pupil, with no time or strength to make a scientific study.

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  • The distinctive feature of the Spanish-Jewish culture was its comprehensiveness.

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  • Other cities where the ceramic industries keep their ground are Pesaro, Gubbio, Faenza (whose name long ago became the distinctive term for the finer kind of potters work in France, falence), Savona and Albissola, Turin, Mondovi, Cuneo, Castellamonte, Milan, Brescia, Sassuolo, Imola, Rimini, Perugia, Castelli, &c. In all these the older styles, by which these places became famous in the IthI8th centuries, have been revived.

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  • of body numerous and not A, B, C, anterior segments from the distinctive of species, being ventral surface; D, hinder end of body irregular and not fixed in of Urochaeta.

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  • Grant that the distinctive mark of our Order may be never to possess anything as its own under the sun for the glory of Thy name, and to have no other patrimony than begging" (in the Legenda 3 Soc.).

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  • Each of these divisions is the home of a special fauna, many species of which are confined to it alone; in the Australian region, indeed, practically the whole fauna is peculiar and distinctive, suggesting a prolonged period of complete biological isolation.

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  • In hieroglyphic a king bears several names preceded by distinctive titles.

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  • His followers were known as the Brethren of Chelcic, and wore a distinctive dress.

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  • Soon after his accession he abolished the distinctive Jewish dress, abrogated the poll-tax, admitted the Jews to military service and their children to the public schools, and in general opened the era of emancipation by the Toleranzpatent of 1782.

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  • In foreign missions the distinctive feature about the Moravians is, not that they were so early in the field (1732), but that they were the first Protestants to declare that the evangelization of the heathen was the duty of the Church as such.

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  • The distinctive characters of the class Chaetopoda as a whole are partly embodied in the name.

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  • Before a similar mode of reasoning, all the other distinctive articles of the Romish creed "disappeared like a dream "; and " after a full conviction," on Christmas day, 1754, he received the sacrament in the church of Lausanne.

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  • GIRAFFE, a corruption of Zarafah, the Arabic name for the tallest of all mammals, and the typical representative of the family Giraffidae, the distinctive characters of which are given in the article Pecora, where the systematic position of the group is indicated.

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  • seq.) and the description of Ezra's horror at the prevalence of intermarriage, which J, threatened to destroy the distinctive character of the community, sufficiently indicates the attitude of the stricter party.

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  • He had an intellectual and distinctive head, but the instant he turned to Prince Andrew the firm, intelligent expression on his face changed in a way evidently deliberate and habitual to him.

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  • Its most distinctive characteristic is the presence of the birds of paradise, which are almost peculiar to it; for, granting that the bower-birds, Chlamydodera and others, of Australia, belong to the same family, they are far less highly specialized than the beautiful and extraordinary forms which are found, within very restricted limits, in the various islands of the subregion.

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  • ARCHIPELAGO, a name now applied to any island-studded sea, but originally the distinctive designation of what is now generally known as the Aegean Sea (Aiyaiov 7rEXayos), its ancient name having been revived.

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  • No one form occurs alone, but always grouped together with others in various ways to make up districts, regions and lands of distinctive characters.

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  • Their distinctive and adaptive characteristics doubtless began to be established as soon as the phanerogamic flora was constituted.

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  • As regards general form, the most distinctive feature is the great relative length of the tail, which reaches the hocks, and is donkey-like rather than deer-like in form.

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  • Here it is enough to observe that the highly advanced doctrines of the distinctive character of Yahweh, as ascribed to the 8th century B.C., presuppose a foundation and development.

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  • This, except historically, is a misnomer, for, though descended from the old English Presbyterians, they retain nothing of their distinctive doctrine of polity - nothing of Presbyterianism, indeed, but the name.

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  • The distinctive task of geography as a science is to investigate the control exercised by the crust-forms directly or indirectly upon the various mobile distributions.

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  • The scantiness of political information and the distinctive arrangement of material preclude the attempt to trace the relative position of the two rivals.

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  • Hence the Mediterranean region is characteristically one of winter rains, the distinctive feature becoming less sharply defined from south to north, and the amount of total annual fall increasing in the same direction.

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  • minute and without any specially distinctive features, until they begin to develop into germ-cells.

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  • A distinctive feature is the position assumed in resting; Culex has a humpbacked attitude, while in Anopheles the proboscis, head and body are in a straight line, and in many species inclined at an angle to the wall, the tail sticking outwards.

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  • The vegetation of each region has its distinctive character, modified here and there by elevation, irrigation from mountain streams, and by the saline character of the soil.

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  • The fineness of the hair may perhaps be ascribed to some peculiarity in the atmosphere, for it is remarkable that the cats, dogs and other animals of the country are to 'a certain extent affected in the same way, and that they all lose much of their distinctive beauty when taken from their native districts.

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  • Oceanic islands have, as a rule, distinctive faunas and floras which resemble, but are not identical with, those of other islands in similar positions.

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  • (I) The Philistines, a foreign people whose presence in Palestine 2 The story of Joseph has distinctive internal features of its own, and appears to be from an independent cycle, which has been used to form a connecting link between the Settlement and the Exodus; see also Ed.

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  • In this way the surface of the land is divided into numerous natural regions, the flora and fauna of each of which include some distinctive species not shared by the others.

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  • Two distinctive nationalities, Belgian and Dutch, were tactful and conciliatory policy of the most consummate statesman of his time could unite those whom the whole trend of events was year by year putting farther asunder.

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  • He was convinced the locale was the same but the fields were not distinctive enough that he recognized anything.

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  • The women of Arles have long enjoyed a reputation for marked beauty, but the distinctive type is fast disappearing owing to their intermarriage with strangers who have immigrated to the town.

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  • The Bretons, who most nearly represent the Celts, and the Basques, who inhabit parts of the western versant of the Pyrenees, have preserved their distinctive languages and customs, and are ethnically the most interesting sections of the nation; the Flemings of French Flanders where Flemish is still spoken are also racially distinct.

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  • has been brought about rather by extermination than specialization, and their distinctive facies by the development and multiplication of the surviving types.

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  • The costume of the Tosks differs from that of the Ghegs; its distinctive feature is the white plaited linen fustanella or petticoat, which has been adopted by the Greeks; the Ghegs wear trews of white or crimson native cloth adorned with black braid, and a short, close-fitting jacket, which in the case of wealthy persons is embellished with gold lace.

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  • Indeed, Hebrew, unlike Assyrian or Phoenician, has no distinctive form for " goddess."

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  • In any case, only the eastern districts would have been affected by invaders from over the Rhine, the chief seat of the Belgae proper being in the west, the country occupied by the Bellovaci, Ambiani and Atrebates, to which it is probable (although the reading is uncertain) that Caesar gives the distinctive name Belgium (corresponding to the old provinces of Picardy and Artois).

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  • He paid especial attention to orthography, and sought to differentiate the meanings of cases of like ending by distinctive marks (the apex to indicate a long vowel is attributed to him).

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  • Though thus exhibiting the distinctive features of a continental climate, Russia does not lie altogether outside the reach of the moderating influence of the ocean.

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  • In the first case prayer will 'be accompanied with disinterested homage, praise and thankgiving, and will in fact tend to lose its distinctive character of entreaty or petition, passing into a mystic communing or converse with God.

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  • The classification of the land surface into areas inhabited by distinctive groups of plants has been attempted by many phytogeographers, but without resulting in any scheme of general acceptance.

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  • While the forms of the sea-bed are not yet sufficiently well known to admit of exact classification, they are recognized to be as a rule distinct from the forms of the land, and the importance Submarine of using a distinctive terminology is felt.

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  • They exist in the Brachiopoda (which are probably not unrelated to the Chaetopoda), but otherwise are absolutely distinctive of the Chaetopods.

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  • Further, the skin is stated to be much less rough, with fewer cracks, while a more important difference occurs in the trunk, which lacks the transverse ridges so distinctive of the ordinary African elephant, and thereby approximates to the Asiatic species.

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  • On the other hand, the book of Deuteronomy has a characteristic social-religious side; its humanity, philanthropy and charity are the distinctive features of its laws, and Josiah's reputation (Jer.

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  • dais in the hall bears the distinctive arms of the third earl of Worcester, as Knight of the Garter.

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  • The party's attempts to carve out distinctive policy positions on public services have met with widespread derision.

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  • Blanchard published some Recherches sur les caracteres osteo- logiques des oiseaux appliquees a la classification naturelle de ces animaux, strongly urging the superiority of such characters over those drawn from the bill or feet, which, he remarks, though they may have sometimes given correct notions, have mostly led to mistakes, and, if observations of habits and food have sometimes afforded happy results, they have often been deceptive; so that, should more be wanted than to draw up a mere inventory of creation or trace the distinctive outline of each species, zoology without anatomy would remain a barren study.

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  • These distinctive properties of living matter are i.

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  • Apart from these characteristics, the most distinctive feature of earwigs is the presence at the end of the abdomen of a pair of pincers which are in reality modified appendages, known as cercopods, and represent the similar limbs of Japyx and the caudal feelers of Campodea and some other insects.

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  • The South American sub-region is perhaps richer in peculiar and distinctive types than either of the preceding.

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  • There can be little doubt that this thought, whether or not in the clear shape that it afterwards assumed, was the germ of all that is most distinctive in his system of political economy.

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  • Distinctive Features.

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  • Briefly, we now know that the Aegean civilization developed these distinctive features.

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  • The heavy ridges over the brow, originally supposed to be distinctive of the gorilla, are particularly well marked in "Johanna," and they would doubtless be still more noticeable in the male of the same race, which seems to be undoubtedly du Chaillu's kulu-kamba.

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  • The instances alleged are, many of them at least, not very distinctive.

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  • Unfortunately the national art is losing its distinctive type through contact with western civilization.

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  • Although not sacrosanct, they had the right of sitting in a curule chair and wore the distinctive toga praetexta.

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  • The rochet is proper to, and distinctive of, prelates and bishops: but the right to wear it is sometimes granted by the pope to others, especially the canons of cathedral churches.

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  • The wholesale jam manufacturers of the present day use this sugar; they boil the jam in vacuo and secure a product that will last a long time without deteriorating, but it lacks the delicacy and distinctive flavour of fruit preserved by a careful housekeeper, who boils it in an open pan with cane sugar to a less density, though exposed for a short time to a greater heat.

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  • The distinctive Latakia tobacco is produced in the province of Saida in northern Syria.

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  • Various combinations and modifications of these two types of furnace have given rise to distinctive names, and as each system has its advantages and disadvantages local conditions determine which is the better.

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  • The skull is narrower and longer than in typical squirrels, and there are distinctive features in the cheek-teeth; but the more aberrant types come much closer to squirrels.

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  • Its distinctive features are pulpit and auditorium, and it is symbolical of the complete equality of ministers and congregation.

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  • The Korinchis live among the mountains south of Padang, and farther south on the borders of Palembang and Benkulen are the Rejangers, a peculiar tribe who employ a distinctive written character which they cut with a kris on bamboo or lontar.

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  • The islands of the Indonesian archipelago also hold very distinctive faunas.

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  • The carapace is usually beige with a distinctive black triangle with the apex pointing toward the abdomen and the base toward the pedipalps.

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  • In 1986 large parts of the lost village were dramatically exposed on the beach, including the church tower with its distinctive octagonal belfry.

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  • The version in ' additional images ' has a distinctive black mark.

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  • It's now part of Pattison's College, whose pupils wear distinctive green and yellow striped blazers.

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  • They use distinctive, bright red open top busses that are adorned with drawings of scenes from the city they service.

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  • The distinctive remnants of a curvilinear churchyard are still to be seen within the later walled yard.

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  • All the songs are played back live, with John adding distinctive, and highly comical, latin percussion.

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  • Clean aerodynamics The distinctive front cowling is beautifully sculptured around the radiator with its chrome surround and incorporates built-in direction indicators.

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  • distinctive flavor.

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  • They were, from the first, distinctive and remained distinctive.

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  • fetch tomorrow. luckilly the mudpud book bag is somewhat distinctive!

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  • The town offers many galleries, specialty shops and distinctive local treasures.

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  • There is no trace of the distinctive marks of Frankish feudalism in Saxon England, not where military service may be thought to rest upon the land, nor even in the rare cases where the tenant seems to some to be made responsible for it, for between these cases as they are described in the original accounts, legally interpreted, and the feudal conception of the vassal's military service, there is a great gulf.

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  • SECOND ADVENTISTS, members of religious bodies whose distinctive feature is a belief in the imminent physical return of Jesus Christ.

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  • Though perhaps subject to slight changes in the course of years, there is no doubt that these dunes are practically permanent features; the more prominent ones serve as landmarks and have well-known distinctive names.

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  • They wear a distinctive garb and are not allowed to carry arms or live in the same quarter as Moslems. Another foreign element of considerable strength in the coast towns of Muscat, Aden and Jidda, is the British Indian trading class; many families of Indian origin also have settled at Mecca, having originally come as pilgrims.

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  • The anatomical differences by which the platypus, and its only allies the echidnas, are separated from all other mammals, so as to form a distinct sub-class, are described in the article Monotremata, where also will be found the main distinctive characters of the two existing representatives of the group. It is there stated that the early stages of the development of the young are not yet fully known.

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  • It is in the face, however, that we find specially distinctive traits, namely, in the eyes, the eyelashes, the cheekbones and the beard.

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  • The teeth form a continuous even series, the small canines being crowded between the incisors and premolars; the crowns of the cheek-series are tall (hypsodont), with a distinctive pattern of their own.

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  • very atypical 1960s Jazz themes giving the film a surreal, distinctive edge.

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  • Current Status Biological status lowland beech and yew woodland spans a variety of distinctive vegetation types reflecting differences in soil and topographical conditions.

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  • An early secession from the general body of Dunkers was that of the Seventh Day Dunkers, whose distinctive principle was that the seventh day was the true Sabbath.

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  • and in several European countries; and also in 1882 of the: radicals, or Progressives, who objected to a distinctive dress and'.

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  • Each of the three must have been regarded in his centre as the most important member in a larger or smaller group, so that their union in a triad marks also the combination of the three distinctive pantheons into a harmonious whole.

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  • In two works of this period, Pierre Bayle (1838) and Philosophie and Christentum (1839), which deal largely with theology, he held that he had proved "that Christianity has in fact long vanished not only from the reason but from the life of mankind, that it is nothing more than a fixed idea" in flagrant contradiction to the distinctive features of contemporary civilization.

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  • The possession of a variable number of excretory tubes (Malpighian tubes), which are developed as outgrowths of the hind-gut and pour their excretion into the intestine,is also a distinctive character of the Hexapoda.

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  • By the 16th century the almuce had become definitely established as the distinctive choir vestment of canons; but it had ceased to have any practical use, and was often only carried over the left arm as a symbol of office.

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  • 8), the distinctive badge of the wandering professional teacher of philosophy, and went about from place to place discussing the truths of Christianity in the hope of bringing educated Pagans, as he himself had been brought, through philosophy to Christ.

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  • One of the distinctive features of this family is the presence of small naked callosities on the buttocks; another being a difference in the number of vertebrae and ribs as compared with those of the Simiidae.

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  • The union of the index and middle fingers by means of a web extending as far as the terminal joints is the distinctive feature of the siamang, which is the largest of the group, and black in colour with a white frontal band.

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  • Besides the distinctions of human and nonhuman, hostile and friendly, the demons in which the lower races believe are classified by them according to function, each class with a distinctive name, with extraordinary minuteness, the list in the case of the Malays running to several score.

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  • Manufacturing is to-day the most distinctive industry, as was commerce in colonial times.

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  • Among the leading and more distinctive items were printing and publishing ($21,023,855 in 1905); sugar and molasses refining ($ 1 5,74 6, 547 in 1900; figures not published in 1905 because of the industry being in the hands of a single owner); men's clothing (in 1900, $8,609,475, in 1905, $11,246,004); women's clothing (in 1900, $3,258,483, in 1905, $5,705,470); boots and shoes (in 1900, $3,882,655, in 1905, $5,575,927); boot and shoe cut stock (in 1905, $5, 211, 445); malt liquors (in 1900, $7,518,668, in 1905, $6,715,215); confectionery (in 1900, $4,455,184, in 1905, $6,210,023); tobacco products (in 1900, $3,504,603, in 1905, $4,59 2, 698); pianos and organs ($3,670,771 in 1905); other musical instruments and materials (in 1905, $231,780); rubber and elastic goods (in 1900, $3,139,783, in 1905, $2,887,323); steam fittings and heating apparatus (in 1900, $2,876,327, in 1905, $3,354, 020); bottling, furniture, &c. Art tiles and pottery are manufactured in Chelsea.

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  • The making of the Chickering pianos goes back to 1823, and of Mason & Hamlin reed organs to 1854; these are to-day very important and distinctive manufactures of the city.

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  • 69-79) the distinctive 2 " The soil of this marsh [east of Palmyra] is so impregnated with salt that a trench or pit sunk in it becomes filled in a short time with concentrated brine, the water of which evaporates in the intense sunshine and leaves an incrustation of excellent salt."

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  • As the number of species of insects is believed to exceed that of all other animals taken together, it is no wonder that their study should form a special division of zoology with a distinctive name.

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  • An attempt is made to get rid of the distinctive nature of miracle when the exceptionalness of the events so regarded is reduced to a new subjective mode of regarding natural phenomena.

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  • Commerce and transport were the only distinctive basis of the city's growth and wealth until after 1890, when there was a great increase in manufacturing, especially, in South St Joseph, of the slaughtering and meat-packing industry in the last three years of the decade.

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  • His distinctive characteristics are his claim for absolute freedom in the study of church history and the New Testament; his distrust of speculative theology, whether orthodox or liberal; his interest in practical Christianity as a religious life and not a system of theology.

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  • Before that time the Manchus were more or less a shifting population, and, being broken up into a number of tribes, they went mainly under the distinctive name of those clans which exercised lordship over them.

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  • Generally the ethnic term, Syrians, came to mean in antiquity the Semiti peoples domiciled outside the Mesopotamian and Arabian areas: but neither in pre-Greek nor in Greek times had the word Syria any very precise geographical significance, various lands, which we include under it, retaining their distinctive status, e.g.

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  • Thereafter it loses much of its distinctive character, but may be traced southwards in J.

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  • Its presence is one of the most distinctive features which separate the Nemertines from the Platyhelminthes.

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  • Their distinctive arm was the great Macedonian pike (sarissa), some 14 ft.

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  • Nearly all their distinctive views (e.g.

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  • The distinctive manufacture is knitted goods.

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  • inland, at the head of a long upland valley (5000 ft.) inhabited by direct descendants of the ancient Lycians, who have preserved a distinctive facial type, noticeable at once in the town population.

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  • The total value of all farm products in 1899 was $72,667,302, of which $59,276,092 was the value of the distinctive crops - cotton, sugar and rice.

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  • The sultan remains the spiritual head of Islam, and Islam is the state religion, but it has no other distinctive or theocratic character.

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  • Accordingly it was decided to form troops known as nizam-i-jedid, affiliated to the Janissaries so as to disarm the jealousy of the latter, properly drilled and wearing a distinctive uniform.

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  • The other mosques do not merit any particular attention, and in general it may be said that Bagdad architecture is neither distinctive nor imposing.

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  • There is, further, the objection that no distinctive crisis in the agricultural era can be associated with the date of the Passover.

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  • The last distinctive epithet was derived from the little hamlet in the vicinity which furnished shelter, not only to the workmen, but to the monks of St Jerome who were afterwards to be in possession of the monastery; and the hamlet itself is generally but perhaps erroneously supposed to be indebted for its name to the scoriae or dross of certain old iron mines.

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  • features, their Turkish language and their distinctive dress.

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  • The distinctive characters of the typical mice (and rats), i.e.

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  • The royal taille naturally retained the distinctive characteristics of the seigniorial, as can be seen from an examination of the way in which it was assessed and collected; the chief characteristic being that ecclesiastics and nobles, who were exempt from the seigniorial taille, were also exempt from the royal.

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  • It is not likely, as many scholars have thought, that Akkad was ever used geographically as a distinctive appellation for northern Babylonia, or that the name Sumer denoted the southern part of the land, because kings who ruled only over Southern Babylonia used the double title "king of Sumer and Akkad," which was also employed by northern rulers who never established their sway farther south than Nippur, notably the great Assyrian conqueror Tiglath pileser III.

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  • As before, the equites wore the narrow, purple-striped tunic, and the gold ring, the latter now being considered the distinctive badge of knighthood., The fourteen rows in the theatre were extended by Augustus to seat's in the circus.

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  • His plays bear a distinctive national character, the subjects of most of them referring to the golden era of the country.

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  • Expressed Equations.-The simplest forms of arithmetical equation arise out of abbreviated solutions of particular problems. In accordance with � 15, it is desirable that our statements should be statements of equality of quantities rather than of numbers; and it is convenient in the early stages to have a distinctive notation, e.g.

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  • The distinctive merit of G.

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  • The Scythian pantheon is not distinctive, and can be paralleled among the Tatars and among the Iranians.

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  • 37), whose distinctive doctrine was a form of Christian materialism, showing itself in the belief that the soul perished and was restored to life along with the body.

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  • But in addition to these distinctive characters, living matter has some other peculiarities, the chief of which are the dependence of all its activities upon moisture and upon heat, within a limited range of temperature, and the fact that it usually possesses a certain structure or organization.

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  • consuetudinem, acc. of consuetudo, custom, habit, manner, &c.), dress or clothing, especially the distinctive clothing worn at different periods by different peoples or different classes of people.

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  • The distinctive feature is the spiral arrangement of the garment,the body being wrapped to a greater or less extent with a bandage of varying length in more or less parallel stripes.

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  • For the outer garments the most distinctive term From Der alte Or'ent, by permission of J.

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  • Distinctive features are found in the head-dress, e.g.

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  • It appears in old Babylonia as a curved stick, and, like the club, is a distinctive symbol of god and king.

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  • His head-dress was as distinctive as that of the high priest at Hierapolis, who wore a golden tiara and a purple dress, while the ordinary priests had a pilos (conical cap, also worn in Israel, Ex.

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  • The Israelite distinctive costume and toilet as part of a distinctive national religion was in harmony with oriental thought, and, as a people chosen and possessed by Yahweh, " a kingdom of priests and an holy nation " (Ex.

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  • in 1215 was intended to prevent Jews from being mistaken for Christians, and similarly in Mahommedan lands they were compelled to wear some distinctive indication of their sect.

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  • After the revolution of 1848-1849, the Banat together with another county (Bács) was separated from Hungary, and created into a distinctive Austrian crown land, but in 1860 it was definitely incorporated with Hungary.

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  • Again, to the naturalist the symptoms of tabes dorsalis were distinctive enough, had he noted them.

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  • It typifies not only the genus Chinchilla, but the family Chinchillidae, for the distinctive features of which see RODENTIA.

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  • But as it is implicit and not part of his distinctive message, it did not hinder his book from enjoying wide quasi-canonical honour during most of the Ante-Nicene period.

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  • Other distinctive manufactures are shirts and base-balls.

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  • Its most distinctive manufactures are paper and wood pulp; more valuable are foundry and machine shop products; other manufactures are safes, malt liquors, flour, woollens, Corliss engines, carriages and wagons and agricultural implements.

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  • The budget of 1860 was marked by two distinctive features.

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  • The immediate source of this version is the poem of Wolfram von Eschenbach, though the Grail, of course, is represented in the form of the Christian relic, not as the jewel talisman of the Parzival; but the psychological reading of the hero's character, the distinctive note of von Eschenbach's version, has been adapted by Wagner with marvellous skill, and his picture of the hero's mental and spiritual development, from extreme simplicity to the wisdom born of perfect charity, is most striking and impressive.

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  • The Buddhist style was probably even more ancient than the Chinese, for the scheme of coloring distinctive of the Buddhist picture was almost certainly of Indian origin; brilliant fi ddhi and decorative, and heightened by a lavish use of S~ t.

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  • C. 1773) and Tsukioka Tange (1717-1786), the latter of whom made the drawings for many of the meish or guidebooks which form so interesting and distinctive a branch of Japanese illustration.

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  • The Japanes kinzoku-shi (metal sculptor) uses thirty-six principal classes 0, chisel, each with its distinctive name, and as most of thes classes comprise from five to ten sub-varieties, his cuttinl and graving tools aggregate about two hundred and fifty.

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  • Another distinctive feature is that Jehovah did not go back to heaven without leaving behind him a visible representative of Himself in the word of the Scripture.

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  • Coal is mined in the vicinity; the city has a large trade with the surrounding agricultural district (whose distinctive product is beans); the Michigan Central railway has car and machine shops here; and the city has many manufacturing establishments.

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  • The Roman Church anathematized, in the council of Trent, all the distinctive doctrines of the Protestant Reformation.

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  • The bridges over the Sumida, and those which span the canals, have always been distinctive features of Tokyo.

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  • They were compelled to wear a distinctive dress, to which, in some places, was attached the foot of a goose or duck (whence they were sometimes called Canards).

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  • praedicare, to proclaim), the proclamation of a Divine message both to those who have not heard it, and to those who, having heard it, have not accepted it, and the regular instruction of the converted in the doctrines and duties of the faith, is a distinctive though not a peculiar feature of the Christian religion.

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  • The Carpathians do not form an uninterrupted chain of mountains, but consist of several orographically and geologically distinctive groups; in fact they present as great a structural variety as the Alps; but as regards magnificence of scenery they cannot compare with the Alps.

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  • So far, however, as the real foundation ceremonies of Craft Masonry are concerned, whether before or after the premier Grand Lodge was formed, it is most unlikely that such a society as the Freemasons would adopt anything of a really distinctive character from any other organization.

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  • - For our present purpose the distinctive features of Roman Catholicism may be said to be summed up in the decrees of the council of Trent and the creed of Pope Pius IV.

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  • The names applied to this debris of a once formidable mountain system are essentially local and hardly distinctive.

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  • But the wings vary considerably in different families, and the most distinctive feature is the structure of the jaws, which form a beaklike organ with stylets adapted for piercing and sucking.

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  • 22), and the use of the term "king of Persia," as a distinctive title after the fall of that empire (33 2 B.C.), are enough to show that, as a whole, they belong to the same age as the book of Chronicles.

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  • It can be kept unaltered in dry air, but the smallest trace of moisture in the atmosphere leads to the evolution of minute quantities of acetylene and gives it a distinctive odour.

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  • The " Blue " brigadeGustavus's infantry wore distinctive colours - overran the Rdcken ' 'Battle Of Lutzen November 16th., 1632  :60,000 I German Armym Swedish Army battery of heavy guns, and the " Swedish " 1 and " Yellow " brigades engaged the left face of the Imperialist lozenge with success.

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  • Wholly novel and distinctive it is not, for the rulers of Catholic countries, like Spain and France, and of England (before the publication of the Act of Supremacy) could and did limit the pope's claims to unlimited jurisdiction, patronage and taxation, and they introduced the placet forbidding the publication within their realms_ of papal edicts, decisions and orders, without the express sanction of the government - in short, in many ways tended to approach the conditions in Protestant lands.

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  • While in its completer form it is thus a doctrine distinctive of modern times, idealism has its roots far back in the history of thought.

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  • Navigation, which was formerly the distinctive feature of its business prosperity, has under the pressure of laws and circumstances given place to manufactures, and the development of carrying facilities on the land rather than on the sea.

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  • The Egyptian monuments represent the Purasati with a very distinctive feather head-dress resembling that of the Lycians and Mycenaeans.

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  • 25 - has there been found evidence for a strange race with several distinctive features.

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  • Here it will suffice to say that the most distinctive features of the Cluny system were (1) a notable increase and prolongation of the church services, which came to take up the greater part of the working day; (2) a strongly centralized government, whereby the houses of the order in their hundreds were strictly subject to the abbot of Cluny.

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  • The dress of the women is less distinctive than that of the men, who wear a picturesque black and white costume, with knee-breeches, a brilliantly coloured sash, black hempen sandals, and a handkerchief wound round the head.

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  • 2) is a short sacramental manual intended for the use of local elders or presbyters, though such are not named, for they were not yet a distinctive order or clergy.

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  • With this, one line of tendency in Roman Catholic doctrine reached its climax; the pope and the council use " dogma " in a distinctive sense for what is definitely formulated by authority.

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  • Their horns are white, tipped with black, and extended and turned upwards in the manner distinctive of the park-breed.

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  • The long face, high crest for the horns, which are ringed, lyrate and more or less strongly angulated, and the moderately long tail, are the distinctive features of the hartebeests.

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  • The five existing species may be grouped into two sections, the distinctive characters of which are only recognizable in the skull.

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  • His most distinctive doctrine is perhaps his theory of the sacrament, which involved him and his followers in a long and, on Luther's part, an acrimonious dispute with the German Protestants.

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  • The Romans cast their larger copper coins, in clay moulds carrying distinctive markings, not because they knew nothing of striking, but because it was not suitable for such large masses of metal.

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  • Varied as are the forms which this idea has assumed under varying conditions of time and place, it remains distinctive enough to constitute one of the three main types of ecclesiastical polity, the others being Episcopacy and Presbyterianism.

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  • Organization corresponded to the life distinctive of the new Ecclesia.

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  • The gulf between the " laity " and " clergy " went on widening during the 5th and 6th centuries; and the people, stripped of their old prerogatives (save in form here and there), passed into a spiritual pupillage which was one distinctive note of the medieval Church.

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  • In the freer atmosphere of Holland the exiles lose the antithetical attitude, with its narrowing and exaggerative tendency, and gain breadth and balance in the assertion of their distinctive testimony.

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  • It was not until about 1850 that American Congregationalists began to draw more closely together, and to propagate in the Western states and territories their own distinctive policy.

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  • His history of the War of 1812 between the United States and Great Britain, written when he was twentyfour years old, is still the standard history of that conflict, and his Winning of the West is probably the best work which has been written on American frontier life of the 19th century, a life that developed certain fundamental and distinctive American social and political traits.

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  • According to one view, sovereignty is not the distinctive note of a state.

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  • But it is so commonly used in America as to be regarded as a distinctive American feature.

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  • In this method of lettering, every enclosed space must be designated by a letter; all external forces must be represented by lines outside the frame, and each space between any two forces must receive a distinctive letter; this method of lettering was first proposed by O.

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  • The distinctive industry is the manufacture of mathematical and musical instruments.

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  • In fact the perspective of the Gospel was seriously changed and its most distinctive features obscured.

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  • the inscription of Mesha), but lacked the distinctive character of a sacrifice in which the victim is the food of the deity, conveyed to him through fire.

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  • Its distinctive feature was the systematic training of nurses for their vocation.

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  • The motive of some of the substitutions was to avoid the confusion which must have ensued from the duplication of previously existing native asterisms; thus, the Egyptian and Greek Lions were composed of totally different stars.: Abstractions in other cases replaced concrete objects, with the general result of effacing the distinctive character of the Greek zodiac as a " circle of living things."

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  • Their distinctive external features are their large size, light-brown colour, high shoulders, massive heads of great breadth and shaggy coat.

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  • All Hydrozoa, in the first place, exhibit the three structural features distinctive of the Coelentera.

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  • To these three characters the Hydrozoa add a fourth which is distinctive of the subdivision of the Coelenterata termed the Cnidaria; that is to say, they always possess peculiar stinging organs known as nettle-cells, or nematocysts (Cnidae), each produced in a cell forming an integral part of the animal's tissues.

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  • The Hydrozoa are thus shown to belong to the group of Coelenterata Cnidaria, and it remains to consider more fully their distinctive features, and in particular those which mark them off from the other main division of the Cnidaria, the Anthozoa, comprising the corals and sea-anemones.

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  • The gastrula has now become an actinula, which may be termed the distinctive larva of the Cnidaria, and doubtless represents in a transitory manner the common ancestor of the group. In no case known, however, does the actinula become the adult, sexually mature individual, but always undergoes further modifications, whereby it develops into either a polyp or a medusa.

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  • Their distinctive name is the Evangelical, - as opposed to the Reformed church.

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  • The Augsburg Confession and Luther's Short Catechism may therefore be said to contain the distinctive principles which all Lutherans are bound to maintain, but, as the principal controversies of the Lutheran church all arose after the publication of the Augsburg Confession and among those who had accepted it, it does not contain all that is distinctively Lutheran.

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  • The distinctive event of this reign is the destruc tion of Alba, which may be regarded as an historical fact.

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  • Canu (1892) distinguishes eight sub-families, Longipediinae, Peltidiinae, Tachidii.nae, Amymoninae, Harpacticinae, Idyinae, Canthocamptinae (for which Canthocampinae should be read), and Nannopinae, adding Stenheliinae (Brady) without distinctive characters for it.

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  • It forms in the Bible the distinctive possession of Christians, just as the Old Testament is the collection of Sacred Books which Christians share with Jews.

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  • The most distinctive of these is probably distilled liquors, the state's whisky being famous.

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  • This connexion of ideas was not of course explicitly before the prophet's mind, for the distinctive features of a national religion could not be formulated so long as no other kind of religion had ever been heard of.

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  • The distinctive tenets of Iamblichus cannot be accounted for from scientific but only from practical considerations.

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  • In its compilation representatives of the Episcopal Church in Scotland co-operated, and the book though " not designed to supersede the distinctive catechisms officially recognized by the several churches for the instruction of their own children," certainly " commends itself as suitable for use in schools where children of various churches are taught together."

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  • It is also a great manufacturing centre, and both city and suburbs have their distinctive industries.

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  • He also demonstrated that mutations have this special or distinctive character, that they repeat in the same direction without oscillation or retrogression.

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  • We must now proceed to define more exactly the peculiar and distinctive character of the Gnostic system.

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  • Jaipal was defeated, and Mahmud, after his return from this expedition, is said to have taken the distinctive appellation of Ghazi (" Valiant for the Faith"), but he is rarely so-called.

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  • in England, where it is now considered distinctive of the chasuble as worn in the Anglican Church.

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  • Some of these reverted breeds have developed horns of considerable size, although not showing that regularity of curve distinctive of the wild race.

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  • As regards wild goats other than the representatives of Capra hircus, the members of the ibex-group are noticed under Ibex, while another distinctive type receives mention under Markhor.

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  • The ibex are connected with the wild goat by means of Capra nubiana, in which the front edge of the horns is thinner than in either the European C. ibex or the Asiatic C. sibirica; while the Spanish C. pyrenaica shows how the ibex-type of horn may pass into the spirally twisted one distinctive of the markhor, C. falconeri.

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  • With the decline of their warlike vigour they began gradually to mix with the natives and to adopt at least their religion: the amalgamation -vas accelerated under Roman influence and ultimately became as complete as that of the Normans with the Saxons in England, but they gave to the mixed race a distinctive tone and spirit, and long retained their national characteristics and social customs, as well as their language (which continued in use, side by side with Greek, in the 4th century after Christ).

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  • The name Gunther became the distinctive name for the members of this house (corresponding to Heinrich in the Reuss family), the various GUnthers being at first distinguished by numbers and afterwards by prefixed names.

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  • the Catskill Mountain region of New York, is one of the distinctive formations of the system.

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  • The most distinctive feature of the Cretaceous of the Atlantic coastal plain is its large content of greensand marl (glauconite).

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  • It has few distinctive species, but within its borders the southern mole and cotton-tail rabbit of the South meet the northern star-nosed and Brewers moles and the varying hare of the North, and the southern bobwhite, Baltimore oriole, bluebird, catbird, chewink, thrasher and wood thrush are neighbors of the bobolink, solitary vireo and the hermit and Wilson s thrushes.

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  • p. 330.) The buildings of the Austin canons or Black canons (so called from the colour of their habit) present few distinctive peculiarities.

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  • In 1835, in a paper on "The Prismatic Decomposition of Electrical Light," he proved that sparks from different metals give distinctive spectra, which afforded a ready means of discriminating between them.

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  • The fauna and flora of Alabama are similar to those of the Gulf states in general and have no distinctive characteristics.

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  • The fauna and flora have no distinctive features.

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  • The entire set of Ruskin's publications amounts to more than fifty works having distinctive titles.

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  • But his son-in-law Robert Sandeman added a distinctive doctrine as to the nature of faith which is thus stated on his tombstone: "That the bare death of Jesus Christ without a thought or deed on the part of man, is sufficient to present the chief of sinners spotless before God."

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  • - Until quite recently it had been a distinctive mark of practical wisdom to treat private efforts for the improvement of international relations for the preservation of peace, with the patronizing tolerance courteous people of the world extend to half-crazy idealists.

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  • A variety of methods to render gases luminous should be at the command of the investigator, for nearly all, show some distinctive peculiarity and any new modification generally results in fresh facts being brought to light.

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  • Certain radicals have a distinctive absorption about 700 together with others about 900, and if the first be visible it almost follows that the distinctive mark of the radical with which it is connected will be found.

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  • By his father's side, who followed the occupation of a tanner, he was descended from a family long known in the district, and the purity of whose Scottish lineage had been tinged by alliance with French Protestant refugees; but it was from his mother's race, the Lowthers, farmers or small proprietors in Annandale, that he seems to have derived the most distinctive features of his personality.

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  • The ultimate source of the subject matter in question, or of the most distinctive and larger part of it, was in all probability an Aramaic one, and in some parts different translations may have been used.

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  • There are some fine species of birds, and the native avifauna is so distinctive that Wallace argued from it that the Hawaiian Archipelago had long been separated from any other land.

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  • Protestantism has, indeed, produced a distinctive church architecture, i.e.

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  • It is divided into two parts, the first of which is purely historical, and devoted to an exposition of various philosophical systems; in the second, which comprises fourteen chapters of the entire work, the distinctive characters and value of these systems are compared and discussed.

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  • But the practical surrender of what was distinctive in their new faith meant a theoretic surrender of the value once placed on that element,when it was matter of a living religious experience far in advance of what Judaism had given them (vi.

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  • 12), yet having his own distinctive manner of presenting the Gospel (1 Cor.

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  • This is known as the Commination service, its distinctive element being the solemn reading of "the general sentences of God's cursing against sinners, gathered out of the seven and twentieth chapter of Deuteronomy, and other places of Scripture."

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  • In the 16th and 17th centuries, painting replaced architecture as the distinctive art of Andalusia; and many of the foremost Spanish painters, including Velazquez and Murillo, were natives of this province.

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  • Till the last it was obliged to contend with the most formidable difficulties: yet it succeeded in effecting many notable reforms and in illuminating and crystallizing the distinctive doctrines of Catholicism.

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  • Goths, Vandals, Suebi, Burgundians and Langobardi embraced it; here too as a distinctive national type of Christianity it perished before the growth of medieval Catholicism, and the name of Arian ceased to represent a definite form of Christian doctrine within the church, or a definite party outside it.

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  • In weight it is lighter than a shirting, and it is usually ornamented with a distinctive coloured heading.

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  • The name was not distinctive enough from the point of view of Babylonia, which belonged to the same water system.

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  • The inhabitants preserve a distinctive but almost obsolete costume, with a curious head-dress.

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  • Those species which are distinctive of the eastern border ridges are found to reach the plateau, but do not spread westwards, so that a botanic separation or distinction is found to exist between the true plateau of Tibet in the west and the alpine tracts of the east.

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  • However this may be, the dalmatic remained for centuries the vestment distinctive of the pope and his deacons, and - according at least to the view held at Rome - could be worn by other clergy only by special concession of the pope.

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  • For the distinctive characteristics of the family Muridae and the genus Mus, to which true rats and true mice alike belong, see Rodentia.

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  • Society, 1856, p. 61), which indeed it very much resembles, especially in having its tailcoverts and quills tipped with white or light ochreous - points that recent North American ornithologists rely upon as distinctive of this form.

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  • The knights then dressed him in distinctive garments, and they then mounted their horses and rode to the hall where the candidate was to receive knighthood; his future squire was to ride before him bareheaded bearing his sword by the point in its scabbard with his spurs hanging from its hilt.

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  • Possibly he had shown in connexion with their relief work that practical capacity which seems to have been his distinctive excellence (cf.

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  • The chief distinctive characters of the sporogenous hyphae are their orientation, usually vertical; their limited apical growth; their peculiar branching, form, colour, contents, consistency; and their spore-production.

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  • These are, indeed, expressly prohibited in the later charter of Bishop Johann Kvag (1294); and the distinctive character of the constitution of Copenhagen during the middle ages consisted in the absence of the free gild system, and the right of any burgher to pursue a craft under license from the Vogt (advocates) of the overlord and the city authorities.

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  • The canals of Belgium are scarcely less numerous or important than those of Holland, especially in Flanders, where they give a distinctive character to the country.

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  • The most important section of it, however, has a distinctive quality of its own.

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  • Its distinctive doctrines are: (1) that all created beings, spiritual or corporeal, are composed of matter and form, the various species of matter being but varieties of the universal matter, and similarly all forms being contained in one universal form; (2) that between the primal One and the intellect (the y olk of Plotinus) there is interposed the divine Will, which is itself divine and above the distinction of form and matter, but is the cause of their union in the being next to itself, the intellect, in which Avicebron holds that the distinction does exist.

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  • The essential oil of tea is of a citron yellow colour; it is lighter than water and possesses the distinctive odour of tea.

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  • It is prepared in two distinctive classes named by the final process of manufacture applied in each in Japan.

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  • In 383 the emperor Theodosius, who had demanded a declaration of faith from all party leaders, punished Eunomius for continuing to teach his distinctive doctrines, by banishing him to Halmyris in Moesia.

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  • For fifty years the main efforts of Louis were directed to defending his kingdom from the inroads of his Slavonic neighbors, and his detachment from the rest of the Empire necessitated by these constant engagements towards the east, gradually gave both him and his subjects a distinctive character, which was displayed and emphasized when, in ratifying an alliance with his half-brother, the West-Frankish king, Charles the Bald, the oath was sworn in different tongues.

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  • south of Antioch) brought to Rome the Book of Helxai - the manifesto of their distinctive message (Hippol., Philos.

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  • He owes his distinctive place to the power of concealing his art.

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  • How far, through these changes, did the Greek population settled by Alexander or his successors in India maintain their distinctive character?

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  • How far to the east the distinctive influence of Greece went is shown by the seal-impressions with Athena and Eros types found by Dr Stein in the buried cities of Khotan (Sand-buried Ruins of Khotan, p. 396), and according to Mr E.

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  • The Egyptians seem to have applied no distinctive name to themselves in early times: they called themselves proudly rmi (RMTW), i.e.

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  • There is nothing distinctive in later jewelry different from Greek and Roman work elsewhere.

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  • The ordinary forms of the north of Europe grow freely in the mild air and protected soil of the islands and the eastern coast; while on the heaths and along the sandhills on the Atlantic side there flourish a number of distinctive species.

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  • Other distinctive features of J's narrative are: (I) Moses alone is bidden to interview Pharaoh (vii.

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  • In the feature of fruit and seed, by which the distribution of Angiosperms is effected, we have a distinctive character of the class.

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  • This pause, often of so long duration, in the growth of the embryo between the time of its perfect development within the seed and the moment of germination, is one of the remarkable and distinctive features of the life of Spermatophytes.

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  • On the other hand, Hume is certainly right in holding that the distinctive character of a percept as compared with an image is in all ordinary cases the force and liveliness with which it strikes the mind - the distinction, therefore, being one of quality, not of degree.

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  • As regards their distinctive features, the antlers are of a complex type and situated close to the occipital ridge of the skull, and thus far away from the sockets of the eyes, with the brow-tines in adult males palmated, laterally compressed, deflected towards the middle of the face, and often unsymmetrically developed.

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  • But the continuity of a sect is to be traced in its principles, and not in its adherents, and it must be remembered that Menno and his followers expressly repudiated the distinctive doctrines of the Munster Anabaptists.

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  • The circumstances which render necessary the habitual pursuit of wild animals, either as a means of subsistence or for self-defence, generally accompany a phase of human progress distinctly inferior to the pastoral and agricultural stages; resorted to as a recreation, however, the practice of the chase in most cases indicates a considerable degree of civilization, and sometimes ultimately becomes the almost distinctive employment of the classes which are possessed of most leisure and wealth.

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  • Throughout his writings we see the impress, not only of his distinctive genius and of his extraordinary gifts, but also of his special views, aims and aspirations.

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  • They are at the same time its distinctive doctrines; that is to say, the doctrines that distinguish it from all previous teaching in India.

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  • In the sane way there is no distinctive term for grandchild.

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  • Pott showed that it did not contain iron and that it yielded a definite series of salts, whilst in 1774 C. Scheele proved that it was the oxide of a distinctive metal.

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  • We have to content ourselves with what is for the greater part of this age a mere catalogue of embarkations and plunderings along all the coasts of western Europe without distinctive characteristics.

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  • Thus descent from a father would be distinctive enough of the dominant race to form the title of that race (patricii), and when that term had been definitely adopted as the title of a class its persistence in the same sense after the organization of the family and the clan by the unprivileged class would be perfectly natural.

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  • The explanation of this is that the plebeians had long been organized, like the patricians, in genies, and nothing remained distinctive of the old nobility except a vague sense of dignity and worth.

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  • In the vertebrae of the neck the distinctive cameloid characters had already made their appearance.

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  • Both these genera have the toe-bones of the irregular nodular form distinctive of modern camels, so that we may safely infer that the feet themselves had assumed the cushiontype.

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  • The carved totem posts of the Haida, standing in front of the heavily framed houses, or at a little distance from them, represent the coats of arms of the respective families of the tribes and generally exhibit designs treated in a bold and original manner, highly conventionalized but always recognizable in their purport by any one familiar with the distinctive marks of the animal forms portrayed.

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  • They did not hesitate, however, to alter St Mark's language where it seemed to them rough or obscure, for each of them had a distinctive style of his own, and St Luke was a literary artist of a high order.

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  • He denounced monastic vows, a distinctive dress for the clergy, the thought of a propitiatory mass, and the presence of images and pictures in the churches.

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  • The variations in the details of the polity of the Lutheran churches were very numerous, but they all preserved the same distinctive principles.

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  • These tribes have many subtribes, each with a distinctive name.

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  • the Socratics) dialectic; (3) that the differences between the different groups of sophists were not inconsiderable, and that in particular the teaching of the rhetoricians was distinct in origin, and, in so far as its aim was success in a special walk of life, distinct in character, from the more general teaching of the sophists of culture, the eristics, and the dialecticians, while the teaching of the dialecticians was discriminated from that of the rest, in so far as the aim of the dialecticians was truth, or at least the bettering of opinion; and, consequently, (4) that, in awarding praise and blame to sophistry and its representatives, the distinctive characteristics of the groups above enumerated must be studiously kept in view.

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  • Common doctrine, that is to say, common doctrine of a positive sort, they could not have, because, being sceptics, they had nothing which could be called positive doctrine; while there was a period when even their scepticism was in no wise distinctive, because they shared it with all or nearly all their contemporaries.

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  • Various as were the phases through which sophistry passed between the middle of the 5th century and the middle of the 4th, the sophists - Socrates himself being no exception - had in their declared antagonism to philosophy a common characteristic; and, if in the interval, philosophical speculation being temporarily suspended, scepticism ceased for the time to be peculiar, at the outset, when Protagoras and Gorgias broke with the physicists, and in the sequel, when Plato raised the cry of " back to Parmenides," this common characteristic was distinctive.

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  • Unlike many other large geographical areas, India is remarkable for having no distinctive botanical features peculiar to itself.

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  • The methods of binding the pagri are innumerable, each method having a distinctive name as arabi (Arab fashion); mansabi (official fashion, much used in the Deccan); mushakhi (sheik fashion); chakridar (worn by hadjis, that is those who have made the pilgrimage to Mecca); khirki-dar (a fashion of piling the cloth high, adopted by retainers of great men); latudar (top-shaped, worn by kayasths or writers); joridar (the cloth twisted into rope shape) (Plate I.

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  • The garment distinctive of the Hindus of all castes, men and women, all over India, is the dhoti or loin cloth.

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  • the distinctive excellent name.

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  • Moreover, the light-curves were all of a uniform type, a distinctive feature of " cluster variables " being the rapid rise to a maximum and slow decline.

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  • - The absence of the distinctive lines of an element in the spectrum does not by any means signify that that clement is wanting or scarce in the star.

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  • A prodigiously long tail, beetling eyebrows with long black hairs, black ears, face, feet and hands, and a general greyish-brown colour of the fur are the distinctive characteristics of the langur.

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  • Abu Moslim, the founder of the Abbasid dynasty, proclaimed himself his avenger, and on that occasion adopted the black garments, which remained the distinctive colour of the dynasty.

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  • Motawakkil, in 850, formulated an edict by which these sectaries were compelled to wear a distinctive dress and to distinguish their houses by a figure of the devil nailed to the door, excluding them at the same time from all public employments, and forbidding them to send their children to Moslem schools.

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  • Perhaps Grote's most distinctive contribution to the study of Greek philosophy is his chapter in the History of Greece on the Sophists, of whom he took a view somewhat more favourable than has been accepted before or since.

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  • Still the tendency to treat merchet as a distinctive feature of serfdom has to be noted, and we find that the custom spread for this very reason in consequence of the encroachments of powerful lords: in the Hundred Rolls it is applied indiscriminately to the whole rustic population of certain hundreds in a way which can hardly be explained unless by artificial extension.

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  • Its distinctive name la Real, " the Royal," was conferred in memory of its capture by Alphonso XI.

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  • Bunsen and Kirchhoff (Ann., 1860, 113, p. 337), in the spectroscopic examination of the residues obtained on evaporation of water from a mineral spring at Diirkheim, being characterized by two distinctive red lines.

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  • It is not implied that in the formation of the " natural " religions individuals were not of great importance, nor, on the other hand, that in individual religions the founder formed his faith independently of the community of which he was a part; but only that as undoubted historic facts certain religions, in tracing their lines to individuals, thereby acquired a distinctive character, and retain the impress of their founder.

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  • Here again, in some instances the pre-Christian elements so asserted themselves as to obscure the new and distinctive teaching.

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  • Its early logic, ontology and cosmology, with many of its distinctive doctrines, are shown to be the natural offspring of the races and ages which gave them birth.

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  • Barrande's term "Primordial zone," all the lower rocks, although they had a distinctive fauna.

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  • Wherever the Cambrian strata have been carefully studied it has now been found possible and convenient to arrange them into three series, each of which is characterized by a distinctive genus of trilobite.

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  • His distinctive title, was the city praetor.

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  • There is nothing, however, in all these symptoms positively distinctive of plague, unless it is already prevalent.

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  • On the north the plateau is supported by a range of varying altitude, which follows the southern coast of the Black Sea and has no distinctive name.

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  • Peter's function in relation to the Gentiles belongs to the early Palestinian conditions, before Paul's distinctive mission had taken shape.

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  • Quellenkritik, then, a distinctive feature of recent research upon Acts, solves many difficulties in the way of treating it as an honest narrative by a companion of Paul.

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  • Other distinctive features by which marsupials are separated from monodelphians or placentals will be found in the article last mentioned.

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  • The distinctive badge of a member of the three upper castes was the sacred triple cord or thread (sutra) - made of cotton, hemp or wool, according to the respective caste - with which he was invested at the upanayana ceremony, or initiation into the use of the sacred savitri, or prayer to the sun (also called gayatri), constituting his second birth.

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  • The distinctive features of their creed consist in their making Rama and Sita, either singly or conjointly, the chief objects of their adoration, instead of Vishnu and Lakshmi, and their attaching little or no importance to the observance of privacy in the cooking and eating of their food.

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  • The followers of this creed wear no distinctive sectarial mark or badge, except a skull-cap; nor do they worship any visible image of any deity, the repetition (japa) of the name of Rama being the only kind of adoration practised by them.

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  • The most distinctive characteristic of the Roman Catholic Church, at least as contrasted with the various Protestant communions, is its vigorous insistence on the principle of ecclesiastical authority.

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  • The popes, then, or at least the more politic of them, have been content to lay down as the condition of reunion no more than the acceptance of the distinctive dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church, especially the supremacy and infallibility of the pope; the ritus of the Uniat Oriental Churches - liturgies and liturgical languages, ecclesiastical law and discipline, marriage of priests, beards and costume, the monastic system of St Basil - they have been content for the most part to leave untouched.

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  • of the central portion of the Basin Region the bolson plains soon lose their distinctive character, the valleys become wider and broader and the mountains less lofty and more isolated.

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  • The distinctive feature is the ingenious manner in which the sheets are printed first on one side, and then on the other.

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  • It has been found unworkable, for instance, to classify the religions of really primitive peoples under a plurality of heads, as becomes necessary the moment that the presence of a distinctive basis of linked ideas testifies to the individuality of this or that type of higher creed.

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  • This distinctive view, common and peculiar to all Baptists, is that baptism should be administered to believers only.

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  • the Mennonites) still practise baptism by pouring or sprinkling, but among those who will here be styled modern Baptists, the mode of administration is also distinctive, to wit, immersion.

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  • This is the distinctive peculiarity of those churches in Scotland and the north of England which are known as Scotch Baptists.

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  • Each class is subdivided according to the quality and colour of the material, and each class receives a distinctive mark called a baler's mark.

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  • This metre came in time to be distinctive of elegy.

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  • The Lapps moreover retain their distinctive dress.

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  • Bostrom (q.v.), and, though traceable ultimately to Schelling's idealism, received its distinctive character from the investigations of N.

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  • The most obvious distinctive character presented by the ostrich is the presence of two toes only, the third and fourth, on each foot - a character absolutely peculiar to the genus Struthio.

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  • The name tarsier refers to the great elongation of two of the bones of the tarsus, or ankle, and spectrum to the huge goggle-like eyes and attenuated form which constitute two of the most distinctive features of this weird little creature.

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  • The headgear is very distinctive.

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  • The distinctive mark of the courtier, military, and upper servant class is the belt, generally of black varnished leather with a brass clasp; princes and courtiers often replace this clasp by a huge round ornament of cut stones.

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  • Even distinctive forms for gender are entirely abandoned, the pronounavo signifies he, she, it.

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  • The distinctive teaching of Marcion originated in a comparison of the Old Testament with the gospel of Christ and the theology of the apostle Paul.

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  • Specimens of the distinctive Claddagh ring, for example, were worn and treasured as venerated heirlooms. These customs, with the distinctive dress of the women, died out but slowly, and even to-day their vestiges remain.

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  • From this time they are called livery companies, "from now generally assuming a distinctive dress or livery."

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  • It is leased from Kalat, and forms a distinctive province, being brought under the ordinary forms of civil administration in British India.

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  • distinctive feature of the genus is the great fore-and-aft length of the penultimate premolar in both jaws.

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  • The skull has a remarkably narrow and pointed muzzle and much inflated auditory bullae; while the two halves of the lower jaw are firmly welded together at their junction, thus effectually preventing the scissor-like action of the lower incisors distinctive of Macropus and its immediate allies.

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  • The total number of flowering plants inhabiting the range amounts probably to 5000 or 6000 species, among which may be reckoned several hundred common English plants chiefly from the temperate and alpine regions; and the characteristic of the flora as a whole is that it contains a general and tolerably complete illustration of almost all the chief natural families of all parts of the world, and has comparatively few distinctive features of its own.

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  • Reading the Ephesian doctrine with the eyes of a Cynic, and the Cynic ethics in the light of Heracliteanism, he came to formulate his distinctive theory of the universe far in advance of either.

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  • on and completed the assimilation of Heraclitean doctrine; but his own contributions were more distinctive and original.

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  • This cosmopolitan citizenship remained all through a distinctive Stoic dogma; when first announced it must have had a powerful influence upon the minds of men, diverting them from the distractions of almost parochial politics to a boundless vista.

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  • This wealth of colour gives to the scenery of Portugal a quite distinctive character and is the one feature common to all its varieties.

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  • humanists, such as Damiao de Goes, and scientists, such as the astronomer Pedro Nunes (Nonius), played conspicuous parts in the great intellectual movements of the time; a distinctive school of painters arose, chief among them being the so-called " Grao Vasco " (Vasco Fernandes of Vizeu); in architecture the name of King Emanuel was given to a new and composite style (the Manoeline or Manoellian), in which decorative forms from India and Africa were harmonized with Gothic and Renaissance designs; palaces, fortresses, cathedrals, monasteries, were built on a scale never before attempted in Portugal; and even in the minor arts and handicrafts - in goldsmith's work, for example, or in pottery - the influence of the East made itself felt.

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  • It is necessary to exclude Brazil from any survey of the Portuguese imperial system, because the colonization of Brazil (q.v.) was effected on distinctive lines.

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  • even permitted his Jewish subjects to live outside the Juderias, relieved them from the obligation to wear a distinctive costume (enforced in 1325), and nominated a Jew, Isaac Abrabanel, as his minister of finance.

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  • 7 contain regulations for the trespass-offering, in which the distinctive character of that offering is clearly brought out.

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  • That it forms an integral part of H is shown both by the recurrence of the same distinctive phraseology and by the emphasis laid on the same motives.

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  • ,;pt;) was originally the distinctive surname of Judas, third son of the Jewish priest Mattathias, who struck the first blow for religious liberty during the persecution under Antiochus IV.

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  • The surname "hammerer" might have been applied to Judas either as a distinctive title pure and simple or symbolically as in the parallel case of Edward Scotorum ` malleus."

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  • On the land side stretch miles of sand-dunes studded with broom, and beyond, the argan forests, distinctive of southern Morocco.

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  • 7 ff.), in virtue of his distinctive Gospel.

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  • Dr Johnson is reported to have said that "Walpole was a minister given by the king to the people, but Pitt was a minister given by the people to the king," and the remark correctly indicates Chatham's distinctive place among English statesmen.

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  • The double procession, in his eyes, means two active principles (airiat) in the Deity, and it means also that there is a confusion between the hypostatical properties; a property possessed by the Father and distinctive of the First Person is attributed also to the Second.

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  • The result was that Jeremiah answered in his Censura Orientalis Ecclesiae condemning the distinctive principles of Lutheranism.

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  • Indeed the distinctive characteristics of the language are very marked, and there is good reason for believing that it differed considerably from the various northern and western languages, whereas the differences among the latter at this time were probably comparatively slight (see Teutonic Languages).

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  • The true character of the kavir, which forms the distinctive feature of east Persia, has scarcely been determined, some regarding it as the bed of a dried-up sea, others as developed by the saline streams draining to it from the surrounding highlands.

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  • This name in later times, owing to the racial amalgamation of the Chaldaeans and Babylonians, lost its former national force, and became, as it occurs in Daniel, a distinctive appellation of the Babylonian priestly class.

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  • In his doctrine of virtue the distinctive Peripatetic position regarding the importance of external goods was defended by him with emphasis against the assaults of the Stoics.

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  • They are all similar in the great features of their land-forms, which have been impressed upon them by the prolonged action of atmospheric denudation rather than by the original order and arrangement of the rocks; but each group has its own geological character, which has imparted something of a distinctive individuality to the scenery.

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  • It is, however, the fish and the fur-bearing animals of its rivers and surrounding seas that are economically most distinctive of and important to Alaska.

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  • Most distinctive is the ubiquitous carpeting of mosses, varying in colours from the pure white and cream of the reindeer moss to the deep green and brown of the peat moss, all conspicuously spangled in the brief summer with bright flowers of the higher orders, heavy blossoms on stunted stalks.

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  • On the north-west this rugged highland region is well defined by the distinctive transverse ridge of Andi, which to the east of Kasbek strikes off from the Caucasus range almost at right angles.

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  • Were worldliness, tongue religion, moral indifference, the distinctive marks of the Jewish element?

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  • The strong sense of social wrongs, the impatience with tongue-religion, the utter ignoring of ceremonialism, the reflection on the value and significance of "life," are distinctive simply of the "wisdom" writers.

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  • The employment of mechanical instruments, of which instances of monkeys using sticks and stones furnish the only rudimentary traces among the lower animals, is one of the often-quoted distinctive powers of man.

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  • The most distinctive feature of the deer of this group is, however, the patch of long erectile white hairs on the buttocks, which, although inconspicuous when the animals are quiescent, is expanded into a large chrysanthemum-like bunch when they start to run or are otherwise excited.

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  • A white fetlock-gland with a black centre is also distinctive of this species.

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  • It has been suggested that transfusion-tracheids represent, in part at least, the centripetal xylem, which forms a distinctive feature of cycadean leaf-bundles; these short tracheids form conspicuous groups laterally attached to the veins in Cunninghamia, abundantly represented in a similar position in the leaves of Sequoia, and scattered through the so-called pericycle in Pinus, Picea, &c. It is of interest to note the occurrence of precisely similar elements in the mesophyll of Lepidodendron leaves.

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  • His ethic had little which was distinctive.

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  • But all such bodies appear to lose their distinctive properties when heated in a vessel which nearly encloses them, for in that case those radiations which they do not emit are either transmitted through them from the walls of the vessel behind, or else reflected from their surface.

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  • Insect life is somewhat less remarkable; but besides a distinctive genus of Orthoptera (Jaquetia Hospodar), there are several kinds of weevils (Curculionidae) said to be peculiar to Rumania.

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  • The peasants retain their distinctive dress, long discarded, except on festivals and at court, by the wealthier classes.

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  • The German immigration began about 1845, and long ago passed its maximum, so that in 1900 more than half of all the foreign-born (not only the Germans, but also the later-coming nationalities) had lived within Missouri for more than twenty years, and more than three-fourths of all had been residents of the state for ten 1 Omitting here printing and publishing, and foundry and machineshop products, which (like carpentering, bakery products, &c., in cities) have little distinctive in them to set Missouri off from other states.

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  • In the four decades before the Civil War, two matters stand out as most distinctive in the history of the state: the trouble with the Mormons, and the growth of river and prairie trade.

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  • He wrote a beautiful, distinctive and clear hand, in spite of the thousands of lines of MS. copying he had done in his early life.

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  • There is a tradition that the Ka`ba was a temple of Saturn (Shahrastani, p. 431); perhaps the most distinctive feature of the shrine may be sought in the sacred doves which still enjoy the protection of the sanctuary.

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  • Variations in matters of detail (having respect chiefly to the depth and distance apart of the parallel drains) have indeed been introduced; but the distinctive features of his system are recognized and acted upon.

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  • The part which treats of the aim, foundation and methods of the science of history is valuable; but what is most distinctive in Buchez's theory - the division of historical development into four great epochs originated by four universal revelations, of each epoch into three periods corresponding to desire, reasoning and performance, and of each of these periods into a theoretical and practical age - is merely ingenious (see Flint's Philosophy of History in Europe, i.

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  • The connexion many of them had with the church was of the slenderest kind, consisting mainly in adopting the name of abbe, after a remarkably moderate course of theological study, practising celibacy and wearing a distinctive dress - a short dark-violet coat with narrow collar.

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  • Early in November stock sheep having lost the distinguishing "burst" put on at clipping time with a large iron letter dipped in hot tar, have the distinctive paint or kiel mark claimed by the farm to which they belong rubbed on the wool.

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  • British lovers of poetry - except John Bright and others of like faith or spirit - have been slow to comprehend his distinctive rank.

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  • The distinctive note of the school is seen in the work of Rousseau and of Millet, each of whom, after spending his early years in Paris, made his home in Barbizon.

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  • The attention may be directed in succession to the different objects, so that the perception is rhythmical; the distinctive rhythm thus aiding the perception of the particular number.

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  • It was during this period, however, that he thought out and developed what is distinctive in his philosophical doctrine.

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  • There are three distinctive points in Cousin's philosophy.

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  • But it is in his doctrine of the Reason that the distinctive principle of the philosophy of Cousin lies.

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  • He left no distinctive permanent principle of philosophy.

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  • He selected the year 1660 as the beginning of his narrative, as being the date when the "sailingship era, with its distinctive features, had fairly begun."

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  • The important and distinctive feature is the presence of pores between the flooring-plates, on either side of the groove; and these, we cannot doubt, served for the passage of podia.

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  • The curious will find in them many reminiscences of Hindu and Buddhist legend; and the antiquary must notice the distinctive symbols assigned to each, in order to recognize the statues of the different Jinas, otherwise identical, in the different Jain temples.

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  • Observe that the distinctive feature is in the exclusive use of such determination of a curve by means of its equation.

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  • A dentition with its component parts so differently formed that these distinctive terms are applicable to them is called heterodont (Gr.

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  • The individuals inhabiting the Indus and the Ganges must therefore have been for long ages isolated without developing any distinctive anatomical characters, those by which P. indi was separated from P. gangetica having been shown to be of no constant value.

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  • Jesus Himself did not inculcate asceticism in His teaching, and the absence of that distinctive element from His practice was sometimes a subject of hostile remark (Matt.

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  • Mummius was the first novas homo of plebeian origin who received a distinctive cognomen for military services.

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  • All the dormice are small rodents (although many of them are double the size of the British species), of arboreal habits, and for the most part of squirrel-like appearance; some of their most distinctive features being internal.

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  • But while to Origen creation also was a continuous process, an unspeculative orthodoxy struck out the latter point as inconsistent with biblical teaching; and we must grant that the eternal generation of the Divine Son adds a more distinctive glory to the Logos when it is no longer balanced by an eternal creation.

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  • To find the distinctive technicalities of Lutheranism we have to leave Melanchthon's system (and his great Reformation creed, the Augsburg Confession) for the Formula of Concord and the lesser men of that later period.

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  • Schleiermacher set himself to explain what is distinctive in religion.

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  • The first distinctive manifestation of the change was the inauguration of Henry Ware (1764-1845) as professor of divinity at Harvard College, in 1805.

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  • Absence of rain is the distinctive feature of the climate.

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  • The distinctive animal of the Pamir plateau is the magnificent Ovis poli (conjectured to be the ancestor of the common sheep).

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  • The inhabitants present a remarkable conglomeration of different races, various nationalities, divers languages, distinctive costumes and conflicting faiths, giving, it is true, a singular interest to what may be termed the human scenery of the city, but rendering impossible any close social cohesion, or the development of a common civic life.

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  • Border ballads occupy a distinctive place in English literature.

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  • There are other remarkable and distinctive features of structure which hold the Arthropoda together, and render it impossible to conceive of them as having a polyphyletic origin, that is to say, as having originated separately by two or three distinct lines of descent from lower animals; and, on the contrary, establish the view that they have been developed from a single line of primitive Gnathopods which arose by modification of parapodiate annulate worms not very unlike some of the existing Chaetopods.

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  • Distinctive Particulars of Christian Morality 821 Development of Opinion in Early Christi C. Modern Ethics - continued Page Association and Evolution 837 Free-will.

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  • May we not then infer that man, as man, has his proper function, and that the well-being or " doing well " that all seek really lies in fulfilling well the proper function of man, - that is, in living well that life of the rational soul which we recognize as man's distinctive attribute ?

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  • The kind of reasoning which his view of virtuous conduct requires is one in which the ultimate major premise states a distinctive characteristic of some virtue, and one or more minor premises show that such characteristic belongs to a certain mode of conduct under given circumstances; since it is essential to good conduct that it should contain its end in itself, and be chosen for its own sake.

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  • But it remains true that the contrast with the " righteousness of the scribes and pharisees " has always served to mark the requirement of " inwardness " as a distinctive feature of the Christian code - an inwardness not merely negative, tending to the repression of vicious desires as well as vicious acts, but also involving a positive rectitude of the inner state of the soul.

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  • prompting to them, we have to notice another form in which the inwardness of Christian morality manifests itself, which, though less distinctive, should yet receive attention in any comparison of Christian ethics with the view of GraecoRoman philosophy.

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  • The distinctive features of Christian ethics are obedience, unworldliness, benevolence, purity and humility.

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  • It is not, however, in this, which is only the old Cyrenaic or Epicurean answer, that the distinctive point of Hobbism lies.

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  • As regards moral sentiments generally, the view suggested by Mill is more definitely given by the chief living representative of the associationist school, Alexander Bain; by whom the distinctive characteristics of conscience are traced to " education under government or authority," though prudence, disinterested sympathy and other emotions combine to swell the mass of feeling vaguely denoted by the term moral.

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  • Its distinctive method is spectrum analysis, the invention and development of which in the 19th century have fundamentally altered the purpose and prospects of celestial inquiries.

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  • Marine to a South American bird which, though long before known and described by the earlier writers - Nieremberg, Marcgrav and Piso (the last of whom has a recognizable but rude figure of it) - had been without any distinctive scientific appellation.

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  • The peak possesses no distinctive native name and has been called Everest after Sir George Everest, who completed the trigonometrical survey of the Himalayas in 1841 and first fixed its position and altitude.

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  • Kajkavci had from about 1550 to 1830 a distinctive literature, consisting of chronicles and histories, poems of a religious or educational character, fables and moral tales.

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  • One result of this nationalist revival was the unsuccessful attempt made between 1814 and 1830 to raise the Cakavci dialect to the rank of a distinctive literary language for CroatiaSlavonia; but the Illyrist movement of 1840 led to the adoption of the Stokavci, which was already the vernacular of the majority of Serbo-Croats.

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  • When the retardation of phase for light of mean period is it or a small multiple of it a crystalline plate placed between a crossed polarizer and analyser exhibits in white light a distinctive greyish violet colour, known as a sensitive tint from the fact that it changes rapidly to blue or red, when the retardation is very slightly increased or diminished.

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  • For the distinctive features of the genus see Deer.

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  • Species The distinctive characteristics of the family, and its position in the zoological system, are given in the articles Equidae and Perissodactyla.

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  • In 1907 there was a beet-sugar factory at Grand Island; at Nebraska City there are several distinctive industries; at South Omaha very important meat-packing houses; and the other cities have interests rather extensive or varied than distinctive.

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  • It is true that neither of these features is absolutely distinctive of the Annelida, but when taken in conjunction with the Annelidan disposition of the chief systems of organs, viz.

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  • These latter wear a distinctive garb and occupy separate villages, or quarters in the towns.

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  • The latter terms are applied to the flower-bud in the same way as vernation is to the leaf-bud, and distinctive names have been given to the different arrangements exhibited, both by the leaves individually and in their relations to each other.

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