Disgust sentence example

disgust
  • Kiera took two steps back, shuddering in disgust and fear.
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  • He made no attempt to hide the disgust in his eyes.
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  • She gave a sigh of disgust and retreated.
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  • She inspected a tee shirt of mine, sniffed it with disgust, and tossed it into a trash can across the room.
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  • Why didn't the idea disgust her like she thought it should?
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  • I thought you felt disgust toward me and would turn me away.
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  • Edith let out a sound of disgust, loud enough that clearly said she didn't care if Cynthia heard it or not.
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  • Ingrid made a sound of disgust but took the blonde's arm.
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  • Jessi grabbed Gerry's arm and slammed the front door behind them, marching through the hallway in a combination of disgust and envy.
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  • The disgust aroused by the vices and effeminacy of the king increased the popularity of Henry of Guise.
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  • Corday stared at Dean as if he were something on his shoe, utter disgust written on his unshaven face.
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  • Dean pounded his fist on the desk in disgust just as Andy Sackler entered the room.
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  • He took a disgust to the world and its occupations, and experienced a longing to give himself over to an ascetic life.
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  • She made a sound of disgust.
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  • The autocratic powers of the Grand Alliance, though forced to support him as the representative of legitimacy in Spain, watched his proceedings with disgust and alarm.
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  • No, any disgust is toward myself, I could not bear to see it reflected in your eyes.
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  • It was revived, however, by the emperor Louis the Pious, much to the disgust of the Romans, who resisted on several occasions.
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  • "You were speeding intentionally," he said with a level of disgust she reserved for the revelation of her sister's ex-boyfriend cheating.
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  • "Men!" she said, in disgust.
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  • I really did like him and cared about him, but now I just have disgust for him.
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  • The wives then review the rule guide left by the other wife, which usually results in some raised eyebrows or sighs of disgust from the wives as they read about the rules of the family they are about to join temporarily.
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  • Jackson shook his head with disgust.
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  • He shook his head in disgust.
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  • William Rufus, to the disgust of his supporters, permitted Odo to leave the kingdom after the collapse of this design (1088), and thenceforward Odo was the right-hand man of Robert in Normandy.
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  • His attitude is one not of bitterness but of calm hopelessness, with an occasional tinge of disgust or contempt.
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  • The sentimentality of her sentiment and the florid magniloquence of her style equally disgust the reader.
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  • In 59 Thrasea first openly showed his disgust at the behaviour of Nero and the obsequiousness of the senate by retiring without voting after the emperor's letter justifying the murder of Agrippina had been read.
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  • ~But John did his best to disgust his followers by adopting the policy of carrying out fierce and purposeless raids of devastation all through the countryside, while refusing to face his enemies in a pitched battle.
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  • You disgust me too, because you are unbelievably arrogant.
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  • The sight of her right now must fill him with disgust.
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  • He ground out, shaking his head in disgust.
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  • Brutus started after them, snarling and barking his disgust.
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  • His body ached with repressed memories and disgust.
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  • In disgust, Descartes started for the west to take part in the siege of La Rochelle, and entered the city with the troops (October 1628).
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  • In 853 and the following years Louis made more than one attempt to secure the throne of Aquitaine, which the people of that country offered him in their disgust with the cruel misrule of Charles the Bald.
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  • From sheer weariness and disgust the king refrained from any intervention in public affairs for nearly ten years, looking on indifferently while the ever shorter and stormier diets wrangled perpetually over questions of preferment and the best way of dealing with the extreme dissenters, to the utter neglect of public business.
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  • Tristan undertakes the mission, though he stipulates that he shall be accompanied by twenty of the barons, greatly to their disgust.
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  • Seven months after Charles's return from Scotland Henry secretly departed to Rome and, with the full approval of his father, but to the intense disgust of his brother, was created a cardinal deacon under the title of the cardinal of York by Pope Benedict XIV.
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  • He was also sent to carry the tribute which the United States still condescended to pay to the dey of Algiers, in order to secure exemption from capture for its merchant ships in the Mediterranean - a service which he performed punctually, though with great disgust.
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  • The heavy taxation of the war years was still retained, to the disgust especially of the income-tax payers; and new issues arose over the Education Act, labour questions, and the introduction of Chinese labour into South Africa (in 1904), which were successfully used against the government in the constituencies.
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  • His manual skill was duly appreciated: "I was a thousand times tempted," he said long afterwards, "to tear up my drawings in disgust at the esteem in which they were held, as if I had been good for nothing better."
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  • Gilbert Walmesley, registrar of the ecclesiastical court of the diocese, a man of distinguished parts, learning and know ledge of the world, did himself honour by patronizing the young adventurer, whose repulsive person, unpolished manners and squalid garb moved many of the petty aristocracy of the neighbourhood to laughter or disgust.
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  • The Prussian diet of 1862 was no whit more tractable than its predecessor, but fell to attacking the prof essional army and advocating the extension of the militia (Landwchr) system; on the 11th of March the king dissolved it in disgust, whereupon the Liberal ministry resigned, and was succeeded by the Conservative cabinet of Prince Hohenlohe.
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  • Under Mowat's successors the barnacles which always attach to a party long in power became unpleasantly conspicuous, and in January 1905 the conscience of Ontario sent the conservatives into power, more from disgust at their opponents than from any enthusiasm for themselves.
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  • At the same time Lysander's year of office expired and he was superseded by Callicratidas, to the disgust of all those whom he had so carefully organized in his service.
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  • Arabi pleaded guilty, was sentenced to death, the sentence being commuted by the khedive to banishment; and Riaz resigned in disgust.
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  • Financial necessities compelled retrenchment, so that a certain number of offices were suppressed altogether, much to the disgust of the office-holding class, which was numerous and wealthy, and had almost come to look on the civil service as its hereditary possession.
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  • The mission accomplished nothing, and Pinckney and Marshall left France in disgust, Gerry (q.v.) remaining.
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  • Stanton was removed from office for opposing the scheme, and Walker resigned in disgust.
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  • He was appointed territorial governor of Kansas in the spring of 1857 by President Buchanan, but in November of the same year resigned in disgust, owing to his opposition to the Lecompton Constitution.
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  • In disgust at his advice being disregarded, Mr. Thomas resigned the secretaryship of the Union, but was eventually persuaded, on promises of better discipline, to resume office.
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  • In his disgust at the crude conceptions of the enthusiasts, who had hoped that the war of liberation might end in a realm of internal liberty, Hegel had forgotten his own youthful vows recorded in verse to HBlderlin, " never, never to live in peace with the ordinance which regulates feeling and opinion."
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  • Then, after the indifference of humanists and Protestant polemic, came the disgust of men of science at the scholastic philosophy - an attitude best exhibited in Bacon's Advancement of Learning.
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  • The Council attempted to establish a general government over its entire domain, but the scheme of some of its members for supporting such a government with contributions from each member in return for an allotment of land was a failure, and although Robert Gorges, the second son of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, was sent over as governor-general in 1623, he accomplished nothing and returned in the next year in disgust.
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  • But the most characteristic passage of the epopee is the mysterious disappearance of Shah Kaikhosrau, who suddenly, when at the height of earthly fame and splendour, renounces the world in utter disgust, and, carried away by his fervent longing for an abode of everlasting tranquillity, vanishes for ever from the midst of his companions.
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  • Soon after his uncle Roger of Salisbury secured him the bishopric of Ely, much to the disgust of the monks.
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  • In the preface to his fifth book he excuses his trenching on the region of political history on the ground of his desire to spare his readers the disgust which perusal of the endless disputes of the bishops could not fail to excite, and in that to his sixth book he prides himself on never having flattered even the orthodox bishops.
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  • According to other accounts, having been made prisoner by a stratagem of Odysseus, he declared that Philoctetes must be fetched from Lemnos before Troy could be taken; or he surrendered to Diomedes and Odysseus in the temple of Apollo, whither he had fled in disgust at the sacrilegious murder of Achilles by Paris in the sanctuary.
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  • His intellect, indeed, was not incapable of understanding and admiring the majestic edifice of Roman law; but he shrank with disgust from the illiberal technicalities of practice.
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  • His assertion that the Celtic race was incapable of assimilating the highest forms of civilization excited "violent disgust," but the Enquiry was twice reprinted, in 1794 and 1814, and is still of value for the documents embodied in it.
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  • While travelling about, Confucius repeatedly came across recluses, - a class of men who had retired from the world in disgust.
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  • Having quitted France in disgust, he proceeded to Vienna, where his relative the emperor Leopold I.
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  • Heraclius (1646), Andromede (1650), a spectacle-opera rather than a play, Don Sanche d'Aragon (1650) and Nicomede (1651) were the products of the next few years' work; but in 1652 Pertharite was received with decided disfavour, and the poet in disgust resolved, like Ben Jonson, to quit the loathed stage.
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  • In sickened disgust the weary traveller made his way back to Ujiji, which he reached on the 13th of October.
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  • At last in the winter of 1013-1014, more as it would seem from sheer disgust at their kings cowardice and incompetence than Canute because further resistance was impossible, the English gave up the struggle and acknowledged Sweyn as king.
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  • Accordingly he endeavoured to temporize and to avoid a rupture, to the archbishops great disgust.
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  • This way of solving, or passing over, the ultimate problems of thought has had many followers in cultured circles imbued with the new physical science of the day, and with disgust for the dogmatic creeds of contemporary orthodoxy; and its outspoken and even aggressive vindication by physicists of the eminence of Huxley had a potent influence upon the attitude taken towards metaphysics, and upon the form which subsequent Christian apologetics adopted.
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  • As an officer of the Imperial Guard, he saw service in Poland, but resigned his commission from a disgust of despotism aroused by witnessing the repressive methods employed against the Poles.
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  • Among the scientific works which Ricci took into China was a set of maps, which at first created great interest, but afterwards disgust when the Chinese came to perceive the insignificant place assigned to the "Middle Kingdom," thrust, as it seemed, into a corner, instead of being set in the centre of the world like the gem in a ring.
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  • All men of political influence were either in open opposition or, when they belonged to the Conservative parties, were holding aloof in disgust at the predominance of the queens favorites, Gonzales Brabo, a mere ruffian, and Marion, her steward, whose position in the palace was perfectly well known.
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  • The single word was a combined expression of disgust and distress.
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  • No, any disgust is toward myself, I could not bear to see it reflected in your eyes.
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  • Dean said as the others returned to work, Rita shaking her head in disgust and Harrigan trying to talk on the phone by sticking a fin­ger in one ear.
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  • He slumped down on the sofa in disgust, waiting for Randy to finish the conversation, his foot kicking open the bicycle maga­zine.
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  • I will readily concede that my visceral disgust for what Gary Glitter was doing influences my views.
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  • Sure, some participants are motivated by animosity or disgust.
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  • To the crowd's disgust, it was actually Chuck Sherman who made his way down the aisle, complete with purple feather boa.
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  • She was running a nail along the edge of an oven tray I'd washed earlier, her nose crinkled in disgust.
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  • You are simply expressing a disgust for his public behavior.
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  • The reason that I am contacting you is to express my utter disgust at your current advertising campaign.
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  • Much to the shock and, in some cases, outright disgust of friends and colleagues I opted for Blackpool.
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  • The way they trashed one of the rooms was absolute disgust!
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  • All I feel for you is deep, deep disgust.
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  • You just have total disgust for the whole lot of them.
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  • The mixture of disgust and exaggerated fear in that interview was wonderful and ancient.
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  • Jack also feigns ' disgust ' at the attention his team-mate Stevie Convery has been recently receiving from the press... .
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  • All she has is a bloody frilly frock, he thinks with disgust.
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  • Be not so severe as to cause disgust, nor so lenient as to make people presume.
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  • He was watching her in the mirror, his expression a blend of surprise and disgust.
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  • "Ikir wouldn't spring for somewhere decent?" she asked, looking around in disgust.
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  • Thus, in spite of its having been approved by the king, this design was happily abandoned - much to Wren's disgust; and he prepared another scheme with a similar treatment of a dome crowned by a spire, which in 1675 was ordered to be carried out.
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  • Shortly afterwards, however, he retired both from parliament and from public life, professing his disgust at the party intrigues of politics, and devoted himself to conducting his newspaper, the Newcastle Daily Chronicle, and to his private business as a mine-owner.
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  • Rictiovarus in disgust cast himself into the fire, or the caldron of boiling tar, from which they had emerged refreshed.
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  • But, either from weariness of the life at Paris, or from disgust at clerical work, he sought permission to go to Turkey in order to reorganize the artillery of the Sultan.
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  • As he foresaw, the shrinkage of the great empire into the realm of old France caused infinite disgust, a feeling fed every day by stories of the tactless way in which the Bourbon princes treated veterans of the Grand Army.
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  • The conflict between her passionate fascination and her disgust at her father's vulgarity is finely realized both in music and drama; but, if we are able to appreciate it, then the operatic convention by which Senta avows her passion becomes crude.
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  • The king's disgust at this affair (which came to an open scandal before the tribunals) was so great that he was on the point of ordering Voltaire out of Prussia, and Darget the secretary had no small trouble in arranging the matter (February 1751).
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  • It is desultory to a degree; it is a base libel on religion and history; it differs from its model Ariosto in being, not, as Ariosto is, a mixture of romance and burlesque, but a sometimes tedious tissue of burlesque pure and simple; and it is exposed to the objection - often and justly urged - that much of its fun depends simply on the fact that there were and are many people who believe enough in Christianity to make its jokes give pain to them and to make their disgust at such jokes piquant to others.
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  • In 1869 the government of Santo Domingo (or the Dominican Republic) expressed a wish for annexation by the United States, and such a step was favoured Washington, comprising wholesale frauds on the public revenue, awakened lively disgust.
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  • He was full of doubt and self-distrust; disgust for the world did not seem to him a sufficient qualification for the religious life, and his daily prayer was, "Lord!
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  • Editors seemed tc be incapable of rising above the dead level of political strife, anc their utterances were not relieved even by a semblance of fairness Readers turned away in disgust, and journal after journal passe out of existence.
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  • The disgust aroused by the anti-national policy of Antony, and the danger to the empire which was averted by the result of the battle of Actium, combined with the confidence inspired by the new ruler to reconcile the great families as well as the great body of the people to the new order of things.
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  • After much unreasoning vituperation the Irish Catholic civil governor, who had arrived amidst the acclamations of all, left his post in disgust.
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  • The growing ambition of General O'Donnell constantly clashed with the views of Espartero, until the latter, in sheer disgust, resigned his premiership and left for Logrono, after warning the queen that a conflict was imminent between O'Donnell and the Cortes, backed by the Progressist militia.
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  • Having been refused a prize owing to the prejudice against African provincials, he left Rome in disgust, and after travelling for some time set up at Tarraco as a teacher of rhetoric. Here he was persuaded by an acquaintance to return to Rome, for it is generally agreed that he is the Florus who wrote the well-known lines quoted together with Hadrian's answer by Aelius Spartianus (Hadrian 16).
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  • Henry very wisely proceeded to get out of the war on the best terms possible, and, to the disgust of Maximilian, sold peace to the French king for 600,000 crowns, as well as an additional sum representing arrears of the pension which Louis XI.
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  • The French Revolution was not, therefore, a conflict for the reform of the political organization of the state, but one for the reorganization of the whole structure of society; and in proportion as it turned away from the path which English ignorance had marked out for it, Englishmen turned away from it in disgust.
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  • The same disgust for abstractions and naked doctrines of right that had stirred him against the pretensions of the British parliament in 1774 and 1776, was revived in as lively a degree by political conceptions which he judged to be identical in the French assembly of 1789.
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  • And this anger and disgust were exasperated by the dread with which certain proceedings in England had inspired him, that the aims, principles, methods and language which he so misdoubted or abhorred in France were likely to infect the people of Great Britain.
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  • They have fostered a sense of moral disgust at the very ideas of secular American liberalism.
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  • Unfortunately such episodes can provoke more mirth than disgust.
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  • Puritan disgust with whole new legs trigger the most.
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  • He threw back the quilt in disgust; now he supposed he's have to call an ambulance.
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  • In any other walk of life, a 44-year-old man introducing his dental work to another might provoke ridicule or disgust.
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  • You disgust me because your aims are entirely self-serving and selfish.
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  • Unsurprisingly, there's a sense of unease, bordering on disgust when she pipes up with a few ill-judged, uninvited witticisms.
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  • The mutual ardour;gradually cooled; motives of prudence and decorum urged the discontinuance of the connexion; and disillusion changed insensibly to disgust.
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  • Six months later, in 1871, he was invited by Amadeus to form a cabinet, and he continued to be the principal councillor of the king until February 1873, when the monarch abdicated in disgust at the resistance he met with in the army, and at the lack of sincerity on the part of the very politicians and generals who had asked him to ascend the throne.
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  • So ended the Eighth Crusade - much as the Sixth had done - to the profound disgust of many of the crusaders, including Prince Edward of England, who only arrived on the eve of the conclusion of the treaty.
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  • The strength of the parties was testel at the General Court of Election of May 1637, when Winthrop defeated Vane for the governorship. Cotton recanted, Vane returned to England in disgust, Wheelwright was tried and banished and the rank and file either followed Cotton in making submission or suffered various minor punishments.
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  • On seeing Rostov, Denisov screwed up his face and pointing over his shoulder with his thumb to the room where Telyanin was sitting, he frowned and gave a shudder of disgust.
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  • Pierre no longer suffered moments of despair, hypochondria, and disgust with life, but the malady that had formerly found expression in such acute attacks was driven inwards and never left him for a moment.
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  • How could you let him go so far? she went on, with a horror and disgust she could hardly conceal.
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  • But still he pitied Prince Andrew to the point of tears and sympathized with his wounded pride, and the more he pitied his friend the more did he think with contempt and even with disgust of that Natasha who had just passed him in the ballroom with such a look of cold dignity.
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  • "Flesh, bodies, cannon fodder!" he thought, and he looked at his own naked body and shuddered, not from cold but from a sense of disgust and horror he did not himself understand, aroused by the sight of that immense number of bodies splashing about in the dirty pond.
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  • But she drove these thoughts away with disgust.
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  • It was now, however, impossible to get back the way he had come; the maid, Aniska, was no longer there, and Pierre with a feeling of pity and disgust pressed the wet, painfully sobbing child to himself as tenderly as he could and ran with her through the garden seeking another way out.
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  • As they passed near a church in the Khamovniki (one of the few unburned quarters of Moscow) the whole mass of prisoners suddenly started to one side and exclamations of horror and disgust were heard.
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  • "Oh, the nasty beasts!" said he with disgust.
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  • He threw back the quilt in disgust; now he supposed he 's have to call an ambulance.
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  • Many of my readers will have recoiled in disgust at that last paragraph as true as they find the final assertion.
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  • In an attempt to disgust and repulse these vile oppressors, I once again induced myself to vomit on their favorite chair.
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  • Mr. Connolly was dismissed, while Mr. van Buitenen was demoted and marginalized, and recently resigned in disgust.
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  • He read it thoroughly and, when he failed to find anything useful, discarded it with a loud snort of disgust.
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  • The stool also swivels smoothly on ball bearings, much to Sasha 's disgust when I get playful.
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  • Whose justifiable disgust at the sight of discarded chewing gum or of dog turds on the pavement made him find alternative routes home.
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  • Unsurprisingly, there 's a sense of unease, bordering on disgust when she pipes up with a few ill-judged, uninvited witticisms.
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  • I have to spit with disgust everytime i see his wrinkled old face.
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  • They begin to feel resentment and disgust towards each other.
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  • Opinions range from fanboy love to sneering disgust with a fairly clear line of age drawn between the two.
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  • Verbal toddlers may express their disgust with the new sibling by asking, "Isn't it time to send him back?"
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  • On the other hand, present your Tom-boy with a swimsuit festooned in ribbons, and all you'll see is the back of her head as she flies out of the room in disgust.
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  • The faces in the crowd that gathered to watch this spectacle displayed various degrees of shock, curiosity, disgust and amusement- probably all of the responses Cohen hoped to provoke.
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  • Often TS women are abused, ridiculed and treating with disgust.
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  • I have seen customers put merchandise back and walk out of a store in disgust when the line at the cash register was too long or not moving fast enough.
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  • Some of the featured careers are fairly tame, while others have to be heavily edited in order to keep the audience watching instead of changing the channel in disgust.
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  • He turned away in disgust.
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  • Sneering at Jackson in disgust, Victor stood in front of Elisabeth and began hitting her, first with open hand and then backhand, sending her head flailing from side to side.
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  • Fred stood up suddenly, much to Mrs. Lincoln's disgust.
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  • Dean said as the others returned to work, Rita shaking her head in disgust and Harrigan trying to talk on the phone by sticking a fin­ger in one ear.
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  • Or, more rightly, never let me in.Dean turned and crossed the room in disgust.
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  • He slumped down on the sofa in disgust, waiting for Randy to finish the conversation, his foot kicking open the bicycle maga­zine.
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  • She rode through the city that bustled with ill- clad warriors and few others, unable to help feeling both disgust and pity for them.
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  • At the end of the six months Pretorius, after a stormy meeting of the volksraad, apparently in disgust at the whole situation, resigned the presidency of the Transvaal.
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  • But to their disgust, when the peace of Aix-la-Chapelle was made in 1748, this conquest was handed back to France.
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  • But Douglas, to the disgust of the French, refused battle, and allowed the English to do what mischief could be done in a thrice stripped country.
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  • According to the legend, Athena, who had invented the flute, threw it away in disgust, because it distorted the features.
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  • In 887, however, Arnulf identified himself with the disgust felt by the Bavarians and others at the incapacity of Charles the Fat.
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  • Financial embarrassment and disgust at the Protestant controversies in which he was forced to participate caused him to seek recall from the imperial court.
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  • The story of his disgust when he found that Queen Christina devoted some time every day to the study of Greek under the tuition of Vossius is at least true in substance.'
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