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disfavour

disfavour Sentence Examples

  • The government looked on the practice with great disfavour, because it transferred large areas from the easy access of the state to an ownership beyond its reach.

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  • He did his utmost to bring Cleomenes into disfavour at home.

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  • Their theory, however, has fallen into disfavour of late years.

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  • A few years later he incurred the royal disfavour for gross malversation in the administration of public property, and failing to compromise matters with the king, fled to Germany and engaged in political intrigues with the adventurer Wilhelm von Grumbach (1503-1567) for the purpose of dethroning Frederick II.

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  • A few years later he incurred the royal disfavour for gross malversation in the administration of public property, and failing to compromise matters with the king, fled to Germany and engaged in political intrigues with the adventurer Wilhelm von Grumbach (1503-1567) for the purpose of dethroning Frederick II.

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  • Within a year the court was brought into sudden disfavour with the country by two events of unequal importance, but both exciting.

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  • The admiral was acquitted, and Cochrane naturally fell into disfavour with the admiralty.

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  • Anthropometry, however, gradually fell into disfavour, and it has been generally supplanted by the superior system of finger prints.

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  • Anthropometry, however, gradually fell into disfavour, and it has been generally supplanted by the superior system of finger prints.

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  • Griesbach, and worked up into an elaborate system by the latter critic. Bengel's labours on the text of the Greek Testament were received with great disfavour in many quarters.

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  • After the adoption of Christianity, and possibly to a certain extent even before, such persons came to be regarded with disfavour - whence the persecutions for witchcraft - but it is clear from Tacitus's works and other sources that their influence in early times must have been very great.

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  • The Jesuits Sixtus regarded with disfavour and suspicion.

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  • Moreover, the important body of apocalyptical and pseudepigraphical literature, with all its links between Christianity and Judaism, fell into disfavour on both sides.

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  • Moreover, the important body of apocalyptical and pseudepigraphical literature, with all its links between Christianity and Judaism, fell into disfavour on both sides.

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  • In 1464 the bishop joined the league of the Public Weal, and fell into disfavour with the king, who seized the temporalities of his see.

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  • It may be that in particular cases particular modes of cultivation disfavour the host; or that the soil, climate or seasons do so; but overwhelming evidence exists to show that the principal causes of epidemics reside in circumstances which favor the spread, nutrition and reproduction of the pest, and the lesson to be learnt is, that precautions against the establishment of such favoring conditions must be sought.

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  • Charles in the Answer to the Petition (June 13, 1642) speaks of cavaliers as a "word by what mistake soever it seemes much in disfavour."

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  • As for copes, in some places they were ordered to be worn, and were worn at the Holy Communion, 4 while elsewhere they were thrown into the bonfires with the rest.5 The difficulty seems to have been not to suppress the chasuble, of the use of which after 1559 not a single authoritative instance has been adduced, but to save the surplice, which the more zealous Puritans looked on with scarcely less disfavour.

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  • Many Southern leaders desired his renomination by the Democratic party in 1860, but he received such suggestions with disfavour.

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  • The unhappy course of this campaign, culminating in the fall of Gran, brought him once more into disfavour, and he was deprived of the seal of office (November 19).

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  • He had fallen into disfavour because of his unwillingness to join in the intrigues of the princess Turkan Khatun, who wished to secure the succession to the throne for her infant son Mahmud at the expense of the elder sons of Malik Shah.

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  • Her husband, however, who viewed these proceedings with disfavour, banished her friends, took her children from her, threw her into prison,, and eventually made her abandon at any rate the outward forms of Calvinism.

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  • These measures for the furthering of education among the people on the part of a government mainly composed of Protestants were received with suspicion and disfavour by the priests, and still more the attempts subsequently made to regulate the education of the priests themselves.

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  • 3 Even the ancient right of petition was seldom exercised, and then only to meet with the imperial disfavour.

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  • In 1617 James visited his native land: ecclesiastical brawls at once broke out, and James vigorously pushed, in face of the disfavour even of his bishops, the acceptance of his famous Five Articles.

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  • was angry at these pretensions, and for a long time held him in disfavour.

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  • in 1918-9.) The disfavour into which cotton fell was partly due to the neglect to use selected seed and to other errors in cultivation, but also to the fact that, where soil and climate suited both crops, tobaccogrowing was more profitable.

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  • In 1616 the Dutch began to compete with the English at Surat, and their piracies against native vessels led to the Mogul governor seizing English warehouses; but soon the native authorities learnt to discriminate between the different European nations, and the unscrupulous methods of the Dutch cast them into disfavour.

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  • As the war which he had done so much to bring about did not eventually secure for Russia advantages commensurate with the sacrifices involved, he fell into disfavour, and retired from active service.

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  • He enjoyed the entire confidence of Abdalmalik with Walid, but Suleiman, the appointed successor, regarded him with disfavour.

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  • At last he fell into disfavour and retired from court, only to be summoned again on a congenial duty.

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  • The mundane rewards of virtue are very great, but need to be reinforced by the favour or disfavour of God.

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  • Lord Carnarvon (the 4th earl), when under-secretary for the colonies in 1858-1859, had regarded Grey's federation proposal with disfavour, but later, as secretary of state, he had introduced the bill for the federation of the Canadian provinces.

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  • This influx was looked upon with disfavour by Kruger and his supporters, and, while the new corners were heavily taxed, steps were speedily taken to revise the franchise laws so that the immigrants should have little chance of becoming burghers of the republic. This exclusion the tilt' policy was even applied to immigrants from the le nders.

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  • established authority having brought him into disfavour with the clergy, he left Naples, where he had been residing, and proceeded to Rome.

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  • During the next few years he as well as his brothers fell into disfavour with Edward IV.; and in 1469, after a successful rising in Yorkshire secretly fermented by Warwick, the king fell into the hands of the archbishop, by whom, after a short imprisonment, he was permitted to escape.

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  • In 1870 the duke of Saldanha, the last survivor of the turbulent statesmen of Queen Maria's reign, threatened an appeal to arms if the king would not dismiss his minister, the duke of Louie, an advanced Radical and freemason, whose influence, dating from the reign of Pedro V., was viewed with disfavour by Saldanha, as well as by more conservative politicians.

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  • He likewise expands at great length a theory of the origin of the Catholic Church much like that sketched by Toland, but assumes that Paul and his party, latterly at least, were distinctly hostile to the Judaical party of their fellow-believers in Jesus as the Messias, while the college of the original twelve apostles and their adherents viewed Paul and his followers with suspicion and disfavour.

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  • In this connexion it is worth pointing out that Garnet had not thought it his duty to disclose the treasonable intrigue with the king of Spain in 1602, though there was no pretence in this case that he was restricted by the seal of confession, and his inactivity now tells greatly in his disfavour; for, allowing even that he was bound by confessional secrecy from taking action on Greenway's information, he had still Catesby's earlier revelations to act upon.

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  • Heraclius (1646), Andromede (1650), a spectacle-opera rather than a play, Don Sanche d'Aragon (1650) and Nicomede (1651) were the products of the next few years' work; but in 1652 Pertharite was received with decided disfavour, and the poet in disgust resolved, like Ben Jonson, to quit the loathed stage.

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    0
  • Gradually as literature and learning increased, judgments delivered by men without special legal training fell into disfavour.

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  • She was in consequence regarded with suspicion and disfavour by Elizabeth and closely watched and guarded at Hardwick by the dowager countess of Shrewsbury.

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  • There, during the disastrous retreat from Santarem to Almeida, he suffered a check which brought him into disfavour.

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  • For some reason he incurred the disfavour of Zinzendorf and fled to Holland, where with the aid of the government he continued his experiments.

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  • Charles in the Answer to the Petition (June 13, 1642) speaks of cavaliers as a "word by what mistake soever it seemes much in disfavour."

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  • He therefore returned from the German capital with clean but empty hands, a plight which found marked disfavour in Italian eyes, and stimulated anti-Austrian Irredentism.

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  • It may be that in particular cases particular modes of cultivation disfavour the host; or that the soil, climate or seasons do so; but overwhelming evidence exists to show that the principal causes of epidemics reside in circumstances which favor the spread, nutrition and reproduction of the pest, and the lesson to be learnt is, that precautions against the establishment of such favoring conditions must be sought.

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  • But the transgression is enough to explain the disfavour into which the Maccabees seem to fall in the judgment of later Judaism, as, in that judgment, it is enough to account for the instability of their dynasty.

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  • In 1464 the bishop joined the league of the Public Weal, and fell into disfavour with the king, who seized the temporalities of his see.

    0
    0
  • As for copes, in some places they were ordered to be worn, and were worn at the Holy Communion, 4 while elsewhere they were thrown into the bonfires with the rest.5 The difficulty seems to have been not to suppress the chasuble, of the use of which after 1559 not a single authoritative instance has been adduced, but to save the surplice, which the more zealous Puritans looked on with scarcely less disfavour.

    0
    0
  • Their theory, however, has fallen into disfavour of late years.

    0
    0
  • The government looked on the practice with great disfavour, because it transferred large areas from the easy access of the state to an ownership beyond its reach.

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  • The bombardment of the forts at Alexandria and the occupation of Egypt in 1882 were viewed with great disfavour by the bulk of the Liberal party, and were but little congenial to Gladstone himself.

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  • Griesbach, and worked up into an elaborate system by the latter critic. Bengel's labours on the text of the Greek Testament were received with great disfavour in many quarters.

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  • These opinions were subversive of the system of the medieval church, and were naturally viewed with great disfavour by its officials; but it cannot fairly be said that they have much in common with the opinions of the Reformers of the 16th century.

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  • The innovation was at first received with some disfavour; critics accustomed to polite formalism censured it as extravagant and undignified; but the freshness and beauty of its melody soon silenced all opposition, and did more than anything else throughout the 18th century to establish the principle of nationalism in musical art.

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  • The annual reports, of which he was the chief author, became controversial pamphlets; he published bold replies to criticisms upon the work of the Commission; he explained its purposes to newspaper correspondents; when Congress refused to appropriate the amount which he believed essential for the work, he made the necessary economies by abandoning examinations of candidates for the Civil Service in those districts whose representatives in Congress had voted to reduce the appropriation, thus very shrewdly bringing their adverse vote into disfavour among their own constituents; and during the six years of his commissionership more than twenty thousand positions for government employes were taken out of the realm of merely political appointment and added to the classified service to be obtained and retained for merit only.

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  • Within a year the court was brought into sudden disfavour with the country by two events of unequal importance, but both exciting.

    0
    0
  • The admiral was acquitted, and Cochrane naturally fell into disfavour with the admiralty.

    0
    0
  • He did his utmost to bring Cleomenes into disfavour at home.

    0
    0
  • Many Southern leaders desired his renomination by the Democratic party in 1860, but he received such suggestions with disfavour.

    0
    0
  • He seemed momentarily to approach the doctrinal position of the Baptists, but by his statement, "I will be baptized only into the primitive Christian faith," by his iconoclastic preaching and his editorial conduct of The 'Christian Baptist (1823-1830), and by the tone of his able debates with Paedobaptists, he soon incurred the disfavour of the Redstone Association of Baptist churches in western Pennsylvania, and in 1823 his followers transferred their membership to the Mahoning Association of Baptist churches in eastern Ohio, only to break absolutely with the Baptists in 1830.

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    0
  • The unhappy course of this campaign, culminating in the fall of Gran, brought him once more into disfavour, and he was deprived of the seal of office (November 19).

    0
    0
  • He had fallen into disfavour because of his unwillingness to join in the intrigues of the princess Turkan Khatun, who wished to secure the succession to the throne for her infant son Mahmud at the expense of the elder sons of Malik Shah.

    0
    0
  • Her husband, however, who viewed these proceedings with disfavour, banished her friends, took her children from her, threw her into prison,, and eventually made her abandon at any rate the outward forms of Calvinism.

    0
    0
  • After the adoption of Christianity, and possibly to a certain extent even before, such persons came to be regarded with disfavour - whence the persecutions for witchcraft - but it is clear from Tacitus's works and other sources that their influence in early times must have been very great.

    0
    0
  • Though his separatist measures at first brought him into disfavour at the imperial court, their true objective was soon recognized, and, with the triumph of the more violent elements of the Hungarian revolution, he was hailed as the most conspicuous champion of the unity of the empire, and was able to bring about that union of the imperial army with the southern Slaves by which the revolution in Vienna and Budapest was overthrown (see Austria-Hungary: History).

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  • These measures for the furthering of education among the people on the part of a government mainly composed of Protestants were received with suspicion and disfavour by the priests, and still more the attempts subsequently made to regulate the education of the priests themselves.

    0
    0
  • 3 Even the ancient right of petition was seldom exercised, and then only to meet with the imperial disfavour.

    0
    0
  • The khedive, moreover, markedly abstained from any association with the agitation of the Nationalists, who viewed with disfavour his highnesss personal friendship with Sir Eldon Gorst.

    0
    0
  • The Jesuits Sixtus regarded with disfavour and suspicion.

    0
    0
  • In 1617 James visited his native land: ecclesiastical brawls at once broke out, and James vigorously pushed, in face of the disfavour even of his bishops, the acceptance of his famous Five Articles.

    0
    0
  • was angry at these pretensions, and for a long time held him in disfavour.

    0
    0
  • in 1918-9.) The disfavour into which cotton fell was partly due to the neglect to use selected seed and to other errors in cultivation, but also to the fact that, where soil and climate suited both crops, tobaccogrowing was more profitable.

    0
    0
  • In 1616 the Dutch began to compete with the English at Surat, and their piracies against native vessels led to the Mogul governor seizing English warehouses; but soon the native authorities learnt to discriminate between the different European nations, and the unscrupulous methods of the Dutch cast them into disfavour.

    0
    0
  • As the war which he had done so much to bring about did not eventually secure for Russia advantages commensurate with the sacrifices involved, he fell into disfavour, and retired from active service.

    0
    0
  • He enjoyed the entire confidence of Abdalmalik with Walid, but Suleiman, the appointed successor, regarded him with disfavour.

    0
    0
  • At last he fell into disfavour and retired from court, only to be summoned again on a congenial duty.

    0
    0
  • The mundane rewards of virtue are very great, but need to be reinforced by the favour or disfavour of God.

    0
    0
  • Lord Carnarvon (the 4th earl), when under-secretary for the colonies in 1858-1859, had regarded Grey's federation proposal with disfavour, but later, as secretary of state, he had introduced the bill for the federation of the Canadian provinces.

    0
    0
  • This influx was looked upon with disfavour by Kruger and his supporters, and, while the new corners were heavily taxed, steps were speedily taken to revise the franchise laws so that the immigrants should have little chance of becoming burghers of the republic. This exclusion the tilt' policy was even applied to immigrants from the le nders.

    0
    0
  • established authority having brought him into disfavour with the clergy, he left Naples, where he had been residing, and proceeded to Rome.

    0
    0
  • During the next few years he as well as his brothers fell into disfavour with Edward IV.; and in 1469, after a successful rising in Yorkshire secretly fermented by Warwick, the king fell into the hands of the archbishop, by whom, after a short imprisonment, he was permitted to escape.

    0
    0
  • In 1870 the duke of Saldanha, the last survivor of the turbulent statesmen of Queen Maria's reign, threatened an appeal to arms if the king would not dismiss his minister, the duke of Louie, an advanced Radical and freemason, whose influence, dating from the reign of Pedro V., was viewed with disfavour by Saldanha, as well as by more conservative politicians.

    0
    0
  • He likewise expands at great length a theory of the origin of the Catholic Church much like that sketched by Toland, but assumes that Paul and his party, latterly at least, were distinctly hostile to the Judaical party of their fellow-believers in Jesus as the Messias, while the college of the original twelve apostles and their adherents viewed Paul and his followers with suspicion and disfavour.

    0
    0
  • In this connexion it is worth pointing out that Garnet had not thought it his duty to disclose the treasonable intrigue with the king of Spain in 1602, though there was no pretence in this case that he was restricted by the seal of confession, and his inactivity now tells greatly in his disfavour; for, allowing even that he was bound by confessional secrecy from taking action on Greenway's information, he had still Catesby's earlier revelations to act upon.

    0
    0
  • Heraclius (1646), Andromede (1650), a spectacle-opera rather than a play, Don Sanche d'Aragon (1650) and Nicomede (1651) were the products of the next few years' work; but in 1652 Pertharite was received with decided disfavour, and the poet in disgust resolved, like Ben Jonson, to quit the loathed stage.

    0
    0
  • Gradually as literature and learning increased, judgments delivered by men without special legal training fell into disfavour.

    0
    0
  • She was in consequence regarded with suspicion and disfavour by Elizabeth and closely watched and guarded at Hardwick by the dowager countess of Shrewsbury.

    0
    0
  • There, during the disastrous retreat from Santarem to Almeida, he suffered a check which brought him into disfavour.

    0
    0
  • These opinions were subversive of the system of the medieval church, and were naturally viewed with great disfavour by its officials; but it cannot fairly be said that they have much in common with the opinions of the Reformers of the 16th century.

    0
    1
  • He seemed momentarily to approach the doctrinal position of the Baptists, but by his statement, "I will be baptized only into the primitive Christian faith," by his iconoclastic preaching and his editorial conduct of The 'Christian Baptist (1823-1830), and by the tone of his able debates with Paedobaptists, he soon incurred the disfavour of the Redstone Association of Baptist churches in western Pennsylvania, and in 1823 his followers transferred their membership to the Mahoning Association of Baptist churches in eastern Ohio, only to break absolutely with the Baptists in 1830.

    0
    1
  • The khedive, moreover, markedly abstained from any association with the agitation of the Nationalists, who viewed with disfavour his highnesss personal friendship with Sir Eldon Gorst.

    0
    1
  • The annual reports, of which he was the chief author, became controversial pamphlets; he published bold replies to criticisms upon the work of the Commission; he explained its purposes to newspaper correspondents; when Congress refused to appropriate the amount which he believed essential for the work, he made the necessary economies by abandoning examinations of candidates for the Civil Service in those districts whose representatives in Congress had voted to reduce the appropriation, thus very shrewdly bringing their adverse vote into disfavour among their own constituents; and during the six years of his commissionership more than twenty thousand positions for government employes were taken out of the realm of merely political appointment and added to the classified service to be obtained and retained for merit only.

    0
    9
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