How to use Disaffection in a sentence

disaffection
  • Several circumstances, moreover, tended to propagate disaffection in the Indian army.

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  • Both by its attitude and by its governmental acts, the papacy of the later 13th century itself contributed to increase the discredit and disaffection from which it suffered.

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  • In the outburst of indignation, followed by increasing disaffection in Ireland, which this event produced, Grattan acted with conspicuous moderation and loyalty, which won for him warm acknowledgments from a member of the English cabinet.2 That cabinet, however, doubtless influenced by the wishes of the king, was now determined firmly to resist the Catholic demands, with the result that the country rapidly drifted towards rebellion.

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  • After much hesitation, and prompted by a growing disaffection amongst the natives (owing, as he maintained, to his loss of prestige after the arrival of Stanley's force), Emin decided to accompany Stanley to the coast, where the expedition arrived in December 1889.

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  • But the disaffection of the court and the more extreme Catholics made it impossible for him as yet to enter upon a struggle against both Austria and Spain; he was only able to regulate the affairs of Italy with much prudence.

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  • The majority of Spaniards were kept by the government and the press quite in the dark about the growth of disaffection in Cuba, so that they were loath to listen to the few men, soldiers and civilians, courageous enough to raise the note of alarm during the ten years before the final catastrophe.

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  • As was expected the result was the election everywhere of ultraliberals opposed to the emperor, and in the succeeding year people everywhere exhibited their disaffection.

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  • The rebels were defeated by Lanfranc in the king's absence; but William returned to settle the difficult question of their punishment, and to stamp out the last sparks of disaffection.

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  • Many admirals declined to serve under Lord Sandwich, and Rodney, who then commanded in the West Indies, had complained of want of proper support from his subordinates, whom he accused of disaffection.

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  • Nerva seems nevertheless to have soon wearied of the uncongenial task of governing, and his anxiety to be rid of it was quickened by the discovery that not even his blameless life and mild rule protected him against intrigue and disaffection.

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  • Thus stimulated, the increasing disaffection culminated in the rebellion of 1798, which was sternly and cruelly repressed.

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  • After reconnoitring farther, the steamers turned and proceeded down stream under a heavy fire, the Sudanese crews showing signs of disaffection.

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  • All these circumstances combined to render the new regime weak and unpopular, since there was no force at the ruler's command except foreign troops to put down disorder or to protect those who submitted, while the discontented nobles fomented disaffection and the inbred hatred of strangers in race and religion among the general Afghan population.

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  • Abdur Rahman executed or exiled all those whose political influence he saw reason to fear, or of whose disaffection he had the slightest suspicion; his administration was severe and his punishments were cruel; but undoubtedly he put down disorder, stopped the petty tyranny of local chiefs and brought violent crime under some effective control in the districts.

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  • The numerous dethroned princes, their heirs and their widows, were the first to take advantage of the spirit of disaffection that was abroad.

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  • At first the government attempted to quell the disaffection by means of the ordinary law, with fair success outside Bengal; but there, owing to the secret ramifications of the conspiracy, it has been found necessary to adopt special measures.

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  • The course on moral philosophy embraced, besides ethics proper, lectures on political philosophy or the theory of government, and from 1800 onwards a separate course of lectures was delivered on political economy, then almost unknown as a science to the general public. Stewart's enlightened political teaching was sufficient, in the times of reaction succeeding the French Revolution, to draw upon him the undeserved suspicion of disaffection to the constitution.

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  • Far more serious was the disaffection which now showed itself in the rich and warlike provinces of the west.

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  • He was unable to check the disaffection of the feudal aristocracy, who combined with an officer named Isaac Comnenus to depose him.

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  • At this period wholesale corruption of the army, in which there was a very large percentage of Irishmen, was a strong feature in the Fenian programme, and O'Reilly, who soon became a great favourite, was successful in disseminating disaffection in his regiment.

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  • The natural effect of this narrow and tyrannous rule was discontent, amounting often to disaffection.

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  • Thousands of men peaceably disposed and, if left alone, perfectly satisfied with their position as British subjects, are being drawn into disaffection, and there is a corresponding exasperation on the side of the British.

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  • The court had indeed acquitted him of personal cowardice or of disaffection, and only condemned him for not having done his utmost.

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  • The disaffection of these leaders was more than counterbalanced, however, by the split of the New York Democrats over the slavery question, which assured Taylor of the vote of that state.

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  • The disaffection soon spread and led to the so-called " disorganizing" assembly in 1672, which went so far as to choose James Carteret, a landgrave of Carolina and presumably a natural son of Sir George, as " President."

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  • There came a time, however, when Clement and more particularly his following had to acknowledge the vanity of these illusive dreams; and before his death, which took place on the 16th of September 1394, he realized the impossibility of overcoming by brute force an opposition which was founded on the convictions of the greater part of Catholic Europe, and discerned among his adherents the germs of disaffection.

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  • After some trifling fighting Mangasha submitted, and Ras Makonnen despatched a force to subdue Beni Shangul, the chief of which gold country, Wad Tur el Guri, was showing signs of disaffection.

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  • The annexation of Oudh, which was the chief recruiting ground of the Bengal army, probably caused wider disaffection in the ranks of that army than any other act or omission of the government.

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  • Lord Canning, the governor-general, who had at first hoped that he had only to deal with isolated cases of disaffection, at last recognized that the plague was epidemic, and that only stern measures could stay it.

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  • When the news of the Meerut outbreak reached Wheeler, who had already noted many symptoms of disaffection in his own station, he was placed in a very difficult position.

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  • There was more or less internecine conflict throughout the war, and local disaffection under Union rule; and Confederate recruiting was carried on even north of the Missouri.

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  • The victory of Jervis over the Spanish fleet at Met tales St Vincent on the 14th of February postponed the at Spit- imminence of the danger; but this again became acute head and owing to the general disaffection in the fleet, which in the Nore.

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  • The disaffection had spread practically to the whole of Admiral Duncans fleet, and by the beginning of June the mutineers were blockading the Thames with no less than 26 vessels.

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  • Ministers saw in the Luddite organization only another conspiracy against the state; and, so far from seeking means for removing the grievances that underlay popular disaffection, th.e activity of parliament, inspired by the narrowest class interests, only tended to increase them.

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  • Irish disaffection had long been astir; the Fenian menace looked formidable not only in Ireland but in England also.

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  • To compete for power or even to express an opinion on public affairs was dangerous, and wholly to refrain from attendance might be construed as disaffection.

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  • Two distinct of the currents of disaffection, one economic, the other R0h1 philosophic, had for long been pervading the nation.

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  • Before it could be promulgated, the tidings came of a separatist rising in the old haunts of Creole disaffection near Santiago de Cuba.

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  • He showed the same merciless spirit in dealing with the Cubans; and he certainly cleared two-thirds of the island of Creole bands, and stamped out disaffection.

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  • Two months before (March 1013) King Alphonso, with characteristic courage, had paid a surprise visit to Barcelona, and the general enthusiasm of his reception seemed to prove that the disaffection was less widespread or deep than had been supposed.

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  • Repercussions of the war included a further body blow to the failing linen industry and the increased disaffection of Northern Presbyterians.

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  • For this reason the present disaffection for politics is a threat to democratic consolidation.

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  • This appeal to Moslem sentiment was, however, powerless against the disaffection due to perennial misgovernment.

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  • Hitherto he had been scrupulously impartial in raising the best men to the judicial bench, including the illustrious Matthew Hale, but he now appointed compliant judges, and, alluding to Magna Carta in terms impossible to transcribe for modern readers, declared that" it should not control his actions which he knew were for the safety of the Commonwealth."The country was now divided into twelve districts each governed by a major-general, to whom was entrusted the duty of maintaining order, stamping out disaffection and plots, and executing the laws relating to public morals.

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  • Foiled by the dictators stubbornness, Cavour had once more to take to underhand methods; and, while continuing futile negotiations with King Francis, sent his agents into Naples to stir up disaffection and create a sentiment in favor of national unity strong enough, in any event, to force Garibaldis hand.

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  • These hetairiae or clubs were forbidden (except in cities formally allied to Rome) by Trajan and other emperors, as being likely to be centres of disaffection; and on this ground Pliny forbade the agape of the Bithynian churches, Christianity not being a lawful religion licensed for such gatherings.

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  • During the Shays' Rebellion Amherst was a centre of disaffection and a rallying-point of the insurgents.

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  • After 1124 the disaffection of Normandy was crushed.

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  • He fostered the disaffection of the Goths, and either by his orders or with his permission, Amalasuntha was imprisoned on an island in the Tuscan lake of Bolsena, where in the spring of 535 she was murdered in her bath.

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  • But to the Magyars they were the immemorial strongholds of their liberties, the last defences of their constitution; and the attempt to suppress them, which made every county a centre of disaffection and resistance, was the action not of a statesman, but of a visionary.

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  • His emissaries roused the Free Staters west of Bloemfontein, and disaffection broke out in.

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  • At this time rumours were current of disaffection among the Zulu, but this was regarded as the effervescence natural after the war.

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  • The preoccupation of the sultan with Ali gave their opportunity to the Greeks whose disaffection had long been organized in the great secret society of the Hetaeria Philike, against which Metternich had in vain warned the Ottoman government.

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  • Lubeck, however, supported by the Bruges counter, despite the disaffection and jealousy on all sides hampering and sometimes thwarting its efforts, stood steadfastly for union and the necessity of obedience to the decrees of the assemblies.

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  • The German Order in 1398 converted the Hanseatic poundage to a territorial tax for its own purposes, and one of the chief causes for Cologne's disaffection a halfcentury later was the extension from Flanders to other parts of the Netherlands of the levy made by the counter at Bruges.

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  • It was prominent in the war of 1868-78 and in the disaffection preceding and following it.

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  • In the winter of1850-1851Gladstone spent between three and four months at Naples, where he learned that more than half the chamber of deputies, who had followed the party of Opposition, had been banished or imprisoned; that a large number, probably not less than 20,000, of the citizens had been imprisoned on charges of political disaffection, and that in prison they were subjected to the grossest cruelties.

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  • Governor James Bowdoin in1786-1787put down with clemency an almost bloodless insurrection in the western counties (there was strong disaffection, however, as far east as Middlesex), known as the Shays Rebellion, significant of the rife ideas of popular power, the economic distress, and the unsettled political conditions of the years of the Confederation.

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  • League the system was the simplest precaution against disaffection on the part of the allies, the strength of whose resentment may be gathered from an inscription (Hicks and Hill, ioi [81]), which, in setting forth the terms of the second Delian Confederacy, expressly forbids the holding of land by Athenians in allied territory.

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  • In 1752 the plantation was incorporated as a "district," and under a general state law of 1775 gained the legal rights of a township. Palmer was a centre of disaffection in the time of the Shays Rebellion.

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  • The two next viceroys were incompetent; further demands from the Spanish authorities in revolt against Joseph Bonaparte increased the disaffection, which was not allayed by the grant of representation in the Spanish Cortes to the colonies; and, on the demands being repeated by a third viceroy, Venegas, Creole conspiracies arose in Queretaro and Guanajato.

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  • Archbishop Wulfstan seems to have been a centre of disaffection in the north, and in 95 2 Edred caused him to be imprisoned in the castle of "Judanburh," while in the same year the king, in revenge for the slaying of Abbot Eadelm, slew many of the citizens of Thetford.

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  • Yet disaffection against Thebes was now growing rife, and Sparta fostered this feeling by stipulating for the complete independence of all the cities in the peace of Antalcidas (387).

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  • But there was much disaffection throughout the country, and the Carbonarist lodges, founded in The Murat's time with the object of freeing the country from foreign rule and obtaining a constitution, had made much progress (see Carbonari).

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  • Cornelius Sulla, who had been banished to Massilia in 58, was put to death on the ground that his residence in Gaul was likely to arouse disaffection in that province, and a similar charge proved fatal to Rubellius Plautus, who had for two years been living in retirement in Asia.

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  • The practical repercussions of the war included a further body blow to the failing linen industry and the increased disaffection of northern Presbyterians.

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  • The Declaration of the Rights of Man in August 1789 seemed to meet their claims, but in March 1790 the assembly, alarmed by rumours of the discontent and disaffection of the planters in San Domingo, passed a resolution that it had not been intended to comprehend the internal government of the colonies in the constitution framed for the mother country.

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  • Its cessation greatly increased disaffection.

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  • This revelation of disaffection, together with the fall of Constantinople, darkened the last years of Nicholas; "As Thomas of Sarzana," he said, "I had more happiness in a day than now in a whole year."

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  • If the danger of French invasion was a reality, it was so mainly owing to the deplorable condition of Ireland, where the The Act natural disaffection of the Roman Catholic majority of Union of the populationdeprived of political and many with d social rights, and exposed to the insults and oppression ft an of a Protestant minority corrupted by centuries of ascendancyinvited the intervention of a foreign enemy.

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