Diocese sentence example

diocese
  • Thurstan was generous to the churches of his diocese and was the founder of several religious houses.
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  • Cloyne was the seat of a Protestant diocese until 1835, when it was united to that of Cork.
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  • In the interval Chicheley found time to visit his diocese for the first time and be enthroned at St David's on the 11th of May 1411.
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  • LISMORE, a market town and seat of a diocese in Co.
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  • A papal bull having also been obtained, on the 28th of August 1425, the archbishop, in the course of a visitation of Lincoln diocese, executed his letters patent founding the college, dedicating it to the Virgin, St Thomas Becket and St Edward the Confessor, and handed over the buildings to its members, the vicar of Higham Ferrers being made the first master or warden.
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  • It gives its name to a Roman Catholic diocese, the cathedral of which is at Queenstown.
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  • it may be noted that Cranmer favoured a proposal for the formation of a council of presbyters in each diocese, and for provincial synods.
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  • Since 1836 there have been at least two archdeaconries in each diocese, and in some dioceses there are four archdeacons.
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  • In 1892 the diocese of Rio de Janeiro was made an archbishopric, and four new dioceses were created.
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  • COUNT MARIANO DEL TINDARO RAMPOLLA (1843-), Italian cardinal, was born on the, 7th of August 1843, at Polizzi, in the Sicilian diocese of Cefalu.
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  • The vidame was originally, like the avoue (advocatus), an official chosen by the bishop of the diocese, with the consent of the count.
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  • He was then already beneficed, receiving a royal ratification of his estate as parson of Llanvarchell in the diocese of St Asaph on the 10th of March 1391/92 (Cal.
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  • The new rulers soon found that he;must be removed and he was ordered to return to his diocese.
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  • Other buildings of note are the massive episcopal palace (1470-1500), afterwards a royal palace, and the old gymnasium founded by Gustavus Adolphus in 1627, which contains the valuable library of old books and manuscripts belonging to the diocese and state college, and collection of coins and antiquities.
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  • He vigorously restored Roman Catholicism in his diocese, made no difficulty about submitting to the papal jurisdiction which he had forsworn, and in 1555 began the persecution to which he owes his fame.
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  • He himself claims to have brought more than a thousand Marcionites within the pale of the church, and to have destroyed many copies of the Diatessaron of Tatian, which were still in ecclesiastical use; and he also exerted himself to improve the diocese, which was at once large and poor, by building bridges and aqueducts, beautifying the town, and by similar works.
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  • 181 letters of Theodoret have come down to us, partly in a separate collection, partly in the Acta of the councils, and partly in the Latin of Marius Mercator; they are of great value not only for the biography of the writer, but also for the history of his diocese and of the church in general.
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  • At this time he was nominated to the pope as coadjutor of Geneva,' and after a visit to Rome he assisted Bishop de Granier in the administration of the newly converted countries and of the diocese at large.
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  • De Granier died in September 1602, and the new bishop entered on the administration of his vast diocese, which, as a contemporary says, "he found brick and left marble."
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  • The care of his diocese and of his new foundation were not enough for his ardent charity, and in 1609 he published his famous introduction to a Devout Life, a work which was at once translated into the chief European languages and of which he himself published five editions.
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  • Watson now found that he possessed no influence with the minister, and that he had destroyed his chance of the great object of his ambition, promo - tion to a better diocese.
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  • The movement was especially strong in the diocese of Liege, and when Julienne, prioress of Mont-Cornillon near Liege (1222-1258), had a vision in which the need for the establishment of a festival in honour of the Sacrament was revealed to her, the matter was taken up with enthusiasm by the clergy, and in 1246 Robert de Torote, bishop of Liege, instituted such a festival for his diocese.
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  • By a bull of 1264 Urban made the festival, hitherto practically confined to the diocese of Liege, obligatory on the whole Church,' and a new office for the festival was written by Thomas Aquinas himself.
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  • In each diocese is a seminary or diocesan school.
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  • Danby therefore ordered a return from every diocese of the numbers of dissenters, both Romanist and Protestant, in order by a proof of their insignificance to remove the royal scruples.3 In December 1676 he issued a proclamation for the suppression of coffee-houses because of the "defamation of His Majesty's Government" which took place in them, but this was soon withdrawn.
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  • The archbishopric was soon removed to Ipek, in Old Servia; but after the Turkish garrison had been expelled in 1862 the city became once more the head of a diocese.
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  • Mainly on account of its strategic position, Diocletian on his reorganization of the empire made Trier the capital not only of Belgica Prima, but of the whole "diocese" of Gaul.
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  • the larger district answering to the civil " diocese "), or before the royal see of Constantinople, who shall do justice upon it.
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  • Such was the case of probate where notable goods of the deceased lay in more than one diocese.
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  • In York there are two courts, one called the consistory for the diocese, the other called the chancery for the province.
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  • c. 86 (the " Church Discipline Act ") creates new tribunals; and first a commission of inquiry appointed by the bishop of five persons, of whom the vicar-general, or an archdeacon, or a rural dean of the diocese must be one.
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  • But the revocation of a desservant, and the forbidding him the execution of his ministry in the diocese, was not a case in which the council of state would interfere (Migne, ubi sup. " Appel comme d'abus," " Conseil d'etat ").
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  • In the diocese of Rome, exercised discipline of a penitential kind over their lay members; but in later times their censures have generally ceased to carry temporal consequences.
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  • The pope's immediate and original jurisdiction in every diocese is now expressly affirmed by the Vatican Council (ib.
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  • The tsar Michael, in the earlier 17th century, confirmed these immunities in the case of the clergy of the patriarch's own diocese, but provided that in country places belonging to his diocese, monasteries, churches and lands should be judged in secular matters by the Court of the Great Palace, theoretically held before the tsar himself (ib.
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  • indultusn, from indulgere, grant, concede, allow), a, papal licence which authorizes the doing of something not sanctioned by the common law of the church; thus by an indult the pope authorizes a bishop to grant certain relaxations during the Lenten fast according to the necessities of the situation, climate, &c., of his diocese.
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  • It constitutes the diocese of Troyes and part of the archiepiscopal province of Sens.
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  • In 673 Archbishop Theodore divided the East Anglian diocese into two, Elmham being the seat of the northern, Dunwich that of the southern bishop. A long blank follows in the history of this kingdom, until in 792 we find Offa of Mercia slaying iEthelberht, king of East Anglia, who is said to have been his son-in-law.
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  • Joao d'Albuquerque, bishop of Goa, he asked his permission to officiate in the diocese, and at once began walking through the streets ringing a small bell, and telling all to come, and send their children and servants, to the "Christian doctrine" or catechetical instruction in the principal church.
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  • Thomas Cornish, suffragan bishop in the diocese of Bath and Wells, and provost of Oriel College, Oxford, from 1493 to 1507, appointed him chaplain of the college of St Mary Ottery, Devonshire.
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  • Out of this abbey a diocese grew, to be united with that of Killaloe in the 12th century.
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  • He spent ten or twelve years in study, chiefly theological, at Palencia, and then, about 1195, he was ordained and became a canon in the cathedral chapter of Osma, his native diocese.
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  • In 1154 the diocese of Sodor was formed to include the Hebrides and other islands west of Scotland.
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  • It is first mentioned in 705 as the place where St Aldhelm fixed his bishop-stool for the new diocese of Western Wessex, being chosen probably for its central position.
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  • Under Diocletian, Belgica Prima (capital, Augusta Trevirorum, Trier) and Secunda (capital, Reims) formed part of the "diocese" of Gaul.
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  • Discouraged by his failure to effect this, he returned to his diocese of Cambrai at the beginning of 1408.
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  • From this, in the same year, he extracted the versions of the Gospels and Epistles "a l'usage du diocese de Meaux."
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  • For example, the priests are not to be chosen by the people; penitents are not to be present at ordinations (lest they should hear the failings of candidates discussed); bishops are to be appointed by the metropolitan and his suffragan; sub-deacons may not distribute the elements of the Eucharist; clerics are forbidden to leave a diocese without the bishop's permission.
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  • Southwark is a bishopric of the Church of England created by act of 1904 (previously a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Rochester), and also of the Roman Catholic Church.
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  • At the Restoration, instead of being recalled to England, as he probably expected and certainly desired, he was appointed to the see of Down and Connor, to which was shortly added the small adjacent diocese of Dromore.
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  • St Andrew's (1811-1813), in the Romanesque style, is a Roman Catholic church, which also serves as the pro-cathedral of the diocese of Galloway.
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  • During the 8th and 9th centuries the office tended to become more and more exclusively purely administrative, the archdeacon by his visitations relieving the bishop of the minutiae of government and keeping him informed in detail of the condition of his diocese.
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  • This process received a great impulse from the erection in the 11th and 12th centuries of defined territorial jurisdictions for the archdeacons, who had hitherto been itinerant representatives of the central power of the diocese.
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  • The functions of the archdeacon are in the present day ancillary in a general way to those of the bishop of the diocese.
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  • It is his privilege to present all candidates for ordination to the bishop of the diocese.
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  • In the colonies there are two or more archdeacons in each diocese, and their functions correspond to those of English archdeacons.
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  • The county is mainly in the diocese of Southwell, with small portions in the dioceses of Peterborough and Lichfield, and contains 255 ecclesiastical parishes or districts.
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  • Ecclesiastically the county constituted an irchdeaconry in the diocese of Lichfield, comprising the six deaneries of Derby, Ashbourne, High Peak, Castillar, Chesterfield and Repington.
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  • In 1884 it was transferred to the newly formed diocese of Southwell.
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  • This charge he resigned in the next year, and, after making arrangements for the protection of his northern diocese from an expected inroad of the Scots, he proceeded in July 1336 to France to attempt a settlement of the claims in dispute between Edward and Philip. In the next year he served on three commissions for the defence of the northern counties.
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  • The chief authority for the bishop's life is William de Chambre (printed in Wharton's Anglia Sacra, 1691, and in Historiae Dunelmensis scriptores tres, Surtees Soc. 1839), who describes him as an amiable and excellent man, charitable in his diocese, and the liberal patron of many learned men, among these being Thomas Bradwardine, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, Richard Fitzralph, afterwards archbishop of Armagh, the enemy of the mendicant orders, Walter Burley, who translated Aristotle, John Mauduit the astronomer, Robert Holkot and Richard de Kilvington.
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  • In 1180 Jean Beleth, of the diocese of Amiens, calls the festival of the sub-deacons festum stultorum (Migne, Patrol.
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  • Towards the end of his career Gerhard Groot retired to his native town of Deventer, in the province of Overyssel and the diocese of Utrecht, and gathered around him a number of those who had been "converted" by his preaching or wished to place themselves under his spiritual guidance.
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  • In each diocese there had arisen a judicature (judices pacis) to decide when the form had been broken; and an executive, or communitas pacis, had been formed to enforce the decisions of the judicature.
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  • Its two other chief towns were Figeac and Moissac. Ecclesiastically it was included almost entirely in the diocese of Cahors until 1317, when a bishopric for lower Quercy was established at Montauban.
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  • In 1864 he was consecrated bishop of Ely, and proceeded to reorganize his diocese.
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  • TROMSO, a seaport of Norway, capital of the amt (county) and stift (diocese) of the same name on the north-western coast.
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  • It may be regarded as certain that St Giles was buried in the hermitage which he had founded in a spot which was afterwards the town of StGilles (diocese of Nimes, department of Gard).
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  • It forms the diocese of Chartres (province of Paris), and belongs to the academic (educational division) of Paris and the region of the IV.
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  • But he protested energetically against tlae loss of the pope's temporal power in 1870, against the confiscation of the property of the religious orders, and against the law of civil marriage established by the Italian government, and he refused to welcome Victor Emmanuel in his diocese.
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  • The diocese includes over half the parishes in Yorkshire, and also covers very small portions of Durham, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire.
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  • In his long administration of his latter diocese he was most energetic, tactful and munificent.
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  • It forms the diocese of Moulins and part of the ecclesiastical province of Bourges, and falls within the academie (educational division) of Clermont-Ferrand and the region of the XIII.
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  • In his earliest years he was confided to the care of his brother, a priest in the diocese of Chambery.
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  • The recantation was probably insincere, for on returning to his diocese he taught adoptianism as before.
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  • The Clerical Resignation Bonds Act 1828 makes a written promise to resign valid if made in favour of some particular nominee or one of two nominees, subject to the conditions that, where there are two nominees, each of them must be either by blood or marriage an uncle, son, grandson, brother, nephew or grand-nephew of the patron, that the writing be deposited with the registrar of the diocese open to public inspection, and that the resignation be followed by presentation within six months of the person for whose benefit the bond is made.
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  • After being cure successively of two villages in that diocese, Loisy went in May 1881, to study and take a theological degree, to the Institut Catholique in Paris.
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  • Two years later he was raised to the see of Nancy, where he remained for four years, during which the diocese became one of the best administered in France.
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  • He never took orders, but acted continually as the representative of the chapter under harassing conditions, administrative and political; he was besides commissary of the diocese of Ermeland; his medical skill, always at the service of the poor, was frequently in demand by the rich; and he laid a scheme for the reform of the currency before the Diet of Graudenz in 1522.
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  • In Diocletian's great reform of the administrative system of the empire, the whole of Roman Africa, with the exception of Mauretania Tingitana (which was attached to the province of Spain), constituted a single diocese subdivided into six provinces: Zeugitana (Carthage), Byzacium (Hadrumetum, now Susa), Numidia Cirtensis (Cirta, Constantine), Tripolitana (Tripolis), Mauretania Sitifensis (Sitifis, Setif), and Mauretania Caesariensis (Caesarea, now Cherchel).
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  • When the orthodox emperor Valentinian ascended the throne, Auxentius was left undisturbed in his diocese, but his theological doctrines were publicly attacked by Hilary of Poitiers.
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  • His power was reduced in the 6th century, when he was deprived of his authority over the Orient diocese, and became civil governor of Syria Prima, retaining his "respectable" rank.
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  • He appears to have been a firm supporter of law and order, an enemy of clerical abuses and a careful administrator of his diocese.
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  • He studied theology at Orleans, was ordained priest in 1824 and placed in charge of the parish of Puiseaux, in the diocese of Orleans.
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  • He published first a collection of Dissertations sur l'histoire civile et ecclesiastique de Paris (3 vols., 1739-1743), then an Histoire de la ville et de tout le diocese de Paris (15 vols., 1745-1760), which is a mine of information, mostly taken from the original sources.
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  • Moreover, an act of the Natal parliament passed in 1909 placed the temporalities into commission in the persons of the bishop and other trustees of the Natal diocese of the Provincial Church; reservations being made in favour of four congregations at that time unwilling to unite with the main body of churchmen.'
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  • episcopatus, the office of a bishop, episcopus), the general term technically applied to that system of church organization in which the chief ecclesiastical authority within a defined district, or diocese, is vested in a bishop. As such it is distinguished on the one hand from Presbyterianism, government by elders, and Congregationalism, in which the individual church or community of worshippers is autonomous, and on the other from Papalism.
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  • In the fully developed episcopal system the bishop sums up in his own person the collective powers of the Church in his diocese, not by delegation of these powers from below, but by divinely bestowed authority from above.
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  • Ep. 9); the bishop, as the successor of the apostles, is the centre of unity in his diocese, the unity of the Church as a whole is maintained by the intercommunion of the bishops, who for this purpose represent their dioceses.
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  • part transference to the territorial sovereigns of modern Europe of the theocratic character of the Christian heads of the Roman world-empire; with the result that for the reformed Churches the unit of church organization was no longer the diocese, or the group of dioceses, but the Christian state.
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  • In 1671 he was appointed bishop of Tulle; eight years later he was transferred to the larger diocese of Agen.
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  • The episcopate of the new metropolitan was marked by a vigour and activity that were felt not merely in his own diocese, but as far as Tours, Orleans and Paris.
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  • It forms the diocese of Carcassonne, and part of the province of the archbishop of Toulouse.
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  • Another translator from Greek was Paul, Monophysite bishop of Callinicus or ar-Rakkah, who, being expelled from his diocese in 519, retired to Edessa and there occupied himself in translating into Syriac the works of Severus, the Monophysite 1 So called " because his dress consisted of a barda`tha, or coarse horse-cloth, which he never changed till it became quite ragged " (Wright).
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  • chiefly spent at Winchester; but his writings for the patrons of Come!, and the fact that he wrote in 998 his Canons' as a pastoral letter for Wulfsige, the bishop of Sherborne, the diocese in which the abbey was situated, afford presumption of continued residence there.
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  • From 1512 to 1514 it was the capital of the island, and from 1518 to 1522 its church was the cathedral of the island's first diocese.
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  • As chancellor, the statutes directed him to study theology, to train others in that study and to oversee the educational work of the diocese.
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  • He started a theological college (the Scholae Cancellarii), founded night schools, delivered courses of lectures on church history, held Bible classes, and was instrumental in founding a society of mission preachers for the diocese, the "Novate Novale."
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  • Early in 1877 he was consecrated first bishop of Truro, and threw himself with characteristic vigour into the work of organizing the new diocese.
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  • His knowledge, his sympathy, his enthusiasm soon made themselves felt everywhere; the ruridecanal conferences of clergy became a real force, and the church in Cornwall was inspired with a vitality that had never been possible when it was part of the unwieldy diocese of Exeter.
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  • Particular questions of importance, the Jerusalem bishopric, the healing of the Colenso schism in the diocese of Natal, the organization of native ministries and the like, occupied much of his time; and he did all in his power to foster the growth of local churches.
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  • On his return to his diocese,his zeal and eloquence were largely instrumental in withstanding the progress of Calvinism, and among others he converted Henry Sponde, who became bishop of Pamiers, and the Swiss general Sancy.
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  • In 1768 he entered into controversy with the bishop of the diocese; he had differences with the superior landlord of part of his estate, the president De Brosses; and he engaged in a long and tedious return match with the republic of Geneva.
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  • The result was a difficulty as to burial, which was compromised by hurried interment at the abbey of Scellieres in Champagne, anticipating the interdict of the bishop of the diocese by an hour or two.
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  • In this diocese, which covers nearly the whole of Middlesex and a very small portion of Hertfordshire, are the suffragan bishoprics of Islington, Kensington and Stepney.
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  • The bishopric of Southwark was created in 1904, having been previously a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Rochester.
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  • He was likewise a good churchman and an able administrator of his diocese; he encouraged the reformation of the clergy and the monasteries.
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  • In the 5th century the clergy of the diocese of Paris built a basilica over the tomb.
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  • The two terms are still used side by side; thus there are patriarchal, national and primatial councils, as well as provincial councils (under the metropolitan of a province) and diocesan synods, consisting of the clergy of a diocese and presided over by the bishop (or the vicar-general).
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  • From this time he lived mostly in retirement, finding a congenial home with Lord Weymouth, his friend from college days, at Longleat in Wiltshire; and though pressed to resume his diocese in 1703, upon the death of Bishop Kidder, he declined, partly on the ground of growing weakness, but partly no doubt from his love for the quiet life of devotion which he was able to lead at Longleat.
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  • In Roman Gaul this territory formed part of the diocese of Auch (civitas Ausciorum), which corresponded roughly with the later duchy of Gascony.
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  • A good bibliography of general works and monographs on the archaeology and the history of the town and diocese of Coutances is given in U.
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  • While in England he was appointed (1503), by Henry VII., to the see of Hereford, and in the following year to the more lucrative diocese of Bath and Wells, but he never resided in either.
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  • The diocese was a large one, including until 1468 not only much of Bavaria, but practically the whole of the archduchy of Austria.
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  • Returning to France he neglected the affairs of his diocese, and passed his time mainly at St Samson-sur-Risle in Normandy.
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  • In the autumn of 1661 he paid a short visit to his diocese, and returning to London he died on the 29th of November.
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  • The professional schools include a school of civil and mining engineering at Lima (created 1876), a military school at Chorrillos under the direction of French instructors, a naval school at Callao, nine episcopal seminaries (one for each diocese), a national agricultural school in the vicinity of Lima (created 1902), and a few commercial schools.
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  • There are Anglican churches in Lima and Cuzco, belonging to the diocese of the Bishop of the Falkland Islands; but their existence is illegal and is ignored rather than permitted.
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  • Each diocese has its seminary for the education of the priesthood, that of Arequipa being distinguished for its influence in church affairs.
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  • No member of the executive branch of the government (president, cabinet minister, prefect, sub-prefect, or governor) can be elected to either chamber, nor can any judge or " fiscal " of the supreme court, nor any member of the ecclesiastical hierarchy from his diocese, province or parish, nor any judge or " fiscal " of superior and first-instance courts from their judicial districts, nor any military officer from the district where he holds a military appointment at the time of election.
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  • Its west portal, the decoration of the spire of the tower, and its stained glass are among the features which make it one of the finest churches of the Rouen diocese.
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  • This result he achieved in spite of the Decian persecution (250251), during which he had felt it to be his duty to absent himself from his diocese, and notwithstanding the demoralizing effects of an irruption of barbarians (Goths and Boranians) who laid waste the diocese in A.D.
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  • Armagh is divided into eight baronies, and contains twenty-five parishes and parts of parishes, the greater number of which are in the Protestant and Roman Catholic dioceses of Armagh, and a few in the Roman Catholic diocese of Dromore.
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  • c. 12, § 2, enacts that" if any person ecclesiastical, or which shall have an ecclesiastical living, shall advisedly maintain or affirm any doctrine directly contrary or repugnant to any of the said articles, and by conventicle before the bishop of the diocese, or the ordinary, or before the queen's highness's commissioners in matters ecclesiastical, shall persist therein or not revoke his error, or after such revocation eftsoons affirm such untrue doctrine,"he shall be deprived of his ecclesiastical promotions.
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  • The principal buildings are the Roman Catholic church, which is the pro-cathedral of the diocese of Killaloe; the parish church formed out of the ruins of the Franciscan Abbey, founded in 1240 by Donough Carbrac O'Brien; a school on the foundation of Erasmus Smith, and various county buildings.
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  • The right to hold a visitation of a suffragan's diocese or to issue censures against him was, by Sess.
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  • c. 3 de ref., of the council of Trent, made dependent upon the consent of the provincial synod after cause shown (causa cognita et probata); and the only two powers left to the archbishop in this respect are to watch over the diocesan seminaries and to compel the residence of the bishop in his diocese.
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  • The archbishop of Canterbury exercises the twofold jurisdiction of a metropolitan and a diocesan bishop. As metropolitan he is the guardian of the spiritualities of every vacant see within the province, he presents to all benefices which fall vacant during the vacancy of the see, and through his special commissary exercises the ordinary jurisdiction of a bishop within the vacant diocese.
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  • The archbishop had formerly exclusive jurisdiction in all causes of wills and intestacies, where parties died having personal property in more than one diocese of the province of Canterbury, and he had concurrent jurisdiction in other cases.
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  • He is entitled to consecrate all the bishops within his province and was formerly entitled, upon consecrating a bishop, to select a benefice within his diocese at his option for one of his chaplains, but this practice was indirectly abolished by 3 and 4 Vict.
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  • The archbishop exercises the ordinary jurisdiction of a bishop over his diocese through his consistory court at Canterbury, the judge of which court is styled the commissary-general of the city and diocese of Canterbury.
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  • The archbishop holds a visitation of his diocese personally every three years, and he is the only diocesan who has kept up the triennial visitation of the dean and chapter of his cathedral.'
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  • In ancient Gaul it was the country of the Nitiobroges with Aginnum for its capital, and in the 4th century it was the Civitas Agennensium which was a part of Aquitania Secunda and which formed the diocese of Agen.
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  • In 18J7 the pope, proprio motu, appointed him provost (or head of the chapter) of Westminster, and the same year he took up his residence in Bayswater as superior of a community known as the "Oblates of St Charles," an association of secular priests on the same lines as the institute of the Oratory, but with this difference, that they are by their constitution at the beck and call of the bishop in whose diocese they live.
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  • The diocese is that of Down, Connor, and Dromore.
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  • He had refused the bishopric of Maine when in 1868 he was elected to the diocese of central New York.
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  • Charles was unwearying in his efforts to improve the education of clergy and laity, and in 789 ordered that schools should be established in every diocese.
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  • Alberic Trium Fontium, a monk of the Cistercian monastery of Trois Fontanes in the diocese of Chalons, embodied much poetical fiction in his chronicle (c. 1249).
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  • The bishop was a prince of the Holy Roman Empire, while his diocese was one of the largest in Germany, including (shortly before the Reformation) most of Baden and Wurttemberg, and 12 out of the 22 Swiss cantons (all the region on the right bank of the Aar, save the portions included in the diocese of Coire) - in it were comprised 350 monasteries, 1760 benefices and 17,000 priests.
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  • 1598), born at Villanueva de Sigena in the diocese of Huesca (Latassa, Bibl.
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  • Servetus at Geneva makes Villanueva his birthplace, assigning it to the adjoining diocese of Lerida.
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  • In 1408, however, the clergy of the city and archiepiscopal diocese of Prague laid before the archbishop a formal complaint against Huss, arising out of strong expressions with regard to clerical abuses of which he had made use in his public discourses; and the result was that, having been first deprived of his appointment as synodal preacher, he was, after a vain attempt to defend himself in writing, publicly forbidden the exercise of any priestly function throughout the diocese.
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  • This programme was adopted by the clergy of his diocese as their cahier, or book of instructions to their representative at the States General, namely Talleyrand himself.
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  • Southampton gives name to a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Winchester.
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  • On his return he retired to his diocese of Arles, where he devoted himself zealously to the instruction of his people.
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  • This countship, the extent of which seems to have been practically identical with that of the ecclesiastical diocese of Angers, occupied the greater part of what is now the department of Maine-et-Loire, further embracing, to the north, Craon, Bazouges (Chateau-Gontier), Le Lude, and to the east, Chateau-la-Valliere and Bourgueil, while to the south, on the other hand, it included neither the present town of MontreuilBellay, nor Vihiers, Cholet, Beaupreau, nor the whole district lying to the west of the Ironne and Thouet, on the left bank of the Loire, which formed the territory of the Mauges.
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  • A quarrel with the papacy turned, or helped to turn, his thoughts in the direction of Church reform, but he hoped this would come from within rather than from without, and with the aid of his friend John Gropper (1503-1559), began, about 1536, to institute certain reforms in his own diocese.
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  • Caesarea was an important diocese, and its bishop was, ex officio, exarch of the great diocese of Pontus.
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  • For the first four or five centuries of Benedictine history there was no organic bond between any of the monasteries; each house formed an independent autonomous family, managing its own affairs and subject to no external authority or control except that of the bishop of the diocese.
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  • In 1618 he attended the synod of Dort, and was soon after made dean of the Chapel Royal and translated to Winchester, a diocese which he administered with loving prudence and the highest success.
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  • He also administered the diocese of Metz, and was nominated to that of Marseilles in 1621, but illhealth obliged him here to take a coadjutor.
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  • The bishop, or count, on whose lands the peace was violated was vested with judicial power, and was directed, in case he was himself unable to execute sentence, to summon to his assistance the laymen and even the clerics of the diocese, all of whom were required to take a solemn oath to observe and enforce the peace.
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  • The archbishop was a strenuous upholder of episcopal independence in the Gallican sense, and involved himself in a controversy with Rome by his endeavours to suppress the jurisdiction of the Jesuits and other religious orders within his diocese.
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  • The Council accordingly listened to the accusations of Ferrar's chapter, and in 1552 he was summoned to London and imprisoned on a charge of praemunire incurred by omitting the king's authority in a commission which he issued for the visitation of his diocese.
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  • cxliii.; for a picture of him in his diocese, Temple Bar, vol.
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  • The title of "official principal," together with that of "vicar-general," is in England now merged in that of "chancellor" of a diocese (see Chancellor).
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  • The Roman Catholics number 2 30% of the whites, the head of their church in the province being a vicar apostolic. At the head of the Anglican community, which is in full communion with the Church of England, is the bishop of Bloemfontein, whose diocese, founded in 1863, includes not only the Orange Free State, but Basutoland, Griqualand West and British Bechuanaland.
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  • Hobart's zeal for the General Seminary and the General Convention led him to oppose the plan of Philander Chase, bishop of Ohio, for an Episcopal seminary in that diocese; but the Ohio seminary was made directly responsible to the House of Bishops, and Hobart approved the plan.
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  • He exerted himself greatly in building up his diocese, attempting to make an annual visit to every parish.
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  • It was necessary to make them large, because in the early Church it was customary for the bishop to baptize all the catechumens in his diocese (and so baptisteries are commonly found attached to the cathedral and not to the parish churches), and also because the rite was performed only thrice in the year.
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  • Here again, however, he failed to satisfy the inflexible emperor and was dismissed to his diocese.
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  • Kent is mainly in the diocese of Canterbury, but has parts in those of Rochester, Southwark and Chichester.
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  • In 1291 the archdeaconry of Canterbury was coextensive with that diocese and included the deaneries of Westbere, Bridge, Sandwich, Dover, Elham, Lympne, Charing, Sutton, Sittingbourne, Ospringe and Canterbury; the archdeaconry of Rochester, also co-extensive with its diocese, included the deaneries of Rochester, Dartford, Mailing and Shoreham.
    0
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  • ALACOQUE, or AL COQ, Marguerite Marie (1647-1690), French nun and mystic, was born at Lauthecourt, a village in the diocese of Autun, on the 22nd of July 1647.
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  • In May 1671 she entered the Visitation convent at Paray-le-Monial, in the diocese of Autun, and took the final vows in November 1672.
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  • As monk in the neighbouring monastery of Euprepius, and afterwards as presbyter, he became celebrated in the diocese for his asceticism, his orthodoxy and his eloquence; hostile critics, such as the church historian Socrates, allege that his arrogance and vanity were hardly less conspicuous.
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  • He stirred up his own clergy, he wrote to encourage the dissidents at Constantinople, he addressed himself to the sister and wife of the emperor (Theodosius himself being known to be still favourable to Nestorius), and he beggared the clergy of his own diocese to find bribes for the officials of the court.
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  • Islington is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of London.
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  • He assisted the king in his studies, received from him the monasteries of Congresbury and Banwell, and sometime later "Exeter and its diocese in Saxonland and Cornwall."
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  • Its territory was coterminous with that of Bononia and Regium, as its diocese is now, and to the south it seems to have extended to the summit of the Apennines.
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  • The clergy and laity of a diocese together elected their bishop, as they had done before; but no one could become a bishop against the will of the king, and the confirmation of their choice rested with him.
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  • Thus the diocese, hitherto a simple unit, became an elaborately articulated whole.
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  • But in 1027, with the rest of the diocese of Trent, it was given by the emperor Conrad II.
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  • CHRISTIANSAND (KRISTIANSAND), a fortified seaport of Norway, the chief town of a diocese (stilt), on a fjord of the Skagerrack, 175 m.
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  • In Farmington Avenue is St Joseph's cathedral (Roman Catholic), the city being the seat of the diocese of Hartford.
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  • Besides some archaeological articles in the Nineteenth Century and contributions to the Dictionary of National Biography, he published a History of the Diocese of Norwich (1879); The Coming of the Friars (1885); The Autobiography of Roger North (1887) and Trials of a Country Parson (1890).
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  • 324, and that St Reparatus, bishop of the diocese, was buried in it in 475.
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  • 1128), bishop of Durham and chief minister of William Rufus, was the son of a Norman parish priest who belonged to the diocese of Bayeux.
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  • the greater part of the diocese of Besancon.
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  • But the Roman Catholic Church as a whole has never had any one official catechism, each bishop being allowed to settle the matter for his own diocese.
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  • In Paris he was still in the employ of the cardinal, who delegated to him the lay patronage which he still retained in the diocese.
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  • Armidale is a cathedral town, being the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop and belonging to the joint Anglican diocese of Grafton; Armidale St Peter's, the Anglican cathedral, and St Mary's, the Roman Catholic, are both fine buildings.
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  • On the 24th of May 1430, Joan of Arc having been taken prisoner at Compiegne, within the limits of his diocese, Cauchon acted as her accuser, and demanded the right of judging her.
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  • As, in consequence of this, it was impossible for him to return to his own diocese, he obtained the bishopric of Lisieux in 1432 by favour of the king of England.
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  • - Offences against the law ecclesiastical (not being crimes) committed by clergy of the Church of England as a rule come by letters of request from the bishop of the diocese before the arches court of Canterbury or the chancery court of York (of both of which the same person is judge).
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  • Adam's Historia - known also as Gesta Hammaburgensis Ecclesiae Pontificum, Bremensium praesulum Historia, and Historia ecclesiastica - is a primary authority, not only for the great diocese of Hamburg-and-Bremen, but for all North German and Baltic lands (down to 1072), and for the Scandinavian colonies as far as America.
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  • 1119, by Norbert (born at Xanten, on the Lower Rhine, c. 1080) at Premontre, a secluded marshy valley in the forest of Coucy in the diocese of Laon.
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  • Kensington is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of London.
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  • In the episcopal church of the United States churchwardens discharge much the same duties as those performed by the English officials; their duties, however, are regulated by canons of the diocese, not by canons general.
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  • Ecclesiastically it is in the diocese of Brixen, whose vicar-general (a suffragan bishop) resides at Feldkirch.
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  • Lang's adherence to the older faith, together with his pride and arrogance, made him very unpopular in his diocese of Salzburg; in 1523 he was involved in a serious struggle with his subjects, and in 1525, during the Peasants' War, he had again to fight hard to hold his own.
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  • It was the country around Orleans, the pagus Aurelianensis; it lay on both banks of the Loire, and for ecclesiastical purposes formed the diocese of Orleans.
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  • In 606 the diocese was divided into two parts, and the patriarchate of Aquileia, protected by the Lombards, was revived, that of Grado being protected by the exarch of Ravenna and later by the doges of Venice.
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  • In 1553 Duke Albert of Prussia, anxious to heal the differences in the Prussian church caused by the discussion of Osiander's doctrines, invited him to Konigsberg, and in the following year appointed him professor of divinity and president of the Samland diocese.
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  • Being mostly Englishmen, they preferred to reside in the portion of their diocese within the gate, and Drogheda, being a walled town, was less liable to attack from the natives.
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  • For a time he contemplated with eagerness the idea of a renovated cathedral life, devoted to the pursuit of learning and to the development of opportunities for the religious and intellectual benefit of the diocese.
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  • But the sudden immersion in the practical administration of a northern diocese gave him new strength.
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  • It forms the diocese of Pamiers and belongs to the ecclesiastical province of Toulouse.
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  • The handsome Roman Catholic cathedral for the diocese of Raphoe occupies a commanding site, and cost a large sum, as it contains carving from Rome, glass from Munich and a pulpit of Irish and Carrara marble.
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  • The Order of Fontevrault was founded about 1too by Robert of Arbrissel, who was born in the village of Arbrissel or Arbresec, in the diocese of Rennes, and attained great fame as a preacher and ascetic. The establishment was a double monastery, containing a nunnery of 300 nuns and a monastery of 200 monks, separated completely so that no communication was allowed except in the church, where the services were carried on in common; there were, moreover, a hospital for 120 lepers and other sick, and a penitentiary for fallen women, both worked by the nuns.
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  • He held the see for six years, but never visited the diocese.
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  • Hull became the seat of a suffragan bishop in the diocese of York in 1891.
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  • In 1148 he resided at Moiltiers la Celle in the diocese of Troyes, with his friend Peter of Celle:.
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  • The county is in the Protestant diocese of Tuam and the Roman Catholic dioceses of Taum, Achonry, Galway and Kilmacduagh, and Killala.
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  • the cartularies of the church and the town of Die (1868), of the abbey of St Andre le-Bas at Vienne (1869),(1869), of the abbey of Notre Dame at Bonnevaux in the diocese of Vienne (1889), of the abbey of St Chaffre at Le Monestier (1884), the Cheviot Hills inventories and several collections of archives of the dauphins of Viennais, and a Bibliotheque liturgique in six volumes (1893-1897), the third and fourth volumes of which constitute the Repertorium hymnologicum, containing more than 20,000 articles.
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  • GERHARD GROOT (1340-1384), otherwise Gerrit or Geert Groet, in Latin Gerardus Magnus, a preacher and founder of the society of Brothers of Common Life, was born in 1340 at Deventer in the diocese of Utrecht, where his father held a good civic position.
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  • In 1379, having received ordination as a deacon, he became missionary preacher throughout the diocese of Utrecht.
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  • The diocese includes rather less than one-third of the parishes of Yorkshire, and also a small part of Lancashire.
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  • 14) that English altars were of wood down to the middle of the i ith century, -at least in the diocese of Worcester.
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  • The principality forms ecclesiastically part of the diocese of Coire, while as regards customs duties it is joined with the Vorarlberg, and as regards postal and coinage arrangements with Austria, which (according to the agreement of 1852, renewed in 1876, by which the principality entered the Austrian customs union) must pay it at least 40,000 crowns annually.
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  • " Eparch" and "eparchy" are also used in the Russian Orthodox Church for a bishop and his diocese respectively.
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  • Energetic as an administrator, churches and schools rose throughout his diocese; and the excellent Mater Misericordiae Hospital and the seminary at Clonlife are lasting memorials of his zeal.
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  • The bishops obtained little by little great temporal powers (the diocese extended to the left bank of the Aar) and riches, becoming in 1125 princes of the empire, while their chapter was recruited only from the noblest families.
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  • sur le diocese de Lausanne (2 vols., Fribourg, 1859); J.
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  • These tools of Rome, both clerks and laymen, continued to increase in every diocese.
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  • was again succeeded, in 1342, by a Frenchman from the south, Pierre Roger de Beaufort, who was born in the castle of Maumont, in the diocese of Limoges.
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  • At the same period Carlo Borromeo made his diocese of Milan the model of a reformed bishopric. The pope supported Mary Stuart with money; his troops assisted Charles IX.
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  • Latimer was prohibited from preaching in the university or in any pulpits of the diocese, and on his occupying the pulpit of the Augustinian monastery, which enjoyed immunity from episcopal control, he was summoned to answer for his opinions before Wolsey, who, however, was so sensible of the value of such discourses that he gave him special licence to preach throughout England.
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  • At last a sermon he was persuaded to preach in London exasperated John Stokesley, bishop of the diocese, and seemed to furnish that fervent persecutor with an opportunity to overthrow the most dangerous champion of the new opinions.
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  • A commission appointed to inquire into the disturbances caused by his preaching in Bristol severely censured the conduct of his opponents; and, when the bishop prohibited him from preaching in his diocese, he obtained from Cranmer a special licence to preach throughout the province of Canterbury.
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  • Through this Congregation the pope, as bishop of Rome, made the inspection of his diocese; it is for this reason that he was president of this commission, the most important member of which was the cardinal vicar.
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  • He takes the place of the pope in the administration of the diocese of Rome; he has his own offices and diocesan assistants as in other bishoprics.
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  • c. 1258), English Franciscan, scholar and theologian, was born about 1200 in the diocese of Bath, and educated at Oxford under the famous Grosseteste.
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  • It is on one of the tributary streams of the Annalee river, in a broad valley surrounded on every side by elevated ground, with picturesque environs, notably the demesnes of Farnham and of Kilmore, which belongs to the bishops of that diocese.
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  • He held several conferences on the subject with the clergy of his diocese; and in the hope of influencing candid minds by means of the opinions of unbiassed foreigners,.
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  • It is usually applied to the bishop of a diocese and to those who exercise jurisdiction in his name or by delegation of his functions.
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  • Thus, in Germany, the term ordinariat is applied to the whole body of officials, including the bishop, through whom a diocese is administered.
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  • Vigilantius now settled for some time in Gaul, and is said by one authority (Gennadius) to have afterwards held a charge in the diocese of Barcelona.
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  • Missions: Ceylon (diocese of Kandy), New Zealand (diocese of Auckland), N.
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  • Missions: Bulgaria (diocese of Nicopolis).
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  • A new beginning was made in 1850 by the Anglican Board of Missions for Australia and Tasmania, and now each diocese is responsible for its own area.
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  • At Bellenden Ker, near Cairns, in North Queensland (diocese of Carpentaria), many natives have settled upon a reserve granted by government to the Anglican Church, and at another reserve, Fraser Island, the diocese of Brisbane has also undertaken successful work.
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  • Each bishop now deals with the Ethiopians in his own diocese.
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  • In 1790 he took charge of the diocese of Rhode Island also.
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  • 1566), who, though he himself was instrumental in introducing the reformed model into his other diocese of Verden, is reckoned as the last Roman Catholic archbishop of Bremen.
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  • 441, which allowed a bishop, who had built a church in the diocese of another bishop, to nominate the clerk, but not to consecrate the church.
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  • In England, for quite two centuries after its conversion, the clergy administered only pro tempore in the parochial churches, receiving their maintenance from the cathedral church, all the appointments within the diocese lying with the bishop. But in order to promote the building and endowment of parochial churches those who had contributed to their erection either by a grant of land, by building or by endowment, became entitled to present a clerk of their own choice to the bishop, who was invested with the revenues derived from such contribution.
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  • Under the Benefices Act, advowsons may not be sold by public auction except in conjunction with landed property adjacent to the benefice; transfers of patronage must be registered in the registry of the diocese, and no such transfers can be made within twelve months after the last admission or institution to the benefice.
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  • One diocese (Podlasie) was abolished, and a new one established at Kielce, while several bishops were sent out of the country.
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  • Bishop Morley even prohibited him from preaching in the diocese of Worcester.
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  • His charities were large and his private life blameless; he was constantly visiting his diocese, correcting offenders and discharging other episcopal duties; and he compelled neighbouring landholders to restore estates which rightly belonged to the see of Hereford.
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  • Rodez is the seat of a bishopric, the diocese of which comprises the department.
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  • He studied theology and canon law, and, after acting as parish priest in his native diocese for twelve years, was sent by the pope to Canada as a bishop's chaplain.
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  • From being chancellor of the diocese of London, he became chaplain and confessor to Edward III., whom he attended during his wars in France.
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  • Gilbert Walmesley, registrar of the ecclesiastical court of the diocese, a man of distinguished parts, learning and know ledge of the world, did himself honour by patronizing the young adventurer, whose repulsive person, unpolished manners and squalid garb moved many of the petty aristocracy of the neighbourhood to laughter or disgust.
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  • Theodore now divided Wilfrid's large diocese into three; and the aggrieved prelate went to lay his case before the bishop of Rome.
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  • In the early days of his bishopric he used to travel about his diocese attended by a little troop of skilled masons.
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  • He was fully occupied in restoring order in Saxony, in the diocese of Salzburg and elsewhere; in adding to his hereditary lands; in negotiating for a better understanding with France and England; and in reminding the vassal states, Hungary, Poland and Bohemia, of their duties towards the Empire.
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  • This law was followed by one authorizing the government to suspend,in every diocese where the bishop continued recalcitrant, the payment of that contribution to the Roman Catholic Church which by agreement had been given by the state since 1817.
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  • He threw himself with characteristic energy into his new work, visiting, preaching and lecturing in every part of his diocese.
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  • He took a foremost part in almost every good work in his diocese, social or educational, political or religious; while he found time also to cultivate friendly relations with thinking men and women of all schools, and to help all and sundry who came to him for advice and assistance.
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  • Subsequently he devoted himself wholly to the reformation of his diocese, which had fallen into a most unsatisfactory condition owing to the prolonged absences of its previous archbishops.
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  • PASTORAL LETTER, an open letter addressed by a bishop to the clergy or laity of his diocese, or to both, containing either general admonition, instruction or consolation, or directions for behaviour in particular circumstances.
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  • Along with Africa, Raetia and western Illyricum, it became part of the Italian praefecture; along with the islands of Sardinia and Corsica, it became part of the Italian diocese.
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  • In 1552, on the temporary extinction of the diocese of Durham, Gateshead was attached to Newcastle, but in 1554 was regranted to Bishop Tunstall.
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  • In Ardnaree is the Roman Catholic cathedral (diocese of Killala), with an east window of Munich glass, and the ruins of an Augustinian abbey (1427) adjoining.
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  • As bishop he was a strict disciplinarian, and did much to restore order in a diocese of which the clergy had become extraordinarily demoralized.
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  • In its later history D is associated with some place in the diocese of Worcester, probably Evesham.
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  • The diocese of New Zealand was founded in 1841, being endowed by the Church Missionary Society through the council, and George Augustus Selwyn was chosen as the first bishop. Since then the increase has gone on, as the result both of home effort and of the action of the colonial churches.
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  • In the latter case there is no legal subdivision of the older diocese, the new bishop administering such districts as belonged to it under commission from its bishop, provision being made, however, that in all matters ecclesiastical there shall be no appeal but to the metropolitan of India.
    0
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  • the diocese Honolulu (Hawaii), previously under the jurisdiction of the archbishop of Canterbury, was transferred in 1900 to the Episcopal Church in the United States on account of political changes.
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  • As the result of negotiations and preparations extending over five years, 250 bishops, together with delegates, clerical and lay, from every diocese in the Anglican communion, met in London, the opening service of intercession being held in Westminster Abbey.
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  • DIOCESE (formed on Fr.
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  • diocese, in place of the Eng.
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  • In this, its sole modern sense, the word diocese (dioecesis) has only been regularly used since the 9th century, though isolated instances of such use occur so early as the 3rd, what is now known as a diocese having been till then usually called a parochia (parish).
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  • But in the reorganization of the empire, begun by Diocletian and completed by Constantine, the word "diocese" acquired a more important meaning, the empire being divided into twelve dioceses, of which the largest - Oriens - embraced sixteen provinces, and the smallest - Britain - four (see Rome: Ancient History; and W.
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  • The organization of the Christian church in the Roman empire following very closely the lines of the civil administration (see Church History), the word diocese, in its ecclesiastical sense, was at first applied to the sphere of jurisdiction, not of a bishop, but of a metropolitan.'
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  • In principle, however, the subdivision of a diocese, in the event of the work becoming too heavy for one bishop, was very early admitted, e.g.
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  • by the first council at Lugo in Spain (569), which erected Lugo into a metropolitanate, the consequent division of diocese being confirmed by the king of the second council, held in 572.
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  • Another reason for dividing a diocese, and establishing a new see, has been recognized by the church as duly existing "if the sovereign should think fit to endow some principal village or town with the rank and privileges of a city" (Bingham, lib.
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  • Nor could any diocese be divided without the consent of the primate.
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  • By the ancient custom of the church the bishop takes his title, not from his diocese, but from his see, i.e.
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  • "Diocese."
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  • There are 94 civil parishes, while the ecclesiastical parishes or districts wholly or in part within the county number 70, of which 67 are in the diocese of St David's and the archdeaconry of Brecon, the remaining 3 being in the diocese of Llandaff.
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  • In 1872 he took part in the congress summoned by the Ultramontanes at Fulda, and by his judicious use of minimizing tactics he kept his diocese free from any participation in the Old Catholic schism.
    0
    0
  • The doctrines of the reformers made their appearance in the diocese early in the 16th century, and soon Archbishop Sigismund, a son of Joachim II., elector of Brandenburg, openly avowed his adherence to Lutheranism.
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    0
  • They were under the supervision of the chancellor of each diocese, and were mainly devoted to studies preparatory for the Church.
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  • In the 8th century one of the most famous is the Anglo-Saxon Willibald, who died in 781 as bishop of the Frankish diocese of Eichstatt.
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  • Ten members are appointed for the diocese of London, six for each of the dioceses of Winchester, Rochester, Lichfield and Worcester; and four for each of the remaining dioceses.
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  • He had close connexion with the diocese of Ely, being successively chancellor, vicar-general and prebendary.
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    0
  • During his episcopate many churches and schools were built in the diocese.
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    0
  • In the same year he had an unpleasant dispute with Cranmer about the visitation of his diocese.
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    0
  • His remonstrances, however, were met by his own committal to the Fleet, and the visitation of his diocese was held during his imprisonment.
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  • In his own diocese no victim of the persecution is known to have suffered till after his death; and, much as he was already maligned by opponents, there are strong evidences that his natural disposition was humane and generous.
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  • Boniface VIII., detaching the city of Pamiers from the diocese of Toulouse in 1295, made it the seat of a new bishopric and appointed Saisset to the see.
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  • charged Richard Leneveu, archdeacon of Auge in the diocese of Lisieux, and Jean de Picquigni, vidame of Amiens, to make an investigation, which lasted several months.
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  • raised him to the cardinalate; and in 1450 he was appointed bishop of Brixen against the wish of Sigismund, archduke of Austria, who opposed the reforms the new bishop sought to introduce into the diocese.
    0
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  • Soon afterwards his dispute with the archduke Sigismund in his own diocese was brought to a point by his claiming certain dues of the bishopric, which the temporal prince had appropriated.
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  • The Bituriges Cubi, called simply Bituriges by Caesar, in whose time they acknowledged the supremacy of the Aedui, inhabited the modern diocese of Bourges, including the departments of Cher and Indre, and partly that of Allier.
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  • tells us in his treatise De synodo dioecesana that the pope often names vicars-apostolic for the government of a particular diocese because the episcopal see is vacant or, being filled, the titular bishop cannot fulfil his functions.
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  • As bishop of Nebbio in Corsica, he took part in some of the earlier sittings of the Lateran council (1516-1517), but, in consequence of party complications, withdrew to his diocese, and ultimately to France, where he became a pensioner of Francis I., and was the first to occupy a chair of Hebrew and Arabic in the university of Paris.
    0
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  • The ecclesiastical preferment was merely intended to provide a salary not at Henry's expense; for Fox never saw either Exeter or the diocese of Bath and Wells to which he was translated in 1492.
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  • For these reasons rather than from any ecclesiastical scruples Fox visited and resided in his new diocese; and he occupied Norham Castle, which he fortified and defended against a Scottish raid in Perkin Warbeck's interests (1497).
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  • Dover is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Canterbury.
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  • The freedom with which he fraternized with his Protestant neighbours called forth the rebuke of his bishop (George Hay), and ultimately, for hunting and for occasionally attending the parish church of Cullen, where one of his friends was minister, he was deprived of his charge and forbidden the exercise of ecclesiastical functions within the diocese.
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  • It was in these circumstances that he returned to Rome; but most of the clergy, suspecting his orthodoxy, and believing him to have had some share in the removal of his predecessor, shunned his fellowship. He enjoyed, however, the support of Narses, and, after he had publicly purged himself of complicity in Vigilius's death in the church of St Peter, he met with toleration in his own immediate diocese.
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  • In 1897 Crediton was made the seat of a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Exeter.
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  • He was a benefactor to his diocese and died on the 12th of May 1293.
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  • He had been some time in orders when Louis XIV., in 1672, selected him as tutor of the princes of Conti, with such success that the king next entrusted to him the education of the count of Vermandois, one of his natural sons, on whose death in 1683 Fleury received for his services the Cistercian abbey of Loc-Dieu, in the diocese of Rhodez.
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  • In 1696 he was elected to fill the place of La Bruyere in the French Academy; and on the completion of the education of the young princes the king bestowed upon him the rich priory of Argenteuil, in the diocese of Paris (1706).
    0
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  • Sometimes a 15th - the finding of the cross by Helena - is added; on the other hand in the diocese of Vienna, the stations were at the end of the 18th century reduced to eleven.
    0
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  • The former summoned councils in Rome to anathematize and excommunicate the image-breakers (730, 732); Leo retaliated by transferring southern Italy and Greece from the papal diocese to that of the patriarch.
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  • In practice the different degrees of jurisdiction, as represented in the pope, are of no importance: he is bishop of Rome and governs his diocese by direct episcopal authority; he is also the head of the Church, and in this capacity governs all the dioceses, though the regular authority of each bishop in his own diocese is also ordinary and immediate, i.e.
    0
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  • The bishop of Leon, whose diocese is included in the archiepiscopal province of Guatemala, is the spiritual head of the Roman Catholics.
    0
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  • Under the new Carolingian dynasty, Pippin and Charlemagne restored the unity of the Frankish realm, and then the word Neustria was restricted to the district between the Loire and the Seine, together with part of the diocese of Rouen north of the Seine; while Austrasia comprised only the Frankish dominions beyond the Rhine, perhaps with the addition of the three cities of Mainz, Worms and Spires on the left bank.
    0
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  • Its exact dimensions are unknown; they probably coincided with those of the old diocese of Worcester, the early bishops of which bore the title "Episcopus Hwicciorum."
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  • At Brechin, famous like Abernethy for its round tower, the Culdee prior and his monks helped to form the chapter of the diocese founded by David I.
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  • When elected, Ketteler refused to allow the students of theology in his diocese to attend lectures at Giessen, and ultimately founded an opposition seminary in the diocese of Mainz itself.
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  • In October 1868 Corrigan became vicar-general of Newark, a diocese then including all the state of New Jersey.
    0
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  • On the death of Cardinal McCloskey in 1885 Archbishop Corrigan became metropolitan of the diocese of New York.
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  • He had made various efforts to introduce a strict form of canonical life in various communities of canons in Germany; in 1120 he was working in the diocese of Laon, and there in a desert place, called Premontre, in Aisne, he and thirteen companions established a monastery to be the cradle of a new order.
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  • In 1246 he was ordained at Tripolis as Jacobite bishop of Gubas near Malatia, and a year later was transferred to the neighbouring diocese of Lakabhin, whence in 1253 he passed to be bishop of Aleppo.
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  • He seems to have been a model of devotion to his ecclesiastical duties and to have won the respect of all parties in his diocese.
    0
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  • As such, the pope is regarded as " vicar of Christ, head of the bishops, and supreme governor of the whole Catholic Church, of whom the whole world is the territory or diocese."
    0
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  • These titles are generally assigned to bishops appointed to Apostolic Delegations, Vicariates and Prefectures, or to the office of coadjutor, auxiliary or administrator of a diocese.
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  • Decennially each bishop of the United States is expected to pay a visit to Rome (Ad Limina Apostolorum), and to make a report of the spiritual condition of religion within his diocese.
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  • The other charitable institutions are 992 in number, and include every form of public and private charity; no diocese is without one or more such establishments.
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  • The diocese includes about one-seventh of the parishes of Yorkshire, and also covers a very small portion of Lancashire.
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  • (1692-1696) the country suffered terribly from famine and pestilence; in the diocese of Abo alone 60,000 persons died in less than nine months.
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  • The diocese of St Davids (Tyddewi), the largest, oldest and poorest of the four Cambrian sees, consists of the counties of Pembroke, Carmarthen and Cardigan, almost the whole of Brecon, the greater part of Radnor, and west Glamorgan with Swansea and Gower.
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  • The cathedral church of St Davids is situated near the remote headland of St Davids in Pembrokeshire, but the episcopal residence has been fixed ever since the Reformation at Abergwili near Carmarthen, the most central spot in this vast diocese.
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  • The diocese of Bangor consists of the counties of Anglesea, Carnarvon and large portions of Merioneth and Montgomery.
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  • The diocese of St Asaph (Llanelwy) consists of the county of Denbigh, nearly the whole of Flint, with portions of Montgomery, Merioneth and Shropshire.
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  • The diocese of Newport (known till 1896 as Newport and Menevia) consists of the counties of Monmouth, Glamorgan and Hereford; whilst the remaining eleven counties were in 1895 formed into the Vicariate of Wales, which in 1898 was erected into a diocese under a bishop with the title of Menevia.
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  • 1816), the non-resident bishop of Llandaff, who rarely visited his diocese during an episcopate of thirty years; and of another English divine who held the deanery, the chancellorship and nine livings in a North Welsh see, his curates-in-charge being paid out of Queen Anne's Bounty, a fund expressly intended for the benefit of impoverished livings.
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  • The first visitation of his friend Odo Rigaldi, archbishop of Rouen, shows that about 15% of the parish clergy in that diocese were notoriously incontinent (Regestrum Visitationum, ed.
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  • Gascoigne, the most distinguished Oxford chancellor of his day, writing about 1450 of John de la Bere, then bishop of St David's, says that he had refused to separate the clergy of his diocese from their concubines, giving publicly as his reason, "for then I your bishop should lose the 400 marks which I receive yearly in my diocese for the priests' lemans" (Gascoigne, Lib.
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  • Unlike Pole, however, he seems to have been averse from the excessive persecution of Mary's reign, and no Protestants were burnt in his diocese.
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  • Later we find him in the diocese of Arles, where the archbishop arrested him and had his case referred, to the tribunal of the pope.
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  • On several occasions St Bernard was begged to fight the innovator on the scene of his exploits, and in 1145, at the instance of the legate Alberic, cardinal bishop of Ostia, he set out, passing through the diocese of Angouleme and Limoges, sojourning for some time at Bordeaux, and finally reaching the heretical towns of Bergerac, Perigueux, Sarlat, Cahors and Toulouse.
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  • Under the name of Cunecastre it was made the seat of a bishop in 882, and continued to be the head of the diocese till the Danish invasion of 995.
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  • The library of 1500 volumes which he bequeathed to the clergy of the diocese is housed in a building with an outside stair, standing near the cathedral, and the Bishop's Walk by the river also perpetuates his memory.
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  • TRONDHJEM, or Throndhjem (sometimes written in the German form Drontheim), a city and seaport of Norway, chief town of the stift (diocese) of Trondhjem and the amt (county) of South Trondhjem, 384 m.
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  • On the 6th of July 1909 he was suddenly taken ill, on the 10th he received conditional absolution from a priest of the diocese of Southwark, and on the 12th extreme unction from the prior of Storrington.
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  • The city is in the diocese of Upsala, but has a separate consistory, composed of the rectors of the city parishes, the president of which is the rector of St Nicholas (Storkyrka).
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  • As a bishop, Horsley was energetic both in his diocese, where he strove to better the position of his clergy, and in parliament.
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  • SIMON WILLIAM GABRIEL BRUTE (1779-1839), American prelate, first Roman Catholic bishop of the diocese of Vincennes, Indiana, U.S.A., was born at Rennes, France, on the 20th of March 1779, his father, Simon Gabriel Guillaume Brute de Remur (1729-1786), being superintendent of the crown lands in Brittany.
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  • His great influence on the entire church, his wonderful success in planning, financing, and carrying out necessary ecclesiastical reforms, and the constructive and executive ability he displayed in his diocese, make him one of the foremost Catholic emigrants to the United States.
    0
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  • In the ecclesiastical organization the exarch of a diocese (the word being here used of the political division) was in the 4th and 5th centuries the same as primate.
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  • Then he reappears in his native district as a priest without a university degree (Sir John Knox) and a notary of the diocese of St Andrews.
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  • Sweden is divided into 12 dioceses and 186 deaneries, the head of the diocese of Upsala being archbishop. The parish is an important unit in secular as well as ecclesiastical connexions.
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  • Public schools for boys are provided by the state, each bishop being superintendent (eforus) of those in his diocese.
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  • About 1235 he became chancellor of the diocese of Canterbury under Archbishop Edmund Rich, and he was with the archbishop during his exile in France.
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  • He was a scholar, a preacher, and a man of affairs, temperamentally quiet and dignified; and his administration differed radically from that of Archbishop Hughes; he was conciliatory rather than polemic and controversial, and not only built up the Roman Catholic Church materially, but greatly changed the tone of public opinion in his diocese toward the Church.
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  • The see was founded in 722 by St Willibrord, and the diocese thus formed, saving for a short time when it was an archbishopric, was subordinate to the see of Cologne.
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  • About three-fifths of this number belong to the diocese of Azerbaijan, with a bishop at Tabriz, and reside in the cities of Tabriz, KhoI, Selmas, Urmia and Maragha, and in about thirty villages close to the north-western frontier; the other two-fifths, under the diocese of Isfahan, with a bishop in Julfa, reside in Teheran, Hamadan, Julfa, Shiraz, Bushire, Resht, Enzeli and other towns, and in some villages in the districts of Chahar Mahal, Feridan, Barbarud, Kamareh, Kazaz, Kharakan, &c. Many Persian Armenians are engaged in trade and commerce, and some of their merchants dispose of much capital, but the bulk live on the proceeds of agriculture and are poor.
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  • Till the council of Trent every bishop had full power to regulate the Breviary of his own diocese; and this was acted upon almost everywhere.
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  • The Roman has thus become nearly universal, with the allowance only of additional offices for saints specially venerated in each particular diocese.
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  • This was inaugurated by Montalembert, but its literary advocates were chiefly Dom Gueranger, a learned Benedictine monk, abbot of Solesmes, and Louis Francois Veuillot (1813-1883) of the Univers; and it succeeded in suppressing them everywhere, the last diocese to surrender being Orleans in 1875.
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  • - Here are found the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Office of the Dead (obligatory on All Souls' Day), and offices peculiar to each diocese.
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  • Ingham, bishop of the diocese, and The Rise of British West Africa (London, 1904) by Claude George.
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  • The last-named diocese is that part of Portuguese East Africa south of the Sabi river; the Mashonaland diocese includes the Portuguese territory between the Sabi and the Zambezi.
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  • His charge to the clergy of the diocese, the only charge of his known to us, is a weighty and valuable address on the importance of external forms in religion.
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  • In his view not only the religious life of the nation, but (what he regarded as synonymous) the church itself, was in an almost hopeless state of decay, as we see from his first and only charge to the diocese of Durham and from many passages in the Analogy.
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  • He even asked John Wesley, in 1739, to desist from preaching in his diocese of Bristol, and in a memorable interview with the great preacher remarked that any claim to the extraordinary gifts of the Holy Spirit was "a horrid thing, a very horrid thing, sir."
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  • The town is the seat of a Roman Catholic diocese.
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  • Immediately on the outbreak of the controversy, Fenelon was exiled to his diocese, and during the last eighteen years of his life he was only once allowed to leave it.
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  • Tours of inspection, repeated several times a year, brought him into touch with every corner of his diocese.
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  • Having finally settled the diocese, he was permitted, as had been previously stipulated by himself, to return to his former diocese, or rather to the smaller and poorer portion of it, the bishopric of Down.
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  • The views of the Reformers had spread in his diocese, and he was suspected of temporizing with them.
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  • There are 9 ecclesiastical parishes and parts of two or three others, all in the diocese of St Davids.
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  • He selected that of Loire-et-Cher, taking the old title of bishop of Blois, and for ten years (1791-1801) ruled his diocese with exemplary zeal.
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  • The diocese of New Jersey was an unpromising field, but he took up his work there with characteristic vigour, especially in the foundation of St Mary's Hall (1837, for girls) and Burlington College (1846) as demonstrations of his theory of education under church control.
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  • Where the bishop himself is patron of a benefice within his own diocese he is empowered to collate a clerk to it, - in other words, to confer it on the clerk without the latter being presented to him.
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  • Besides bishops presiding over definite sees, there have been from time immemorial in the Christian Church bishops holding their jurisdiction in subordination to the bishop of the diocese.
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  • (4) Coadjutor bishops are such as are appointed to assist the bishop of the diocese when incapacitated by infirmity or by other causes from fulfilling his functions alone.
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  • Under this act the coadjutor bishop has the right of succession to the see, or in the case of the archiepiscopal sees and those of London, Winchester and Durham, to the see vacated by the bishop, translated from another diocese to fill the vacancy.
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  • The crown, having made choice of one of such persons, is empowered to present him by letters patent under the great seal to the metropolitan, requiring him to consecrate him to the same name, title, style and dignity of a bishop; and the person so consecrated is thereupon entitled to exercise, under a commission from the bishop who has nominated him, such authority and jurisdiction, within the diocese of such bishop, as shall be given to him by the commission, and no other.
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  • The bishop of the chief city in each diocese naturally rose to a pre-eminence, and was commonly called exarch - a title borrowed from the civil jurisdiction.
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  • Each patriarch is, within his diocese, what the Gallican theory makes the pope in the universal church.
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  • The imperial diocese of Pontus was governed by the exarch of Caesarea, who ruled over thirteen metropolitans with more than 100 suffragans.
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  • The diocese has been united with that of Savona.
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  • a few weeks later, found him in the midst of the pastoral duties of his great diocese.
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  • Wrexham is the seat of the Roman Catholic bishop of Menevia, whose diocese includes all Wales except Glamorganshire.
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  • His visitation of his diocese (printed in English Hist.
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  • The great bent of his energies was ceaselessly directed to the better organization of his diocese and to the furtherance of schemes for increasing the influence and efficiency of the church.
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  • After twenty-four years' labour in the diocese of Oxford, he was translated by Gladstone to the bishopric of Winchester.
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  • Diocese.
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  • On the death of King Frederick, Tausen, at the instance of Ronne, was, at the Herredag of 1533, convicted of blasphemy and condemned to expulsion from the diocese of Sjaelland, whereupon the mob rose in arms against the bishop, who would have been murdered but for the courageous intervention of Tausen, who conducted him home in safety.
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  • In 1838 he refused the post of assistant bishop of the eastern diocese (Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Rhode Island).
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  • In 1846 he established the western and north-eastern convocations of priests in his diocese; from 1850 to 1860, when its corner-stone was laid, he laboured for the "Hospital of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia"; and in 1861 he established the Philadelphia Divinity School.
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  • In 1833-1854 he was rector of St Peter's, Albany; in November 18J4 he was elected provincial bishop of New York in place of Benjamin Tredwell Onderdonk (1791-1861), who had been suspended, and upon Onderdonk's death he became bishop. In 1868 his diocese was divided, the new dioceses of Albany, Central New York and Long Island being separated from it.
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  • In India Bishop Heber laboured indefatigably, not only for the good of his own diocese, but for the spread of Christianity throughout the East.
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  • a sermon on sacrilege, which was duly published, and displays the high ideal which even then he had formed of the clerical office; and about the same time he was presented to the vicarage of Norton, in the diocese of Durham, and obtained a licence, through William Cecil, as a general preacher throughout the kingdom as long as the king lived.
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  • Sadoleto was a diligent and devoted bishop and left his diocese with reluctance even after he was made cardinal (1536).
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  • Here he gave his support to the new movement for church restoration in Wales, and during his occupation of the see more than twenty new churches were built in the diocese.
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  • As bishop of Hereford Dr Hampden made no change in his long-formed habits of studious seclusion, and though he showed no special ecclesiastical activity or zeal, the diocese certainly prospered in his charge.
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  • There are also processions of honour, for instance to meet a royal personage, or the bishop on his first entry into his diocese (Pontif.
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  • Bedfordshire forms an archdeaconry in the diocese of Ely, with 125 ecclesiastical parishes and parts of 6 others.
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  • With the division of the Mercian diocese in 679 Bedfordshire fell naturally to the new see of Dorchester.
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  • It formed part of Lincoln diocese from 1075 until 1837, when it was finally transferred to Ely.
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  • It forms the diocese of Viviers and part of the archiepiscopal province of Avignon.
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  • In 1128, at the council of Usedom, St Otto appointed his disciple Boniface bishop of Julin, the first Pomeranian diocese, and the foundation of a better order of things was laid.
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  • The bishop of the diocese, Dr Barlow, is said to have interceded for him.
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  • Whilst visiting his diocese, however, he was thrown into prison, and had to pay 3000 pistoles to prevent his being given up to Elizabeth.
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  • There were 270 churches and 312 chapels in the republic. Each diocese has its own seminary for the training of priests.
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  • Stepney is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of London.
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  • In 1847 a bishop of Cape Town was appointed to preside over this church, whose diocese extended not only over Cape Colony and Natal, but also over the island of St Helena.
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  • Silistria was the Durostorum of the Romans (Bulgarian Drstr); the ancient name remains in the title of the archbishop, who is styled metropolitan of Dorostol, and whose diocese is now united with that of Tcherven (Rustchuk).
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  • Thetford is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Norwich.
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  • presbyters appointed by the bishops in each diocese to defend the interests of the presbyters and now for the first time given " decisive " voice in synods) and certain clerical representatives from the " districts " or dioceses.
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  • The code of this last year created diocesan synods, to be held annually and to consist of the bishop, dean and all instituted clergy of the diocese.
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  • Deacons are also admitted to a deciding voice in every diocese but New Jersey, where they may speak but not vote.
    0
    0
  • These exceptions, introduced with a good object, had grown into a widespread evil by the 12th century, virtually creating an imperium in isnperio, and depriving the bishop of all authority over the chief centres of influence in his diocese.
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  • When a vacancy occurred, the bishop of the diocese chose the abbot out of the monks of the convent, but the right of election was transferred by jurisdiction to the monks themselves, reserving to the bishop the confirmation of the election and the benediction of the new abbot.
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  • Having studied at the university of Frankfort-on-the-Oder, he entered the ecclesiastical profession, and in 1513 became archbishop of Magdeburg and administrator of the diocese of Halberstadt.
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    0
  • Each division was under a praeses, and both belonged to the diocese of Illyria in the prefecture of Italy.
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  • His strict orthodoxy on the subject of the Trinity and the Incarnation, together with his vigorous eloquence, combined to make him peculiarly obnoxious to the Arian faction, which was at that time in the ascendant through the protection of the emperor Valens; and in 375, the synod of Ancyra, convened by Demetrius the Arian governor of Pontus, condemned him for alleged irregularities in his election and in the administration of the finances of his diocese.
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  • The bishops registers of the diocese of Norwich show that many parishes had three and some four successive vicars admitted in eighteen months.
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    0
  • The cases of Foxe and Morton were much the same; the former passed for a well-meaning man, yet had been practically absent from his diocese for twenty years.
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  • It constitutes the diocese of Bayonne, comes within the educational circumscription.
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  • Richardson the novelist, in Sir Charles Grandison, wishes there could be a Protestant nunnery in every county, " with a truly worthy divine, at the appointment of the bishop of the diocese, to direct and animate the devotion of such a society "; in 1829 the poet Southey, in his Colloquies (cxiii.), trusts that " thirty years hence this reproach also may be effaced, and England may have its Beguines and its sisters of mercy.
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  • He wrote the De jure Meneviensis ecclesiae in support of the claims of his diocese.
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    0
  • He called a general synod of his diocese.
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    0
  • His attempt to incorporate the wealthy diocese of Transylvania with his own primatial province was one of the principal causes of the spread of the Reformation in Hungary.
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  • From this post he was transferred as bishop, first to the diocese of Pereyaslav, and afterwards to that of Krusitsy near Moscow, finally becoming archbishop of Moscow in 1761.
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    0
  • Henceforth the diocese was to be conterminous with the department, and the parish with the commune.
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  • c. 1204-1207), French theologian, was born in the latter part of the 12th century at Bena, a village in the diocese of Chartres.
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  • This parish was the chief of thirteen locally situated within the diocese of London but exempt from the bishop's jurisdiction, and it was no doubt owing to this circumstance that it was selected originally as the place of judicature for the archbishop's court.
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  • They were originally introduced by the pope for the purpose of curtailing the bishop's legitimate authority within his diocese; "an object which," says Phillimore, "they certainly attained, to the great confusion of ecclesiastical jurisdiction for many years."
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  • The original office of the dean of the Arches may now be regarded as extinct, though the title is still popularly used, for no dean of the Arches has been appointed eo nomine for several centuries, and by an act of 1838 bishops have jurisdiction over all peculiars within their diocese.
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  • Under the Benefices Act 1898 the official principal of the archbishop is required to institute a presentee to a benefice if the tribunal constituted under that act decides that there is no valid ground for refusing institution and the bishop of the diocese notwithstanding fails to institute him.
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  • Each diocese has its synod of the clergy.
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  • He administered his diocese with conspicuous ability and success for about eleven years; and applied a large share of his revenues to the promotion of the interests of the Church, of schools and of charitable institutions.
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  • This diocese, and indeed the whole of Bavaria, was then disturbed by the feud between the Welfs and the Hohenstaufen, and the church was in a deplorable condition; but a great improvement was brought about by the new bishop in both ecclesiastical and secular matters.
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  • His father, Gerard Cauvin or Calvin,' was a notary-apostolic and procuratorfiscal for the lordship of Noyon, besides holding certain ecclesiastical offices in connexion with that diocese.
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  • Among the principal buildings are the modern Catholic cathedral of St Colman for the diocese of Cloyne, designed by A.
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  • These he published in January 1409, and among them was one forbidding the translation of the Bible into English without the consent of the bishop of the diocese, or of a provincial synod.
    0
    0
  • However, the bishop of Castres recovered his diocese (1483), and the heirs of the duke of Nemours took legal proceedings for the recovery of the countship of Castres.
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  • 1 93 - 211) Numidia was separated from Africa Vetus, and governed by an imperial procurator (procurator per Numidiam); finally, under the new organization of the empire by Diocletian, Numidia became one of the seven provinces of the diocese of Africa, being known as Numidia Cirtensis, and after Constantine as N.
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  • For many years Usher was actively employed both in the government of his diocese and in the publication of several learned works, amongst which may be specified Emmanuel (a treatise upon the Incarnation), published in 1638, and Britannicarum Ecclesiarum Antiquitates, in 1639.
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  • Four discourses delivered to the clergy of his diocese were printed in 1694.
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  • The episcopal emoluments arise from the mensal parishes, the incumbency of which is retained by the bishops, from licences and from an annual contribution, varying in amount, paid by the clergy of the diocese.
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  • When diocesan jurisdiction was introduced into Ireland in the 12th century the tuath became a diocese.
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  • Thus the diocese of Kilmacduagh was the territory of the Hui Fiachrach Aidne; that of Kilfenora was the tribe land of Corco-Mruad or Corcomroe.
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  • " My lord," said a beneficed priest, whom he had himself promoted, and who wept as he spoke, " before ye went last to Dublin ye were the best beloved man in your diocese that ever came in it, now ye are the worst beloved..
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  • His first nominee, Dr Richard Turner, resolutely declined the honour, declaring that he would be unintelligible to the people; and Cranmer could only answer that English was spoken in Ireland, though he did indeed doubt whether it was spoken in the diocese of Armagh.
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  • apxurp€a 1 3157-Epos), in the Christian Church, originally the title of the chief of the priests in a diocese.
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  • The office appears as early as the 4th century as that of the priest who presided over the presbyters of the diocese and assisted the bishop in matters of public worship, much as the archdeacon helped him in administrative affairs.
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  • Beverley is the seat of a suffragan bishop in the diocese of York.
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  • The cathedral was restored in 1848; it is the seat of the diocese of Bisarcio.
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  • The former cathedral of this diocese lies some distance to the N.W.; it is a fine Romanesque building of the 12th and 13th centuries.
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  • It is mostly in the diocese of Lincoln, but in part also in the dioceses of Southwell and York.
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  • Lincolnshire was originally included in the Mercian diocese of Lichfield, but, on the subdivision of the latter by Theodore in 680, the fen-district was included in the diocese of Lichfield, while the see for the northern parts of the county was placed at "Sidnacester," generally identified with Stow.
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  • He studied theology in the German College at Rome, and then became successively a member of the chapter of Porrentruy, bishop in partibus of Lydda, and finally suffragan of Basel for that part of the diocese situated in French territory.
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  • On the other hand, in a letter of Lupus, abbot of The False Capitularies are for civil legislation what the False Decretals are for ecclesiastical legislation: three books of Capitularies of the Frankish kings, more of which are spurious than authen Ferrieres, written in 858, and in the synodical letter of the council of Quierzy in 857 are to be found quotations which are certainly from these false decretals; and further, an undoubted allusion in the statutes given by Hincmar to his diocese on the 1st of November 852.
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  • In the second place, Isidore wishes to increase the strength and cohesion of the churches; he tries to give absolute stability to the diocese and the ecclesiastical province; he reinforces the rights of the bishop and his comprovincials, while he initiates a determined campaign against the chorepiscopi; finally, as the keystone of the arch he places the papacy.
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  • Barking is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of St Albans.
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  • Theudis, who made his headquarters at Seville, endeavoured to complete his mastery of the diocese of Spain by occupying Mauritania Tingitana, but he was defeated by the The imperial officers at Ceuta.
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  • Spain was so far relaxed as to permit the re-establishment of the orders of St Vincent de Paul, St Philip Neri and one other among those approved by the Holy See, so that throughout the country the bishops might have at their disposal a sufficient number of ministers and preachers for the purpose of missions in the villages of their dioceses, &c. In practice the phrase one other was interpreted by the bishops, not as one for the whole of Spain, but as one in each diocese, and at the request of the bishops congregations of all kinds established themselves in Spain, the number greatly increasing after the loss of the colonies and as a result of the measures of secularization in France.i The result was what is usual in such cases.
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  • His father was Robert, a priest of the diocese of Bath, who entered a monastery and left the boy to his own resources.
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  • He did much for his diocese, both by ecclesiastical reforms on the Hildebrandine model and by material developments.
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  • He was long reverenced in his own diocese as a saint before, in 1523, he was canonized by Pope Adrian VI.
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  • 1188), English statesman and prelate, was born in the diocese of Bath, where he obtained preferment.
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  • He undertook without delay the reformation of morals and clerical discipline throughout his vast diocese.
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  • But at least up to the year 12 4 7 he submitted patiently to papal encroachments, contenting himself with the protection (by a special papal privilege) of his own diocese from alien clerks.
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  • In 1253, upon being commanded to provide in his own diocese for a papal nephew, he wrote a letter of expostulation and refusal, not to the pope himself but to the commissioner, Master Innocent, through whom he received the mandate.
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  • Each house can call its superior to account, can depose, and can restore him, without appeal to any external authority, although the bishop of the diocese in which any house of the Oratory is established is its ordinary and immediate superior, though without power to interfere with the rule.
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  • Lloyd was an indefatigable opponent of the Roman Catholic tendencies of James II., and was one of the seven bishops who for refusing to have the Declaration of Indulgence read in his diocese was charged with publishing a seditious libel against the king and acquitted (1688).
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  • Croydon is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Canterbury.
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  • The election was confirmed by the pope in 1257 and Hugh set to work to repair the harm done to the diocese by the intruder.
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  • At the latter is a Church of England mission station under a native Indian catechist attached to the diocese of Rangoon.
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  • Serenus of Marseilles had ordered the destruction of all sacred images within his diocese; this action called forth several letters from Pope Gregory (viii.
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  • In 705, or perhaps earlier, Haddi, bishop of Winchester, died, and the diocese was divided into two parts.
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  • He was on his rounds in his diocese when he died in the church of Doulting on the 25th of May 709.
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  • Opizo, bishop of Parma, protected them until they caused trouble in his diocese.
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  • paroisse), originally an episcopal district or diocese.
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  • Towards the close of the 4th century it had become usual for the bishop to appoint resident presbyters to defined districts or territories, to which the term "parish" came gradually to be applied (see also Diocese).
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  • It seems probable (though the point is obscure) that the bishops presided at the first formation of the parishes - the parish being a subdivision of the diocese - and at any rate down to the date of the Reformation they exercised the power of creating new parishes within their respective dioceses (Duncan, Parochial Law, p. 4).
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  • Magdeburg is the seat of an Evangelical consistory; the Roman Catholics belong to the diocese of Paderborn.
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  • He was obliged to resign from his diocese due to a deterioration in his health.
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  • The Diocese has three archdeacons, one of whom serves the Isle of Wight.
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  • His first archdeacon was named Elias, 5 and his second Robert, and the archdeaconry was conterminous with the diocese.
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  • Derbyshire forms an archdeaconry in the diocese of Lichfield, and contains nineteen rural deaneries.
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  • The historic archdeaconry of Nottingham was an extensive ecclesiastical jurisdiction within the diocese of York.
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  • Initially the Suffolk portion of the Diocese was a single archdeaconry but this was divided into eastern and western parts in 1125.
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  • archdeaconry in the diocese of Lichfield, and contains nineteen rural deaneries.
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  • Notes to editors: The process for choosing a diocesan bishop: The process for choosing a diocesan bishop begins in the diocese.
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  • bishop's Transcripts A duplicate copy of a parish register, which was sent to the bishop of the diocese for safekeeping.
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  • cathedral of the diocese.
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  • chancellors of the diocese which will be found in the county histories are some names which may be noted.
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  • clergy in the diocese.
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  • Despite nothing coming of these overtures, neither the Diocese nor the Province were able to offer any concrete alternative to appointing another cleric.
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  • These days, the local Anglican diocese seems concerned to take care of its buildings.
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  • consecrated as the new bishop of the Diocese.
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  • Gwyn and Kay moved to St David's Diocese early in 1970 where he served a second curacy at Pembroke Dock.
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  • The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 62.
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  • The living is a p. curacy in the diocese of Chester.
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  • He served his first curacy at St Nicholas, Kingston upon Hull in the Diocese of York.
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  • The living is a donative curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 93, in the patronage of Sir M. W. Ridley.
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  • curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 60.
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  • The living is a perpetual curate in the diocese of Ripon val £ 94, in the patron of certain trustees.
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  • He was assisted by two permanent deacons of the Aberdeen Diocese, the Revs.
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  • deanery consultation meetings around the diocese this autumn your parish can pick up a free demo CD.
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  • It is no secret that the Bishop considers St Thomas' deanery as a model for the other deaneries of the diocese.
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  • Pray also for the development of new ways of serving the diocese.
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