Diocesan sentence example

diocesan
  • That he in no way slighted diocesan work had been shown at Truro.
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  • The archbishop holds a visitation of his diocese personally every three years, and he is the only diocesan who has kept up the triennial visitation of the dean and chapter of his cathedral.'
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  • He has also an appellate jurisdiction of an analogous character, which he exercises through his provincial court, whilst his diocesan jurisdiction is exercised through his consistorial court, the judges of both courts being nominated by the archbishop. His ancient testamentary and matrimonial jurisdiction was transferred to the crown by the same statutes which divested the see of Canterbury of its jurisdiction in similar matters.
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  • By acts of 1833 and 1834, the metropolitans of Cashel and of Tuam were reduced to the status of diocesan bishops.
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  • In spite of the hostile attitude of the great majority of the bishops, Bishop de' Ricci issued on the 31st of July a summons to a diocesan synod, which was solemnly opened on the 18th of September.
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  • In episcopacy the supreme authority is a diocesan bishop; in congregationalism it is the members of the congregation assembled in church meeting; in Presbyterianism it is a church council composed of representative presbyters.
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  • This episcopacy was at first rather congregational than diocesan; but the tendency of its growth was undoubtedly towards the latter.
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  • He was sent to the Marshalsea, and a few years later was indicted on a charge of praemunire on refusing the oath when tendered him by his diocesan, Bishop Home of Winchester.
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  • In each diocese is a seminary or diocesan school.
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  • The diocesan synod P Y Y system.
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  • (b) At first the bishop was the only judge in the diocesan court and he always remains a judge.
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  • Fournier (p. 219) says that in France it was not till the 17th century that there grew up a custom of having different officials for the metropolitan, one for him as bishop, a second as metropolitan, and even a third as primate, with an appeal from one to the other, and that it was an abuse due to the parlements which strove to make the official independent of the bishop. In England there has been, for a long time, a separate diocesan court of Canterbury held before the " commissary."
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  • The bishop of London was treated as the diocesan bishop of the colonists in North America; and in order to provide for testamentary and matrimonial jurisdiction it was usual in the letters patent appointing the governor of a colony to name him ordinary.
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  • They consist of five, or at least three, priests nominated by the bishop in and with the advice of the diocesan synod.
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  • Metropolitans usually now have a metropolitan tribunal distinct from their diocesan court (ib.
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  • Certain religious houses, however, had their own final tribunals and were " peculiars," exempt from any diocesan or patriarchal jurisdiction for at least all causes relating to Church property (ib.
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  • Other old buildings are a church of Our Lady, dating as it stands from 1242, a diocesan library (partly of the, 5th century), royal palace (1733) and institute for daughters of noblemen (1670).
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  • abbots and religious superiors, who are withdrawn from the ordinary diocesan jurisdiction and themselves possess episcopal jurisdiction (jurisdictio quasi episcopalis).
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  • Since the close of the 10th century diocesan councils in France had been busily acting as legislatures, and enacting "forms of peace" for the maintenance of God's Peace or Truce (Pax Dei or Treuga Dei).
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  • This is why, besides the disciplinary measures which regulated the elections, the celebration of divine service, the periodical holding of diocesan synods and provincial councils, are found also decrees aimed at some of the "rights" by which the popes had extended their power, and helped out their finances at the expense of the local churches.
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  • The establishment of a diocesan hierarchy in Scotland had been decided upon before the death of Pius IX., but the actual announcement of it was made by Leo XIII.
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  • In India he established a diocesan hierarchy, with seven archbishoprics, the archbishop of Goa taking precedence with the rank of patriarch.
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  • The principal schools are St Peter's cathedral grammar-school (originally endowed in 1557), Archbishop Holgate's grammar-school, the York and diocesan grammar-school, and the bluecoat school for boys (founded in 5705), with the associated greycoat school for girls.
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  • He protests against Peel's Income Tax Bill of 1842; against the Aberdeen Act 1843, as conferring undue power on church courts; against the perpetuation of diocesan courts for probate and administration; against Lord Stanley's absurd bill providing compensation for the destruction of fences to dispossessed Irish tenants; and against the Parliamentary Proceedings Bill, which proposed that all bills, except money bills, having reached a certain stage or having passed one House, should be continued to next session.
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  • The Roman Catholic Church has 4 archbishops; Esztergom (Gran), Kalocsa, Eger (Erlau) and Zagrab (Agram), and 17 diocesan bishops; to the latter must be added the chief abbot of Pannonhalma, who likewise enjoys episcopal rights.
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  • The two terms are still used side by side; thus there are patriarchal, national and primatial councils, as well as provincial councils (under the metropolitan of a province) and diocesan synods, consisting of the clergy of a diocese and presided over by the bishop (or the vicar-general).
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  • In 1838 he took a leading part in the Church education movement, by which diocesan boards were established throughout the country; and he wrote an open letter to his bishop in criticism of the recent appointment of the ecclesiastical commission.
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  • He made an unsuccessful and costly effort to establish a Catholic university at Kensington, and he also made provision for a diocesan seminary of strictly ecclesiastical type.
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  • At the present day there are of Black Benedictine nuns 262 convents with 7000 nuns, the large majority being directly subject to the diocesan bishops; if the Cistercians and others be included, there are 387 convents with nearly Ii,000 nuns.
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  • With the opening of the Ilth century, the pax ecclesiae spread over northern France and Burgundy, and diocesan leagues began to be organized for its maintenance.
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  • At the Council of Bourges (1038), the archbishop decreed that every Christian fifteen years and over should take such an oath and enter the diocesan militia.
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  • diocesan Episcopacy, represents the principle of official rule in a monarchical form: Pre g byterianism stands for the rule of an official aristocracy, exercising collective control through an ascending series of ecclesiastical courts.
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  • Hence " if we are to give a name to these primitive communities with their bishops, congregational ' will describe them better than ` diocesan ' " (Sanday, Expositor, III.
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  • It persisted in the main during the 2nd and 3rd centuries, and only faded before the growing influence of metropolitan or diocesan bishops in the 4th century.
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  • In 1851 he established his fame as a philologist by The Study of Words, originally delivered as lectures to the pupils of the Diocesan Training School, Winchester.
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  • He was elected assistant bishop of New York, with the right of succession, in 1811, and was acting diocesan from that date because of the ill-health of Bishop Benjamin Moore, whom he formally succeeded on the latter's death in February 1816.
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  • These bishops were originally not diocesan but congregational, that is, each church, however small, had its own bishop. This is the organization testified to by Ignatius, and Cyprian's insistence upon the bishop as necessary to the very existence of the Church seems to imply the same thing.
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  • So long as each church had its own bishop the presbyters constituted simply his council, but with the growth of diocesan episcopacy it became the custom to put each congregation under the care of a particular presbyter, who performed within it most of the pastoral duties formerly discharged by the bishop himself.
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  • They were only representatives of the bishop, and the churches over which they were set were all a part of his parish, so that the Cyprianic principle, that the bishop is necessary to the very being of the Church, held good of diocesan as well as of congregational episcopacy.
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  • The growth of the diocesan principle promoted the unity of the churches gathered under a common head.
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  • A large number of the reformed monasteries attached themselves to the congregation of Cluny, thus assuring the influence of reformed monasticism upon the Church, and securing likewise its independence of the diocesan bishops, since the abbot of Cluny was subordinate of the pope alone.
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  • Bishop Strachan devoted the latter years of his long life entirely to his episcopal duties, and by introducing the diocesan synod he furnished the Episcopal Church in Canada with a more democratic organ of government.
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  • When in 1866 the Second Plenary Council of Baltimore considered the matter of new diocesan developments, he was selected to organize the new Vicariate Apostolic of North Carolina; and was consecrated bishop in August 1868.
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  • The regular clergy, who were almost wholly sheltered from the power of the diocesan bishops, found themselves, even more than the secular priesthood, in a state of complete dependence on the Curia.
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  • He takes the place of the pope in the administration of the diocese of Rome; he has his own offices and diocesan assistants as in other bishoprics.
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  • the diocesan episcopate, is established in the country, with residential sees.
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  • Some of their powers of legislation and administration they possess motu proprio in virtue of their position as diocesan bishops, others they enjoy under special faculties granted by the Holy See; but all bishops are bound, by an oath taken at the time of their consecration, to go to Rome at fixed intervals (visitare sacra limina apostolorum) to report in person, and in writing, on the state of their dioceses.
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  • He justified his appointment by his magnificent speech when the Disestablishment Bill reached the House of Lords in 1869, and then plunged into diocesan and general work in England.
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  • The men evangelists have to pass an examination by the archdeacon of Middlesex, and are then (since 1896) admitted by the bishop of London as "lay evangelists in the Church"; the mission sisters must likewise pass an examination by the diocesan inspector of schools.
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  • The whole of the work is done in loyal subordination to the diocesan and parochial organization of the Church of England.
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  • Among the principal buildings are the cathedral (rebuilt in the 16th century), and several other churches, among which the Mariae Kirke with its Romanesque nave is the earliest; a hospital, diocesan college, naval academy, school of design and a theatre.
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  • With the rise of the diocesan bishops the position of the presbyters became more important.
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  • Meanwhile he had published several small historical works; but his college and university duties left little time for writing, and in 1875 he accepted the vicarage of Embleton, a parish on the coast of Northumberland, near Dunstanburgh, with an ancient and beautiful church and a fortified parsonage house, and within reach of the fine library in Bamburgh Keep. Here he remained for nearly ten years, acquiring that experience of parochial work which afterwards stood him in good stead, taking private pupils, studying and writing, as well as taking an active part in diocesan business.
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  • In accordance with a vote of the diocesan conference, the bishop arranged the "Round Table Conference" between representative members of various parties, held at Fulham in October 1900, on "the doctrine of the Holy Eucharist and its expression in ritual," and a report of its proceedings was published with a preface by him.
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  • There is a Roman Catholic diocesan college and the Protestant parish church is also in Ardnaree.
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  • Two further developments must be mentioned: (a) The creation of diocesan and provincial synods, the first diocesan synod to meet being that of New Zealand in 1844, whilst the formation of a provincial synod was foreshadowed by a conference of Australasian bishops at Sydney in 1850; (b) towards the close of the r9th century the title of archbishop began to be assumed by the metropolitans of several provinces.
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  • The members are elected by the various diocesan conferences, which are in turn elected by the laity of their respective parishes or rural deaneries.
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  • But on his arrival there he ascertained that a part of the pope's plan for restoring a diocesan hierarchy in England was that he himself should return to England as cardinal and archbishop of Westminster.
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  • Wiseman displayed calmness and courage, and immediately penned an admirable Appeal to the English People (a pamphlet of over 30 pages), in which he explained the nature of the pope's action, and argued that the admitted principle of toleration included leave to establish a diocesan hierarchy; and in his concluding paragraphs he effectively contrasted that dominion over Westminster, which he was taunted with claiming, with his duties towards the poor Catholics resident there, with which alone he was really concerned.
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  • King, "The Church of St Mary and of the Holy Cross, Credition," in Exeter Diocesan Architectural Society, Transactions, vol.
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  • Low, Diocesan History of Durham (London, 1881); and M.
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  • Of these the former are outside the normal organization of the Church, being exempt from the ordinary jurisdiction of the diocesan bishops, while the more recently formed congregations are either wholly or largely subject to episcopal authority.
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  • They are under the jurisdiction of the Latin diocesan bishops, but their priests are ordained by bishops of their own rite specially appointed by the pope.
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  • Instead of being brought up in diocesan seminaries, centres of provincial narrowness, candidates for ordination were to be collected into a few large colleges set up in university towns.
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  • Nor were matters much bettered when the papacy took advantage of the presence of a Catholic queen in England, and sent over in 1625 a vicarapostolic 3 - that is, a prelate in episcopal orders, but without the full authority of a diocesan bishop. He was soon compelled.
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  • The actual government of the Church in the United States is represented by one cardinal, 14 archbishops, 89 bishops, 11,135 diocesan clergymen, under the sole and immediate direction of their bishops, 3958 members of religious orders subject to episcopal supervision - in all 15,093 clergymen.
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  • In 441 a synod of sixteen bishops was held at Orange under the presidency of St Hilary of Arles, which adopted thirty canons touching the reconciliation of penitents and heretics; the ecclesiastical right of asylum, diocesan prerogatives of bishops, spiritual privileges of the defective or demoniac, the deportment of catechumens at worship, and clerical celibacy (forbidding married men to be ordained as deacons, and digamists to be advanced beyond the sub-diaconate).
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  • There are a Nonconformist grammar school, a diocesan training college for mistresses, and other educational establishments.
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  • He was educated for the medical profession, but entered the Sulpician Seminary of Paris in November 1803, was ordained priest in 1808, refused the post of chaplain to Napoleon, was professor of theology in the Diocesan Seminary at Rennes in 1808-1810, and in August 1810 settled in Baltimore, Maryland, whither his long general interest in missions, and particularly his acquaintance with Bishop Flaget of Kentucky, had drawn him.
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  • Bishop Kennion of Bath and Wells entered into an agreement to raise a sum of £31,000, the cost of the purchase; this was completed, and the site and buildings were formally transferred at a dedicatory service in 1909 to the Diocesan Trustees of Bath and Wells, who are to hold and manage the property according to a deed of trust.
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  • After his ordination he became professor at the lyceum of his native place, but his patriotic sympathies excited the jealousy of the Austrian authorities, and although protected by his diocesan, he was compelled to resign in 1853.
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  • In the disestablished and daughter Churches the election is by the synod of the Church, as in Ireland, or by a diocesan convention, as in the United States of America.
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  • (3) Bishops in partibus infidelium were originally those who had been expelled from their sees by the pagans, and, while retaining their titles, were appointed to assist diocesan bishops in their work.
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  • (5) Su f fragan bishops (episcopi suffraganei or auxiliares) are those appointed to assist diocesan bishops in their pontifical functions when hindered by infirmity, public affairs or other causes.
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  • In these circumstances the government and people resolved that there should be ten diocesan bishops and forty additional provisional sees.
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  • Subsequently another bishopric, St John's, Kaffraria, was created and the Cape Town diocesan raised to the rank of archbishop. Of other Protestant bodies the Methodists outnumber the Anglicans, eight-ninths of their members being coloured people.
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  • These are the South African College at Cape Town (founded in 1829), the Victoria College at Stellenbosch, the Diocesan College at Rondebosch, Rhodes University College, Graham's Town, Gill College at Somerset East, the School of Mines at Kimberley and the Huguenot Ladies' College at Wellington.
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  • Whether in the case of national or provincial councils, or of diocesan synods, the chief object of the decrees is to reinforce, define or apply the law; the measures which constitute a derogation have only a small place in them.
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  • England has its council of Westminster (1852), the United States their plenary councils of Baltimore (1852, 1866, 1884), mentioning the diocesan synods; and Ot h er 4) g co u the whole of Latin America is ruled by the special law of its plenary council, held at Rome in 1899.
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  • Apparently diocesan synods may still enact valid canons without the king's authority; but these bodies are not now called.
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  • 19 repealed any act of parliament, law or custom whereby the bishops, clergy or laity of the said church were prohibited from holding synods or electing representatives thereto for the purpose of making rules for the well-being and ordering of the said church, and enacted that no such law, &c., should hinder the said bishops, clergy and laity, by such representatives, lay and clerical, and so elected as they shall appoint, from meeting in general synod or convention and in such general synod or convention forming constitutions and providing for future representation of the members of the church in diocesan synods, general convention or otherwise.
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  • For any alteration or amendment of " articles, doctrines, rites or rubrics," a two-thirds majority of each order of the represen tative house was required and a year's delay for consultation of the diocesan synods.
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  • Provisions were made as to lay representation in the diocesan synods.
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  • The code of this last year created diocesan synods, to be held annually and to consist of the bishop, dean and all instituted clergy of the diocese.
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  • This revised code enabled the bishop to appoint a learned and discreet layman to act as his chancellor, to advise him in legal matters and be his assessor at diocesan synods.
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  • Assistant curates and mission priests were, under certain restrictions, given seats in diocesan synods.
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  • In the West Indies, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, provincial and diocesan synods or conventions have been formed on one or other of the types above mentioned and have enacted canons.
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  • The principal libraries are those of Johns Hopkins University, Peabody Institute, Maryland Historical Society, and the Bar Association; and the Enoch Pratt, the New Mercantile, and Maryland Diocesan (Protestant Episcopal).
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  • As dean of Westminster (1662-1683) he opposed an attempt to bring the abbey under diocesan rule.
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  • courts of appeal and diocesan courts of first instance in every bishopric; the canon law is an important part of the law of the land.
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  • The Roman Catholics have diocesan schools, schools under religious orders, monastic and convent schools, and Christian Brothers' schools, which were attended, according to the census returns in 1901, by nearly 22,000 pupils, male and female.
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  • Under this heading may be included royal and diocesan schools and schools upon the foundation of Erasmus Smith, and others privately endowed.
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  • Although St Patrick endeavoured to organize the Irish church on regular diocesan lines, after his death an approximation to the lay system was under the circumstances almost inevitable.
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  • Diocesan organization as understood in countries under Roman Law being unknown, there was not that limitation of the number of bishops which territorial jurisdiction renders necessary, and consequently the number of bishops increased beyond all proportions.
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  • The tuath bishop in later centuries corresponded to the diocesan bishop as closely as it was possible in two systems so different as tribal and municipal government.
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  • When diocesan jurisdiction was introduced into Ireland in the 12th century the tuath became a diocese.
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  • At the synod of Kells (1152) there was established that diocesan system which has ever since continued without material alteration.
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  • Hitherto the Scandinavian section of the church in Ireland had been most decidedly inclined to receive the hierarchical and diocesan as distinguished from the monastic and quasi-tribal system.
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  • Popular Protestant feeling ran very high at the time, partly in consequence of the recent establishment of a Roman Catholic diocesan hierarchy by Pius IX., and criminal proceedings against Newman for libel resulted in an acknowledged gross miscarriage of justice.
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  • anthropology of religion; local clergy and diocesan liturgical advisors.
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  • archidiaconal records are held at the Lincolnshire Archives, which is the Diocesan Record Office.
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  • awaiting planning approval from the Church's Diocesan Advisory Committee (DAC ).
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  • Notes to editors: The process for choosing a diocesan bishop: The process for choosing a diocesan bishop begins in the diocese.
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  • bishops ' transcripts, where they have survived, will usually be deposited at the Diocesan Record Office (usually County Record Office ).
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  • The only names which are considered for appointment to diocesan bishoprics come from the church.
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  • He was chosen to be the bishop of Mantua and also the diocesan chancellor.
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  • chorister parent, reflects below on his experiences of a Diocesan Easter Vigil in Portsmouth Cathedral... ... .
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  • Peter is not addressing the diocesan clergy; he is speaking to these scattered strangers.
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  • commissary appointed in writing, shall preside at the Diocesan Nomination Board and have a casting vote.
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  • diocesan ' opportunities to Explore Faith ' The Sacrament of Reconciliation Do we still need this Sacrament?
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  • Pastoral service is carried out by 156 bishops including 130 diocesan and 26 vicar bishops; 12 bishops are retired.
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  • Royal Peculiars are churches that are independent from normal diocesan and provincial control.
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  • King Stephen refused to invest Murdac who was, significantly, the first diocesan since 1066 to be appointed without royal assent.
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  • diocesan synod.
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  • diocesan bishop, who is also said to be ' deposed '?
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  • diocesan pilgrimage to Lourdes 24 th - 29 th July.
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  • diocesan missioner who sent his would-be evangelists into a betting shop, to put some money on a horse.
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  • diocesan seminary was opened on the island of Gozo.
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  • diocesan clergy; he is speaking to these scattered strangers.
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  • The most common source of reference for many of the clergy is their obituary which would have been articled in the then diocesan almanac.
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  • This guidance takes account of your responses as well as the views of our colleagues in the Diocesan Board of Finance and neighboring dioceses.
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  • Working with diocesan staff to reduce the environmental impact of the diocesan offices.
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  • His diocesan would scarcely have approved of such overtures to a person already widely believed to be a sorcerer.
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  • Once competent, ringers are encouraged to become members of the Wirral Branch of the Chester Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers.
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  • DIOCESAN WOMEN'S COMMISSION: Environmental Awareness walk, sat.
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  • RE in most schools is taught to a locally agreed syllabus or a diocesan syllabus.
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  • On his return home he held a diocesan synod.
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  • The main business Diocesan synod, usually the first synod of the year, represents God the Son.
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  • Vocation Sunday also sees the national launch of posters, leaflets and prayer cards to promote the specific vocation Sunday also sees the national launch of posters, leaflets and prayer cards to promote the specific vocation to the Diocesan priesthood.
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  • SYNOD OF PISTOIA, a diocesan synod held in 1786 under the presidency of Scipione de' Ricci (1741-1810), bishop of Pistoia, and the patronage of Leopold, grand-duke of Tuscany, with a view to preparing the ground for a national council and a reform of the Tuscan Church.
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  • On the 26th of January the grand-duke issued a circular letter to the Tuscan bishops suggesting certain reforms, especially in the matter of the restoration of the authority of diocesan synods, the purging of the missals and breviaries of legends, the assertion of episcopal as against papal authority, the curtailing of the privileges of the monastic orders, and the better education of the clergy.
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  • Later in Englnd it became usual to appoint one man to the two offices and to call him chancellor, a word perhaps borrowed from cathedral chapters, and not in use for a diocesan officer till the time of Henry VIII.
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  • In 181o the diocesan official of Paris entertained the cause between Napoleon and Josephine, and pronounced a decree of nullity (Migne, ubi sup. s.v.
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  • In the remainder of the empire the titles of metropolitan, save in the case of the metropolitan of all Russia, and of archbishop, were and are purely honorary, and their holders have merely a diocesan jurisdiction (see Mouravieff, History of the Russian Church, translated Blackmore, 1842, translator's notes at pp. 370, 39 0, 416 et seq.).
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  • Before the reign of Edward I., when convocation assumed substantially its present form (see Convocation), there were convened in London various diocesan, provincial, national and legatine synods; during the past six centuries, however, the chief ecclesiastical assemblies held there have been convocations of the province of Canterbury.
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  • The Benefices Act of that year absolutely invalidates any transfer of a right of patronage unless (a) it is registered in the diocesan registry, (b) unless more than twelve months have elapsed since the last institution or admission to the benefice, and (c) unless "it transfers the whole interest of the transferor in the right" with certain reservations; in other words, the act abolished the sale of next presentations, but it expressly reserved from its operation (a) a transmission on marriage, death or bankruptcy or otherwise by operation of law, or (b) a transfer on the appointment of a new trustee where no beneficial interest passes.
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  • suffraganeus suffragator, one who assists, from sujJragari, to vote in favour of, to support) in the Christian Church, (I) a diocesan bishop in his relation to the metropolitan; (2) an assistant bishop. (See the article BISHOP.)
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  • According to the medieval canon law, based on the decretals, and codified in the 13th century in the Corpus juris canonici, by which the earlier powers of metropolitans had been greatly curtailed, the powers of the archbishop consisted in the right (i) to confirm and consecrate suffragan bishops; (2) to summon and preside over provincial synods; (3) to superintend the suffragans and visit their dioceses, as well as to censure and punish bishops in the interests of discipline, the right of deprivation, however, being reserved to the pope; (4) to act as a court of appeal from the diocesan courts; (5) to exercise the jus devolutionis, i.e.
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  • In addition to his diocesan synods, he presided in 1873 over the fourth provincial synod of Westminster, which legislated on "acatholic" universities, church music, mixed marriages, and the order of a priest's household, having previously taken part, as theologian, in the provincial synods of 1853 and 1859, with a hand in the preparation of their decrees.
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  • In ecclesiastical law the word "official" has a special technical sense as applied to the official exercising a diocesan bishop's jurisdiction as his representative and in his name (see Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction).
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  • But after the middle of the 3rd century diocesan episcopacy began to make its appearance here and there, and became common in the 4th century under the influence of the general tendency toward centralization, the increasing power of city bishops, and the growing dignity of the episcopate (cf.
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  • These are: (a) boy's brigades - the Church Lads' Brigade, the London Diocesan Brigade, the Jewish Lads' Brigade, &c.; (b) the Legion of Frontiersmen, an organization intended to enroll for "irregular" service men with colonial or frontier experience; (c) rifle clubs, which exist solely for rifle practice, and have no military liabilities; (d) boy scouts, an organization founded in 1908 by Lieut.-General Sir R.
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  • GH undertook to find out what he could at the Bishop 's Liaison Committee and JT said he would contact the Diocesan RE adviser.
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  • Diocesan registries may hold records for cathedral schools among the archive of the Dean and Chapter; plans of schools.
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  • DIOCESAN WOMEN'S COMMISSION: Environmental Awareness Walk, Sat.
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  • The main business Diocesan Synod, usually the first synod of the year, represents God the Son.
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  • Vocation Sunday also sees the national launch of posters, leaflets and prayer cards to promote the specific vocation to the Diocesan priesthood.
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  • enabled the diocesan alone, without the co-operation of a synod, to pronounce sentence of heresy, and required the sheriff to execute it by burning the offender, without waiting for the consent of the crown.'
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  • c. 3 de ref., of the council of Trent, made dependent upon the consent of the provincial synod after cause shown (causa cognita et probata); and the only two powers left to the archbishop in this respect are to watch over the diocesan seminaries and to compel the residence of the bishop in his diocese.
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  • The archbishop of Canterbury exercises the twofold jurisdiction of a metropolitan and a diocesan bishop. As metropolitan he is the guardian of the spiritualities of every vacant see within the province, he presents to all benefices which fall vacant during the vacancy of the see, and through his special commissary exercises the ordinary jurisdiction of a bishop within the vacant diocese.
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