How to use Digress in a sentence

digress
  • He let the conversation digress into endless discussions about "character."

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  • Let me digress a bit to let the ink dry.

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  • In order to disillusion anyone who may think that my position was a sinecure, I shall now digress.

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  • I need to digress for a moment here.

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  • Kids often digress when out from under parental control.

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  • I need to digress here a touch, just to explain the difference between psychologists and psychiatrists.

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  • At this point you should digress briefly into the concept of psychological structure.

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  • I want to digress to consider those categories which have, from my point of view, important sociological significance.

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  • I want to digress a moment to note that reports of strange aerial phenomena are not peculiar to the post WWII period.

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  • To digress somewhat, there are a large number of rounds in Cornwall, usually located on spurs of land or prominently on hillslopes.

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  • But, because time had not yet made the matter clear, Locke suffered himself to digress in his second book into the psychological question of the origin of our ideas; and his theory of knowledge is ruined by the failure to distinguish between the epistemological sense of "idea" as significant content and the psychological sense in which it is applied to a fact or process in the individual mind.

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  • Herr Grün adds "We shall not digress; let us remain in France."

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  • Let me digress here to discuss the problem of our youth, particularly in the advanced industrialized nations.

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  • You can digress slightly.

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