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diction

diction

diction Sentence Examples

  • His perfect diction never failed to be commented on.

    654
    169
  • Clear diction, not a "posh voice", was what was wanted.

    164
    103
  • His diction is pure, his style correct, his versification smooth though monotonous.

    143
    85
  • His speech and diction were plain, terse, forcible.

    135
    75
  • Poetic diction describes the range of language used in poems.

    104
    65
  • These additions are identical in object and closely related in character and diction with the Psalms of Solomon.

    80
    62
  • The decision to use an archaic diction might be thought a central part of Spenser's particularly Protestant poetics.

    78
    59
  • This helps to improve diction, organize what they want to say and focus on the main points of interest.

    69
    56
  • The choir had very good diction, which enabled the audience to hear Nancy Bush's words clearly.

    67
    56
  • The Renaissance displayed itself in their effort to purify the form and diction of poetry.

    64
    41
  • Diction employed by the author seems to exaggerate and stretch the truth.

    55
    33
  • His commanding presence, mastery of diction, and resonant voice made him an effective platform speaker.

    53
    30
  • His commanding presence, mastery of diction, and resonant voice made him an effective platform speaker.

    52
    30
  • The work of Kadlubek is more ornate in diction than that of Bogufal, and for a long time enjoyed great popularity.

    41
    24
  • In spite of the incorrectness of his diction, he was gifted with a genuine eloquence, and well knew how to carry the populace with him.

    41
    24
  • The best critics admitted that his diction was too monotonous, too obviously artificial, and now and then turgid even to absurdity.

    34
    20
  • No alteration of a text, or emendation, is entitled to approval, unless in addition to providing the sense and diction required, it also presents a reading which the evidence furnished by the tradition shows might not improbably have been corrupted to what stands in the text.

    33
    22
  • When therefore he, after the lapse of years, resumed his pen, the mannerism which he had contracted while he was in the constant habit of elaborate composition was less perceptible than formerly, and his diction frequently had a colloquial ease which it had formerly wanted.

    33
    25
  • Next come three eucharistic prayers, the language of which is clearly marked off from that of the rest of the book, and shows parallels with the diction of St John's Gospel.

    32
    22
  • In unity of style and in the high level of its dramatic diction, Die Jungfrau von Orleans is unsurpassed among Schiller's works.

    30
    19
  • Bridget's excellent diction was just loud enough to create an ambient echo which rather suited her careful English tones.

    29
    35
  • There is a deterioration in the diction as well as in the music of poetry.

    28
    18
  • Nevertheless, it is on a false interpretation of this challenge that the dogma of the incomparable excellence of the style and diction of the Koran is based.

    27
    18
  • The artificial character of the diction renders it in emotional passages stilted and even absurd, and makes Canning's clever caricature - The Loves of the Triangles - often remarkably like the poem it satirizes: in some passages, however, it is not without a stately appropriateness.

    26
    17
  • The stories of the Middle Kingdom were in choice diction, large portions of them being rhetorical or poetical compositions attributed to the principal characters.

    25
    19
  • Indeed, the diction and versification of his own Latin compositions show that he had paid at least as much attention to modern copies from the antique as to the original models.

    24
    22
  • His narrative contains frequent repetitions and contradictions, is without colouring, and monotonous; and his simple diction, which stands intermediate between pure Attic and the colloquial Greek of his time, enables us to detect in the narrative the undigested fragments of the materials which he employed.

    23
    22
  • As far as the diction itself is concerned, the lyric outbursts of the chorus gave Schiller's genius an opportunity of which he was not slow to avail himself.

    21
    17
  • He seems to have been interested in the poetic diction of Milton and Thomson, and a few of his verses are remotely inspired by Shakespeare and Gray.

    21
    19
  • He seems to have been interested in the poetic diction of Milton and Thomson, and a few of his verses are remotely inspired by Shakespeare and Gray.

    21
    19
  • The earliest efforts of his art (the Eclogues) reproduce the cadences, the diction and the pastoral fancies of Theocritus; but even in these imitative poems of his youth Virgil shows a perfect mastery of his materials.

    20
    18
  • As Virgil marks the point of maturest excellence in poetic diction and rhythm, Ovid marks that of the greatest facility.

    19
    20
  • It is most sincere in its representation, least artificial in diction, most penetrating in its satire, most just in its criticism of art and style.

    19
    25
  • Some of the poems are faultless, after their kind, flowing from the first stage to the last, lucid in thought, vivid in diction, harmonious in their pensive melody.

    19
    25
  • To Thackeray her diction recalled the sound of village bells falling sweetly and softly on the ear, and it sent a shiver through John Stuart Mill, like a symphony of Haydn or Mozart.

    19
    26
  • His skill in marshalling facts and his clearness of diction were marvellous.

    18
    22
  • His diction is still very artificial, the poetic diction of Delille transformed in the direction of Hugo, but not very much.

    15
    21
  • The vividness and distinction of Pascal's phrase, his singular faculty of inserting without any loss of dignity in the gravest and most impassioned meditation what may be almost called quips of thought and diction, the intense earnestness of meaning weighting but not confusing the style, all appear here.

    13
    29
  • Propertius is a less accomplished artist and a less equably pleasing writer than either Tibullus or Ovid, but he shows more power of dealing gravely with a great or tragic situation than either of them, and his diction and rhythm give frequent proof of a concentrated force of conception and a corresponding movement of imaginative feeling which remind us of Lucretius.

    12
    18
  • They are closely related in origin, style, diction and thought, and occupy so distinct a place in these respects that the Pauline authorship of them has been much questioned.

    12
    24
  • His sermons were not remarkable for eloquence, but a certain solidity and balance of judgment, an absence of partisanship, a sobriety of expression combined with clearness and force of diction, attracted hearers and inspired them with confidence.

    11
    19
  • 215), a system of grammar much used in his own time and largely drawn upon by later grammarians, contained rules for correct diction, illustrative quotations and treated of barbarisms and solecisms (Juvenal vi.

    11
    21
  • His narrative of the years 353-378 (all that now remains) is honest and straightforward, but his diction is awkward and obscure.

    10
    16
  • His restlessness leads us at times to a comparison with Skelton, not in respect of any parallelism of idea or literary craftsmanship, but in his experimental zeal in turning the diction and tuning the rhythms of the chaotic English which only Chaucer's genius had reduced to order.

    10
    17
  • But there is immense wit, a wonderful command of such metre and language as the taste of the time allowed to the poet, occasionally a singular if somewhat artificial grace, and a curious felicity of diction and manner.

    10
    19
  • Wordsworth's theories of poetry - the objects best suited for poetic treatment, the characteristics of such treatment and the choice of diction suitable for the purpose - may be said to have grown out of the soil and substance of the lakes and mountains, and out of the homely lives of the people, of Cumberland and Westmoreland.

    9
    13
  • The third group of dramatic writers take their subjects, surroundings and diction from the folk-life of the villages (nepszinmu, " folkdrama ").

    9
    16
  • But, as a rule, Wagner's poetic diction must simply be tolerated by the critic who would submit himself to Wagner's ideas.

    8
    13
  • Their literary and speculative qualities are indeed exceptionally brilliant; they are splendid in diction, elaborate in argument, cogent yet reverent, keen while fearless in criticism.

    8
    15
  • As far as purity of diction, fine wit, crushing satire against a debased and ignorant clergy, and a general sympathy with suffering humanity are concerned, Omar certainly reminds us of the great Frenchman; but there the comparison ceases.

    8
    16
  • Asconius Pedianus and Thrasea Paetus were natives of the town; and Quintilian speaks of the directness and simplicity of their diction as Patavinitas, comparing it with the artificial obscurity of the writers of Rome itself.

    8
    16
  • Asconius Pedianus and Thrasea Paetus were natives of the town; and Quintilian speaks of the directness and simplicity of their diction as Patavinitas, comparing it with the artificial obscurity of the writers of Rome itself.

    8
    16
  • But he is always ingenious, often witty, and nobody has carried farther than he the harmony of diction, sometimes marred by an affectation of symmetry and an excessive use of antithesis.

    8
    18
  • It is not provided with a glossary, but contains an elaborate and most valuable analysis of the diction, synonymy and syntactical features of the poem.

    7
    13
  • The main, the overwhelming value of the book lies not in this province, but in its ethical teaching, which has achieved a real immortality by influencing the thought and diction of the writers of the New Testament, and even those of our Lord.

    7
    14
  • In these and other dramatic writings, more remarkable perhaps for poetic than for stage effects, Doczi still maintains his brilliancy of diction and the delicacy of his poetic touch.

    6
    13
  • Where a borough has not a separate court of quarter sessions, but has a separate commission of the peace, the justices of the county in which the borough is situate have a concurrent jurisJuris d - diction with the borough justices in all matters arising ti o n o within the borough.

    1
    0
  • Nor can we deny to the Yashts, in their depiction of the Zoroastrian angels and their presentment of the old sagas, a certain poetic feeling, at times, and a pleasant diction.

    1
    0
  • Clearness, cogency, masculine simplicity of diction, are conspicuous in the pamphlet, but true creative power told the Tale of a Tub.

    1
    0
  • With a lively and fertile fancy Eupolis combined a sound practical judgment; he was reputed to equal Aristophanes in the elegance and purity of his diction, and Cratinus in his command of irony and sarcasm.

    1
    1
  • Of George Sand's style a foreigner can be but an imperfect judge, but French critics, from Sainte-Beuve, Nisard and Caro down to Jules Lemaitre and Faguet, have agreed to praise her spontaneity, her correctness of diction, her easy opulence - the lactea ubertas that Quintilian attributes to Livy.

    0
    0
  • It is sparing in the use of personal pronouns, and prefers impersonal and elliptical diction.

    0
    0
  • Liber sapientiae), an apocryphal book of the "Wisdom Literature" (q.v.), the most brilliant production of pre-Christian Hebrew philosophical thought, remarkable both for the elevation of its ideas and for the splendour of its diction.

    0
    0
  • His hasidas are almost equal to his ghazels; for, while they rival those of Nef `i in brilliancy, they surpass them in beauty of diction, and are not so artificial and dependent on fantastic and farfetched conceits.

    0
    0
  • The year of her death (1380) was that of the birth of St Bernardino Albizzeschi (S Bernardino of Siena), a popular preacher whose sermons in the vulgar tongue are models of style and diction.

    0
    0
  • But a few years ago they used to compile laborious essays, in which the inspiration was drawn from Occidental text-books, and the alien character of the source was hidden under a veneer of Chinese aphorisms., To-day they write terse, succinct, closely-reasoned articles, seldom diffuse, often witty; and generally free from extravagance of thought or diction.

    0
    0
  • Calpurnius Siculus, written at the beginning of the reign of Nero, which are not without grace and facility of diction.

    0
    0
  • Great fluency and ease of diction, considerable warmth of imagination and moral sentiment, and a sharp eye to discover any oddity of style or violation of the accepted canons of good taste, made his criticisms pungent and effective.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes in plain narrative the lecturer would be specially awkward, while in abstruse passages he seemed specially at home, rose into a natural eloquence, and carried away the hearer by the grandeur of his diction.

    0
    0
  • Morris (1895) in imitative metre, and almost unintelligibly archaistic in diction; and C. B.

    0
    0
  • The contemporary poets whom Keble most admired were Scott, Wordsworth and Southey; and of their influence traces are visible in his diction.

    0
    0
  • To be a gentleman in Italy meant at this epoch to be a man acquainted with the rudiments at least of scholarship, refined in diction, capable of corresponding or of speaking in choice phrases, open to the beauty of the arts, intelligently interested in archaeology, taking for his models of conduct the great men of antiquity rather than the saints of the church.

    0
    0
  • The result of their endeavour was immediately apparent in the new force added to French rhythm, the new pomp, richness, colouring and polish conferred upon poetic diction.

    0
    0
  • And he surpasses almost all of them in the richness of his diction, and his skill in the use of metaphors and illustrations.

    0
    0
  • Nor can it be argued that the characteristics of the pastorals are those of private letters; they are not private, nor even semi-private as they stand; besides, the only private note from Paul's hand (Philemon) bears no traces of the special diction exhibited in the epistles to Timothy and Titus.

    0
    0
  • The diction is full, even to excess, of meaning, point and emphasis.

    0
    0
  • He is purely medieval in subject and spirit, his lyrics are perfect in form and expression, his diction thoroughly popular.

    0
    0
  • Samuel Usque, a Lisbon Jew, deserves a place to himself for his Consolagam as tribulagoes de Israel, where he exposes the persecutions endured by his countrymen in every age down to his time; the book takes the dialogue form, and its diction is elegant and pure.

    0
    0
  • He has passed far beyond the bald and meagre diction of the early chroniclers.

    0
    0
  • From the tendency to use a poetic diction in prose, which was so conspicuous a fault in the writers of the silver age, Livy is not wholly free.

    0
    0
  • His treatises, orations, and familiar letters, though remarkable for a prose style which is eminently characteristic of the man, are not distinguished by purity of diction.

    0
    0
  • What he lacked was that insight into the best classical masterpieces, that command of the best classical diction, which is the product of successive generations of scholarship. To attain to this, Giovanni da Ravenna, Colluccio Salutato, Poggio and Filelfo had to labour, before a Poliziano and a Bembo finally prepared the path for an Erasmus.

    0
    0
  • His diffuseness and the antiquated character of his matter and diction, have, however, come to be regarded as difficulties in the way of study, and he is more renowned than read.

    0
    0
  • The Book of Enoch was written in the second and first centuries B.C. It was well known to many of the writers of the New Testament, and in many instances influenced their thought and diction.

    0
    0
  • In the New Testament the similarity of matter and diction is sufficiently strong to establish a close connexion, if not a literary dependence.

    0
    0
  • No other Rumanian translation approaches it in style and diction, although the authors, as they own, utilized the older translations, and for the New Testament and the Psalter they utilized Sylvestre's work.

    0
    0
  • And magnificent rhetorician though he was, his labour was given less to his diction than to the facts; his heart was less in the form than the matter.

    0
    0
  • All his works were written in the most elegant style and chaste diction; but apart from his share in the editing of the Historiens de la France, they were mostly in the form of separate articles on literary and historical subjects.

    0
    0
  • Influenced by Jonas Hallgrimsson with regard to language and poetic diction, but keeping unbroken the traditions of Icelandic medieval poetry maintained by Sigur5r Breic fjorc6 (1798-1846), is another school of poets, very unlike the first.

    0
    0
  • According to the custom of that age in Italy, it now became his duty to explain the language, and to illustrate the beauties of the principal Latin authors, Cicero and Virgil being considered the chief masters of moral science and of elegant diction.

    0
    0
  • Aeschines reproached the diction of Demosthenes with excess of, elaboration and adornment (7reptcpryia).

    0
    0
  • Its style is as easily recognized as that of Deutero-Isaiah, being as remarkable for its copious diction as for its depths of moral and religious feeling.

    0
    0
  • archaic diction might thus be thought a central part of Spenser's particularly Protestant poetics.

    0
    0
  • Tired diction here, inappropriate register there; natural, unforced cadence here, resonant phrasing there.

    0
    0
  • clarity of diction that we have come to expect.

    0
    0
  • Volume and diction are very important - my plaintive cry of ' I can't hear you!

    0
    0
  • Everything was taken as a similar pace, with similar emphasis, with words elided and diction often poor.

    0
    0
  • Throughout the empire, monumental sculptors continued to draw upon the heightened diction of classical figuration.

    0
    0
  • Barry Gunner, as the reverend gentleman whose daughter is the first to be stricken by devil fever, has unusually good diction.

    0
    0
  • The curriculum says children should be taught to use clear diction and appropriate intonation.

    0
    0
  • poetic diction, some by awkwardness of expression.

    0
    0
  • The decision to use an archaic diction might thus be thought a central part of Spenser's particularly Protestant poetics.

    0
    0
  • reverend gentleman whose daughter is the first to be stricken by devil fever, has unusually good diction.

    0
    0
  • Her emblem is tears and her diction is characterized by simplicity, in sharp contrast to her father.

    0
    0
  • Write with a casual, conversational tone rather than a formal tone such as textbook diction.

    0
    0
  • Of George Sand's style a foreigner can be but an imperfect judge, but French critics, from Sainte-Beuve, Nisard and Caro down to Jules Lemaitre and Faguet, have agreed to praise her spontaneity, her correctness of diction, her easy opulence - the lactea ubertas that Quintilian attributes to Livy.

    0
    0
  • To Thackeray her diction recalled the sound of village bells falling sweetly and softly on the ear, and it sent a shiver through John Stuart Mill, like a symphony of Haydn or Mozart.

    0
    0
  • He was probably not unconscious of this danger; for, as he gained experience as a writer, his diction became more simple, and his ludicrous illustrations less frequent.

    0
    0
  • But he is always ingenious, often witty, and nobody has carried farther than he the harmony of diction, sometimes marred by an affectation of symmetry and an excessive use of antithesis.

    0
    0
  • They are closely related in origin, style, diction and thought, and occupy so distinct a place in these respects that the Pauline authorship of them has been much questioned.

    0
    0
  • It is sparing in the use of personal pronouns, and prefers impersonal and elliptical diction.

    0
    0
  • But, as a rule, Wagner's poetic diction must simply be tolerated by the critic who would submit himself to Wagner's ideas.

    0
    0
  • Wordsworth's theories of poetry - the objects best suited for poetic treatment, the characteristics of such treatment and the choice of diction suitable for the purpose - may be said to have grown out of the soil and substance of the lakes and mountains, and out of the homely lives of the people, of Cumberland and Westmoreland.

    0
    0
  • The main, the overwhelming value of the book lies not in this province, but in its ethical teaching, which has achieved a real immortality by influencing the thought and diction of the writers of the New Testament, and even those of our Lord.

    0
    0
  • These additions are identical in object and closely related in character and diction with the Psalms of Solomon.

    0
    0
  • Liber sapientiae), an apocryphal book of the "Wisdom Literature" (q.v.), the most brilliant production of pre-Christian Hebrew philosophical thought, remarkable both for the elevation of its ideas and for the splendour of its diction.

    0
    0
  • His hasidas are almost equal to his ghazels; for, while they rival those of Nef `i in brilliancy, they surpass them in beauty of diction, and are not so artificial and dependent on fantastic and farfetched conceits.

    0
    0
  • As far as purity of diction, fine wit, crushing satire against a debased and ignorant clergy, and a general sympathy with suffering humanity are concerned, Omar certainly reminds us of the great Frenchman; but there the comparison ceases.

    0
    0
  • The year of her death (1380) was that of the birth of St Bernardino Albizzeschi (S Bernardino of Siena), a popular preacher whose sermons in the vulgar tongue are models of style and diction.

    0
    0
  • Serious students in Portugal and abroad welcomed the book as an historical work of the first rank, for its evidence of careful research, its able marshalling of facts, its learning and its painful accuracy, while the sculptural simplicity of the style and the correctness of the diction have made it a Portuguese classic. The first volume, however, gave rise to a celebrated controversy, because Herculano had reduced the famous battle of Ourique, which was supposed to have seen the birth of the Portuguese monarchy, to the dimensions of a mere skirmish, and denied the apparition of Christ to King Affonso, a fable first circulated in the 15th century.

    0
    0
  • But the fervent patriotism, elevated style, and glowing diction of Berzsenyi soon caused him to be recognized as a truly national bard.

    0
    0
  • In these and other dramatic writings, more remarkable perhaps for poetic than for stage effects, Doczi still maintains his brilliancy of diction and the delicacy of his poetic touch.

    0
    0
  • The third group of dramatic writers take their subjects, surroundings and diction from the folk-life of the villages (nepszinmu, " folkdrama ").

    0
    0
  • His Poesies pastorales (1688) have no greater claim to permanent repute, being characterized by stiffness and affectation; and the utmost that can be said for his poetry in general is that it displays much of the limae labor, great purity of diction and occasional felicity of expression.

    0
    0
  • His restlessness leads us at times to a comparison with Skelton, not in respect of any parallelism of idea or literary craftsmanship, but in his experimental zeal in turning the diction and tuning the rhythms of the chaotic English which only Chaucer's genius had reduced to order.

    0
    0
  • But there is immense wit, a wonderful command of such metre and language as the taste of the time allowed to the poet, occasionally a singular if somewhat artificial grace, and a curious felicity of diction and manner.

    0
    0
  • It is not provided with a glossary, but contains an elaborate and most valuable analysis of the diction, synonymy and syntactical features of the poem.

    0
    0
  • From 1848 date the first poetical efforts of Arnaldo Marquez, who is distinguished for his correct diction and rich imagination, as is Nicolas Corpancho for his dramas and a volume of poems entitled Brisas, Adolfo Garcia for a beautiful sonnet to Bolivar, which was published at Havre in 1870, in his one volume of poems, and Clemente Althaus for his productivity and style.

    0
    0
  • Their literary and speculative qualities are indeed exceptionally brilliant; they are splendid in diction, elaborate in argument, cogent yet reverent, keen while fearless in criticism.

    0
    0
  • For the JinkOshotO-ki, by its strong advocacy of the mikados administrative rights as against the ustirpations of military feudalism, may be said to have sowed the seeds of Japan~s modern polity; and the Taihei-ki, by its erudite diction, skilful rhetoric, simplification of old grammatical constructions and copious interpolation of Chinese words, furnished a model for many imitators and laid the foundations of Japans 19th-century style.

    0
    0
  • Up to Tsubouchis time the Meiji literature was all in the literary language, but there was then formed a society calling itself Kenyusha, some of whose associates-as BimyOsaiused the colloquial language in their works, while othersas Kayo, Rohan, &c.went back to the classical diction of the Genroku era (1655-1703).

    0
    0
  • But a few years ago they used to compile laborious essays, in which the inspiration was drawn from Occidental text-books, and the alien character of the source was hidden under a veneer of Chinese aphorisms., To-day they write terse, succinct, closely-reasoned articles, seldom diffuse, often witty; and generally free from extravagance of thought or diction.

    0
    0
  • His diction is still very artificial, the poetic diction of Delille transformed in the direction of Hugo, but not very much.

    0
    0
  • The idiom of ordinary life and social intercourse and the more fervid and elevated diction of oratorical prose had made great progress, but the language of imagination and poetical feeling was, if vivid and impressive in isolated expressions, still incapable of being wrought into consecutive passages of artistic composition.

    0
    0
  • Yet, apart altogether from its independent value, by his speculative power and enthusiasm, by his revelation of the life and spectacle of nature, by the fresh creativeness of his diction and the elevated movement of his rhythm, Lucretius exercised a more powerful influence than any other on the art of his more perfect successors.

    0
    0
  • The earliest efforts of his art (the Eclogues) reproduce the cadences, the diction and the pastoral fancies of Theocritus; but even in these imitative poems of his youth Virgil shows a perfect mastery of his materials.

    0
    0
  • Propertius is a less accomplished artist and a less equably pleasing writer than either Tibullus or Ovid, but he shows more power of dealing gravely with a great or tragic situation than either of them, and his diction and rhythm give frequent proof of a concentrated force of conception and a corresponding movement of imaginative feeling which remind us of Lucretius.

    0
    0
  • As Virgil marks the point of maturest excellence in poetic diction and rhythm, Ovid marks that of the greatest facility.

    0
    0
  • There is a deterioration in the diction as well as in the music of poetry.

    0
    0
  • Calpurnius Siculus, written at the beginning of the reign of Nero, which are not without grace and facility of diction.

    0
    0
  • It is most sincere in its representation, least artificial in diction, most penetrating in its satire, most just in its criticism of art and style.

    0
    0
  • His narrative of the years 353-378 (all that now remains) is honest and straightforward, but his diction is awkward and obscure.

    0
    0
  • It was from such a standpoint conceivable that the thoughts and diction of the writer had undergone an entire transformation in the long interval that intervened between the composition of the two books, on the supposition that both were from the same hand.

    0
    0
  • Others may have surpassed him in originality, learning or reasoning power, but for grasp of his subject, clearness of language, lucidity of arrangement, felicity of illustration, vividness of imagination, elegance of diction, and above all, for sympathy with the intellectual position of those whom he addressed, he has hardly been rivalled.

    0
    0
  • The artificial character of the diction renders it in emotional passages stilted and even absurd, and makes Canning's clever caricature - The Loves of the Triangles - often remarkably like the poem it satirizes: in some passages, however, it is not without a stately appropriateness.

    0
    0
  • Next come three eucharistic prayers, the language of which is clearly marked off from that of the rest of the book, and shows parallels with the diction of St John's Gospel.

    0
    0
  • His diction is pure, his style correct, his versification smooth though monotonous.

    0
    0
  • The work of Kadlubek is more ornate in diction than that of Bogufal, and for a long time enjoyed great popularity.

    0
    0
  • Great fluency and ease of diction, considerable warmth of imagination and moral sentiment, and a sharp eye to discover any oddity of style or violation of the accepted canons of good taste, made his criticisms pungent and effective.

    0
    0
  • Bentley calls Prudentius " the Horace and Virgil of the Christians," but his diction is stilted and his metre often faulty.

    0
    0
  • No alteration of a text, or emendation, is entitled to approval, unless in addition to providing the sense and diction required, it also presents a reading which the evidence furnished by the tradition shows might not improbably have been corrupted to what stands in the text.

    0
    0
  • At the bar Wedderburn was the most elegant speaker of his time, and, although his knowledge of the principles and precedents of law was deficient, his skill in marshalling facts and his clearness of diction were marvellous; on the bench his judgments were remarkable for their perspicuity, particularly in the appeal cases to the House of Lords.

    0
    0
  • 215), a system of grammar much used in his own time and largely drawn upon by later grammarians, contained rules for correct diction, illustrative quotations and treated of barbarisms and solecisms (Juvenal vi.

    0
    0
  • The vividness and distinction of Pascal's phrase, his singular faculty of inserting without any loss of dignity in the gravest and most impassioned meditation what may be almost called quips of thought and diction, the intense earnestness of meaning weighting but not confusing the style, all appear here.

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  • His narrative contains frequent repetitions and contradictions, is without colouring, and monotonous; and his simple diction, which stands intermediate between pure Attic and the colloquial Greek of his time, enables us to detect in the narrative the undigested fragments of the materials which he employed.

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  • Indeed, the diction and versification of his own Latin compositions show that he had paid at least as much attention to modern copies from the antique as to the original models.

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  • The best critics admitted that his diction was too monotonous, too obviously artificial, and now and then turgid even to absurdity.

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  • When therefore he, after the lapse of years, resumed his pen, the mannerism which he had contracted while he was in the constant habit of elaborate composition was less perceptible than formerly, and his diction frequently had a colloquial ease which it had formerly wanted.

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  • His speech and diction were plain, terse, forcible.

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  • Nevertheless, it is on a false interpretation of this challenge that the dogma of the incomparable excellence of the style and diction of the Koran is based.

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  • The stories of the Middle Kingdom were in choice diction, large portions of them being rhetorical or poetical compositions attributed to the principal characters.

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  • In unity of style and in the high level of its dramatic diction, Die Jungfrau von Orleans is unsurpassed among Schiller's works.

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  • As far as the diction itself is concerned, the lyric outbursts of the chorus gave Schiller's genius an opportunity of which he was not slow to avail himself.

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  • In spite of the incorrectness of his diction, he was gifted with a genuine eloquence, and well knew how to carry the populace with him.

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  • Sometimes in plain narrative the lecturer would be specially awkward, while in abstruse passages he seemed specially at home, rose into a natural eloquence, and carried away the hearer by the grandeur of his diction.

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  • Morris (1895) in imitative metre, and almost unintelligibly archaistic in diction; and C. B.

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  • The contemporary poets whom Keble most admired were Scott, Wordsworth and Southey; and of their influence traces are visible in his diction.

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  • Some of the poems are faultless, after their kind, flowing from the first stage to the last, lucid in thought, vivid in diction, harmonious in their pensive melody.

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  • To be a gentleman in Italy meant at this epoch to be a man acquainted with the rudiments at least of scholarship, refined in diction, capable of corresponding or of speaking in choice phrases, open to the beauty of the arts, intelligently interested in archaeology, taking for his models of conduct the great men of antiquity rather than the saints of the church.

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  • The Renaissance displayed itself in their effort to purify the form and diction of poetry.

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  • The result of their endeavour was immediately apparent in the new force added to French rhythm, the new pomp, richness, colouring and polish conferred upon poetic diction.

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  • His speeches were characterized by skill of statement, ingenious grouping of facts, fervent diction, and ardent patriotism; sometimes by biting sarcasm, but also by superficial research, half-knowledge and an unwillingness to reason a proposition to its logical results.

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  • The dramatic and literary ability shown in these plays, all of which were published later in book form, was as undoubted as their diction and ideas were characteristically paradoxical.

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  • And he surpasses almost all of them in the richness of his diction, and his skill in the use of metaphors and illustrations.

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  • Nor can it be argued that the characteristics of the pastorals are those of private letters; they are not private, nor even semi-private as they stand; besides, the only private note from Paul's hand (Philemon) bears no traces of the special diction exhibited in the epistles to Timothy and Titus.

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  • The diction is full, even to excess, of meaning, point and emphasis.

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  • He is purely medieval in subject and spirit, his lyrics are perfect in form and expression, his diction thoroughly popular.

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  • Samuel Usque, a Lisbon Jew, deserves a place to himself for his Consolagam as tribulagoes de Israel, where he exposes the persecutions endured by his countrymen in every age down to his time; the book takes the dialogue form, and its diction is elegant and pure.

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  • He has passed far beyond the bald and meagre diction of the early chroniclers.

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  • From the tendency to use a poetic diction in prose, which was so conspicuous a fault in the writers of the silver age, Livy is not wholly free.

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  • His treatises, orations, and familiar letters, though remarkable for a prose style which is eminently characteristic of the man, are not distinguished by purity of diction.

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  • What he lacked was that insight into the best classical masterpieces, that command of the best classical diction, which is the product of successive generations of scholarship. To attain to this, Giovanni da Ravenna, Colluccio Salutato, Poggio and Filelfo had to labour, before a Poliziano and a Bembo finally prepared the path for an Erasmus.

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  • Where a borough has not a separate court of quarter sessions, but has a separate commission of the peace, the justices of the county in which the borough is situate have a concurrent jurisJuris d - diction with the borough justices in all matters arising ti o n o within the borough.

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  • Nor can we deny to the Yashts, in their depiction of the Zoroastrian angels and their presentment of the old sagas, a certain poetic feeling, at times, and a pleasant diction.

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  • Clearness, cogency, masculine simplicity of diction, are conspicuous in the pamphlet, but true creative power told the Tale of a Tub.

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  • His diffuseness and the antiquated character of his matter and diction, have, however, come to be regarded as difficulties in the way of study, and he is more renowned than read.

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  • The Book of Enoch was written in the second and first centuries B.C. It was well known to many of the writers of the New Testament, and in many instances influenced their thought and diction.

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  • In the New Testament the similarity of matter and diction is sufficiently strong to establish a close connexion, if not a literary dependence.

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  • No other Rumanian translation approaches it in style and diction, although the authors, as they own, utilized the older translations, and for the New Testament and the Psalter they utilized Sylvestre's work.

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  • And magnificent rhetorician though he was, his labour was given less to his diction than to the facts; his heart was less in the form than the matter.

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  • All his works were written in the most elegant style and chaste diction; but apart from his share in the editing of the Historiens de la France, they were mostly in the form of separate articles on literary and historical subjects.

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  • Influenced by Jonas Hallgrimsson with regard to language and poetic diction, but keeping unbroken the traditions of Icelandic medieval poetry maintained by Sigur5r Breic fjorc6 (1798-1846), is another school of poets, very unlike the first.

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  • According to the custom of that age in Italy, it now became his duty to explain the language, and to illustrate the beauties of the principal Latin authors, Cicero and Virgil being considered the chief masters of moral science and of elegant diction.

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  • Aeschines reproached the diction of Demosthenes with excess of, elaboration and adornment (7reptcpryia).

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  • Its style is as easily recognized as that of Deutero-Isaiah, being as remarkable for its copious diction as for its depths of moral and religious feeling.

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  • Her emblem is tears and her diction is characterized by simplicity, in sharp contrast to her father.

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  • Write with a casual, conversational tone rather than a formal tone such as textbook diction.

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  • Speech therapy can significantly improve diction, especially in the second decade of the disorder.

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  • That last one brings up the question of case and diction.

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  • After a lesson in proper diction, the men have to create original rap songs with proper grammar and no curse words.

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  • His diction sounds so upperclass Brit to twentieth century ears, however, that we are led to assume that European union proceeded apace in the years between now and the time of the Enterprise-D.

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  • The dramatic and literary ability shown in these plays, all of which were published later in book form, was as undoubted as their diction and ideas were characteristically paradoxical.

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  • His sermons were not remarkable for eloquence, but a certain solidity and balance of judgment, an absence of partisanship, a sobriety of expression combined with clearness and force of diction, attracted hearers and inspired them with confidence.

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  • The conservatism which is a feature of proper names everywhere, in consequence of which the archaic traits of a language are frequently preserved in them, just as they are preserved in terms used in the ritual and in poetic diction, is sufficient to account for the interesting fact that the Semitic settlers of the Euphrates valley in handing down their names from one generation to another retained the custom of writing them in " Sumerian " fashion, or, as we might also put it, in "ideographic" form.

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