Diameter sentence example

diameter
  • The diameter of the orchestra is 762 ft.
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  • in diameter, but those of the larger ichthyosauri are of much greater dimensions.
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  • He gives no diameter or wind-pressure.
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  • In the rubber ring joint an india-rubber ring is used; slightly less in diameter than the pipe.
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  • The front or cover of the case is a similar button of hard polished carbon D, also slightly smaller in diameter than the cylindrical wall of the box.
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  • My furniture, part of which I made myself--and the rest cost me nothing of which I have not rendered an account--consisted of a bed, a table, a desk, three chairs, a looking-glass three inches in diameter, a pair of tongs and andirons, a kettle, a skillet, and a frying-pan, a dipper, a wash-bowl, two knives and forks, three plates, one cup, one spoon, a jug for oil, a jug for molasses, and a japanned lamp.
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  • Its eastern side is built into the hill, its longer diameter is 76 yds., and it accommodated seven or eight thousand spectators.
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  • in diameter; it has two or three niches, and a conical roof formed by the gradual inclination of the walls to the centre.
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  • in diameter, and bear in the axil a solitary, stalked, white flower, about the size and shape of the garden anemone, with six or more petals and twice as many hypogynous stamens.
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  • Estimate the diameter of the star's image in terms of the 4" intervals of the movable webs.
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  • They have shown that columns of water of very small diameter can so resist tensile strain that they can be lifted bodily instead of flowing along the channel, They suggest that the forces causing the movement are complex, and draw particular attention to the pull upwards in consequence of disturbances in the leaves.
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  • in diameter, and with the shoots or young branches more or less angular; the glossy deltoid leaves are sharply pointed, somewhat cordate at the base, and with flattened petioles; the fertile catkins ripen about the middle of June, when their opening capsules discharge the cottony seeds which have given the tree its common western name; in New England it is sometimes called the "river poplar."
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  • in diameter, and the smallest 2 in., are wrapped in asbestos, felt and other non-conducting materials, and are placed in wooden tubes laid under ground like water and gas pipes.
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  • Ellis used this indication to have an organ pipe made which with one-sixteenth diameter and a wind-pressure of 34 in., at one-fourth Schlick's length, gave f' 301.6, from which he derived a just major third of a' 377, which would compare very well with an old Greek a'.
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  • It is also a rule that the diameter of the bowl shall not be less than 411n.
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  • The New York-Chicago line, built in 1892, is of wire 165 millimetres in diameter (No.
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  • These bubbles are from an eightieth to an eighth of an inch in diameter, very clear and beautiful, and you see your face reflected in them through the ice.
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  • To the brass bottom of the case is attached 'a thin disk of polished hard carbon C, which is slightly less in diameter than the brass bottom, so that the carbon disk almost entirely covers this brass back, leaving only a slight annular space around its edge.
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  • It was about a foot in diameter at the big end, and he had expected to get a good saw-log, but it was so rotten as to be fit only for fuel, if for that.
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  • suggestion of Toscanelli, and under-estimating the diameter of the globe, by sailing due west.
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  • Compared with heating by hot water, steam-heating requires less piping, which, further, may be of much smaller diameter to attain a similar result, because of the higher temperature of the heat yielding surface.
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  • All the comforts of home, except behind the rich brocade fabric walls stood twenty-four inches of rebar reinforced concrete and the door consisted of eight-inch diameter solid steel bars.
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  • A military organization may be quite correctly compared to a cone, of which the base with the largest diameter consists of the rank and file; the next higher and smaller section of the cone consists of the next higher grades of the army, and so on to the apex, the point of which will represent the commander-in-chief.
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  • The manubrium is absent altogether in the fresh-water medusa Limnocnida, in which the diameter of the mouth exceeds half that of the umbrella; on the other hand, the manubrium may attain a great length, owing to the centre of the sub-umbrella with the stomach being drawn into it, as it were, to form a long proboscis, as in Geryonia.
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  • Sieve-tubes with accompanying corn- diameter of the stem, the cortex sd.p~cierizedperid~sm.
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  • in diameter, charged to a negative potential of at least 2000 volts, is supported between insulators in the open, usually at a height of about 2 metres.
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  • in diameter, and i-in.
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  • in diameter and 200 ft.
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  • and a diameter of 4 ft.
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  • You may see from a boat, in calm weather, near the sandy eastern shore, where the water is eight or ten feet deep, and also in some other parts of the pond, some circular heaps half a dozen feet in diameter by a foot in height, consisting of small stones less than a hen's egg in size, where all around is bare sand.
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  • in diameter and flowers 8 to 16 in.
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  • in outside diameter and 4 in.
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  • When the diameter of the stele is greater, parenchymatous conjunctive tissue often occupies its centre and is frequently called the pith.
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  • in diameter, to a total resistance of zoo ohms. The actual current required to work the instrument is 3.3 milliamperes (equivalent approximately to the current given by 1 Daniell cell through 3300 ohms), but in practice a current of to milliamperes is allowed.
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  • The coils of the electromagnets are differentially wound with silk-covered wire, 4 mils (= 004 inch) in diameter, to a total resistance of 400 ohms. This differential winding enables the instrument to be used for " duplex " working, but the connexions of the wires to the terminal screws are such that the relay can be used for ordinary single working.
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  • The limit of each years increment of secondary wood, in those plants whose yearly activity is interrupted by a regular winter or dry season, is marked by a more or less distinct line, which is produced by the sharp contrast between the wood formed in the late summer of one year (characterized by the sparseness or small diameter of the tracheal elements, or by the preponderance of fibres, or by a combination of these characters, giving a denseness to the wood) and the loose spring wood of the next year, with its absence of fibres, or its numerous large tracheae.
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  • 21, p. 373, Adrien Auzout gives the results of some measures of the diameter of the sun and moon made by himself, and this communication led to the letters of Townley and Bevis above referred to.
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  • But if, using the shortest diameter of Loch Fyne, we apply these proportions to Walden, which, as we have seen, appears already in a vertical section only like a shallow plate, it will appear four times as shallow.
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  • These include the mutual distances of some of the stars in the Pleiades, a few observations of the apparent diameter of the sun, others of the distance of the moon from neighbouring stars, and a great number of measurements of the diameter of the moon.
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  • in diameter are frequently found, and sometimes these dimensions are greatly ex ceeded.
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  • in diameter; the wood is strong, hard and close grained; the acorns are produced in great quantity, and are used by the Indians as food.
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  • in diameter and 90 ft.
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  • Radiators should not be fixed directly on to the main heating pipe, but always on branches of smaller diameter leading from the flow pipe to one end of the radiator and back to the main return pipe from the other end; they may then be easily controlled by a valve placed on the branch from the flow pipe.
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  • It is seen as a clump of wire-like leaves, a few feet in diameter, surrounding a stem, hardly thicker than a walking-stick, rising to a height of Jo or 12 ft.
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  • castaneaefolia, diameter, not uncommon in most forests one-third natural size.
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  • in diameter, covered with a heap of stones, like a small cairn, may sometimes be seen; these were possibly intended for the burial of slaves or less important members of the tribe.
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  • In the majority of ferns, at a higher level, after the stele has increased greatly in diameter, a large-celled true pith or medulla, resembling the cortex in its characters, and quite distinct from conjunctive, from which it is separated by an internal endodernlis, appears in the centre.
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  • in diameter at the base and decreasing in diameter as it ascends; it is built of rough blocks of stone, as a rule about 2 ft.
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  • by the disk, for any difference in speed between nut and screw will cause the nut to move along the screw until the diameter of the cone is reached which fulfils the above conditions for equality in speed.
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  • in diameter, attached to a stretched fibre and having a M t ru e small magnetic needle fixed to its back, is arranged within a menu.
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  • He sometimes held the carbon powder against the diaphragm in a small tr ans' shallow cell (from a quarter to half an inch in diameter and about an eighth of an inch deep), and sometimes he used what he describes as a fluff, that is, a little brush of silk fibre with plumbago rubbed into it.
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  • The electrostatic capacity of a cable of this type is low, and its dimensions are small, the external diameter of a cable containing 1600 ten-lb conductors being only 24 in.
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  • It differs from Limnocodium in having practically no manubrium but a wide mouth two-thirds the diameter of the umbrella across.
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  • slabs or two small walls; the semicircular space thus formed has a diameter of about 45 ft., and was probably intended for sacrifices.
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  • Theoretically for a given outside diameter of core the greatest speed of signalling through a cable is obtained when the diameter of the conductor is 606 (1/,/e) the diameter of the core, but this ratio makes the thickness of the guttapercha covering insufficient for mechanical strength.
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  • Archimedes concluded from his measurements that the sun's diameter was greater than 27' and less than 32'; and even Tycho Brahe was so misled by his measures of the apparent diameters of the sun and moon as to conclude that a total eclipse of the sun was impossible.'
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  • The wheels range in diameter from 18 in.
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  • The diameter (on the ground level) of the dome is 116 ft.
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  • in diameter, should be raised and lowered by water power, under control of the observer by means of electric keys which act on secondary mechanism that in turn works the valves and reversing gear of the water engines.
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  • It was a rough circle about four feet in diameter.
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  • in length by any mirrors which can be practically constructed would be like attempting optical experiments with mirrors one-hundred-thousandth of an inch in diameter.
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  • diameter by E.
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  • The young corm, at first about the diameter of the flower-stalk, grows continuously, till in the following July it attains the size of a small apricot.
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  • in diameter, which lift the water to a trough at the top of the dam, whence it is distributed among the gardens and melon patches, rice, cotton, tobacco, liquorice and durra fields, between the immediate bed of the river and the rocky banks which shut it out from the desert.
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  • In Thomas Walker's harpoon or frictionless log, introduced in 1861, the wheelwork was enclosed in a cylindrical case of the same diameter as the body of the rotator or fan, and the latter was brought close up to the register, forming a compact machine and avoiding the use of the 6-ft.
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  • This increase in the diameter of stem and root is correlated with the increase in leaf-area each season, due to the continued production of new leaf-bearing branches.
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  • in diameter and 8 ft.
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  • in diameter, the next 6 in., the next 3 in.
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  • The columns vary somewhat in diameter (more than even the difference caused by fluting would warrant) and three different types of capital are noticeable.
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  • diameter, 24 in.
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  • diameter; but subsequently these dimensions were varied.
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  • Their boilers are of relatively large proportions for the train weight and average speed, and the driving wheels of small diameter, a large proportion of their total weight being " adhesive."
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  • below the surface, with an external diameter of 10 ft.
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  • clear diameter of 10 ft.
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  • The later examples of these railways have a diameter ranging from 13 to 15 ft.
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  • The cost of constructing the deep tubular tunnels in London, whose diameter is about 15 ft.
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  • 10.86 in.), diameter of driving-wheels 1 m.
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  • in diameter (Notizie degli scavi, 1883, p. 423).
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  • in diameter, sessile, and generally in pairs, and are made up of large angular scales, slightly convex exteriorly, and with a sharp point in the centre.
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  • or more in diameter,, growing in or near water or on low-lying land which is subject.
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  • It has been estimated that the sun is at present contracting so that its diameter diminishes 10 m.
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  • This is an inappreciable distance when compared with the diameter of the sun, which is nearly a million of miles, but the significance for our present purpose depends upon the fact that this contraction is always taking place.
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  • Assuming the accuracy of the estimate just made, we see that a thousand years ago the sun must have had a diameter 100 m.
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  • greater than at present, ten thousand years ago that diameter must have been 1000 m.
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  • in diameter, cut in the rock, with a double winding inclined plane, so that asses could ascend and descend to carry the water from the bottom.
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  • The lower fort lies at the eastern base of the rock and measures about half a mile in diameter.
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  • The greatest height of the monument is 60 ft., and the diameter of its base is 86 ft.
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  • In a favourable soil and open situation it becomes the tallest and one of the stateliest of European trees, rising sometimes to a height of from 150 to 170 ft., the trunk attaining a diameter of from 5 to 6 ft.
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  • The trees usually grow very close together, the slender trunks rising to a great height bare of branches; but they do not attain the size of the Norway spruce, being seldom taller than 60 or 70 ft., with a diameter of 12 or 2 ft.
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  • At low tide the limpet (being a strictly intertidal organism) is exposed to the air, and (according to trustworthy observers) quits its attachment and walks away in search of food (minute encrusting algae), and then once more returns to the identical spot, not an inch in diameter, which belongs, as it were, to it.
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  • in diameter, and by a dome over each of the arms. The plan is derived from the Church of the Holy Apostles at Constantinople, now covered by the mosque of Mahommed II., and bears a strong resemblance to the plan of St Front at Perigueux in France (I 120).
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  • The branch to East Boston (1900-1904) passes beneath the harbour bed; it is the first double-track tunnel in the United States, and the first all-cement tunnel (diameter, 23.6 ft.) in the world.
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  • in diameter, passing from the bull-wheel shaft over a grooved wheel known as the crown-pulley, at the summit of the derrick.
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  • in diameter and about to ft.
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  • in diameter and 24 ft.
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  • The initial diameter of the well drilled from the bottom of this pit is in some instances as much as 36 in., bore-holes of the larger size being preferred, as they are less liable to become choked, and admit of the use of larger bailers for raising the oil.
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  • This consists in the use of an expanding reamer by means of which Drilling in the well may be drilled to a diameter admitting of the Galicia.
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  • The outward set of teeth drill the hole large enough to permit the drilling apparatus to descend freely, and the teeth set inwardly pare down the core to such a diameter as will admit of the body of the cutter passing over it without seizing.
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  • The calyx is a long tube, or a series of connected tubes, situated above the core barrel, to which it is equal in diameter.
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  • A form of the rod system is used in the Russian oil-fields, but owing to the large diameter of the wells the appliances differ from those employed elsewhere.
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  • in diameter, the body carrying one barrel, while another is slung beneath the axle.
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  • in diameter and 30 ft.
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  • The gas is distributed to the consumer from the wells in wrought-iron pipes, ranging in diameter from 20 in.
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  • in diameter are also used.
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  • in diameter, usually carrying a pressure of about 4 oz.
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  • At that point the outer wall, if one may so call it, of the solid dome could be traced, and had a diameter of 68 ft.
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  • in diameter, with six engaged Corinthian columns and a sculptured frieze, standing on a rectangular base of Peiraic stone.
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  • in diameter; the eight sides, which face the points of the compass, are furnished with a frieze containing inartistic figures in relief representing the winds; below it, on the sides facing the sun, are the lines of a sun-dial.
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  • in diameter and halls on each side divided into two aisles, each compartment being covered with a dome, in this respect also not following the early normal type, in which domes were only found over tombs.
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  • in diameter is thoroughly cleansed and packed as shown in fig.
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  • in diameter, and covered by a high dome.
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  • The size of a globe is usually given in terms of its diameter.
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  • It is the work of Richard of Haldingham, and has a diameter of 134 cm.
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  • A map essentially identical with that of Hereford, but larger - its diameter is 156 cm.
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  • The geographical ideas which prevailed at the time Columbus started in search of Cathay may be most readily gathered from two contemporary globes, the one known as the Laon globe because it was picked up in 1860 at a curiosity shop in that town, the other produced at Nuremberg in 1492 by Martin Behaim.1 The Laon globe is of copper gilt, and has a diameter of 170 mm.
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  • - a_= = The globe is of pasteboard covered with whiting and parchment, and has a diameter of 507 mm.
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  • He published in 1507 a huge map of the world, in 12 sheets, together with a small globe of a diameter of I 10 mm., the segments for which were printed from wood-blocks.
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  • Its diameter is only 42 in.
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  • Its diameter is 160 mm., its date about 1530.
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  • It has a diameter of II ft.
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  • Its diameter is 3.25 metres.
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  • Their diameter is nearly 5 metres.
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  • in diameter was set up by Dr Roger Long at Cambridge; the terrestrial globe which Count Ch.
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  • in 1787 had a diameter of 26 metres, or 85 ft.
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  • That which Colonel Langlois erected in the"Champs Elysees(1824) had a diameter of 39 metres.
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  • Nine feet in diameter at the base, it tapers to eight feet at the top. The catacombs, a short distance S.W.
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  • in diameter, lies in the E.
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  • in diameter, supported by a huge cylindrical pillar ?
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  • in diameter, sometimes surmounted by trees in the midst of a treeless plain and sometimes arranged in circles and on radii, and decreasing in size with distance from the centre of the field - has been variously explained.
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  • in diameter and having a temperature of about 3000°.
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  • The terminal circle, whose longest diameter is 300 ft., is somewhat difficult to make out, as it is broken by the houses and gardens of a little hamlet.
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  • It was a mile in diameter, built in concentric circles, with the mosque and palace of the caliph in the centre, and had four gates toward the four points of the compass.
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  • in diameter, and its height at the centre is about 320 ft.
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  • in diameter 60 ft.
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  • and a diameter of 16 ft., and is capped with a hexagonal spire of 18 ft., which was added in the 15th century.
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  • Of these one is circular, with a diameter of 60 ft.
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  • or more in diameter, and large hairy oblong lanceolate leaves often 18 in.
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  • in diameter, is expected to yield annually 20 gallons of milk, each gallon giving about 2 lb of rubber.
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  • in diameter, standing on the south side of the court.
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  • In each case the results of the observations may be systematically in error, not only from the uncertain diameter of the moon, but in a still greater degree from the varying effect of irradiation and the personal equation of the observers.
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  • Kohlrausch 2 the distance between the poles of a cylindrical magnet the length of which is from io to 30 times the diameter, is sensibly equal to five-sixths of the length of the bar.
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  • du Bois (Magnetic Circuit, p. 33), the demagnetizing factor, and the ratio of the length of the ellipsoid 2c to its equatorial diameter 2a (=c/a), the dimensional ratio, denoted by the symbol nt.
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  • (35) Du Bois has shown that _when the dimensional ratio in (= length/ diameter) exceeds t00, Nm 2 =constant=45, and hence for long thin rods N = 45/ m2.
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  • in diameter, which is suspended by a single fibre of unspun silk; this arrangement, when enclosed in a case with a glazed front to protect it from currents of air, constitutes a simple but efficient magnetometer.
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  • A little instrument, supplied by Hartmann and Braun, contains a short length of fine bismuth wire wound into a flat double spiral, half an inch or thereabouts in diameter, and attached to a long ebonite handle.
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  • in diameter the maximum elongation was nearly doubled when a current of two amperes was passing through the iron, while the " critical value " of the field was increased from 130 to 200.
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  • in length and had a diameter of 24 ft.
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  • in diameter, and weighing up to nearly 5 tons.
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  • In optics, it is that portion of the diameter of an object-glass or mirror through which light can pass free from obstruction.
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  • It is equal to the actual diameter of the cylinder of rays admitted by a telescope.
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  • in diameter, upon which rests a simple epistyle, supporting a row of smaller columns, so that the interior of the cella was in two storeys.
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  • in diameter; it was dedicated on the 30th of September 1907, when an address was delivered by President Roosevelt.
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  • Thus in the case of the circular disk, equidistant (r) from the source of light and from the screen upon which the shadow is observed, the width of the first exterior zone is given by = X(2r)/4(2x), 2x being the diameter of the disk.
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  • 12 -7r2R4 x2 f 2 The roots of Jo(z) after the first may be found from We may compare this with the corresponding result for a rectangular aperture of width a, tlf = X/a; and it appears that in consequence of the preponderance of the central parts, the compensation in the case of the circle does not set in at so small an obliquity as when the circle is replaced by a rectangular aperture, whose side is equal to the diameter of the circle.
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  • It has been found by Sir William Herschel and others that the definition of a telescope is often improved by stopping off a part of the central area of the object-glass; but the advantage to be obtained in this way is in no case great, and anything like a reduction of the aperture to a narrow annulus is attended by a development of the external luminous rings sufficient to outweigh any improvement due to the diminished diameter of the central area.'
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  • If 2R be the diameter of the objectglass and D the distance of the object, the angle subtended by AP is E/D, and the angular resolving power is given by X/2 D sin a = X/2 R (3) This method of derivation (substantially due to Helmholtz) makes it obvious that there is no essential difference of principle between the two cases, although the results are conveniently stated in different forms. In the case of the telescope we have to deal with a linear measure of aperture and an angular limit of resolution, whereas in the case of the microscope the limit of resolution is linear, and it is expressed in terms of angular aperture.
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  • in diameter remained fairly visible up to a distance of 20 ft.
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  • In his experiments upon this subject Fraunhofer employed plates of glass dusted over with lycopodium, or studded with small metallic disks of uniform size; and he found that the diameters of the rings were proportional to the length of the waves and inversely as the diameter of the disks.
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  • If we suppose the diameter of the lens to be given (2R), and its focal length f gradually to increase, the original differences of phase at the image of an infinitely distant luminous point diminish without limit.
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  • in diameter, is therefore at least as well defined as that seen direct.
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  • The latter element must eventually be decreased until less than the diameter of the pupil of the eye.
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  • of spectra, for the sun has an appreciable apparent diameter, and each point on its surface gives rise to an individual spectrum.
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  • This overlapping may become so pronounced as to produce a rainbow in which colour is practically absent; this is particularly so when a thin cloud intervenes between the sun and the rain, which has the effect of increasing the apparent diameter of the sun to as much as 2° or 3°.
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  • In nature, however, this is not realized, for the sun has an appreciable diameter.
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  • A horizontal pencil of sunlight was admitted by a vertical slit, and then allowed to fall on a column of water supplied by a jet of about th of an inch in diameter.
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  • in diameter, leaves the stamps in suspension in water, and passes through a series of troughs in which the heavier mineral is collected; this then passes through a series of washing operations, which leaves a mixture consisting chiefly of tinstone and arsenical pyrites, which is calcined and washed again, until finally black tin containing about 60 to 65% of metal is left.
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  • in external diameter, also in the Lombard Romanesque style.
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  • It was a peripteral hexastyle, and must have had at least nineteen columns at the sides; the portion excavated shows that its total width is 744 ft., the width of the cella 382 ft., the lower diameter of the columns 64 ft.
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  • and a total breadth of 72 ft.; the columns have a lower diameter of 54 ft., and the inter-columniation is 132 ft.
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  • in diameter, and having about sixty rows of seats; the eleven lower tiers were originally covered with marble.
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  • in lower diameter: its length is estimated at 197 ft., its breadth at 664 ft.
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  • in diameter may be carried long distances underground with the use of little more than an equal volume of water.
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  • The diameter of the cylinders is such that each alone is capable of starting the load.
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  • To prevent excessive bending stresses the diameter of drum and sheave must bear a proper ratio to that of the rope.
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  • or more in diameter by io or 12 ft.
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  • diameter, discharging hundreds of thousands of cubic feet of air per minute.
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  • It is seen that the action is intermittent, liquid only being discharged during a down stroke, but since the driving force is that which is supplied to the piston rod, the lift is only con ditioned by the power available and by the strength of the pump. A continuous supply can be obtained by leading the delivery pipe into the base of an air chamber H, which is fitted with a discharge pipe J of such a diameter that the liquid cannot escape from it as fast as it is pumped in during a down stroke.
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  • Fraunhofer; the latter ultimately attained considerable success and produced telescope disks up to 28 centimetres (II in.) diameter.
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  • If the blowing iron is held vertically with the bulb uppermost the bulb becomes flattened and shallow, if the bulb is allowed to hang downwards it becomes elongated and reduced in diameter, and if the end of the bulb is pierced and the iron is held horizontally and sharply trundled, as a mop is trundled, the bulb opens out into a flattened disk.
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  • The diameter of the cane or tube is regulated by the weight of glass carried, and by the distance covered by the two workmen.
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  • in diameter, and are fed with a mixture of fine emery and oil.
    0
    0
  • When this is the case the gathering is carried to a block or half-open mould in which it is rolled and blown until it acquires, roughly, the shape of a hemisphere, the flat side being towards the pipe and the convexity away from it; the diameter of this hemisphere is so regulated as to be approximately that of the cylinder which is next to be formed of the viscous mass.
    0
    0
  • In the case of large and thick cylinders, however, another process of opening the ends is generally employed: an assistant attaches a small lump of hot glass to the domed end, and the heat of this added glass softens the cylinder sufficiently to enable the assistant to cut the end open with a pair of shears; subsequently the open end is spun out to the diameter of the whole as described above.
    0
    0
  • A full account of the process of blowing crown-glass will be found in all older books and articles on the subject, so that it need only be mentioned here that the glass, instead of being blown into a cylinder, is blown into a flattened sphere, which is caused to burst at the point opposite the pipe and is then, by the rapid spinning of the glass in front of a very hot furnace-opening, caused to expand into a flat disk of large diameter.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and vary in thickness from a to $ in.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and vary in thickness from a to z in., the centre being the thickest.
    0
    0
  • He was especially successful in making vases and circular dishes of vitro di trina; one of the latter in the Correr collection at Venice, believed to have been made in his glass-house, measures 55 centimetres (nearly 23 in.) in diameter.
    0
    0
  • He had discovered a contraction in the vein of fluid (vena contracta) which issued from the orifice, and found that, at the distance of about a diameter of the aperture, the section of the vein was contracted in the subduplicate ratio of two to one.
    0
    0
  • Afterwards, when the metal has risen above B, to the level KK', the additional thrust is the weight of the cylinder of diameter KK' and height BH.
    0
    0
  • Taking two planes x = =b, and considering the increase of momentum in the liquid between them, due to the entry and exit of liquid momentum, the increase across dy in the direction Oy, due to elements at P and P' at opposite ends of the diameter PP', is pdy (U - Ua 2 r2 cos 20 +mr i sin 0) (Ua 2 r 2 sin 2 0+mr 1 cos 0) + pdy (- U+Ua 2 r 2 cos 2 0 +mr1 sin 0) (Ua 2 r 2 sin 2 0 -mr 1 cos 0) =2pdymUr '(cos 0 -a 2 r 2 cos 30), (8) and with b tan r =b sec this is 2pmUdo(i -a 2 b2 cos 30 cos 0), (9) and integrating between the limits 0 = 27r, the resultant, as before, is 27rpmU.
    0
    0
  • The effective angular inertia of the body in the medium is now required; denote it by C 1 about the axis of the figure, and by C2 about a diameter of the mean section.
    0
    0
  • the moment of inertia of the body about the axis, denoted by But if is the moment of inertia of the body about a mean diameter, and w the angular velocity about it generated by an impluse couple M, and M' is the couple required to set the surrounding medium in motion, supposed of effective radius of gyration k', If the shot is spinning about its axis with angular velocity p, and is precessing steadily at a rate about a line parallel to the resultant momentum F at an angle 0, the velocity of the vector of angular momentum, as in the case of a top, is C i pµ sin 0- C2µ 2 sin 0 cos 0; (4) and equating this to the impressed couple (multiplied by g), that is, to gN = (c 1 -c 2)c2u 2 tan 0, (5) and dividing out sin 0, which equated to zero would imply perfect centring, we obtain C21 2 cos 0- (c 2 -c 1)c2u 2 sec 0 =o.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and it became clear that this temple had supplied building materials for S.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, in any of which larger sizes they may be fruited in the following season, but, to be successful in this, the young rod produced must be thoroughly matured after it has reached its limit of growth.
    0
    0
  • He sought to determine the distance and magnitude of the sun, to calculate the diameter of the earth and the influence of the moon on the tides.
    0
    0
  • in diameter by 60 in.
    0
    0
  • in diameter by 78 in.
    0
    0
  • conveniently made of diameter which will give the cylindrical portion sufficient capacity to hold the juice expressed from the cane-mill in one hour.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and 6 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, which follows the curve of the hemispherical bottom, and is fitted from one side to the other of the defecator; one end is entirely closed, and the other is connected by a small pipe to a shallow circular vessel outside the defecator, covered with an india-rubber diaphragm, to the centre of which is attached a light rod actuating a steam throttle-valve, and capable of being adjusted as to length, &c. The copper pipe and circular vessel are filled with cold water, which on becoming heated by the surrounding juice expands, and so forces up the india-rubber diaphragm and shuts off the steam.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and 50 ft.
    0
    0
  • diameter, which were fitted with knives and made 140 to 150 revolutions per minute, under the hopper which received the roots.
    0
    0
  • and upwards in diameter, are used.
    0
    0
  • outside diameter and 5 ft.
    0
    0
  • high, and of such diameter as to hold a given quantity of animal charcoal (also called " bone-black " and " char ") in proportion to the contemplated output of the refinery.
    0
    0
  • diameter), containing a fertilized ovum surrounded usually by many yolk-cells.
    0
    0
  • in diameter) of sand and other minerals derived from the decomposition of rocks, with a small amount of silicate of alumina.
    0
    0
  • Most of the material termed " sand " in such analyses consists of particles ranging in diameter from .5 to.
    0
    0
  • internal diameter.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, while for a current of 100 H.P. (say, of 746 amperes and Too volts) it measured about 14 by 12 by 14 in., and the electrodes were about 1 .
    0
    0
  • in diameter (internally), and about 32 in.
    0
    0
  • or more in diameter, and are evidently portions of a large root.
    0
    0
  • Numerous lateral ramifying branches spread out from the main trunk in a horizontal direction, tier upon tier, covering a compass of ground the diameter of which is often greater than the height of the tree.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and is covered with a cone-surmounted dome 190 ft.
    0
    0
  • The eighth storey, which contains the bells, is of much smaller diameter than the rest of the tower, and has only twelve columns.
    0
    0
  • In 1920 he was able to demonstrate by means of light-interference that the diameter of Alpha Orionis was 260,000,000 miles.
    0
    0
  • The old town, containing many narrow and irregular streets, forms a semicircle with its diameter towards the river, while round its periphery has sprung up the greater part of modern Munich, including the handsome Maximilian and Ludwig districts.
    0
    0
  • in inside diameter, seemed small for its length of 172 ft.
    0
    0
  • The body-wall is extensively calcified in the Cyclostomata and in most Cheilostomata, which may form elegant network-like colonies, as in the unilaminar genus Retepora, or may consist of wavy anastomosing plates, as in the bilaminar Lepralia foliacea of the British coasts, specimens of which may have a diameter of many inches.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and as many in depth, was formed on the E.
    0
    0
  • The diameter ox the outer crater, within which rises the modern cone to a height of 500 ft.
    0
    0
  • activity, has itself a diameter of 3/4 m.
    0
    0
  • In short, the little chisel becomes in his fingers a painters brush, and when it is remembered that, the basis upon which he works being simply a thread of silk, his hand must be trained to such delicacy of muscular effort as to be capable of arresting the edge of the knile at varying depths within the diameter of the tiny filament, the difficulty of the achievement will be understood.
    0
    0
  • The fruit-stalk is very short, bearing a subglobose fruit an inch or rather more in diameter, of an orange-yellow colour, and with a sweetish astringent pulp. It is surrounded at the base by the persistent calyxlobes, which increase in size as the fruit ripens.
    0
    0
  • in diameter; it is about 65 ft.
    0
    0
  • We can thus easily calculate the capacity of a long thin wire like a telegraph wire far removed from the earth, as follows: Let 2r be the diameter of the wire, 1 its length, and the uniform Capac ity surface electric density..
    0
    0
  • Thus for instance the capacity in free space of a sphere 2 metres in diameter would be 100/900,000 = 1/9000 of a microfarad.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, are introduced into an iron vessel provided with an iron tube that leads into a condenser containing water.
    0
    0
  • The diameter is generally 26 ft., but may be greater; the best depth is considered to be a quarter of the diameter.
    0
    0
  • The nest is an inch and more in diameter, with a small aperture for an entrance.
    0
    0
  • to 60 ft., and have a diameter of from I ft.
    0
    0
  • - Echinocactus much reduced; the flowers are several inches in diameter.
    0
    0
  • or more in diameter.
    0
    0
  • The largest is an ellipse of about 60 by 66 ft., but most of the sesi have a diameter of 20-25 ft.
    0
    0
  • DIAMETER (from the Gr.
    0
    0
  • The diameter of a quadric surface is a line at the extremities of which the tangent planes are parallel.
    0
    0
  • Newton defined the diameter of a curve of any order as the locus of the centres of the mean distances of the points of intersection of a system of parallel chords with the curve; this locus may be shown to be a straight line.
    0
    0
  • 2) to determine the height of a column, which should vary from eight to ten diameters according to the intercolumniation: and it is generally the custom to fix the lower diameter of the shaft by the height required and the Order employed.
    0
    0
  • in diameter at the bottom.
    0
    0
  • Oros, sun, and ÆTpov, a measure), an instrument originally designed for measuring the variation of the sun's diameter at different seasons of the year, but applied now to the modern form of the instrument which is capable of much wider use.
    0
    0
  • The width of each of the portions aghc and acfe cut away from the lens was made slightly greater than the focal length of lens X tangent of sun's greatest diameter.
    0
    0
  • Here, in order to fulfil the purposes of the previous models, the distance of the centres of the lenses from each other should only slightly exceed the tangent of sun's diameter X focal length of lenses.
    0
    0
  • The differences of the readings of the screw, when converted into arc, afford the means of measuring the variations of the sun's apparent diameter.
    0
    0
  • Jupiter was measured on eleven nights in the months of June and July 1794; from these measures Schur derives the values 35"39 and 37".94 for the polar and equatorial diameter respectively, at mean distance, corresponding with a compression 1/14.44.
    0
    0
  • 2 The diameter of Venus was measured with one of these heliometers at the observatory of Breslau by Brandes in 1820 (Berlin Jahrbuch, 1824, p. 064).
    0
    0
  • " the introduction of a diaphragm having two circular apertures touching each other in a point coinciding with the line of collimation of the telescope, and the diameter of each aperture exactly equal to the semidiameter of the cone of rays at the distance of the diaphragm from the focal point of the object-glass."
    0
    0
  • Modern surveying ships no longer make use of hempen lines with enormously heavy sinkers, such as were employed on the " Challenger," but they sound instead with steel piano wire not more than 310 to 215 of an inch in diameter and a detachable lead seldom weighing more than 70 lb.
    0
    0
  • in diameter are sufficient for this purpose, but in the tropics, where the transparency is much greater, disks 3 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter at least must be used or the angle of vision for the reflected light is too small.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, which is kept some 50 or 60 ft.
    0
    0
  • The tubbing, which is considerably less in diameter than the borehole, is suspended by rods from the surface until a bed suitable for a foundation is reached, upon which a sliding length of tube, known as the moss box, bearing a shoulder, which is filled with dried moss, is placed.
    0
    0
  • in diameter are about 4 in.
    0
    0
  • In this system the soft ground or fissured water-bearing rock is rendered temporarily solid by freezing the contained water within a surface a few feet larger in diameter than the size of the finished shaft, so that the ground may be broken either by hand tools or blasting in the same manner as hard rock.
    0
    0
  • The chilled brine enters through a central tube of small diameter, passes to the bottom of the outer one and rises through the latter to the surface, each system of tubes being connected above by a ring main with the circulating pumps.
    0
    0
  • diameter, in a covering of cretaceous strata, were frozen to a depth of 300 ft.
    0
    0
  • the largest diameter employed.
    0
    0
  • The power is applied by steam acting directly on a crank at one end of the axle, and the diameter of the fan may be 40 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, but at their outer circumference they are only 2 ft.
    0
    0
  • The extreme diameter is 25 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, hanging from a cross-bar connected with the pit-head framing at the surface, and attached to a similar bar at the bottom, which are kept straight by a stretching weight of from 30 cwt.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, are chains.
    0
    0
  • in diameter W gave this resistance.
    0
    0
  • It may be regarded as an epicycloid in which the rolling and fixed circles are equal in diameter, as the inverse of a parabola for its focus, or as the caustic produced by the reflection at a spherical surface of rays emanating from a point on the circumference.
    0
    0
  • in diameter - of an extinct volcano, the rim of which rises in several Rivers.
    0
    0
  • The lake, which is roughly circular with a diameter of some 13 m., lies at an altitude of 6135 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and 32 ft.
    0
    0
  • It combines the planisphere and armillae of Hipparchus and others, and the theodolite of Theon, and was usually of brass, varying in diameter from a couple of inches to a foot or more.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that we require the area of a circular grass-plot of measured diameter.
    0
    0
  • Thus the inaccuracy in taking the measured diameter as the datum is practically of the same order as the inaccuracy in taking the grass-plot to be circular.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that in the example given in § 20 the diameter as measured is is ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter at the widest part.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and lifted out with circular tongs suspended from a travelling crane which is worked by electricity.
    0
    0
  • in diameter set parallel to one another with a small interval between, and revolved by electric or steam power.
    0
    0
  • They are divided into breaking-down and finishing rolls, the latter being of smaller diameter than the former.
    0
    0
  • The distance between the block and the plate is adjusted so as to be slightly less than the diameter of the blank, and the result is that the edge of the blank is thickened and its diameter reduced before it escapes from the machine.
    0
    0
  • The elements of this disparate pair, calculated by Dr Vogel on the somewhat precarious assumption that its dark and bright members are of equal mean density, are as follows: Diameter of Algol.
    0
    0
  • and diameter of 71 ft., and are mostly formed of three blocks.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and 2 in.
    0
    0
  • He found that in all cases the velocity decreased with a diameter.
    0
    0
  • This limit for a diameter 1 1 m.
    0
    0
  • was Uo=330 6 met./sec., while for a diameter 0.108 it was U 0 =324' 25 met./sec.
    0
    0
  • Regnault also set up a shorter length of pipes of diameter o 108 m.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and, using Regnault's apparatus, found, that the velocity could be represented by 33 3(1 +C/P), where P is the mean excess of pressure above the normal.
    0
    0
  • Violle and Vautier made some later experiments on the propagation of musical sounds in a tunnel 3 metres in diameter (Ann.
    0
    0
  • 24) with a large hole at one end of a diameter, at the other end of which the brass is drawn out into a short, narrow tube that can be put close to the ear.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, has a little lycopodium powder introduced, and the powder is allowed to run all along the tube, which is then fixed horizontally.
    0
    0
  • This investigation is subject to the limitation that the diameter of the cross-section must be small compared with the wave-length.
    0
    0
  • A " sounding tube," say an inch in diameter, and somewhat more than twice the length of the jet tube, is then lowered over the flame, as in the figure.
    0
    0
  • in diameter contracted to an orifice i g inch in diameter, the orifice being nicked by a pair of scissors into a V-shape.
    0
    0
  • The cylindrical form of jet is unstable if its length is more than 7 times its diameter, and usually the irregular disturbances it receives at the orifice go on growing, and ultimately break it up irregularly into drops which go out at different rates.
    0
    0
  • But, if quite regular disturbances are impressed on the jet at intervals of time which depend on the diameter and speed of outflow (they must be somewhat more than ?r times its diameter apart), these disturbances go on growing and break the stream up into equal drops, which all move with the same velocity one after the other.
    0
    0
  • 42), consisting of two A circular quadrants of the same diameter as the plate.
    0
    0
  • Every point is equidistant from a fixed point within the surface; this point is the "centre," the constant distance the "radius," and any line through the centre and intersecting the sphere is a "diameter."
    0
    0
  • "Great" circles may also be defined as circles on a sphere which pass through the extremities of a diameter; they are familiar as the meridians or lines of longitude of geographers; lines of latitude are "small circles."
    0
    0
  • The extremities of the diameter perpendicular to a small circle are called the "poles" of that circle, and the distance from the pole to the circle, measured by the arc of the great circle through the pole, is the "polar distance" of the small circle.
    0
    0
  • Calling the radius r, and denoting by the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle, the volume is 31rr 3, and the surface 41rr2.
    0
    0
  • in diameter; each was composed of seven strands, containing 520 parallel wires, or 3640 wires in each cable.
    0
    0
  • in diameter; each weighs about 1116 tons, and has a nominal breaking strength of 22,320 tons, the actual breaking strength being the floor into rectangles 3 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and 48 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, each composed of 9472 galvanized steel wires a in.
    0
    0
  • in diameter with a ring in halves surrounding it 5 in.
    0
    0
  • length of roller, where d is the diameter of the roller in inches.
    0
    0
  • in diameter inside, r in.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and 22 in.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and are 6 ft.
    0
    0
  • At their end is fixed a blade of cast iron from two to eight times the diameter of the shaft of the pile; the pitch of the screw varies from one-half to one-fourth of the external diameter of the blade.
    0
    0
  • or more in diameter filled with concrete.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, sunk iio ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter were sunk about 40 ft.
    0
    0
  • less in diameter than the rivet and reamed out, so as to remove the ring of material strained by the punch.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and not so large as white pepper; their contracted stalk-like bases are between a and 2 in.
    0
    0
  • It was a cylinder of parchment of about the diameter of a coachwheel, and was literally rolled up on the floor of the house.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and now about 42 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, on which stood lofty columns.
    0
    0
  • In diameter the pillars vary from 15 to 20 in., and in height some are as much as 20 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and of a reddish-brown colour.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and in height; a smaller square chamber opens out of it.
    0
    0
  • The morainic belts and other obstructions in the drift plains hem in the waters in the intervening basins and create what are called " glacial lakes," var y ing in diameter from a few yards to several miles.
    0
    0
  • If material systems are constituted of discrete atoms, separated from each other by many times the diameter of any of them, this simple plan of exhibiting their interactions in terms of direct forces between them would indeed be exact enough to apply to a wide range of questions, provided we could be certain that the laws of the forces depended only on the positions and not also on the motions of the atoms. The most important example of its successful application has been the theory of capillary action elaborated by P. S.
    0
    0
  • We can obtain a pertinent illustration from the motion of a vortex ring in a fluid; if the circular core of the ring is thin compared with its diameter, and the vorticity is not very great, it is the vortical state of motion that travels across the fluid without transporting the latter bodily with it except to a slight extent very close to the core.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, ridged and warty on the upper half, and light brown to dark greyish-yellow within.
    0
    0
  • In the hydropolyp the body is typically elongated, the height of the column being far greater than the diameter.
    0
    0
  • The ectoderm loses entirely the ciliation which it had in the planula and actinula stages and commonly secretes on its external surface a protective or supporting investment, the perisarc. Contrasting with this, the anthopolyp is generally of s q uat form, the diameter often exceeding the height; the peristome is wide, a hypostome is lacking, and the ectoderm, or so much of it as is exposed, i.e.
    0
    0
  • in diameter are the most convenient.
    0
    0
  • diameter in 1842.
    0
    0
  • in diameter; owing to these large dimensions it cannot be pointed to every part of the heavens, but can only be moved a short distance from the meridian and very little to the north of the zenith; these restrictions have, however, hardly been felt, as there is almost at any moment a sufficient number of objects within its reach.
    0
    0
  • As a first result of experiment it was found that the resistance of similar shot was proportional, at the same velocity, to the surface or cross section, or square of the diameter.
    0
    0
  • The resistance R can thus be divided into two factors, one of which is d 2, where d denotes the diameter of the shot in inches, and the other factor is denoted by p, where p is the resistance in pounds at the same velocity to a similar I-in.
    0
    0
  • We first determine the time t in seconds required for the velocity of a shot, d inches in diameter and weighing w lb, to fall from any initial velocity V(f/s) to any final velocity v(f/s).
    0
    0
  • After a certain discount for friction and the recoil of the gun, the net work realized by the powder-gas as the shot advances AM is represented by the area Acpm, and this is equated to the kinetic energy e of the shot, in foot-tons, (I) e d2 I + p, a in which the factor 4(k 2 /d 2)tan 2 S represents the fraction due to the rotation of the shot, of diameter d and axial radius of gyration k, and S represents the angle of the rifling; this factor may be ignored in the subsequent calculations as small, less than I %.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, is ornamented with 60 engaged Ionic columns.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and distinguished by the presence of spines along the ribs of the shell.
    0
    0
  • Even the small island-rocks of the Mediterranean, sometimes only a few hundred yards in diameter, are occupied by peculiar races of lizards, which have attracted much attention from the fact that they have assumed under such isolated conditions a more or less dark,.
    0
    0
  • in diameter with inner and outer gates, the latter flanked by square towers some i i yds.
    0
    0
  • The great extension of surface thus produced had the drawback of exaggerating any small defect in the union of the two metals, increasing it to a blister of an inch or more in diameter.
    0
    0
  • In the United Kingdom the metric standard of capacity is the litre, represented (Order in Council, 19th May 1890) by the capacity of a hollow cylindrical brass measure whose internal diameter is equal to one-half its height, and which at 0° C., when filled to the brim, contains one kg.
    0
    0
  • A secondary standard measure for dry goods is the bushel of 1824, containing 8 imperial gallons, represented by a hollow bronze cylinder having a plane base, its internal diameter bring double its depth.
    0
    0
  • 5) made of brass, with a plane base, of equal height and diameter; which when filled to the brim, as determined by a plane glass disk, contains io lb weight of water at t = 62° F.B.
    0
    0
  • Some species build their nests in trees - great globular masses sometimes three feet in diameter, supported on the larger branches, and connected with the ground by covered passages on the outside of the tree.
    0
    0
  • The polar equation is r=a+b cos 0, where 2a= length of the rod, and b= diameter of the circle.
    0
    0
  • or more in height, with a diameter of from 12 to 15, or rarely 20 to 28 ft.
    0
    0
  • with a diameter near the ground of 20 ft.; but specimens from 300 to 320 ft.
    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding the rude character of the apparatus at his disposal, Horrocks was enabled by his observation of it to introduce some important corrections into the elements of the planet's, orbit, and to reduce to its exact value the received estimate of its apparent diameter.
    0
    0
  • AB, is a " diameter "; any other line similarly terminated, e.g.
    0
    0
  • In the succeeding three definitions the centre, diameter and the semicircle are defined, while the third postulate of the same book demands the possibility of describing a circle for every " centre " and " distance."
    0
    0
  • The circle on the line joining the internal and external centres of similitude as diameter is named the " circle of similitude."
    0
    0
  • A system coaxal with the two given circles is readily constructed by describing circles through the common points on the radical axis and any third point; the minimum circle of the system is obviously that which has the common chord of intersection for diameter, the maximum is the radical axis - considered as a circle of infinite radius.
    0
    0
  • All exact relations pertaining to the mensuration of the circle involve the ratio of the circumference to the diameter.
    0
    0
  • 7 angled at C, ADB is the semicircle described on AB as diameter, AEB the circular arc described with centre C and radius CA= CB.
    0
    0
  • Accordingly, we find in Vieta a formula for the ratio of diameter to circumference, viz.
    0
    0
  • Qui in vita sua multo labore circumferentiae circuli proximam rationem ad diametrum invenit sequentem quando diameter est I turn circuli circumferentia plus est quam 100000000000000000000000000000000000 et minus 314159265358979323846264338327950289 100000000000000000000000000000000000..
    0
    0
  • A given straight line being viewed as equal in length to the circumference of a circle, he sought to find the diameter of the circle.
    0
    0
  • The diameter sought is the straight line from A to the limiting position of the series of B's, say the straight line AB co.
    0
    0
  • gives us at once an expression for the diameter in terms of the circumference by means of an infinite series.'
    0
    0
  • In a very curious manner, by viewing the circle y= (1 - x2): as a member of the series of curves y= (I -x 2 )', y = (I -x 2) 2, &c., he was led to the proposition that four times the reciprocal of the ratio of the circumference to the diameter, i.e.
    0
    0
  • 8 With him, apparently, began the usage of denoting by 71 the ratio of the circumference to the diameter.'
    0
    0
  • The generality of treatment is indeed remarkable; he gives as the fundamental property of all the conics the equivalent of the Cartesian equation referred to oblique axes (consisting of a diameter and the tangent at its extremity) obtained by cutting an oblique circular cone in any manner, and the axes appear only as a particular case after he has shown that the property of the conic can be expressed in the same form with reference to any new diameter and the tangent at its extremity.
    0
    0
  • thick, built of layers of flat stones without cement or mortar, and an interior diameter of 40 ft.
    0
    0
  • The quantity of mercury or shot inserted depends upon the density of the liquids for which the hydrometer is to be employed, it being essential that the whole of the bulb should be immersed in the heaviest liquid for which the instrument is used, while the length and diameter of the stem must be such that the hydrometer will float in the lightest liquid for which it is required.
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    0
  • in diameter, while the stem consisted of a wire io in.
    0
    0
  • Diameter 11661n.
    0
    0
  • Diameter 21D in.
    0
    0
  • Diameter 12 in.
    0
    0
  • This error diminishes as the diameter of the stem is reduced, but is sensible in the case of the thinnest stem which can be employed, and is the chief source of error in the employment of Nicholson's hydrometer, which otherwise would be an instrument of extreme delicacy and precision.
    0
    0
  • IIo, differs from Nicholson's instrument in being constructed of glass, and having a cylindrical bulb about 21 centimetres in length and 22 millimetres in diameter.
    0
    0
  • in length, the conjugate diameter being 12 in.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, below which is a weight B connected with the ball by a short conical stem C. The stem D is rectangular in section and about 32 in.
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    0
  • high, and has a diameter of 52 ft.
    0
    0
  • The trunk attains a height of from 80 to 140 ft., with a diameter of from 3 to 5 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter; one at Glenarbuck, near the Clyde, grew above 140 ft.
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    0
  • in diameter and rarely above 80 ft.
    0
    0
  • According to race, &c., they vary considerably in size and weight, but on an average they measure from an inch to an inch and a half in length, and from half an inch to an inch in diameter.
    0
    0
  • Sir Thomas Wardle of Leek, in his handbook on silk published in 1887, showed by a series of measurements that the diameter of a single cocoon thread or bave varied from o oth to -nth part of an inch in diameter in the various species of Bombycides, whilst those of the Saturnides or wild species varied from - 0 oth to 3-0 0 th part of an inch.
    0
    0
  • A silk " throwster " receives his silk in skein form, the thread of which consists of a number of silk fibres wound together to make a certain diameter or size, the separate fibre having actually been spun by the worm, and this fibre may measure anything from Soo to woo yds.
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    0
  • in diameter, the silk being wrapped thinly and evenly all round the circumference of the drum.
    0
    0
  • The general results may be summarized as follows: if the width of the slit is equal to fX/4D (where X is the wave-length concerned, D the diameter of the collimator lens, and f its focal length) practically full resolving power is obtained and a further narrowing of the slit would lead to loss of light without corresponding gain.
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    0
  • Proposition 30 describes the construction of a curve of double curvature called by Pappus the helix on a sphere; it is described by a point moving uniformly along the arc of a great circle, which itself turns about its diameter uniformly, the point describing a quadrant and the great circle a complete revolution in the same time.
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    0
  • The two branched tentacles (TB) are seen partially extruded from their sheaths (TS); when fully extended they exceed the diameter of the animal five or six times.
    0
    0
  • in diameter in 1905), now full of boiling lava, now empty to a depth of perhaps woo ft.
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    0
  • of Oahu, has an irregularly circular form with a maximum diameter of about 25 m.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and projecting about 3 in.
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    0
  • or more in diameter) and closely resemble those found in northern Germany.
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    0
  • in diameter,.
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  • in diameter; violets, lilies, golden-rods, ceanothus, manzanita, wild rose and azalea make broad beds and banks of bloom in the spring; and on the warmest parts of the walls flowers blossom in every month of the year.
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    0
  • The only relic of the ancient town now visible above ground is a small portion (four columns, lower diameter 7 ft.) of a Doric temple, the date of which (whether before or after 480 B.C.) is uncertain.
    0
    0
  • For first-class work, however, and especially in steel concrete, it is customary to reject very large stones, and to insist that all shall pass through a ring a of an inch in diameter.
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    0
  • The building consisted of a circular Ionic colonnade (of eighteen columns), about 15 metres in diameter, raised on three steps and enclosing a small circular cella, probably adorned with fourteen Corinthian half-columns.
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  • in diameter, with south-southwest aspect.
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    0
  • The former are situated at from 90° to 140° from the sun; the latter is a white patch of light situated at the anti-solar point and often exceeding in size the apparent diameter of the luminary.
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    0
  • The impurity of the colours (due partly to the sun's diameter, but still more to oblique refraction) is more marked in halos than in rainbows; in fact, only the red is at all pure, and as a rule, only a mere trace of green or blue is seen, the external portion of each halo being nearly white.
    0
    0
  • In creased length necessitated an increase in the diameter of the main tube to limit the amplitude of the vibrations caused by being pushed through the water.
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    0
  • diameter main tube, and the top 3 ft.
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    0
  • (1.2 in.) diameter.
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    0
  • It appears, then, that, confronted with the "problem of ascertaining the relative diameter of the particles of which, he was convinced, all gases were made up, he had recourse to the results of chemical analysis.
    0
    0
  • in diameter will carry as much current as a copper wire o� loo in.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, while the former weighs about 79 lb and the latter 162 lb per mile.
    0
    0
  • Assuming the materials to be of equal tensile strength per unit of area - hard-drawn copper is stronger, but has a lower conductivity - the adoption of aluminium thus leads to a reduction of 52% in the weight, a gain of 60% in the strength, and an increase of 26% in the diameter of the conductor.
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    0
  • A saucepan is required to have a certain diameter and a certain depth in order that it may hold a certain bulk of liquid: its weight is merely an encumbrance.
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    0
  • in diameter to a height of 125-150 ft., and the eruption lasts 4-41 minutes.
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    0
  • The following discoveries in geometry are attributed to Thales (I) the circle is bisected by its diameter (Procl.
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  • 27); (4) he determined the diameter of the sun to be the 720th part of the zodiac; 6 (5) he appears to have pointed out the constellation of the Lesser Bear to his countrymen, and instructed them to steer by it [as nearer the pole] instead of the Great Bear (Callimachus ap. Diog.
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  • in diameter and 40 ft.
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    0
  • in diameter, is formed by the Snow telescope on the collimator slit (d).
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    0
  • This slit is long enough (82 in.) to extend entirely across the solar image and across such prominences of ordinary height as may happen to lie at the extremities of a vertical diameter.
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    0
  • collimator objective (e), which is constructed in the manner of a portrait lens in order to give a sharp field of sufficient diameter to include the entire solar image.
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    0
  • in diameter on the collimator objective, as its focal length is 60 in.
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    0
  • Since the diameter of the solar image is 6.7 in.
    0
    0
  • there is a slight, but inappreciable loss of light from points in the image at the extremities of a vertical diameter.
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    0
  • would suffice, but if intended to combine display with storage, the internal diameter should be about 13 ft.
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  • in diameter in autumn.
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    0
  • in diameter, it is cultivated as an ornamental plant.
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    0
  • The seeds of the different cultivated varieties, of which there are a great number, differ much in size and in external markings; but average seeds are of an oval laterally compressed form, with their longest diameter about four lines.
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    0
  • 3), each two inches in diameter and separately supported on insulating arms in the same plane, so that a third revolving plate B may pass very near them without touching.
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    0
  • A brass ball D two inches in diameter is fixed on the end of the axis that carries the plate B, and is loaded within at one side, so as to act as a counterpoise to the revolving plate B.
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    0
  • The action of the machine is as follows: Suppose one paper armature to be charged positively, it acts by induction on the right hand comb, causing negative electricity to issue from the comb points upon the glass revolving disk; at the same time the positive electricity passes through the closed discharge circuit to the left comb and issues from its teeth upon the part of the glass disk at the opposite end of the diameter.
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    0
  • The operation of the machine is as follows: Let us suppose that one of the studs on the back plate is positively electrified and one at the opposite end of a diameter is negatively electrified, and that at that moment two corresponding studs on the front plate passing opposite to these back studs are momentarily connected together by the neutralizing wire belonging to the front plate.
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  • in diameter which could give sparks 2.5 in.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, found that the current given by it could only electrolyse acidulated water in 40 hours sufficient to liberate one cubic centimetre of mixed gases.
    0
    0
  • Our modern diminutive " horsetails " with scaly leaves were represented in the Carboniferous period by gigantic calamites, often with a diameter of I to 2 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and too ft.
    0
    0
  • The simpler mycelia consist of hyphae all alike and thin-walled, or merely differing in the diameter of the branches of various orders, or in their relations to the environment, some plunging into the substratum like roots, others remaining on its surface, and others (aerial hyphae) rising into the air.
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    0
  • The indirect process once established, the gradual increase in the height and diameter of the high furnace, which has lasted till our own days, naturally went on and developed the gigantic blast furnaces of the present time, still called " high furnaces " in French and German.
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    0
  • In limiting the diameter at the tuyeres to 122 ft., the height of the boshes to one which will keep their upper end below the region of pastiness, and their slope to one over which the burning coke will descend freely, we limit the width of the furnace at the top of the boshes and thus complete the outline of the lower part of the furnace.
    0
    0
  • When we have thus fixed the height of the furnace, its diameter at its ends, and the slope of its upper and lower parts, we have completed its outline closely enough for our purpose here.
    0
    0
  • The shape which the molten metal under treatment has in the Kjellin furnace, a thin ring of large diameter, is evidently bad, inconvenient for manipulation and with excessive heat-radiating surface.
    0
    0
  • 33) upon the protruding end, F, of the rod, transmitted to the still undrawn part, E, squeezes the yielding metal of the rod against the hard unyielding die, C. As when a half-opened umbrella is thrust ferrule-foremost between the balusters of a staircase, so when the rod is drawn forward, its yielding metal is folded and forced backwards and centrewards by the resistance of the unyielding die, and thus it is reduced in diameter and simultaneously lengthened proportionally, without material change of volume or density.
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  • The number of great shafts for marine engines, reaching a diameter of 22k in.
    0
    0
  • Moreover, a single pair of rolls suffices for armour plates of any width or thickness, whereas if shafts of different diameters were to be rolled, a special final groove would be needed for each different diameter, and, as there is room for only a few large grooves in a single set of rolls, this would imply not only providing but installing a separate .set of rolls for almost every diameter of shaft.
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  • in diameter and 12 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, in the centre of which a smaller crater was later on built up (the basin is now known as the Campo di Annibale) with several lateral vents (the Lake of Albano, the Lake of Nemi, &c.).
    0
    0
  • high, is nearly circular and has a maximum diameter of 6 m.
    0
    0
  • The diameter is only a few feet less than that of St Peter's in Rome.
    0
    0
  • in diameter to a maximum with a 36-in, horizontal and an 18-in.
    0
    0
  • in diameter) with the revolving part of the dynamo mounted on the upper end of the shaft weigh about 152,000 lb, a special device, since adopted in other similar power plants, was designed to balance in part this.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, running at 135 revolutions a minute under a head of 130 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and has a speed of fifty revolutions per minute, and the power generated is transmitted through bevel-gearing to a horizontal shaft from which the power is taken FIG.
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    0
  • in diameter; that at Kimberley occupying 10 acres, that at Dutoitspan 23 acres.
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    0
  • high; its diameter at the base is 42 ft., decreasing to 15 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and is clear and sweet, with a temperature of 73 ° F.
    0
    0
  • If the thickness of the glass is small compared with the diameter of the tube, say one-tenth, equation (1) may be applied with sufficient approximation, the area A being taken as the mean between the internal and external surfaces.
    0
    0
  • It had a diameter of 4 in., and a length of 4 ft.
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    0
  • 5' cms. in diameter.
    0
    0
  • This consists of a mirror about half an inch in diameter, which, when it is suspended as shown in fig.
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    0
  • in diameter, built in A.D.
    0
    0
  • Other species, especially the alligators, make a very large nest of leaves, twigs and humus, scraping together a mound about a yard high and two or more yards in diameter.
    0
    0
  • But the volume of the cell is not appreciably altered, despite the change of its shape, for its one diameter increases in proportion as its other is diminished.
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    0
  • in diameter and 70 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, and over 50 ft.
    0
    0
  • Moreover they contain no cambium and the stem once formed increases in diameter only in exceptional cases.
    0
    0
  • in diameter and little less from north to south, this area including many large gardens.
    0
    0
  • length, an ordinary length in modern practice being zoo to 120 ft.; their diameter correspondingly varies from 6 ft.
    0
    0
  • in diameter by means of a split ring encircling the cylinder, the motion of which is magnified by two light rods extending radially.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, containing about 70 vents.
    0
    0
  • in diameter; Colta, east of Riobamba, and Colay, south of the same place.
    0
    0
  • The line CD passing through the focus and perpendicular to the directrix is the axis or principal diameter, and meets the curve in the vertex G.
    0
    0
  • Any line parallel to the axis is a diameter, and the parameter of any diameter is measured by the focal chord drawn FIG.
    0
    0
  • parallel to the tangent at the vertex of the diameter and is equal P A B to four times the focal distance of the vertex.
    0
    0
  • An equation of similar form is obtained when the axes of co-ordinates are any diameter and the tangent at the vertex.
    0
    0
  • with a diameter of from 12 to 30 in.
    0
    0
  • and diameter 3 ft.
    0
    0
  • high by 50 diameter) is a tumulus or "moat-hill," formerly thought to mark the site of a Roman camp. The theological college of the Calvinistic Methodists and the grammar school (endowed), which was founded in 1712, are the chief features, together with the statue of the Rev. Thomas Charles, the distinguished theological writer, to whom was largely due the foundation of the British and Foreign Bible Society.
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    0
  • in diameter, with five spreading white petals alternating with five persistent green sepals, a large number of stamens with pinkish-brown anthers, and one to three carpels sunk in the cup-shaped floral axis.
    0
    0
  • in diameter, of a ?.
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    0
  • The diameter increases with the size of the globules making up the mist.