Di sentence example

di
  • The volcanic region of the Terra di Lavoro is separated by the Volscian mountains from the Roman district.
    3
    2
  • His grandfather, Gregorio Brunacci, of an ancient family of Pisa, had changed his name in order to become heir to a certain marchese di Consalvi.
    2
    2
  • Such is the Lago di Bolsena, near the city of the same name, which is an extensive sheet of water, as well as the much smaller Lago di Vico (the Ciminian lake of ancient writers) and the Lago di Bracciano, nearer Rome, while to the south of Rome the well known lakes of Albano and Nemi have a similar origin.
    1
    0
  • The longer efforts partake of the nature of translations from sundry medieval compilations like those of Guido di Colonna and Boccaccio, which are in Latin.
    1
    1
  • Antioco, joined by a narrow isthmus and a group of bridges to the mainland, forms a good natural harbour to the south of the isthmus, the Golfo di Palmas; while the north portion of the peninsula, with the island of S.
    1
    2
    Advertisement
  • If you have more time, you can also check out the Sattui family's other winery that was just completed called Castello di Amorosa This is truly an amazing property and another Sattui gem!
    1
    2
  • The Po itself, which is here a very large stream, with an average width of 400 to 600 yds., continues to flow with an undivided mass of waters as far as Sta Maria di Ariano, where it parts into two arms, known as the Po di Maestra and Po di Goro, and these again are subdivided into several other branches, forming a delta above 20 m.
    0
    0
  • west of Ferrara, where a small arm of the river, still called the Po di Ferrara, branches from the main stream.
    0
    0
  • Previous to the year 1154 this channel was the main stream, and the two small branches into which it subdivides, called the Po di Volano and Po di Primaro, were in early times the two main outlets of the river.
    0
    0
  • The southernmost of these, the Po di Primaro, enters the Adriatic about 12 m.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • of Genoa, flows by Bobbio, and joins the Po a few miles above Piacenza; (3) the Nure, a few miles east of the preceding; (4) the Taro, a more considerable stream; (5) the Parma, flowing by the city of the same name; (6) the Enza; (7) the Secchia, which flows by Modena; (8) the Panaro, a few miles to the east of that city; (9) the Reno, which flows by Bologna, but instead of holding its course till it discharges its waters into the Po, as it did in Roman times, is turned aside by an artificial channel into the Po di Primaro.
    0
    0
  • The other small streams east of this—of which the most considerable are the Solaro, the Santerno, flowing by Imola, the Lamone by Faenza, the Montone by Forlì, all in Roman times tributaries of the Po—have their outlet in like manner into the Po di Primaro, or by artificial mouths into the Adriatic between Ravenna and Rimini.
    0
    0
  • The most considerable of them are—the Roja, which rises in the Col di Tenda and descends to Ventimiglia; the Taggia, between San Remo and Oneglia; and the Centa, which enters the sea at Albenga.
    0
    0
  • This is the highest point in the northern Apennines, and belongs to a group of summits of nearly equal altitude; the range which is continued thence between Tuscany and what are now known as the Emilian provinces presents a continuous ridge from the mountains at the head of the Val di Mugello (due north of Florence) to the point where they are traversed by the celebrated Furlo Pass.
    0
    0
  • Proceeding thence southwards, we find in succession the Monte Vettore (8128 ft.), the Pizzo di Sevo (7945 ft.), and the two great mountain masses of the Monte Corno, commonly called the Gran Sasso d'Italia, the most lofty of all the Apennines, attaining to a height of 9560 ft., and the Monte della Maiella, its highest summit measuring 9170 ft.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This communicates with the upper valley of the Sangro by a level plain called the Piano di Cinque Miglia, at an elevation of 4298 ft., regarded as the most wintry spot in Italy.
    0
    0
  • Thus the Gran Sasso and the Maiella are separated by the deep valley of the Aterno, while the Tronto breaks through the range between Monte Vettore and the Pizzo di Sevo.
    0
    0
  • Another lateral rsnge, the Prato Magno, which branches off from the central chain at the Monte Falterona, and separates the upper valley of the Arno from its second basin, rises to 5188 ft.; while a similar branch, called the Alpe di Catenaja, of inferior elevation, divides the upper course of the Arno from that of the Tiber.
    0
    0
  • Its principal tributary is the Sieve, which joins it at Pontassieve, bringing down the waters of the Val di Mugello.
    0
    0
  • Sepolcro and Città di Castello, then between Perugia and Todi to Orte, just below which it receives the Nera.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This mountainous tract, which has an average breadth of from 50 to 60 m., is bounded west by the plain of Campania, now called the Terra di Lavoro, and east by the much broader and more extensive tract of Apulia or Puglia, composed partly of level plains, but for the most part of undulating downs, contrasting strongly with the mountain ranges of the Apennines, which rise abruptly above them.
    0
    0
  • Eastward from this the ranges of low bare hills called the Murgie of Gravina and Altamura gradually sink into the still more moderate level of those which constitute the peninsular tract between Brindisi and Taranto as far as the Cape of Sta Maria di Leuca, the south-east extremity of Italy.
    0
    0
  • east of the city of that name, brings down a considerable body of water; as does also the Volturno, which rises in the mountains between Castel di Sangro and Agnone, flows past Isernia, Venafro and Capua, and enters the sea about 15 m.
    0
    0
  • The Crati, which flows from Cosenza northwards, and then turns abruptly eastward to enter the same gulf, is the only stream worthy of notice in the rugged peninsula of Calabria; while the arid limestone hills projecting eastwards to Capo di Leuca do not give rise to anything more than a mere streamlet, from the mouth of the Ofanto to the south-eastern extremity of Italy.
    0
    0
  • Of a wholly different character is the Lago di Varese, between the Lago Maggiore and that of Lugano, which is a mere shallow expanse of water, surrounded by hills of very moderate elevation.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The most important of these, the Lacus Fucinus of the ancients, now called the Lago di Celano, situated almost exactly in the centre of the peninsula, occupies a basin of considerable extent, surrounded by mountains and without any natural outlet, at an elevation of more than 2000 ft.
    0
    0
  • end of the Campanian Plain, the highest cone, called Montagna di Santa Croce, is 3291 ft.
    0
    0
  • Its highest peak, the Pizzuto di Melfi, attains an elevation of 4365 ft.
    0
    0
  • The district from the south-east of Lake Fucino to the Piano di Cinque Miglia, enclosing the upper basin of the Sangro and the small lake of Scanno, is the coldest and most bleak part of Italy south of the Alps.
    0
    0
  • Nathan, Vent' anni di vita italiana attraverso all' annuario, 169 sqq.).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Considerable trade is done in agro di limone or lemon extract, which forms the basis of citric acid.
    0
    0
  • Of the numerous sub-varieties, the finest is said to be that of the Val di Chiana, where the animals are stall-fed all the year round; next is ranked the so-called Valle Tiberina type.
    0
    0
  • Large landlords are usually represented by ministri, or factors, who direct agricultural operations and manage the estates, but the estate is often let to a middleman, or mercante di campagna.
    0
    0
  • The French institution of Prudhommes was introduced into Italy in 1893, under the name of Coltegi di Probiviri.
    0
    0
  • The northern frontier is crossed by the railway from Turin to Ventimiglia by the Col di Tenda, the Mont Cenis line from Turin to Modane (the tunnel is 7 m.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Besides these international lines the most important are those from Milan to Turin (via Vercelli and via Alessandria), to Genoa via Tortona, to Bologna via Parma and Modena, to V~rona, and the shorter lines to the district of the lakes of Lombardy; from Turin to Genoa via Savona and via Alessandria; from Genoa to Savona and Ventimiglia along the Riviera, and along the south-west coast of Italy, via Sarzana (whence a line runs to Parma) to Pisa (whence lines run to Pistoia and Florence) and Rome; from Verona to Modena, and to Venice via Padua; from Bologna to Padtia, to Rimini (and thence along the north-east coast via Ancona, Castellammare Adriatico and Foggia to Brindisi and Otranto), and to Florence and Rome; from Rome to Ancona, to Castellammare Adriatico and to Naples; from Naples to Foggia, via Metaponto (with a junction for Reggio di Calabria), to Brindisi and to Reggio di Calabria.
    0
    0
  • The P0 is itself navigable from Turin downwards, but through its delta it is so sandy that canals are preferred, the P0 di Volano ~.nd the P0 di Primaro on the right, and the Canale Bianco on the left.
    0
    0
  • The institutions which co-operate with the universities are the special schools for engineers at Turin, Naples, Rome and Bologna (and others attached to some of the universities), the higher technical institute at Milan, the higher veterinary schools of Milan, Naples and Turin, the institute for higher studies at Florence (Istituto di studi superiori, pratici e di perfezionamento), the literary and scientific academy of Milan, the higher institutes for the training of female teachers at Florence and Rome, the Institute of Social Studies at Florence, the higher commercial schools at Venice, Ban and Genoa, the commercial university founded by L.
    0
    0
  • Most large towns contain important state or communal archives, iii which a considerable amount of research is being done by local investigators; the various societies for local history (Societd di Storia Patria) do very good work and issue valuable publications; the treasures which the archives contain are by no means exhausted.
    0
    0
  • The law considers as charitable institutions (opere pie) all poorhouses, almshouses and institutes which partly or wholly give help to able-bodied or infirm paupers, or seek to improve their moral and economic condition; and also the Congregazioni di caritd (municipal charity boards existing in every commune, and composed of ~embers elected by the municipal council), which administer funds destined for the poor in general.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Public pawnshops or Monti di piet numbered 555 in 1896, with a net patrimony of 2,879,625.
    0
    0
  • Sepoicro, Colle di Val dElsa, Fiesole, S.
    0
    0
  • The archbishops are those of Amalfi, Aquila, Camerino and Treia, Catania, Cosenza, Ferrara, Gaeta, Lucca, Perugia, Rossano, Spoleto, and Udine, and the bishops those of Acireale, Acquapendente, Alatri, Amelia, Anagni, Ancona-Umana, Aquino-Sora-Pontecorvo, Arezzo, Ascoli, Assisi, Aversa, Bagnorea, Borgo San Donnino, Cava-Sarno, Citt di Castello, Citt della Pieve, Civit Castellana-Orte-Gallese, Corneto-Civita Vecchia~ Cortona, Fabriano-Matelica, Fano,Ferentino Foggia, Foligno, Gravina-Montepeloso, Gubbio, Jesi, Luni-Sarzana and Bragnato, S.
    0
    0
  • A royal decree, dated February 1891, established three classes of prisons: judiciary prisons, for persons awaiting examination or persons sentenced to arrest, detention or seclusion for less than six months; penitentiaries of various kinds (ergastoli, case di reclusione, detenzione or custodia), for criminals condemned to long terms of imprisonment; and reformatories, for criminals under age and vagabonds.
    0
    0
  • by Nathan, Vent ann-i di vita -italiana, p. 241) thatthe efforts of the juge dinstruction are, as a rule, in fact, though not in law, largely directed to prove that the accused is guilty.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • These figures include not only the categories of income and expenditure proper, but also those known as movement of capital, railway constructions and part ite di giro, which do not constitute real income and expenditure.i Considering only income and expenditure proper, the approximate totals are:
    0
    0
  • The revenue in the Italian financial year 1905-1906 (July I, 1905 to June 30, 1906) was 102,486,108, and the expenditure 99,945,253, or, subtracting the partite di giro, 99,684,121 and 97,143,266, leaving a surplus of 2,54o,855.f The surplus was made up by contributions from every branch of the effective revenue, except the contributions and repayments from local authorities.
    0
    0
  • Banca di Napoli.
    0
    0
  • Banca di Sicilia.
    0
    0
  • the so-called guardie di pubblica sicurezza, the carabinieri being really a military force; only the largest towns maintain a municipal police force), charities, education, &c., in case such expenditure is neglected by the communal authorities.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The most important of the local dues is the gate tax, or dazio di consumo, which may be either a surtax upon commodities (such as alcoholic drinks or meat), having already paid customs duty at the frontier, in which case the local surtax may not exceed 50% of the frontier duty, or an exclusively communal duty limited to 10% on flour, bread and farinaceous products,2 and to 20% upon other commodities.
    0
    0
  • Nathan, Vent Anni di ua ital,iana altraverso al(Annuario (Rome, 1906); G.
    0
    0
  • Herein he was aided by the troops of Facino Cane, who, dying opportunely at this period, left considerable wealth, a welltrained band of mercenaries, and a widow, Beatrice di Tenda.
    0
    0
  • Alessandro de Medici was placed there with the title of duke of Civit di Penna; and, on his murder in 1537, Cosimo de Medici, of the younger branch of the ruling house, was made duke.
    0
    0
  • Leopold, among other useful works, drained the Val di Chiana, and restored those fertile upland plains to agriculture.
    0
    0
  • In March 1821, Count Santorre di Santarosa and other conspirators informed Charles Albert of a constitutional and anti-Austrian plot, and asked for his help. After a momentary hesitation he informed the king; but at his request no arrests were made, and no precautions were taken.
    0
    0
  • A third important publication was Massimo dAzeglios Degli ultimi casi di Romagna, in which the author, another Piedmontese nobleman, exposed papal misgovernment while condemning the secret societies and advocating open resistance and protest.
    0
    0
  • At the opening of the Piedmontese parliament in 1859, Victor Emmanuel pronounced the memorable words that he could not be insensible to the cry of pain (ii grido di dolore) which reached him from all parts of Italy.
    0
    0
  • Di Rudini, and the arrival of reinforcements.
    0
    0
  • Chialas Lettere del Conte di Cavour (~ vols., Turin, 1883 1887) and D.
    0
    0
  • Zanichellis Scritti del Conte di Cavour (Bologna, 1892) are very important, and so are Prince Metternichs 7ff moires (7 vols., Paris, f881).
    0
    0
  • Bersezio, Ii Regno di Vittorio Emanuele II (8 vols., Turin, 1889, &c.).
    0
    0
  • by Count Ponza di San Martino in September 1870.
    0
    0
  • Count di Robilant, anxious that Italy should not seem to beg a smile from the central Powers, advised Mancini to receive with caution the suggestions of the Austrian press.
    0
    0
  • They hastened Mancinis downfall (17th June 1885), and prepared the advent of count di Robilant, who three months later succeeded Mancini at the Italian Foreign Office.
    0
    0
  • In November 1887 a strong expedition under General di San Marzano raised the strength of the Massawa garrison to nearly 20,000 men.
    0
    0
  • Menelek, by means of Count Antonelli, resident in the Shoa country, requested Italy to execute a di version in his favor by occupying Asmar and other points on the high plateau.
    0
    0
  • Within four months the death of Depretis (29th July 1887) opened for Crispi the way to the premiership. Besides assuming the presidency of the council of ministers and retaining the ministry of the interior, Crispi took over the portfolio of foreign affairs which Depretis had held since the resignation of Count di Robilant.
    0
    0
  • A few days later he was succeeded in the premiership by the marquis di Rudini, leader of the Right, who formed a coalition cabinet with Nicotera and a part of the Left.
    0
    0
  • Fortunately for Italy, the marquis Visconti Venosta shortly afterwards consented to assume the portfolio of foreign affairs, which had been resigned by Duke Caetani di Sermoneta, and again to place, after an interval of twenty years, his unrivalled experience at the service of his country.
    0
    0
  • No Italian administration since the death of Depretis underwent so many metamorphoses as that of the marquis di Rudini.
    0
    0
  • Carutti, Storia delta corte di Savoic durante la rivoluzione e 1 impero francese (2 vols., Turin, 1892); G.
    0
    0
  • Corios Stonia di Milano, G.
    0
    0
  • Capponis Stone della repubblica di Firenze (Florence, 1875), P. Villaris I pnimi due secoli della stonia di Firenze (Florence, 1905), F.
    0
    0
  • Paganos Istonia del regno di Napoli (PalermoNaples, 1832, &c.), P. Romanins Storia documentata di Venezia (Venice, 1853), M.
    0
    0
  • Amaris Musulmani di Sicilia (f8541875), F.
    0
    0
  • Cibranios Stone della monarchic pieniontese (Turin, I84o), and P. Caruttis .Sloria della diplomazia delta corte di Savoia (Rome, 1875).
    0
    0
  • The Archivii storici and Deputazloni di storia patria of the various Italian towns and provinces contain a great deal of valuable material for local history.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of this theory of history as an upward progress of man out of a barbaric and animal condition were laid by Vico in his celebrated work Principii di scienza nuova.
    0
    0
  • Other works which may be mentioned are Zeitgenossen, Biografien and Charakteristiken (Berlin, 1862); Bibliografia del lavori pubblicati in Germania sulla storia d'Italia (Berlin, 1863); Biographische Denkblatter nach personlichen Erinnerungen (Leipzig, 1878); and Saggi di storia e letteratura (Florence, 1880).
    0
    0
  • Alvisi, Cesare Borgia, Duca di Romagna (Imola, 1878).
    0
    0
  • Di,fferentiation.Any account of the general morphology of living organisms is incomplete if it does not include some attempt at an explanation of its causation; though such an attempt cannot be carried far at the present time.
    0
    0
  • One of the most remarkable of the Italian travellers was Ludovico di Varthema, who left his native land in 1502.
    0
    0
  • The harbour consisted of the outer basin, or Porto di Miseno, protected by moles, of which remains still exist, and the present Mare Morto, separated from it by a comparatively modern embankment.
    0
    0
  • west coast from Naples to Reggio di Calabria.
    0
    0
  • 8 § 36) or &di o os (Excerpta ex Theodoto, § 16).
    0
    0
  • He at once took a leading position in the mathematical teaching of the university, and published treatises on the Di f ferential calculus (in 1848) and the Infinitesimal calculus (4 vols., 1852-1860), which for long were the recognized textbooks there.
    0
    0
  • See Rosmini, Vita e disciplina di Guarino (1805-1806); Sabbadini, Guarino Veronese (1885); Sandys, Hist.
    0
    0
  • In the principal square stands the town hall, built in1448-1457in the VenetianGothic style, and skilfully restored after a fire in 1876; opposite is a clock tower resembling that of the Piazza di San Marco at Venice.
    0
    0
  • Giorgio di Nogaro, and a steam tramway to S.
    0
    0
  • non-Semitic) is rendered certain by the proper names Jau-bit-di (= Ilu-bi`di) of Hamath in Sargon's inscriptions, Ahi-jawi (mi) in Sellin's discovered tablet at Ta'annek, to say nothing of those which have been found in the documents of Khammurabi's reign.
    0
    0
  • In 1767 also he joined with Di.
    0
    0
  • di Napoli - Documenti inedite dell' Archivio Vaticano (1896, &c.).
    0
    0
  • Three years later he was appointed to the chair of philosophy at the Istituto di Perfezionamento at Florence, and, in 1871, was made professor of philosophy in the university of Rome.
    0
    0
  • On the death of Mamiani in 1885 he became editor of the Filosofia delle scuole italiane, the title of which he changed to Rivista italiana di filosofia.
    0
    0
  • Among his works may be mentioned Studii sulla coscienza; Il Fenomeno nelle sue relazioni con la sensazione; Della idea del vero; Della filosofia del diritto presso Aristotile (1885); Il Genio di Aristotile; La Psicologia di Pietro Pomponazzi (1877), and, most important, Essai sur l'histoire de la philosophie en Italie au XIX' siecle (Paris, 1869), and La Psychologie de l'association depuis Hobbes jusqu'd nos jours.
    0
    0
  • A rare work on the earlier church (Buonamici, La Metropolitana di Ravenna) gives details of its construction.
    0
    0
  • In the eastern part of the city he built for himself a large palace, which probably occupied about a sixth of the space now enclosed within the city walls, or nearly the whole of the rectangle enclosed by Strada di Porta Alberoni on the south, Strada Nuova di Porta Serrata on the west and the line of the city walls on the north and east.
    0
    0
  • There still remains close to the first-named street and fronting the Corso Garibaldi a high wall built of square Roman bricks, with pillars and arched recesses in the upper portion, which goes by the name of Palazzo di Teodorico.
    0
    0
  • Maria di Porto erected in the town in the 16th century (owing to malaria, as in the case of those of Classe), and of S.
    0
    0
  • More than five centuries later (1320) Dante became the guest of Guido Novello di Polenta, lord of Ravenna, and here he died on the 14th September of the following year.
    0
    0
  • of Aragon, whose wife Constance was a daughter of Manfred, arrived in Sicily, and a Sicilian-Catalan fleet under the Calabrese admiral, Ruggiero di Lauria, completely destroyed that of Charles.
    0
    0
  • In the meanwhile Ruggiero di Lauria appeared before Naples and destroyed another Angevin fleet commanded by Charles's son, who was taken prisoner (May 1284).
    0
    0
  • The Milhamoth was published in 1560 at Riva di Trento, and has been published at Leipzig, 1866.
    0
    0
  • Assuming then the leadership of the constitutional opposition, he combated the alliance between the Di Rudini cabinet and the subversive parties, criticized the financial schemes of the treasury minister, Luzzatti, and opposed the "democratic" finance of the first Pelloux administration as likely to endanger financial stability.
    0
    0
  • Schone, Le antichitd del Museo Bocchi di Adria (Rome, 1878).
    0
    0
  • di Monferrato (Turin, 1885); Ilgen, Markgraf Konrad von Montferrat (1880); and also the works of Cerrato (Turin, 1884) and Desimoni (Genoa, 1886).
    0
    0
  • 460 seq.), whose rich collection of materials was used by Bromata, Vita di Paolo IV.
    0
    0
  • VILLAFRANCA DI VERONA, a town of Venetia, Italy, in the province of Verona, i 1 m.
    0
    0
  • BAGNI DI LUCCA (Baths of Lucca, formerly Bagno a Corsena), a commune of Tuscany, Italy, in the province of Lucca, containing a number of famous watering-places.
    0
    0
  • The springs are situated in the valley of the Lima, a tributary of the Serchio; and the district is known in the early history of Lucca as the Vicaria di Val di Lima.
    0
    0
  • The chief glory of the place is its splendid cathedral, dedicated to the Virgin; it was begun before 1285, perhaps by Arnolfo di Cambio, on the site of an older church; and from the 13th till the 16th century was enriched by the labours of a whole succession of great Italian painters and sculptors.
    0
    0
  • The well, now disused, called Il pozzo di S.
    0
    0
  • Fumi, Il Duomo d'Orvieto e i suoi restauri (Rome, 1891); Orvieto, note storiche e biografiche (Citta di Castello, 1891), and other works.
    0
    0
  • and xii.; Savignoni, Il Vaso di Haghia Triada).
    0
    0
  • In the lower sanctuary the natural pillars of stalagmite had been used as objects of worship, and bronze votive objects thrust into their crevices (Halbherr, Museo di antichitd classica, ii.
    0
    0
  • Milchhdfer (Anfdnge der Kunst) had called attention to certain remarkable examples of archaic Greek bronze-work, and the subsequent discovery of the votive bronzes in the cave of Zeus on Mount Ida, and notably the shields with their fine embossed designs, shows that by the 8th century B.C. Cretan technique in metal not only held its own beside imported Cypro-Phoenician work, but was distinctly ahead of that of the rest of Greece (Halbherr, Bronzi del antro di Zeus Ideo).
    0
    0
  • Urquhart states that he went to Mantua, became the tutor of the young prince of Mantua, Vincenzo di Gonzaga, and was killed by the latter in a street quarrel in 1582.
    0
    0
  • Marchese Di Maffei Francesco Scipione >>
    0
    0
  • The upper town still retains in part its fortifications, including the two great towers at the two extremities, called the Torre dell' Elefante (S.) and the Torre di S.
    0
    0
  • The Torre di S.
    0
    0
  • AMMONIUS GRAMMATICUS, the supposed author of a treatise entitled IIEpc 6yoLwv Kai &acaopwv (On the Di f ferences of Synonymous Expressions), of whom nothing is known.
    0
    0
  • Although bitterly opposed by the partisans of scholastic routine, Genovesi found influential patrons, amongst them Bartolomeo Intieri, a Florentine, who in 1754 founded the first Italian or European chair of political economy (commerce and mechanics), on condition that Genovesi should be the first professor, and that it should never be held by an ecclesiastic. The fruit of Genovesi's professorial labours was the Lezioni di Commercio, the first complete and systematic work in Italian on economics.
    0
    0
  • Bobba, Commemorazione di A.
    0
    0
  • The town is situated in the valley of the Metauro, in the centre of fine scenery, at the meeting-point of roads to Fano, to the Furlo pass and Fossato di Vico (the ancient Via Flaminia), to Urbino and to Sinigaglia, the last crossing the river by a fine bridge.
    0
    0
  • In 12 9 5 the Malatesta obtained possession of it, and kept it until 1444, when it was sold, with Pesaro, to Federico di Montefeltro of Urbino, and with the latter it passed to the papacy under Urban VIII.
    0
    0
  • Citta di Castello >>
    0
    0
  • The beautiful church of the Madonna di S.
    0
    0
  • The incident led to a feud with the supporters of Morati, among whom was Pozzo di Borgo (destined to be his life-long enemy), and opened a breach between the Bonapartes and Paoli.
    0
    0
  • in all southern Europe only four faunistic products can be named: the Saggio di storia naturale Bresciana of Pilati, published at Brescia in 1769; the Ornitologia dell' Europa meridionale of Bernini, published at Parma between 1772 and 1776; the Uccelli di Sardegna of Cetti, published at Sassari in 1776; and the Romana ornithologia of Gilius, published at Rome in 1781 - the last being in great part devoted to pigeons and poultry.
    0
    0
  • The following year Ranzani of Bologna, in his Elementi di zoologia - a very respectable compilation - came to treat of birds, and then followed to some extent the plan of De Blainville and Merrem (concerning which much more has to be said by and by), placing the Struthious birds in an Order by themselves.
    0
    0
  • Bonaparte, in his Saggio di una distribuzione metodica degli Animali Vertebrati, published at Rome, and in 1837 communicated to the Linnean 'Society of London, " A new Systematic Arrangement of Vertebrated Animals," which was subsequently printed in that Society's Transactions (xviii.
    0
    0
  • (I) Montecatini in Val di Cecina, in the province of Pisa, 5 m.
    0
    0
  • (2) Montecatini in Val di Nievole, in the province of Lucca, 7 m.
    0
    0
  • Pop. (1901), 3048 (Bagni di Montecatini); 2856 (Montecatini).
    0
    0
  • Giovanni Di Monte Corvino >>
    0
    0
  • Raulich, Storia di Carlo Emanuele I.
    0
    0
  • Giacomo di Rialto, 1 Secretary to Theodoric the Great, in a letter dated A.
    0
    0
  • The remains of a Byzantine façade now almost entirely built into a wall in the Rio di Ca' Foscari offer us excellent illustration of this decorative work.
    0
    0
  • Similar results are obtained in the magnificent facade of the Scuola di San Marco, at SS.
    0
    0
  • We have already mentioned two of these, the Scuola di San Giovanni Evangelista and the Scuola di San Marco, both of them masterpieces of the Lombardesque style.
    0
    0
  • The Scuola di San Marco is now a part of the town hospital, and besides its facade, already described, it is remarkable for the handsome carved ceiling in the main hall (1463).
    0
    0
  • But the most magnificent of these gild halls is the Scuola di San Rocco, designed by Bartolomeo Buono in 1517 and carried out by Scarpagnino and Sante Lombardo.
    0
    0
  • The republic entrusted the work to the Florentine Verrocchio, who dying before the statue was completed begged the government to allow his pupil Lorenzo di Credi to carry it to a conclusion.
    0
    0
  • They contain the voluminous and invaluable records of the Venetian republic, diplomatic, judicial, commercial, notarial, &c. Under the republic the various departments of state stored their records in various buildings, at the ducal palace, at the Scuola di San Teodoro, at the Camerlenghi.
    0
    0
  • Altogether the gallery contains twenty rooms, one being assigned to the complete cycle of the "History of Saint Ursula," by Carpaccio; another to Giambellino and to the Celliniani; and a whole wall of a third being occupied by the famous Veronese, "11 Convito in casa di Levi."
    0
    0
  • The Heralds' College, the avvogadori di comun, in order to ensure purity of blood, were ordered to open a register of all marriages and births among members of the newly created caste, and these registers formed the basis of the famous Libro d'oro.
    0
    0
  • Romanin, Storia documentata di Venezia (Venice, 1853); P. Molmenti, La Storia di Venezia nella Vita privata (Bergamo, 1906; also English translation, London); P. Daru, Storia della Republica di Venezia, tr.
    0
    0
  • Sandi, Storia civile della Republica di Venezia (Venice, 1755); C. A.
    0
    0
  • Maria di Leuca (so called since ancient times from its white cliffs), the S.E.
    0
    0
  • A cup found in an Etruscan tomb bears the inscription "Lavernai Pocolom," and in a fragment of Septimius Serenus Laverna is expressly mentioned in connexion with the di inferi.
    0
    0
  • It is on the main line to Battipaglia, at the point of junction of a branch line from Cancello round the east of Vesuvius, and of the branch to Castellammare di Stabia and Gragnano.
    0
    0
  • SANTA MARIA DI LICODIA, a village of Sicily, in the province of Catania, 18 m.
    0
    0
  • The cathedral has a Romanesque Gothic portal of 1332 by a Roman marble worker named Deodatus, and the interior is decorated in the Baroque style, but still retains the pointed vaulting of 1154, introduced into Italy by French Benedictines; it contains a splendid silver antependium by the 15th-century goldsmith Nicolo di Guardiagrele (1433-48).
    0
    0
  • His chief work is his Istorie della Gila di Firenze, covering the period from 1498 to 1538, in part based on Biagio Buonaccorsi's Diario.
    0
    0
  • His largest work,Trattato generale di numeri e misure, is a comprehensive mathematical treatise, including arithmetic, geometry, mensuration, and algebra as far as quadratic equations (Venice, 1556, 1560).
    0
    0
  • See also Buoncompagni, Intorno ad un lestamento inedito di N.
    0
    0
  • (Milan, 1881); Rossi, Elogi di Bresciana illustri, p. 386.
    0
    0
  • After two weeks he left, having received the blessing of Pope Adrian VI., and proceeded by Padua to Venice, where he begged his bread and slept in the Piazza di San Marco until a rich Spaniard gave him shelter and obtained an order from the doge for a passage in a pilgrim ship bound for Cyprus, whence he could get to Jaffa.
    0
    0
  • Bartole, the official biographer, wrote his Della vita e dell' instituto di S.
    0
    0
  • Ca, Ba, Sr, Pb; Fe, Zn, Mn, Mg; Ni, Co, Cu; Ce, La, Di, Er, Y, Ca; Cu, Hg, Pb; Cd, Be, In, Zn; Tl, Pb.
    0
    0
  • Selmi, Enciclopedia di chimica, are more valuable; the latter two are kept up to date by annual supplements.
    0
    0
  • Ariano Di Puglia >>
    0
    0
  • In a letter, Del movimento della cometa apparsa it mese di decembre 1664, published in 1665 under the pseudonym Pier Maria Mutoli, he was the first to suggest the idea of a parabolic path; and another of his astronomical works was Theorica mediceorum planetarum ex causis physicis deducta (Florence, 1666), in which he considered the influence of attraction on the satellites of Jupiter.
    0
    0
  • How anxious the Pergamene kings, with their ardent Hellenism, were to avoid offence is shown by the elaborate forms by which, in their own capital, they sought to give their real control the appearance of popular freedom (Cardinali, Regno di Pergamo, p. 281 seq.).
    0
    0
  • In the Pergamene kingdom at any rate, though the living king was worshipped with sacrifice, the title Oe6 was only given to those who were dead (Cardinali, Regno di Pergamo, p. 153).
    0
    0
  • 41), at any rate di till the battle of Magnesia.
    0
    0
  • Pais, Storia di Roma, i.
    0
    0
  • trans., 1906), where he comes to the conclusion that "instead of being the sixth rex of Rome, he was originally the rex serous, the priest of the cult of Diana Aricina transferred to the Aventine, the priest of the protecting goddess of fugitive slaves"; C. Pascal, Patti e legende di Roma antica (Florence, 1903); also O.
    0
    0
  • 1835) and Giovan Battista Vico, his first works were an article in the Biblioteca Italiana entitled "Mente di Gian Domenico Romagnosi" (1835), and a complete edition of the works of Vico, prefaced by an appreciation (1835).
    0
    0
  • The works of this period are Les Philosophes Salaries, Machiavel juge des revolutions de notre temps (1849), La Federazione repubblicana (1851), La Filosofia della rivoluzione (1851), L' Italia dopo it colpo di Stato (1852), Histoire des revolutions, ou Guelfes et Gibelins (1858; Italian trans., 1871-1873).
    0
    0
  • See Scelta di atti episcopali del cardinale G.
    0
    0
  • Nibby (Analisi della carta dei dintorni di Roma, Rome, 1848, iii.
    0
    0
  • The objects discovered are in the Museo di Papa Giulio at Rome.
    0
    0
  • The whole of antiquity seemed precious in the eyes of its discoverers; and even a thinker so acute as Pico di Mirandola dreamed of the possibility of extracting the essence of philosophical truth by indiscriminate collation of the most divergent doctrines.
    0
    0
  • Bandini, Pisa, 1771); Roscoe's Life of Lorenzo de' Medici; Pasquale Villari, La Storia di Girolamo Savonarola (Firenze, Le Monnier, 1859); Von Reumont, Lorenzo de' Medici (Leipzig, 1874).
    0
    0
  • Cosentino, La Carta di papiro," in Archivio storico siciliano (1889), pp. 134-164.
    0
    0
  • At the ninth mile the road crosses a ravine by the well-preserved and lofty Ponte di Nona, with seven arches, the finest ancient bridge in the neighbourhood of Rome.
    0
    0
  • It consists of a series of apartments approached by staircases, Bulletino di archaeologia cristiana, 1865.
    0
    0
  • In the same year building operations in the Via di Sant' Onofrio revealed the presence of catacombs beneath the foundations: examination of the loculi showed that no martyrs or illustrious persons were buried here.
    0
    0
  • All new discoveries made by the active Commissione di archeologia sacra are chronicled with as little delay as possible in the Nuovo Bulletino de archeologia cristiana published in Rome.
    0
    0
  • The most recent accounts of the catacombs are to be found in the following books: - Armellini, Gli Antichi Cimiteri cristiani di Roma e d'Italia (Rome, 1893); O.
    0
    0
  • Marucchi, Le Catacombe romane (Rome, 1903; also translated into French), Manuale di epigrafia cristiana (Milan, 1904); M.
    0
    0
  • C. Barrecca, Le Catacombe di San Giovanni in Siracusa (Syracuse, 1906).
    0
    0
  • With the exception of Benevento, surrounded by the Neapolitan province of Principato Ulteriore, and the small state of Pontecorvo, enclosed within the Terra di Lavoro, the States of the Church formed a compact territory, bounded on the N.W.
    0
    0
  • Angelo di Costanzo >>
    0
    0
  • Opposite to the promontory of Sabbioncello, and at the entrance to the Bocche di Cattaro, the frontier of Herzegovina comes down to the Adriatic; but these two strips of coast do not contain any good harbour, and extend only for a total distance of 141 m.
    0
    0
  • It then pierces through the mountains of northern Herzegovina, traverses the Narenta valley, and runs almost parallel with the coast to Trebinje, Ragusa and the Bocche di Cattaro.
    0
    0
  • Cuneo lies on the railway from Turin to Ventimiglia, which farther on passes under the Col di Tenda (tunnel 5 m.
    0
    0
  • di Chachak ., ?
    0
    0
  • 4to, Lucca, 1759, 1761); Del modo di regolare i fiumi e i torrenti (Lucca, 1762); Cosmographia physica et mathematica (Milan, 1 774, 1 775, 2 vols.
    0
    0
  • His daughter Cornelia married Prince Giulio Cesare Colonna di Sciarra in 1728, who added her name to his own.
    0
    0
  • 1 1 where laan and di denotes, not s successive operations of d1, but the operator of order s obtained by raising d l to the s th power symbolically as in Taylor's theorem in the Differential Calculus.
    0
    0
  • di denotes, in fact, an operator of order s, but we may transform the right-hand side so that we are only concerned with the successive performance of linear operations.
    0
    0
  • +AsDs ...) p Di p2 D2+...
    0
    0
  • we find that Di must be equal to p x g x for then t x (p x) 3 +, u (g x) 3, Hence, if px, qx be the linear factors of the Hessian 64, the cubic can be put into the form A(p x) 3 +�(g x) 3 and immediately solved.
    0
    0
  • 1170) in Foucon de Candie (Candie = Gandia in Spain ?) is the return of Guillaume from the battle; and the Italian compilation I Nerbonesi, based on these and other chansons, seems in some cases to represent an earlier tradition than the later of the French chansons, although its author Andrea di Barberino wrote towards the end of the 14th century.
    0
    0
  • He was the author of four scientific treatises: Lezioni di fisica (2 vols., Pisa, 1841), Lezioni sui fenomeni fisicochimici dei corgi viventi (Pisa, 1844), Manuale di telegrafia elettrica (Pisa, 1850) and Cours special sur l'induction, le magnetisme de rotation, &c. (Paris, 1854).
    0
    0
  • The vicinity of Trani produces an excellent wine (Moscato di Trani); xxvii.
    0
    0
  • CITTA DI CASTELLO, a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, 38 m.
    0
    0
  • See Magherini Graziani, L'Arte a Cilia di Castello (1897).
    0
    0
  • Gozzadini, Studi archeologico-topografici sulla citta di Bologna, Bologna, 1868).
    0
    0
  • A fine view may be had from the Madonna di S.
    0
    0
  • Steam tramways .run to Vignola, Pieve di Cento and Malalbergo.
    0
    0
  • See C. Ricci,;Guida di Bologna (3rd ed., Bologna, two).
    0
    0
  • of Fossato di Vico (on the line between Foligno and Ancona) and 70 m.
    0
    0
  • side of the Piazza della Signoria; it is a huge Gothic edifice with a tower, erected in 1332-1346, according to tradition, by Matteo di Giovanello of Gubbio; the name of Angelo da Orvieto occurs on the arch of the main door, but his work may be limited to the sculptures of this arch.
    0
    0
  • They are held in the public square, the curious and historic Piazza del Campo (now Piazza di Vittorio Emanuele) in shape resembling an ancient theatre, on the 2nd of July and the 16th of August of each year; they date from the middle ages and were instituted in commemoration of victories and in honour of the Virgin Mary (the old title of Siena, as shown by seals and medals, having been "Sena vetus civitas Virginis").
    0
    0
  • It has a beautiful but incomplete facade designed by Giovanni di Mino del Pellicciaio in 1382, and a marvellous font with bas-reliefs by Donatello, Ghiberti, Jacopo della Quercia and other 15th-century sculptors.
    0
    0
  • Maria di Provenzano, a vast baroque building of some elegance, designed by Schifardini (1594) Sant' Agostino, rebuilt by Vanvitelli in 1755, containing a Crucifixion and Saints by Perugino, a Massacre of the Innocents by Matteo di Giovanni, the Coming of the Magi by Sodoma, and a St Anthony by Spagnoletto (?); the beautiful church of the Servites (15th century), which contains another Massacre of the Innocents by Matteo di Giovanni and other good examples of the Sienese school; San Francesco, designed by Agostino and Agnolo about 1326, and now restored, which once possessed many fine paintings by Duccio Buoninsegna, Lorenzetti, Sodoma and Beccafumi, some of which perished in the great fire of 1655; San Domenico, a fine 13th-century building with a single nave and transept, containing Sodoma's splendid fresco the Swoon of St Catherine, the Madonna of Guido da Siena, 1281, and a crucifix by Sano di Pietro.
    0
    0
  • The Accademia di Belle Arti contains a good collection of pictures of the Sienese school, illustrating its development.
    0
    0
  • The atrium has a fresco by Bartolo di Fredi and the two ground-floor halls contain a Coronation of the Virgin by Sano di Pietro and a splendid Resurrection by Sodoma.
    0
    0
  • In the Sala dei Nove or della Pace above are the noble allegorical frescoes of Ambrogio Lorenzetti representing the effects of just and unjust government; the Sala delle Balestre or del Mappamondo is painted by Simone di Martino (Memmi) and others, the Cappella della Signoria by Taddeo di Bartolo, and the Sala del Consistorio by Beccafumi.
    0
    0
  • Another hall, the Sala di Balia, has frescoes by Spinello Aretino (1408) with scenes from the life of Pope Alexander III., while yet another has been painted by local artists with episodes in recent Italian history.
    0
    0
  • designed by Bernardo Rossellino, and now the Banca d'Italia; the enormous block of the Monte de' Paschi, a bank of considerable wealth and antiquity, enlarged and partly rebuilt in the original style between 1877 and 1881, the old Dogana and Salimbeni palaces; the Palazzo Spannochi, a fine early Renaissance building by Giuliano da Maiano (now the post office); the Loggia di Mercanzia (15th century), now a club, imitating the Loggia dei Lanzi at Florence, with sculptures of the 15th century; the Loggia del Papa, erected by Pius II.; and other fine buildings.
    0
    0
  • We may also mention the two celebrated fountains, Fonte Gaia and Fontebranda; the former, in the Piazza del Campo, by Jacopo della Quercia (1409-1419), but freely restored in 1868, the much-damaged original reliefs being now in the Opera del Duomo; the Fonte Nuova, near Porta Ovile, by Camaino di Crescentino also deserves notice (1298).
    0
    0
  • During the rule of the nobles and the mixed rule of nobles and popolani the commune of Siena was enlarged by fortunate acquisitions of neighbouring lands and by the submission of feudal lords, such as the Scialenghi, Aldobrandeschi, Pannocchieschi, Visconti di Campiglia, &c.
    0
    0
  • The rival claims to the Neapolitan kingdom of Carlo di Durazzo and Louis of Anjou caused fresh disturbances in Tuscany.
    0
    0
  • The balia was reconstituted several times by the imperial agents - in 1530 by Don Lopez di Soria and Alphonso Piccolomini, duke of Amalfi, in 1540 by Granvella (or Granvelle) and in 1548 by Don Diego di Mendoza; but government was carried on as badly as before, and there was increased hatred of the Spanish rule.
    0
    0
  • The first hostilities of the imperial forces in Val di Chiana (1552-1553) did little damage; but when Cosimo took the field with an army commanded by the marquis of Marignano the ruin of Siena was at hand.
    0
    0
  • On the 2nd of August of the same year, at Marciano in Val di Chiana, he won a complete victory over the Sienese and French troops under Piero Strozzi, the Florentine exile and marshal of France.
    0
    0
  • In the 17th century we find Ludovico Sergardi (Quinto Settano), a Latinist and satirical writer of much talent and culture; but the most original and brilliant figure in Sienese literature is that of Girolamo Gigli (1660-1722), author of the Gazzettino, La Sorellina di Don Pilone, Il Vocabolario cateriniano and the Diario ecclesiastico.
    0
    0
  • They are Orlando Malavolti (1515-1596), a man of noble birth, the most trustworthy of all; Antonio Bellarmati; Alessandro Sozzini di Girolamo, the sympathetic author of the Diario dell' ultima guerra senese; and Giugurta Tommasi, of whose tedious history ten books, down to 1354, have been published, the rest being still in manuscript.
    0
    0
  • The 14th century gives us Ugolino, Duccio di Buoninsegna, Simone di Martino (or Memmi), Lippo Memmi, Pietro and Ambrogio Lorenzetti, Andrea di Vanni (painter and statesman), Bartolo di Fredi and Taddeo di Bartolo.
    0
    0
  • In the 15th century we have Domenico di Bartolo, Sano di Pietro, Giovanni di Paolo, Stefano di Giovanni (Il Sassetta) and Matteo and Benvenuto di Giovanni Bartoli, who fell, however, behind their contemporaries elsewhere, and made indeed but little progress.
    0
    0
  • There may, also be mentioned many sculptors and architects, such as Lorenzo Maitani, architect of Orvieto cathedral (end of 13th century); Camaino di Crescentino; Tino di Camaino, sculptor of the monument to Henry VII.
    0
    0
  • in the Campo Santo of Pisa; Agostino and Agnolo, who in 1330 carved the fine tomb of Bishop Guido Tarlati in the cathedral of Arezzo; Lando di Pietro (14th century), architect, entrusted by the Sienese commune with the proposed enlargement of the cathedral (1339), and perhaps author of the famous Gothic reliquary containing the head of S Galgano in the Chiesa del Santuccio, which, however, is more usually attributed to Ugolino di Vieri, author of the tabernacle in the cathedral at Orvieto; Giacopo (or Jacopo) della Quercia, whose lovely fountain, the Fonte Gaia, in the Piazza del Campo has been recently restored; Lorenzo di Pietro (Il Vecchietta), a pupil of Della Quercia and an excellent artist in marble and bronze; Francesco d'Antonio, a skilful goldsmith of the 1 6th century; Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1502), painter, sculptor, military engineer and writer on art; Giacomo Cozzarelli (15th century); and Lorenzo Mariano, surnamed 11 Marrina (16th century).
    0
    0
  • to the east of Terranova di Sibari, and as occupying an area some 4 m.
    0
    0
  • Appointed minister of the treasury in the first Di Rudini cabinet of 1891, he imprudently abolished the system of frequent clearings of bank-notes between the state banks, a measure which facilitated the duplication of part of the paper currency and hastened the bank crisis of 1893.
    0
    0
  • In 1896 he entered the second Di Rudini cabinet as minister of the treasury, and by timely legislation helped to save the bank of Naples from failure.
    0
    0
  • Willaert, dying in 1562, was succeeded by Cipriano di Rore, on whose removal to Parma in 1565 Zarlino was elected choirmaster.
    0
    0
  • 31 Discorso Intorno alle Opere di Messer Gioseffe Zarlino, and followed it up in his famous Dialogo, defending the Pythagorean system in very unmeasured language.
    0
    0
  • See P. Russo, Illustrazione storica di Aderno (Aderno, 1897) .
    0
    0
  • 6 The best edition is Guidi's La Lettera di Simeone Vescovo di Beth-Arsam sopra i martini omeriti (Rome, 1881).
    0
    0
  • Hampe, Geschichte Konradins von Hohenstaufen (Berlin, 1893); del Giudice, Il Giudizio e la condanna di Corradirlb (Naples, 1876); E.
    0
    0
  • Lombroso, Antropometria di 400 delinquenti (1872); Roberts, Manual of Anthropometry (1878); Ferri, Studi comparati di antropometria (2 vols., 1881-1882); Lombroso, Rughe anomale speciali ai criminali (1890); Bertillon, Instructions signaletiques pour l'identification anthropometrique (1893); Livi, Anthropometria (Milan, D900); Furst, Indextabellen zum anthropometrischen Gebrauch (Jena, 1902); Report of Home Office Committee on the Best Means of Identifying Habitual Criminals (1893-1894).
    0
    0
  • See Scritti e discorsi politici di F.
    0
    0
  • The Palazzo Fodri, now the Monte di Pieta, has a beautiful 15thcentury frieze of terra-cotta bas-reliefs, as have some other palaces in private hands.
    0
    0
  • See Guida di Cremona (Cremona, 1904).
    0
    0
  • (1250-1309), king of Naples and Sicily, son of Charles I., had been captured by Ruggiero di Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284, and when his father died he was still a prisoner in the hands of Peter of Aragon.
    0
    0
  • Sternfeld, Karl von Anjou als Graf von Provence (Berlin, 1888); Charles's connexion with north Italy is dealt with in Merkel's La Dominazione di Carlo d'Angio in Piemonte e in Lombardia (Turin, 1891), while the R.
    0
    0
  • Deputazione di Storia Patria Toscana has recently published a Codice diplomatico delle relazioni di Carlo d'Angib con la Toscana; the contents of the Angevin archives at Naples have been published by Durrien, Archives angevines de Naples (Toulouse, 1866-1867).
    0
    0
  • In October 1848 Cibrario was made senator, and after the battle of Novara (March 1849), when Charles Albert abdicated and retired to a monastery near Oporto, Cibrario and Count Giacinto di Collegno were sent as representatives of the senate to express the sympathy of that body with the fallen king.
    0
    0
  • della monarchia di Savoia (Turin, 1854); Degli ordini cavallereschi (Turin, 1846); Degli ordini religiosi (Turin, 1845); and the Memorie Segrete of Charles Albert, written by order of Victor Emmanuel but afterwards withdrawn.
    0
    0
  • and C. Cavallari, Topografia archeologica di Siracusa (Palermo, 1883), or the more handy German translation by B.
    0
    0
  • Lupus, Topographic von Syrakus (Strassburg, 1887); P. Orsi, in Atti del congresso di scienze storiche, v.
    0
    0
  • and atlas (Milan, 1818, 1822); Descrizione geologica della provincia di Milano (1822).
    0
    0
  • An elaborate account of the processes of making the vitro di trina and the vasi a reticelli (Plate I., fig.
    0
    0
  • He was especially successful in making vases and circular dishes of vitro di trina; one of the latter in the Correr collection at Venice, believed to have been made in his glass-house, measures 55 centimetres (nearly 23 in.) in diameter.
    0
    0
  • Har Rai was charged with friendship for Dara Shikoh, the son of Shah Jahan, and also with preaching a religion di s tinct from Islam.
    0
    0
  • J -1k di - d 3a dX +2(a2+X)d (a -) =o, and integrating (a 2 + X) 3 /2ad?
    0
    0
  • important, founded in 1298 on the plans of Arnolfo di Cambio, completed by Brunelleschi, and consecrated in 1436; the façade, however, was not finished until the 19th century - it was begun in 1875 on the designs of de Fabris and unveiled in 1888.
    0
    0
  • Opposite is the Baptistery built by Arnolfo di Cambio in the 13th century on the site of an earlier church, and adorned with beautiful bronze doors by Ghiberti in the 15th century.
    0
    0
  • After the new centre was built, a society called the Societa per la difesa di Firenze antica was formed by many prominent citizens to safeguard the ancient buildings and prevent them from destruction, and a spirit of intelligent conservatism seems now to prevail in this connexion.
    0
    0
  • Higher education is imparted at the university (Istituto di studii superiori e di perfezionalnento), with 600 to 650 students; although only comprising the faculties of literature, medicine and natural science, it is, as regards the first-named faculty, one of the most important institutions in Italy.
    0
    0
  • Besides the Istituto di studii superiori there is the Istituto di scienze sociali "Cesare Alfieri," founded by the marchese Alfieri di Sostegno for the education of aspirants to the diplomatic and consular services, and for students of economics and social sciences (about 50 students); an academy of fine arts, a conservatoire of music, a higher female training-college with 150 students, a number of professional and trade schools, and an academy of recitation.
    0
    0
  • Milani, "Reliquie di Firenze antica," in Monumenti dei Lincei, vi.
    0
    0
  • The tumults against the Paterine heretics (1244-1245), among whom were many Ghibelline nobles favoured by the podestd Pace di Pesamigola, indicate a successful Guelphic reaction; but Frederick II., having defeated his enemies both in Lombardy and in the Two Sicilies, appointed his natural son, Frederick of Antioch, imperial vicar in Tuscany, who, when civil war broke out, entered the city with 1600 German knights.
    0
    0
  • The attempt to seize Montevarchi and other castles where the Guelph exiles were congregated failed, and in 1250 the burghers elected thirty-six caporali di popolo, who formed the basis of the primo popolo or body of citizens independent of the nobles, headed by the capitano del popolo.
    0
    0
  • Other bodies and magistrates were maintained, and the capitano del popolo, now called capitano della massa di parte Guelfa, tended to become a very important person.
    0
    0
  • The property of the Ghibellines was confiscated, and a commission of six capitani di parte Guelfa appointed to administer it and in general to expend it for the persecution of the Ghibellines.
    0
    0
  • The priori were reduced to 8 (2 popolani grassi, 3 mediani and 3 artifici minuti), while the gonfaloniere was to be chosen in turn from each of those classes; the grandi were excluded from the administration, but they were still admitted to the consiglio del comune, the cinque di mercanzia, and other offices pertaining to the commune; the Ordinamenti were maintained but in a somewhat attenuated form, and certain grandi as a favour were declared to be of the popolo.
    0
    0
  • Savonarola also proposed a court of appeal for criminal and political crimes tried by the Otto di guardia e balia; this too was agreed to, but the right of appeal was to be, not to a court as Savonarola suggested, but to the Greater Council, a fact which led to grave abuses, as judicial appeals became subject to party passions.
    0
    0
  • The parlamenti were abolished and a monte di pieta to advance money at reasonable interest was created.
    0
    0
  • - The best complete history of Florence is Gino Capponi's Storia della Repubblica di Firenze (2 vols., Florence, 1875), which although defective as regards the earliest times is a standard work based on original authorities; also F.
    0
    0
  • For the early period see Pasquale Villari's I Primi Due Secoli della storia di Firenze (Eng.
    0
    0
  • 16, which enjoins the duty of study and of scrupulousness in the observance of religious ordinances, only a very remarkable characterization of the different natures of the scholars remains (Aboth di R.
    0
    0
  • and the collection of essays entitled Una famiglia di patrioti.
    0
    0
  • Castellano, Introduzione allo studio delle opere di B.
    0
    0
  • Ceglie di Bari) on the Via Traiana, 5 m.
    0
    0
  • His biographical studies, Franz von Assisi (1856; 2nd ed., 1892), Katerina von Siena (1864; 2nd ed., 1892), Neue Propheten (Di Jungfrau von Orleans, Savonarola, Thomas Miinzer) are judiciou and sympathetic. Other works are: Hutterus redivivus oder Dog matik der evang.-luth.
    0
    0
  • See also Brilli, Intorno allci vita e atle azioni di Marcello II.
    0
    0
  • In the vicinity are the royal stud-farm (horses and dromedaries) of Cascine di San Rossore, and the mineral baths of San Giuliano, alkaline-ferruginous, with temperature 91.4° to 105.8° Fahr.
    0
    0
  • At the mouth of the Arno, joined to the city by a steam tramway, is the seaside resort of Marina di Pisa, also known as Bocca d'Arno, a well-known centre for landscape painters.
    0
    0
  • Thus it is not surprising that Pisa should already have had its own code of laws (Consuetudini di mare), which in 1075 were approved by Gregory VII., and in 1081 confirmed by a patent from the emperor Henry IV., a document which mentions for the first time the existence of a magistrate analogous to the consuls of the republic, although the latter, according to some writers, already existed in Pisa as early as the year 1080; the point, however, is doubtful, and other writers place the first authentic mention of the consuls in the year 1094.1 The oldest of Pisan statutes still extant is the Breve dei consoli di mare of 1162.
    0
    0
  • - Paolo Tronci, Annali di Pisa, edited by E.
    0
    0
  • Volpe's Studii sulle istituzioni, comunali di Pisa (Pisa, 1902), and for the laws, F.
    0
    0
  • Bonaini's Statuti inediti della cilia di Pisa (3 vols., Florence, 1851, &c.).
    0
    0
  • P. di Cesnola, Cyprus, 1878 passim) and to the British Museum (Excavations in Cyprus, 18 94 (1899) passim); but the city has vanished, except fragments of wall and of a great stone cistern on the acropolis.
    0
    0
  • St Catherine of Siena was the youngest of the twenty-five children of Giacomo di Benincasa, a dyer, and was born, with a twin-sister who did not survive her birth, on the st 25th of March 1347.
    0
    0
  • To this year, 1376, belongs the admission to Catherine's circle of disciples of Stefano di Corrado Maconi, a Sienese noble distinguished by a character full of charm and purity, and her healing of the bitter feud between his family and the Tolomei.
    0
    0
  • Among them were Fra Raimondo, who became master-general of the Dominicans, William Flete, an ascetically-minded Englishman from Cambridge, Stefano Maconi, who joined the Carthusians and ultimately became prior-general, and the two secretaries, Neri di Landoccio and Francesco Malavolti.
    0
    0
  • Opera Omnia (Frankfort, 1729); the detailed "Studii sul pontificato di Clem.
    0
    0
  • Soc. romance di storia patria, vols.
    0
    0
  • Under the rule of Venice the university was governed by a board of three patricians, called the Riformatori dello Studio di Padova.
    0
    0
  • Gennari, Annali di Padova (Padua); G.
    0
    0
  • Gonzati, La Basilica di Sant' Antonio di Padova (Padua, 1853).
    0
    0
  • While wintering at Napoli di Romania (Nauplia) he died on the 6th of January 1694.
    0
    0
  • 17, ibid.; Romanin, Storia documentata di Venezia, also other general Venetian histories; G.
    0
    0
  • Dalla Santa, Due Lettere di umanisti veneziani a Paolo Morosini (in Nuovo archivio veneto, xix.
    0
    0
  • Arrighi, Vita di F.
    0
    0
  • The Arco di Riccardo, which derives its name from a popular delusion that it was connected with Richard Coeur-de-Lion, is believed by some to be a Roman triumphal arch, but is probably an arch of a Roman aqueduct.
    0
    0
  • Giulio Caprin, Trieste (Bergamo, 1906); Mainati's Croniche ossia memorie stor.- sacroprofane di Trieste (7 vols., Venice, 1817-1818); Lowenthal, Gesch.
    0
    0
  • der Stadt Triest (Trieste, 1857); Della Croce, Storia di Trieste (ibid., 1879); Scussa, Storia cronografica di Trieste (ibid., new ed., 1885-1886); Neumann-Spallart, Osterreichs maritime Entwicklung and die Hebung von Triest (Stuttgart, 1882); Die osterreich-ungarische Monarchie: Das Kiistenland (Vienna, 1891); Montanelli, Il Movimento storico della popolazione di Trieste (1905); Hartleben, Fi hrer durch Triest and Umgebung (5th ed., Vienna, 1905).
    0
    0
  • Maria di Collemaggio, just outside the town, has a very fine Romanesque facade of simple design (1270-1280) in red and white marble, with three finely decorated portals and a rose-window above each.
    0
    0
  • He would have been executed had not the Austrians intervened in his favour, and he was exiled instead to Briinn in Moravia; in 1823 he was permitted to settle in Florence, where he spent the rest of his days engaged on his Storia del reame di Napoli.
    0
    0
  • See Gino Capponi's memoir of him published in the Storia del reame di Napoli (2nd ed., Florence, 1848).
    0
    0
  • A creature of the Arrabbiati, a Franciscan friar named Francesco di Puglia, challenged Savonarola to prove the truth of his doctrines by the ordeal of fire.
    0
    0
  • Rudelbach, Hieronymus Savonarola and seine Zeit, aus den Quellen dargestellt (Hamburg, 1835); Karl Meier, Girolamo Savonarola, aus grossentheils handschriftlichen Quellen dargestellt (Berlin, 1836); Padre Vincenzo Marchese, Storia di S.
    0
    0
  • Marco di Firenze (Florence, 1855); F.
    0
    0
  • Madden, The Life and Martyrdom of Girolamo Savonarola, &c. (London, 18 54); Bartolommeo Aquarone, Vita di Fra Geronimo Savonarola (Alessandria, 1857); L.
    0
    0
  • The standard modern work on Savonarola is Pasquale Villari's, La Storia di Fra Girolamo Savonarola e de' suoi tempi (Florence, 1887) based on an exhaustive study of the original authorities and containing a number of new documents (English translation by Linda Villari, London, 1889).
    0
    0
  • Casanova have published a Scelta di prediche e scritti di Fra Girolamo Savonarola con nuovi documenti (Florence, 1898); Il Savonarola e la critica tedesca (Florence, 1900), a selection of translations from the German.
    0
    0
  • Bolla, Arriano di Nicomedia '0890); E.
    0
    0
  • of Cephaloedium [[[Cefalu]]], to the east of the modern Castel di Tusa, founded in 403 B.C. by Archonides, tyrant of Herbita, whose name it sometimes bore: we find, e.g.
    0
    0
  • Below Fiesole, between it and Florence, lies San Domenico di Fiesole (485 ft.); in the Dominican monastery the painter, Fra Giovanni Angelico da Fiesole (1387-1455), lived until he went to S.
    0
    0
  • Here, too, is the Badia di Fiesole, founded in 1028 and re-erected about 1456-1466 by a follower of Brunelleschi.
    0
    0
  • Di ntzer and F.
    0
    0
  • There are four other bridges across the Adige: one, the graceful Ponte di Pietra, rests upon ancient foundations, while the two arches nearest to the left bank are Roman; but it has been frequently restored.
    0
    0
  • The Camuzzoni industrial canal, which runs from the Chievo di S.
    0
    0
  • di Carrara, lord of Padua.
    0
    0
  • Giani, L' Antico teatro di Verona (Verona, 1908).
    0
    0
  • Avanzi di antichita (Voghera, 1893).
    0
    0
  • His Storia critica di Spagna e della cultura spagnuola in ogni genere (2 vols., 1781-1784) was finally expanded into the Historia critica de Espana y de la cultura espanola (1783-1805), which, though it consists of twenty volumes, was left unfinished; had it been continued on the same scale, the work would have consisted of fifty volumes.
    0
    0
  • Di ctionaries.F.
    0
    0
  • Peter I., through his commander Ruggiero di Loria, defeated the French off the Faro; and from 1282 to 1713 Messina remained a possession of the Spanish royal house.
    0
    0
  • Messina was the birthplace of Dicaearchus, the historian (c. 322 B.C.); Aristocles, the Peripatetic; Euhemerus, the rationalist (c. 316 B.C.); Stefano Protonotario, Mazzeo di Ricco and Tommaso di Sasso, poets of the court of Frederick II.
    0
    0
  • The Galleria di Minerva was'first published at Venice in 1696.
    0
    0
  • The next that deserve mention are the Giornale enciclopedico (1806) of Naples, followed by the Progresso delle scienze (1833-1848) and the Museo di scienze e letteratura of the same city, and the Giornale arcadico (1819) of Rome.
    0
    0
  • Naples had in 1832 Il)Progresso of Carlo Troya, helped by Tommaseo and Centofanti, and Palermo owned the Giornale di statistica (1834), suppressed eight years later.
    0
    0
  • The Rassegna nazionale, conducted by the marchese Manfredo di Passano, a chief of the moderate clerical party, the Nuova rivista of Turin, the Fanfulla della Domenica, and the Gazzetta letteraria may also be mentioned.
    0
    0
  • Some of the following are still published: Annali di matematica (1867); Annuario di giurisprudenza (1883); Archivio di statistica (1876); Archivio storico lombardo (1874); Archivio veneto (1871); Archivio per lo studio delle tradizioni popolari; Archivio per la zoologia; Il Bibliofilo; Il Filangieri (1876); La Natura (1884); Nuovo giornale botanico (1869); Giornale degli eruditi (1883); Giornale di filologia romanza; Nuova rivista Internazionale (1879); La Rassegna italiana (1881); Revue internationale (1883).
    0
    0
  • Bibliography: Rivista delle biblioteche e degli archivi (1888), published monthly at Rome and Florence, the official organ of librarians and archivists; Giornale della libreria della tipografia (1888), supplement to the Bibliografia italiana; Bollettino di bibliografia e storia delle scienze matematiche (1898); La Bibliofilia (1899), Florence, monthly; Raccolta Vinciana (1904).
    0
    0
  • Philology: Bollettino di filologia classica (1894); Giornale italiano di filologia e linguistica classica (1886); Studi di filologia romanza (1885); Studi italiani di filologia classica (1893); Bessarione, bi-monthly.
    0
    0
  • No class has developed more usefully than the historical, among them being: Bollettino dell' instituto storico italiano (1886); Nuovo archivio veneto (1890); Rivista di storia antica e scienze affini (1895); Rivista storica italiana (1884).
    0
    0
  • New literary and scientific reviews are: L'Alighieri, rivista di cose dantesche (1889); Giornale dantesco (1894); Giornale storico della letteratura italiana (1883); Studi di letteratura italiana (1899); Studi medievali (1904); L' Arcadia, periodico mensile di scienze, lettere, ed arti (1889); Periodico di matematica per l'insegnamento secondario (1885); Rivista di matematica (1891); Rivista philosofica (1899); Rivista d'Italia, monthly at Rome.
    0
    0
  • Accademia delle scienze di Torino (2nd ser.
    0
    0
  • Eusebio in Atti del Congresso Internazionale di Scienze Storiche (Rome, 1904), vol.
    0
    0
  • Beltrami, Il Castello di Soncino, Milan, 1890).
    0
    0
  • In 1692 he lost Namur and was badly defeated at Steinkirk (August 4th), and in 1693 he was di astrously beaten at Neerwinden or Landen (July 19th).
    0
    0
  • G, prefrontal; M, maxilla; J, poison-fang; Tr, transpalatine; Pt, pterygoid; p, palatine; Q, quadrate; Sq, squamosal; Pm, premaxilla; T.a, articular; Pe and Di, muscles.
    0
    0
  • Pedroli, "I Tributi degli alleati d'Atene" in Beloch's Studi di storia antica.
    0
    0
  • So, too, is the character of the offering: male victims must be sacrificed to male deities; female victims to goddesses: white animals are the due of the di superi, the gods of the upper world, black animals of the gods below.
    0
    0
  • This conception of the nature of the numina and man's relation to them is the root notion of the old Roman religion, and the fully-formed state cult of the di indigetes even at the earliest historical period, must have been the result of long and gradual development, of which we can to a certain extent trace the stages.
    0
    0
  • As Janus is in the household the numen of the door, so in the state he is the god associated with the great gate near the corner of the forum: the Penates have their analogy in the Di Penates populi Romani Quiritium by whom the magistrates take their oath on entering office, the Lar familiaris in the Lares Praestites of the community, and the Genius in the new notion of the Genius populi Romani or Genius urbis Romae.
    0
    0
  • The consequence was the introduction of certain new deities, the di novensides, from external sources, and the birth of new conceptions of the gods and their worship. We may distinguish three main influences, to a certain extent historically successive.
    0
    0
  • de Marchi, Il culto privato di Roma Antica.
    0
    0
  • Within the town are two subterranean vaulted buildings in good masonry, of uncertain nature, some other remains under modern buildings, and a concrete ruin known as the "Bagni di Bacco."
    0
    0
  • Below the town is the massive tomb chamber (originally subterranean, but now lacking the mound of the earth which covered it) known as the Grotta di Pitagora (grotto of Pythagoras).
    0
    0
  • Maria del Calcinaio, a fine early Renaissance building by Francesco di Giorgio Martini of Siena, with fine stained glass windows.
    0
    0
  • Scanty remains of walling and of buildings of the Roman period exist above ground; traces of a large rectangular platform were found in 1876, and part of the thermae in 1829; it occupied the summit of a hill defended by ravines, called Piano di Civita.
    0
    0
  • Some authorities indeed consider, and very likely with good reason, that this was the site of the Etruscan city, and that the Piano di Civita, which lies further inland and commands but little view of the sea, was only occupied in Roman times.
    0
    0
  • Dasti, Notizie Storiche archeologiche di Tarquinia e Corneto (Rome, 1878); G.
    0
    0
  • - Luigi Cibrario, Scoria della monarchia di Savoia (Turin, 1840), for the early history; E.
    0
    0
  • I, 4), the modern Citta di Castello, he set up a temple at his own expense and adorned it with statues of Nerva and Trajan (x.
    0
    0
  • Lago di Albano), a lake about 12 m.
    0
    0
  • To the south, outside the Porta di Lecce, is the Citta Nuova, on the site of the main part of the ancient town.
    0
    0
  • Under the Aragonese, Malta, as regards local affairs, was administered bya Universitd or municipal commonwealth with wide and indefinite powers, including the election of its officers, Capitan di Verga, Jurats, &c. The minutes of the " Consiglio Popolare " of this period are preserved, showing it had no legislative power; this was vested in the king, and was exercised despotically in the interests of the Crown.
    0
    0
  • Zeri, I porti delle isole del gruppo di Malta (1906); G.
    0
    0
  • Bonamico, Delle glossipietre di Malta (1688).
    0
    0
  • After her death, much against the advice of his remaining son arrd heir, Carlino (afterwards Charles Emmanuel III.), he married the Contessa di San Sebastiano, whom he created Marchesa di Spigno, abdicated the crown and retired to Chambery to end his days (1730).
    0
    0
  • Carutti, Storia del Regno di Vittorio Amedeo II.
    0
    0
  • ed Eugenio di Savoia (Milan, 1888).
    0
    0
  • Giometti, Guida di Chiusi (Poggibonsi, 1904).
    0
    0
  • The Ponte di Cecco (so named from Cecco d'Ascoli), with two arches, is also Roman and belongs to the Via Salaria; the Ponte Maggiore and the Ponte Cartaro are, on the other hand, medieval, though the latter perhaps preserves some traces of Roman work.
    0
    0
  • By successive trials two beads, of known density, say di, d 2, are obtained, one of which floats above, and the other below, the test crystal; the distances separating the beads from the crystal are determined by means of a scale placed behind the tube.
    0
    0
  • Nitti di Vito, Le Pergamene di S.
    0
    0
  • Nicola di Bari (Bari, 1901); Charles Cahier, Caracteristiques des saints (Paris, 186 7), p. 354; Frances ArnoldForster, Studies in Church Dedications (London, 1899), i.
    0
    0
  • His ancestry claimed blood relationship with the lords of Montespertoli, a fief situated between Val di Pesa and Val d'Elsa, at no great distance from the city.
    0
    0
  • The masters he had to serve were the dieci di liberta e pace, who, though subordinate to the signoria, exercised a separate control over the departments of war and the interior.
    0
    0
  • On the 6th of December 1506 his plan was approved by the signoria, and a special ministry, called the nove di ordinanza e militia, was appointed.
    0
    0
  • The same qualities are noticeable in his Ritratti delle cose di Francia, which he drew up after an embassy to Louis XII.
    0
    0
  • This second treatise is the Discorsi sopra la prima deca di Tito Livio.
    0
    0
  • The year 1520 saw the composition of the Arte della guerra and the Vita di Castruccio.
    0
    0
  • The Vita di Castruccio was composed at Lucca, whither Machiavelli had been sent on a mission.
    0
    0
  • The best biography is the standard work of Pasquale Villari, La Storia di Niccolo Machiavelli e de' suoi tempi (Florence, 1877-1882; latest ed., 1895 Eng.
    0
    0
  • Tomasini, La Vita e gli scritti di Niccolo Machiavelli (Turin, 1883); L.
    0
    0
  • Wilson, in History of England (1706); Istoria del Granducato di Toscana, by R.
    0
    0
  • Similar summer resorts are situated among the woods above the Casentino or upper valley of the Arno to the east, such as Camaldoli, Badia di Prataglia, &c. Camaldoli was the original headquarters of the Camaldulensian order, now partly occupied by an hotel.
    0
    0
  • Persichetti, Viaggio archeologico sulla Via Salaria nel Circondario di Cittaducale (Rome, 1893); and in Rmische Mitteilungen (1903), 276 seq.
    0
    0
  • (Rome, 1601-1602); and Ciappi, Comp. dell' attioni e santa vita di Gregorio XIII (Rome, 1591).
    0
    0
  • From the earliest Christian times the saints took the place of the pagan tutelary deities (Di tutelares) and were in this capacity called tutelares or patroni, patron-saints.
    0
    0
  • His principal works, generally published under the assumed name of "Agatopisto Cromazione," are on the history of philosophy: - Della Istoria e delle Indole di ogni Filosofia, 7 vols., 1772 seq.; and Della Restaurazione di ogni Filosofia ne' Secoli, xvi., xvii., xviii., 3 vols., 1789 (German trans.
    0
    0
  • His other works are Istoria critica e filosofica del suicidio (1761); Delle conquiste celebri esaminate col naturale diritto delle genti (1763); Storia critica del moderno diritto di natura e delle genti (1789); and a few poems and philosophic comedies.
    0
    0
  • Caesium is found in the mineral springs of Frankenhausen, Montecatini, di Val di Nievole, Tuscany, and Wheal Clifford near Redruth, Cornwall (W.
    0
    0
  • Cain) at Paris in 1846; and an Italian Biografia di Davide Garrick was published by C. Blasis at Milan in 1840.
    0
    0
  • Accademia di Archeologia (Naples, 1897, vol.
    0
    0
  • Charles Albert no doubt was aware of this, but he never actually became a Carbonaro, and was surprised and startled when after the outbreak of the Neapolitan revolution of 1820 some of the leading conspirators in the Piedmontese army, including Count Santorre di Santarosa and Count San Marzano, informed him that a military rising was ready and that they counted on his help (2nd March 1821).
    0
    0
  • Cappelletti, Storia di Carlo Alberto (Rome, 1891); Nicomede Bianchi, Storia della diplomazia europea in Italia (8 vols., Turin, 1865, &c.), a most important work of a general character, and the same author's Scritti e lettere di Carlo Alberto (Rome, 1879) And his Storia della monarchia piemontese (Turin, 1877); Count S.
    0
    0
  • See Passerini, Gli Alberti di Firenze (1869, 1870); Mancini, Vita.
    0
    0
  • di Alberti (Firenze, 1882); V.
    0
    0
  • AMEDEO FERDINANDO MARIA DI SAVOIA, duke of Aosta (1845-1890), third son of Victor Emmanuel II., king of Italy, and of Adelaide, archduchess of Austria, was born at Turin on the 30th of May 1845.
    0
    0
  • See Annali della republics di Genova, by Agostino Giustiniani (ed.
    0
    0
  • de Marchi, Il Culto privato di Roma antica (1896-1903), p. 28 foil.; G.
    0
    0
  • Ristori, Biografia di Guido monaco d'Arezzo (1868).
    0
    0
  • trans., 1906), where the story is connected with the ceremonies performed in honour of Jupiter Tigillus and Juno Sororia; C. Pascal, Fatti e legende di Roma antica (Florence, 1903); 0.
    0
    0
  • Ludovico di Varthema >>
    0
    0
  • Here the name of Laurentum is preserved by the modern name Pantan di Lauro.
    0
    0
  • The remains of the villa of Pliny, too, were excavated in 1713 and in 1802-1819, and it is noteworthy that the place bears the name Villa di Pino (sic) on the staff map; how old the name is, is uncertain.
    0
    0
  • Several remains of reservoirs exist; one very large one is now called Piscina di Cardito.
    0
    0
  • Maria di Piazza, built in 1517 after the designs of Bramante: the picture over the high altar is one of Gaudenzio Ferrari's best works.
    0
    0
  • He was one of the founders of the Annali universali di statistica.
    0
    0
  • Le Fatiche d'Ercole (1475) is a romance in poetic prose by Pietro Bassi, and the Dodeci Travagli di Ercole (1544) a poem by J.
    0
    0
  • Potentia must be distinguished from Potentia in Picenum, on the Adriatic coast, near the modern Porto di Recanati, a colony founded in 184 B.C., the same year as Pisaurum, but of which little is known.
    0
    0
  • von Platen, Storia del reame di Napoli dal 1414 al 1423 (1864).
    0
    0
  • Romano, Antichita Termitane (Palermo, 1838); Mauceri, Acropoli Pelasgica nei dintorni di Termini Imerese (Palermo, 1896).
    0
    0
  • Mayr, Brevi notizie storiche della vita e delle, opere di Giuseppe Haydn (1809); Griesinger, Biographische Notizen fiber Joseph Haydn (1810); Carpani, Le Haydeni (1812 and 1823); Bombet (M.
    0
    0
  • If then dl is an element of the path, putting dt = do/U, we have the average excess of pressure p = ° (to } pu 2) dt = Lj j (+pu2)dI.
    0
    0
  • The last gained him the friendship of the Marchesa di Barolo, the reformer of the Turin prisons, and in 1834 he accepted from her a yearly pension of 1200 francs.
    0
    0
  • d'Ancona (Citta di Castello, 1895) and translated into English by W.
    0
    0
  • Martini's most important works are his Storia della musica (Bologna, 1757-1781) and his Saggio di contrapunto (Bologna, 1 7741 775).
    0
    0
  • quellenkritisch untersucht (1889); P. Balan, Storia di Gregorio IX e dei suoi tempi (3 vols., Modena, 1872-1873); F.
    0
    0
  • The walls by which it is surrounded were erected in 1320 by Guido Tarlati di Pietramala, its warlike bishop, who died in 1327, and is buried in the cathedral; they were reconstructed by Cosimo I.
    0
    0
  • 1540) by Giuliano di Baccio of Florence, with his tomb by Raffaello da Montelupo.
    0
    0
  • For the Bonaparte family in general, and Carlo and Letizia, see Storia genealogica della famiglia Bonaparte, della sua origine lino all' estinzione del ramo gia esisente nella cilia, di S.
    0
    0
  • In 1793 he distinguished himself by the brilliant defence of a redoubt at the Col di Tenda, with only thirty men against a battalion of the enemy.
    0
    0
  • ASPROMONTE, a mountain of Calabria, Italy, rising behind Reggio di Calabria, the west extremity of the Sila range.
    0
    0
  • See Vedriani, Storia di Modena (1666); Tiraboschi, Mem.
    0
    0
  • Modena (1859); Oreste Raggi, Modena descritta (1860); Baraldi, Storia di Modena; Valdrighi, Diz.
    0
    0
  • Storico, &c., delle contrade di Modena (1798-1880); Crespellani, Guida di Modena (1879); Cavedoni, Dichiarazione degli antici marmi Modenesi (1828).
    0
    0
  • 1328), whose tomb by the Pisan Giovanni di Balducci is in S.
    0
    0
  • A branch of the Cadolingi di Borgonuovo family, lords of Fucecchio in Tuscany from the 10th century onwards, which had acquired the name of Bonaparte, had settled near Sarzana before 1264; in 1512 a member of the family took up his residence in Ajaccio, and hence, according to some authorities, was descended the emperor Napoleon I.
    0
    0
  • Sarzana, owing to its position on the frontier, changed masters more than once, belonging first to Pisa, then to Florence, then to the Banco di S.
    0
    0
  • Failing to receive aid from Pozzo di Borgo, his mother's uncle, Louis Blanc studied law in Paris, living in poverty, and became a contributor to various journals.
    0
    0
  • There was another temple of Pietas near the Circus Flaminius, which is connected by Amatucci (Rivista di storia antica, 1903) with the story of the pietas of C. Flaminius (Val.
    0
    0
  • Capo d'Istria, Nesselrode, Stein, Pozzo di Borgo were perhaps the best men in Europe to manage the Russian policy, while Czartoriski represented at the imperial court the hope of Polish nationality.
    0
    0
  • von Reumont, Geschichte Toscanas (Gotha, 1877); and "Federico Manfredini e la politica Toscana nei primi a.nni di Ferdinando III."
    0
    0
  • 153 seq.; Capasso, La Politica di papa Paolo III.
    0
    0
  • After this Fondi was much neglected; in 1721 it was sold to the Di Sangro family, in which it still remains.
    0
    0
  • The Lago di Fondi, which lies in the middle of the plain, and the partially drained marshes surrounding it, compelled the ancient Via Appia, followed by the modern road, to make a considerable detour.
    0
    0
  • For modern discoveries see P. di Tucci in Notizie degli scavi (1880), 480; G.
    0
    0
  • Conte Colino, Storia di Fondi (Naples, 1902); B.
    0
    0
  • Bianchi, Memorie storiche e statutarie di Fondi in Campania (Rome, 1903); T.
    0
    0
  • If the inclination or change of inclination in degrees is denoted by S or OS, (21) 5/180=i/7r, so that (22) AS 180 _ 180g (Ot and if 5 and i change to D and I for the standard projectile, AT Ov 180g AT (23) DI =g ., = v p, AD = -Tr, and vv or J VQ'V, D(V) -D(v) = 180 [I(V) - i (v)].
    0
    0
  • The differences OD and DI are thus calculated, while the values of D(v) and I (v) are obtained by summation with the arithmometer, and entered in their respective columns.
    0
    0
  • so that Denoting dx/dt, the horizontal component of the velocity, by q, (49) v cos i =q, equation (43) becomes (50) dq/dt= -r cos i, and therefore by !(48) (51) dq _dq dt ry di - dt di-g' It is convenient to express r as a function of v in the previous notation (52) Cr = f(v), dq _vf(v) di - Cg ' an equation connecting q and i.
    0
    0
  • Now, since v sec i (54) di sec i dq C f(q sec i)' and multiplying by /dt or q, (55) dx C q sec i dq - f (q sec i)' and multiplying by dy/dx or tan i, (56) dy C q sec i tan dq - f (q sec i) ' also (57) di Cg dq g sec i .f (g sec i)' (58) d tan i C g sec i dq - q.
    0
    0
  • di g d tan i g dt - v cos i ' and now (53) dx d 2 y dy d2xdx Cif dt 2 dt dt2 _ - _ gdt' and this, in conjunction with (46) dy _ d y tan i = dx dt/dt' (47)di d 2 d d 2 x dx sec 2 idt = (ctt d t - at dt2) I (dt), reduces to (48) Integrating from any initial pseudo-velocity U, (60) du t _ C U uf(u) x= C cos n f u (u) y=C sin n ff (a); and supposing the inclination i to change from 0, to 8 radians over the arc.
    0
    0
  • FRANCIA (c. 1450 - 1517), a Bolognese painter, whose real name was Francesco Raibolini, his father being Marco di Giacomo Raibolini, a carpenter, descended from an old and creditable family, was born at Bologna about 1450.
    0
    0
  • Calvi, Memorie della vita di Francesco Raibolini (1812), and especially G.
    0
    0
  • Perini, Di qua dal Mareb (Florence, 1905).
    0
    0
  • For the history of its genesis and its diffusion the reader may consult D'Ancona, La leggenda di Vergogna e la leggenda di Giuda (1869), and papers by W.
    0
    0
  • The chief towns in the various provinces, with their communal population in 1901, are: Belluno 19,050; total of province 214,803, number of communes 66; Padua 81,242; Monselice 11,571, Este 10,779,10,779, Piove di Sacco 10,021; total of province 444,360, number of communes, 103; Rovigo 10,735, Adria 15,711; total of province 222,057, number of communes 63; Treviso 32,793, Castelfranco Veneto 12,440, Montebelluna 10,284, Conegliano 10,252; total of province 416,945, number of communes 95; Udine 36,899, Pordenone 12,409, S.
    0
    0
  • Streams of rainwater, formed by condensation of exhaled steam often mingled with volcanic ashes so as to produce mud, are known as lava d'acqua, whilst the streams of molten matter are called lava di fuoco.
    0
    0
  • 9 and io, London, 1846); Campana di Cavelli, Les Derniers Stuarts a Saint-Germain en-Laye (London, 1871); and Martin Haile Mary of Modena (London, 1905).
    0
    0
  • He returned to the mainland at the head of 200 convicts, and committed further excesses in the Terra di Lavoro; but the French troops were everywhere on the alert to capture him and he had to take refuge in the woods of Lenola.
    0
    0
  • The best known account of Fra Diavolo is in Pietro Colletta's Storia del reame di Napoli (2nd ed., Florence, 1848); B.
    0
    0
  • An indiscreet announcement of the limitations of the Triple Alliance contributed to his fall in June 1885, when he was succeeded by Count di Robilant.
    0
    0
  • Piero Di Cosimo >>
    0
    0
  • ANGELO DI COSTANZO (c 1507-1591), Italian historian and poet, was born at Naples about 1507.
    0
    0
  • His great work, Le Istorie del regno di Napoli dal 1250 fino al 1498, first appeared at Naples in 1572, and was the fruit of thirty or forty years' labour; but nine more years were devoted to the task before it was issued in its final form at Aquila (1581).
    0
    0
  • The Rime of di Costanzo are remarkable for finical taste, for polish and frequent beauty of expression, and for strict obedience to the poetical canons of his time.
    0
    0
  • That same year the Dorias inherited the fiefs and titles of the house of Pamphilii-Landi of Gubbio, patricians of Rome and princes of San Martino, Valmontano, Val di Toro, Bardi and Corupiano.
    0
    0
  • Falchi, Ricerche di Vetulonia (Prato, 1881), and other works, especially Vetulonia e la sua necropoli antichissima (Florence, 1891); G.
    0
    0
  • Gravina, Il Duomo di Monreale (Palermo, 1859-1865).
    0
    0
  • Creyghton (Hague, 1660); Cecconi, Studi storici sul concilio di Firenze (Florence, 1869), (appendix); J.
    0
    0
  • See Carandini, Vita di M.
    0
    0
  • Di Giorgio, Il Generale M.
    0
    0
  • In ancient Rome the Di manes, or as we should say the blessed dead, who reposed in their necropolis outside the walls, were specially commemorated on the dies parentales or days of placating them (placandis Manibus).
    0
    0
  • In 1868 Adamo Rossi published in his Ricerche per le biblioteche di Perugia three "novelle" by Grazzini, from a MS. of the 16th century in the "Comunale" of Perugia: and in 1870 a small collection of those poems which have been left unpublished by previous editors appeared at Poggibonsi, Alcune Poesie inedite.
    0
    0
  • See Pietro Fanfani's "Vita del Lasca," prefixed to his edition of the Opere di A.
    0
    0
  • In later times the place became a municipium, and unimportant Roman remains still exist upon the hill known as Monte di Canne.
    0
    0
  • di bibliogr.
    0
    0
  • e di storia delle sci.
    0
    0
  • Cordenone in Bollettino del Museo Civico di Padova, iv.
    0
    0
  • de l'Histoire, p. 102, Paris, 1729); Mazzoleni, Vita di Francesco Bianchini (Verona, 1735); Tipaldo, Biografia degli Italiani Illustri, vii.
    0
    0
  • Simone, Il Duomo di Conversano, Trani, 1896).
    0
    0
  • 115): "Ahi, Costantin, di questo mal fu matre Non la tua conversion, ma quella dote Che da to prese it primo ricco patre !"
    0
    0
  • The citadel of the 15th century, constructed by Francesco di Giorgio Martini of Siena, is on the S.E.
    0
    0
  • Mochi, Storia di Cagli, Cagli, 1878.) About 5 m.
    0
    0
  • Acqualagna is the site of an ancient town; the place is now called piano di Valeria, and is scattered with ruins.
    0
    0
  • ARIANO DI PUGLIA, a town and episcopal see, which, despite its name, now belongs to Campania, Italy, in the province of Avellino, 1509 ft.
    0
    0
  • Castellammare di Stabia).
    0
    0
  • Ruggiero, Scavi di Stabia del 1749 al 1782 (Naples, 1881); J.
    0
    0
  • Tisri calcolo della Pasqua, e correzione di quello di Gauss, con critiche o;servazioni sit quanto ha scrittc del calendario it Delambri, di Lodovico Ciccolini (Rome, 1817); E.
    0
    0
  • Bentivoglio's principal works are: - Della Guerra di Fiandria (best edition, Cologne, 1633-1639), translated into English by Henry, earl of Monmouth (London, 1654); Relazioni di G.
    0
    0
  • Bentivoglio in tempo delle sue Nunziature di Fiandria e di Francia (Cologne, 1630); Lettere diplomatiche di Guido Bentivoglio (Brussels, 1631, frequently reprinted, best edition by L.
    0
    0
  • The socalled Arco di Riccardo is a half-buried Roman arch with Corinthian pilasters, possibly a triumphal arch, possibly connected with an aqueduct.
    0
    0
  • di corr.
    0
    0
  • The university, founded in 1400 by Lodovico di.
    0
    0
  • Among the hospitals is that called by the name of its founder, Cottolengo, a vast institution providing for more than 5000 persons; there are also the Ospedale Maggiore di San Giovanni, the Ospedale Mauriziano, and many other hospitals for special diseases, as well as asylums and charitable institutions of all kinds.
    0
    0
  • Turin has, however, the advantage of being the nearest to the Mont Cenis, while the completion of the line through Cuneo over the Col di Tenda affords direct communication with the French Riviera.
    0
    0
  • Not far from Turin are also the castles of Moncalieri, Stupinigi, Rivoli, Racconigi, Agle, Venaria, and the ancient monastery of the Sagra di San Michele (753 metres above sea-level), famous for its view of the Alps as far as the beginning of the Lombard plain.
    0
    0
  • (3) St delle Chiaje, Memorie sulla storia e anatomia degli animali senza vertebre del regno di Napoli (Naples, 1823-1829), new edition with 172 plates, fol., 18 43.
    0
    0
  • On the 10th of December 1816 Pozzo di Borgo wrote to the duke enclosing a memorandum in which the emperor Alexander of Russia suggested a reduction in the army of occupation: "no mere question of finance, but one of general policy, based on reason, equity and a severe morality"; at the same time he left the question of its postponement entirely to Wellington.
    0
    0
  • Murena, Vita di Roberto d'Angib, re di Napoli (Naples, 1770); and Archivio storico Siciliano (1884, viii.
    0
    0
  • Semeria, Vita politico-religiose di s.
    0
    0
  • It was at his court that Piero della Francesca wrote his celebrated work on the science of perspective, Francesco di Giorgio Martini his Trattato d'architettura (published by Saluzzo, Turin, 1841), and Giovanni Santi his poetical account of the chief artists of his time.
    0
    0
  • Most of the finest pieces of Urbino ware were made specially for the dukes, who covered their sideboards with the rich storied piatti di pompa.
    0
    0
  • Besides the silver altar it contains many fine works of sculpture; the chief are the monument of Cino da Pistoia, lawyer and poet, Dante's contemporary (1337), by Cellino di Nese, surrounded by his scholars, and Verrocchio's finest work in marble, the monument to Cardinal Forteguerra (1474), with a large figure of Christ, surrounded by angels, in high relief.
    0
    0
  • The octagonal baptistery is by Cellino di Nese (1339).
    0
    0
  • The gem of the collection is Raphael's "Madonna di San Sisto," for which a room is set apart.
    0
    0
  • Fontana, Renata di Francia (Rome, 1889 seq.); and E.
    0
    0
  • p. 396; and Beloch, " Der italische Bund unter romischer Hegemonie " (Leipzig, 1880) and " "La Conquista Romana della regione Sabina," in the Rivista di storia antica (1905), ix.
    0
    0
  • In 1350 Cola di Rienzi, "the last of the tribunes," was confined by the emperor Charles IV.
    0
    0
  • (Venice, 1855), and his Lezioni di storia Veneta (Florence, 1875) L.
    0
    0
  • Nibby, Dintorni di Roma, i.
    0
    0
  • Di mmler, Geschichte des ostfrdnkischen Reichs (Leipzig, 1887-1888); M.
    0
    0
  • The Tomba di Rotari is a domed building of the Norman period.
    0
    0
  • P. Badger has, however, pointed out (Travels of Ludovico di Varthema, trans.
    0
    0
  • See also Bertelli in Boncompagni's Bollettino di bibliografia, t.
    0
    0
  • See C. Cipolla, Note bibliografiche circa l'odierna condizione degli studi critici sul testo delle opere di Paolo Diacono (Venice, 1901); the Atti e memorie del congresso storico tenuto in Cividale (Udine, Two); F.
    0
    0
  • (Leipzig, 1898); P. del Giudice, Studi di storia e diritto (Milan, 1889); and U.
    0
    0
  • In Rome there ensued, during the pontificate of Clement, the revolutions of the visionary Cola di Rienzo (q.v.) who restored the old republic, though not for long.
    0
    0
  • It was in vain that Carlo di Malatesta, a stanch adherent of Gregory, sought at the eleventh hour to negotiate a compromise between Gregory and the synod.
    0
    0
  • It was by members of this Oratory - especially St Gaetano di Tiene; Carafa (later Paul IV.), and the great bishop of Verona, Giberti - that the foundations of the Catholic reformation were laid.
    0
    0
  • The Pincian, the Esquiline, and the south-easterly part of the Caelian hills received essentially their present form by the creation of the Via Sistina, Felice, delle Quattro Fontane, di Sta Croce in Gerusalemme, &c.; by the buildings at Sta Maria Maggiore, the Villa Montalto, the reconstruction of the Lateran, and the aqueduct of the Felice, which partially utilized the Alexandrina and cost upwards of 300,000 scudi.
    0
    0
  • as boast not only of having re-established di lomatic Diplomatist.
    0
    0