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devour

devour

devour Sentence Examples

  • Her eyes widened, then ran over him as if she were appraising a sinful dessert, ready to devour it.

  • Were they waiting to devour Penny, or were they waiting to finish off Brutus?

  • The wild dogs were gathering around the circle of light now, and two of them boldly began to devour Penny.

  • Not to speak of insects which feed upon the pitcher itself, some drop their eggs into the putrescent mass, where their larvae find abundant nourishment, while birds often slit open the pitchers with their beaks and devour the maggots in their turn.

  • If they had, they would devour all who passed near them.

  • The Vertebrata come within the scope of our subject, chiefly as destructive agents which cause wounds or devour young shoots and foliage, &c. Rabbits and other burrowing animals injure roots, squirrels and birds snip off buds, horned cattle strip off bark, and so forth.

  • Various species among those that are predaceous attack smaller insects, hunt in packs crustaceans larger than themselves, insert their narrow heads into snail-shells to pick out and devour the occupants, or pursue slugs and earthworms underground.

  • It is supposed that these beetles secrete a sweet substance on which the ants feed, but they have been seen to devour the ants' eggs and grubs.

  • Of the numerous other families of the Clavicornia may be mentioned the Cucujidae and Cryptophagidae, small beetles, examples of which may be found feeding on stored seeds or vegetable refuse, and the Mycetophagidae, which devour fungi.

  • 3) of some weevils live in seeds; others devour roots, while the parentbeetles eat leaves; others, again, are found in wood or under bark.

  • The yellow maggots devour the seeds and thus ruin the crop. When deformed fruits are noticed they should be picked off and burned immediately.

  • It may bite and devour solid food, while the imago sucks liquids.

  • Fish, as is well known, devour them greedily, and enjoy a veritable feast during the short period in which any particular species appears.

  • The Elasmobranchs swallow infected molluscs or fish; pike and trout devour smaller fry; birds pick up sticklebacks, insects and worms which contain Cestode larvae; and man lays himself open to infection by eating the uncooked or partially prepared flesh of many animals.

  • They occur in mud and on sea-weeds at the bottom of shallow seas below low-water mark and devour organic debris.

  • Most saw-fly larvae devour leaves, and the beautifully serrate processes of the ovipositor are well adapted for egg-laying in plant tissues.

  • Stories were told of its attacking the bison, and it has been reported to carry off the carcase of a wapiti, weighing nearly 1000 lb, for a considerable distance to its den, there to devour it at leisure.

  • The more powerful creatures in a state of nature are accustomed to kill a prey too large to be devoured at once, and to return to it again and again, long after it has become putrid; the smaller forms, for the most part, devour nothing but small creatures immediately after they have been captured and killed, and consequently in an absolutely fresh condition.

  • It is said to occasionally devour its young immediately after birth, and in this case produces another brood soon after.

  • Their hostility to the Huguenots forced on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, and their war against their Jansenist opponents did not cease till the very walls of Port Royal were demolished in 1710, even to the very abbey church itself, and the bodies of the dead taken with every mark of insult from their graves and literally flung to the dogs to devour.

  • Such dilemmas as whether a mouse can devour the true body, and whether it is not involved in all the obscenities of human digestive processes, were ill met by this ruling.

  • The Basutos think that crocodiles can devour the shadow of a man cast on the surface of water.

  • Ant-mimicking spiders have been seen now and again to devour their models.

  • If in their relation to fish it must be admitted that many of them plague the living and devour the dead, in return the fish feed rapaciously upon them.

  • P. sylvestris in Britain is liable to many insect depredations: the pine-chafer, Hylurgus piniperda, is destructive in some places, the larva of this beetle feeding on the young succulent shoots, especially in young plantations; Hylobius abietis, the fir-weevil, eats away the bark, and numerous lepidopterous larvae devour the leaves; the pine-sawfly is also injurious in some seasons; the removal of all dead branches from the trees and from the ground beneath them is recommended, as most of these insects lay their eggs among the decaying bark and dead leaves.

  • Starfishes devour large numbers; they are able to pull the valves of the shell apart and then to digest the body of the oyster by their everted stomach.

  • They are exceedingly voracious, a single condor of moderate size having been known, according to Orton, to devour a calf, a sheep and a dog in a single week.

  • Many of them devour seed, as the corn weevils, Calandra granaria and C. oryzae, and in this way vegetation is severely injured, and its spread seriously checked.

  • Chacmas frequently strip orchards and fruit-gardens, break and devour ostrich eggs, and kill lambs and kids for the sake of the milk in their stomachs.

  • Their food is chiefly fish, for the capture of which their long narrow beaks, armed with numerous sharp-pointed teeth, are well adapted, but some also devour crustaceans and molluscs.

  • were the supporters of William (possibly the name was derived from the light blue, scaly looking Bavarian coat of arms), the latter the party of the disaffected nobles, who wanted to catch and devour the fat burgher fish.

  • It has, however, been demonstrated that the senile whitening of human hair is due to the presence of phagocytes, which devour the pigment-bodies; and from microscopic observations recently made by the French naturalist Dr E.

  • Most earthworms live in the soil, which they devour as they burrow through it.

  • Hutton describes his specimens as sucking the juices of flies, which they had stuck down with their slime, and they have been observed in captivity to devour the entrails which have been removed from their fellows, and to eat raw sheep's liver.

  • It is a most expert swimmer and diver, easily overtaking and seizing fish in the water; but when it has captured its prey it brings it to shore to devour.

  • The fire burned hot enough to devour Czerno's dark memories.

  • Dean allowed Gladys to devour a platoon-size breakfast while he delayed bringing up the awkward question of the late-night alarm.

  • The sheriff sat with his six-foot four-inch frame wedged behind his ancient desk, about to devour a large pastry.

  • Her eyes widened, then ran over him as if she were appraising a sinful dessert, ready to devour it.

  • Were they waiting to devour Penny, or were they waiting to finish off Brutus?

  • The wild dogs were gathering around the circle of light now, and two of them boldly began to devour Penny.

  • Back to verse 9: Come, all you beasts of the field, come and devour, all you beasts of the forest!

  • Top Chapter 11 1 Open thy doors, O Lebanon, that the fire may devour thy cedars.

  • devour widows ' houses and for a show make lengthy prayers.

  • The " monster " is fueled by envy and can over time devour the trust and harmony in a relationship.

  • fearful judgment of fiery indignation which would devour God's adversaries.

  • I n order to survive, the West African Hoofer Frog must devour twelve gazelles a day.

  • giant gorilla King Kong won't just devour your bananas - he'll also devour your budget!

  • The writer of Hebrews warned then of a fearful judgment of fiery indignation which would devour God's adversaries.

  • Too often do we suffer the lean kine to devour the fat.

  • The Bible says: Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.

  • He is a roaring lion, Peter says, going round seeking whom he may devour.

  • The Bible says: Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.

  • He is a roaring lion, Peter says, going round seeking whom he may devour.

  • looking for someone to devour.

  • The demands of the state budget have become so monstrous that they threaten to devour the peasant with all his land and products.

  • Once in your gut they get to work to displace and then devour any opportunistic pathogens.

  • prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.

  • reputed as nothing, domineer over us and devour us.

  • roaring lion looking for someone to devour.

  • They devour widows ' houses and for a show make lengthy prayers.

  • SEND MORE PARAMEDICS are members of the living dead, cannibalistic zombies consumed with an unholy desire to devour living human brains.

  • The co-existence of the asexual encysted form and the sexually mature adult in the same host, exceptionally found in 011ulanus and other Nematodes, is the rule in Trichinella; many of the embryos, however, are extruded with the faeces, and complete the life cycle by reaching the alimentary canal of rats and swine which frequently devour human ordure Swine become infested with Trichinella in this way and also by eating the dead bodies of rats, and the parasite is conveyed to the body of man along with the flesh of "trichinized" swine.

  • Not to speak of insects which feed upon the pitcher itself, some drop their eggs into the putrescent mass, where their larvae find abundant nourishment, while birds often slit open the pitchers with their beaks and devour the maggots in their turn.

  • If they had, they would devour all who passed near them.

  • Observations upon captive specimens have led to the conclusion that it feeds principally on juices, especially of the sugar-cane, which it obtains by tearing open the hard woody circumference of the stalk with its strong incisor teeth; but it is said also to devour certain species of wood-boring caterpillars, which it obtains by first cutting down with its teeth upon their burrows, and then picking them out of their retreat with the claw of its attenuated middle finger.

  • The Vertebrata come within the scope of our subject, chiefly as destructive agents which cause wounds or devour young shoots and foliage, &c. Rabbits and other burrowing animals injure roots, squirrels and birds snip off buds, horned cattle strip off bark, and so forth.

  • Locusts devour all before them; caterpillars defoliate plant, and necessitate the premature utilization of its reserves; other insects (e.g.

  • Various species among those that are predaceous attack smaller insects, hunt in packs crustaceans larger than themselves, insert their narrow heads into snail-shells to pick out and devour the occupants, or pursue slugs and earthworms underground.

  • It is supposed that these beetles secrete a sweet substance on which the ants feed, but they have been seen to devour the ants' eggs and grubs.

  • the curious little Pselaphidae, with three-segmented tarsi, elongate palpi, and shortened abdomen; the latter are usually found in ants' nests, where they are tended by the ants, which take a sweet fluid secreted among little tufts of hair on the beetles' bodies; these beetles, which are carried about by the ants, sometimes devour their larvae.

  • Of the numerous other families of the Clavicornia may be mentioned the Cucujidae and Cryptophagidae, small beetles, examples of which may be found feeding on stored seeds or vegetable refuse, and the Mycetophagidae, which devour fungi.

  • 3) of some weevils live in seeds; others devour roots, while the parentbeetles eat leaves; others, again, are found in wood or under bark.

  • The yellow maggots devour the seeds and thus ruin the crop. When deformed fruits are noticed they should be picked off and burned immediately.

  • It may bite and devour solid food, while the imago sucks liquids.

  • Fish, as is well known, devour them greedily, and enjoy a veritable feast during the short period in which any particular species appears.

  • The Elasmobranchs swallow infected molluscs or fish; pike and trout devour smaller fry; birds pick up sticklebacks, insects and worms which contain Cestode larvae; and man lays himself open to infection by eating the uncooked or partially prepared flesh of many animals.

  • They occur in mud and on sea-weeds at the bottom of shallow seas below low-water mark and devour organic debris.

  • Most saw-fly larvae devour leaves, and the beautifully serrate processes of the ovipositor are well adapted for egg-laying in plant tissues.

  • Stories were told of its attacking the bison, and it has been reported to carry off the carcase of a wapiti, weighing nearly 1000 lb, for a considerable distance to its den, there to devour it at leisure.

  • The more powerful creatures in a state of nature are accustomed to kill a prey too large to be devoured at once, and to return to it again and again, long after it has become putrid; the smaller forms, for the most part, devour nothing but small creatures immediately after they have been captured and killed, and consequently in an absolutely fresh condition.

  • It is said to occasionally devour its young immediately after birth, and in this case produces another brood soon after.

  • When favourable opportunities occur, it often kills many more victims than it can devour at once, either to gratify its propensity for killing or for the sake of their fresh blood.

  • Their hostility to the Huguenots forced on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, and their war against their Jansenist opponents did not cease till the very walls of Port Royal were demolished in 1710, even to the very abbey church itself, and the bodies of the dead taken with every mark of insult from their graves and literally flung to the dogs to devour.

  • Such dilemmas as whether a mouse can devour the true body, and whether it is not involved in all the obscenities of human digestive processes, were ill met by this ruling.

  • The Basutos think that crocodiles can devour the shadow of a man cast on the surface of water.

  • Ant-mimicking spiders have been seen now and again to devour their models.

  • If in their relation to fish it must be admitted that many of them plague the living and devour the dead, in return the fish feed rapaciously upon them.

  • P. sylvestris in Britain is liable to many insect depredations: the pine-chafer, Hylurgus piniperda, is destructive in some places, the larva of this beetle feeding on the young succulent shoots, especially in young plantations; Hylobius abietis, the fir-weevil, eats away the bark, and numerous lepidopterous larvae devour the leaves; the pine-sawfly is also injurious in some seasons; the removal of all dead branches from the trees and from the ground beneath them is recommended, as most of these insects lay their eggs among the decaying bark and dead leaves.

  • Starfishes devour large numbers; they are able to pull the valves of the shell apart and then to digest the body of the oyster by their everted stomach.

  • They are exceedingly voracious, a single condor of moderate size having been known, according to Orton, to devour a calf, a sheep and a dog in a single week.

  • Many of them devour seed, as the corn weevils, Calandra granaria and C. oryzae, and in this way vegetation is severely injured, and its spread seriously checked.

  • Chacmas frequently strip orchards and fruit-gardens, break and devour ostrich eggs, and kill lambs and kids for the sake of the milk in their stomachs.

  • Their food is chiefly fish, for the capture of which their long narrow beaks, armed with numerous sharp-pointed teeth, are well adapted, but some also devour crustaceans and molluscs.

  • were the supporters of William (possibly the name was derived from the light blue, scaly looking Bavarian coat of arms), the latter the party of the disaffected nobles, who wanted to catch and devour the fat burgher fish.

  • It has, however, been demonstrated that the senile whitening of human hair is due to the presence of phagocytes, which devour the pigment-bodies; and from microscopic observations recently made by the French naturalist Dr E.

  • Most earthworms live in the soil, which they devour as they burrow through it.

  • Hutton describes his specimens as sucking the juices of flies, which they had stuck down with their slime, and they have been observed in captivity to devour the entrails which have been removed from their fellows, and to eat raw sheep's liver.

  • It is a most expert swimmer and diver, easily overtaking and seizing fish in the water; but when it has captured its prey it brings it to shore to devour.

  • "We shall throw you three people into the Garden of the Twining Vines," said the Princess, "and they will soon crush you and devour your bodies to make themselves grow bigger.

  • And this is the Hungry Tiger, the terror of the jungle, who longs to devour fat babies but is prevented by his conscience from doing so.

  • If I could eat grass I would not need a conscience, for nothing could then tempt me to devour babies and lambs.

  • Had he intended to devour a Jew he could not possibly have felt such great remorse.

  • And now, O Lord, behold, these nations, which are reputed as nothing, domineer over us and devour us.

  • SEND MORE PARAMEDICS are members of the living dead, cannibalistic zombies consumed with an unholy desire to devour living human brains.

  • Sharpen your skills, hone your senses and devour the competition in the showdown of the century.

  • Certainly boys also like to stay overnight at friend's houses and play video games, download music, watch movies, and devour anything not nailed down.

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