Devonshire sentence example

devonshire
  • The central offices and reference library of the Society of Friends are situate at Devonshire House, Bishopsgate Without, London.

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  • He remained president till 1908, in which year he was chosen to succeed the 8th duke of Devonshire as chancellor of Cambridge University.

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  • From the earls of Cork it descended by marriage to the dukes of Devonshire.

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  • Robur; in the mild climate of Devonshire and Cornwall it has reached a height of TOO ft.

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  • From its rugged silvery bark and dark-green foliage, it is a handsome tree, quite hardy in Cornwall and Devonshire, where it has grown to a large size.

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  • See Victoria County History, Devonshire; The Teignmouth Guide and Complete Handbook to the Town and Neighbourhood (Teignmouth, 1875).

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  • Schraufite is a reddish resin from the Carpathian sandstone, and it occurs with jet in the cretaceous rocks of the Lebanon; ambrite is a resin found in many of the coals of New Zealand; retinite occurs in the lignite of Bovey Tracey in Devonshire and elsewhere; whilst copaline has been found in the London clay of Highgate in North London.

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  • The bone-bed of Axmouth in Devonshire and Westbury and Aust in Gloucestershire, in the Penarth or Rhaetic series of strata, contains the scales, teeth and bones of saurians and fishes, together with abundance of coprolites; but neither there nor at Lyme Regis is there a sufficient quantity of phosphatic material to render the working of it for agricultural purposes remunerative.

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  • Four years afterwards he made his first appearance as an author with an elegy called Fame's Memorial, or the Earl of Devonshire deceased, and dedicated to the widow of the earl (Charles Blount, Lord Mountjoy, "coronized," to use Ford's expression, by King James in 1603 for his services in Ireland) - a lady who would have been no unfitting heroine for one of his own tragedies of lawless passion, the famous Penelope, formerly Lady Rich.

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  • His leisure was devoted to the study of astronomy, and he was appointed in 1870 secretary to the duke of Devonshire's royal commission on science.

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  • Thomas Cornish, suffragan bishop in the diocese of Bath and Wells, and provost of Oriel College, Oxford, from 1493 to 1507, appointed him chaplain of the college of St Mary Ottery, Devonshire.

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  • Among other occurrences of the name of Avon in Great Britain there may be noted - in England, a stream flowing south-east from Dartmoor in Devonshire to the English Channel; in South Wales, the stream which has its mouth at Aberavon in Glamorganshire; in Scotland, tributaries of the Clyde, the Spey and the Forth.

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  • He superintended every step of the progress of the building and of the purchase of the very valuable collection of apparatus with which it was equipped at the expense of its munificent founder the seventh duke of Devonshire (chancellor of the university, and one of its most distinguished alumni).

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  • Other small-fruited pears, distinguished by their precocity and apple-like fruit, may be referred to P. cordate, a species found wild in western France, and in Devonshire and Cornwall.

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  • His father, a farmer, also named John, was of the fourth generation in descent from Henry Adams, who emigrated from Devonshire, England, to Massachusetts about 1636; his mother was Susanna Boylston Adams. Young Adams graduated from Harvard College in 1755, and for a time taught school at Worcester and studied law in the office of Rufus Putnam.

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  • Having served his apprenticeship as gardener from the age of fifteen, and himself constructed a large lake when gardener to Battlesden in 1821, he was in 1823 employed in the arboretum at Chiswick, the seat of the duke of Devonshire, and eventually became superintendent of the duke's gardens and grounds at Chatsworth, and manager of his Derbyshire estates.

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  • In his later years he ministered to a Unitarian congregation at Lympston, Devonshire.

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  • Shortly before his death at Colford, near Crediton, Devonshire, on the 25th of September 1805, he completed his Second Thoughts on the Trinity, in reply to a work of the bishop of Gloucester.

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  • It is the headquarters of the Devonshire sea-fisheries, having also a large coasting trade.

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  • Babingtonite is found as small black crystals on felspar in the granite of Baveno in Italy, and in the Haytor iron mine in Devonshire.

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  • The Church had theological colleges at Manchester and Sheffield, boys' schools at Shebbear, in Devonshire, and at Harrogate, and a girls' school at Bideford.

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  • See Victoria County History; Devonshire; The History of Totnes, its neighbourhood and Berry Pomeroy Castle (Totnes, 1825); William Cotton, A Graphic and Historical Sketch of the Antiquities of Totnes (London, 1858).

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  • Lord Derby became a Liberal Unionist, and took an active part in the general management of that party, leading it in the House of Lords till 1891, when Lord Hartington became duke of Devonshire.

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  • The principal imports are coal, timber and slates, and the principal export stone of the Transition limestone or Devonshire marble.

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  • Chiswick House, a seat of the duke of Devonshire, is surrounded by beautiful grounds; here died Fox (1806) and Canning (1827).

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  • In the summer he took a voyage to the Channel Islands and Devonshire; and even this was not his latest excursion from home, for in July 1892 he went up for a visit to London.

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  • He was succeeded by Lord Hartington, afterwards duke of Devonshire.

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  • After carrying his motion for the abolition of the slave trade on the 10th of June, he was forced to give up attendance in parliament, and he died in the house of the duke of Devonshire, at Chiswick, on the 13th of September 1806.

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  • His first achievement was the rallying of Cornwall to the royal cause, his next to carry the war from that county into Devonshire.

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  • In May 1643 he won the brilliant victory of Stratton, in June he overran Devonshire, and on the 5th of July he inflicted a severe defeat on Sir William Waller at Lansdown.

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  • On his retirement he settled in Devonshire as a small landowner, and contemplated a farming life for his son Frederick, giving him a practical training to that end.

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  • The settlement was founded in 1841 by the Plymouth Company under the auspices of the New Zealand Company, and chiefly consisted of emigrants from Devonshire and Cornwall.

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  • Devonshire Park of 13 acres is pleasantly laid out, and contains a pavilion and a theatre.

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  • The duke of Devonshire is the principal landowner.

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  • The " marble " or " Devonshire woody galls " of oak-buds, which often destroy the leading shoots of young trees, are produced by Cynips Kollari," already alluded to.

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  • They were first introduced into Devonshire about the year 1847, had become common near Birmingham by 1866, and two or three years later were observed in several parts of Scotland.

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  • In 1601 he took orders, in 1603 becoming chaplain to Charles Blount, earl of Devonshire.

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  • In his own character it produced the somewhat blunted moral sense which led to the few incidents in his career which need moral defence, his performance of the marriage ceremony between his first patron Lord Devonshire and the latter's mistress, the divorced wife of Lord Rich, an act completely at variance with his principles; his strange intimacy with Buckingham; his love of power and place.

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  • He married in 1766 Lady Dorothy Cavendish (1750-1794), daughter of the 4th duke of Devonshire, and was succeeded as 4th duke by his son William Henry (1768-1854), who married a daughter of the famous gambler, General John Scott, and was brother-in-law to Canning.

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  • In grass countries, where "flying fences" are found, the rate of speed must of necessity be quicker than when about to take a Devonshire bank of some 7 ft.

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  • There is also a Foreland on the north coast of Devonshire, 22 m.

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  • At the dissolution in 1774 he had been returned for Okehampton in Devonshire, and for Castle Rising in Norfolk, and selected the former constituency; on his promotion as leading law officer of the crown he returned to Bishop's Castle.

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  • But the public noted that the duke of Devonshire, whose orthodoxy was considered typical, remained in the cabinet.

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  • Next day the duke of Devonshire resigned, a step somewhat bitterly resented by Mr Balfour, who clearly thought that his sacrifices in order to conciliate the duke had now been made in vain.

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  • The free-trade Unionists, with the duke of Devonshire, Lord Goschen, Lord James and Lord Hugh Cecil, as their chief representatives, started a Free Food league in opposition to Mr Chamberlain's Tariff Reform league; and at a great meeting at Queen's Hall, London, on the 24th of November their attitude was made plain.

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  • In Devonshire and in parts of Kent the farmers entertain a marked prejudice against white pigs, because "the sun blisters their skin."

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  • Radiolaria are found in cherts in the Culm of Devonshire and Cornwall, in Russia, Germany and elsewhere.

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  • By the end of the 7th century a considerable part at least of Devonshire as well as the whole of Somerset and Dorset seems to have come into the hands of the West Saxons.

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  • He was ordained in 1762 and became vicar of Harpford with Fenn-Ottery, Devonshire, in 1766.

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  • In 1768 he exchanged to the living of Broadhembury, Devonshire.

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  • In the same year Hobbes was recommended by Wilkinson as tutor to the son of William Cavendish, baron of Hardwick (afterwards 2nd earl of Devonshire), and thus began a lifelong connexion with a great and powerful family.

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  • Nothing else is known of his doings 1 The translation, under the title Eight Books of the Peloponnesian War, written by Thucydides the son of Olorus, interpreted with faith and diligence immediately out of the Greek by Thomas Hobbes, secretary to the late Earl of Devonshire, appeared in 1628 (or 1629), after the death of the earl, to whom touching reference is made in the dedication.

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  • His friend and master, after about two years' tenure of the earldom of Devonshire, died of the plague in June 1628, and the affairs of the family were so disordered financially that the widowed countess was left with the task of righting them in the boyhood of the third earl.

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  • The engagement came to an end in 1631, when he was recalled to train the young earl of Devonshire, now thirteen years old, son of his previous pupil.

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  • The date of the dedication to the young earl of Devonshire was altered from 1641 to 1646.

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  • Taking up his abode in Fetter Lane, London, on his return, and continuing to reside there for the sake of intellectual society, even after renewing his old ties with the earl of Devonshire, who lived in the country till the Restoration,4 he worked so steadily as to be printing the De corpore in the year 1654.

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  • Certain pseudomorphs of chalcedony after datolite, from Haytor in Devonshire, have received the name of "haytorite."

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  • Of the numerous paintings of Henry none is by Holbein, who, however, executed the striking chalk-drawing of Henry's head, now at Munich, and the famous but decaying cartoon at Devonshire House.

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  • Perhaps in his memory (for the great extent of the parish shows that it was thinly populated) it became in 909 the seat of the first bishopric in Devonshire.

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  • He was a descendant of an old Devonshire family of high standing, the third son of Sir John Pratt, chief-justice of the king's bench in the reign of George I.

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  • The contents of these for a long time remained unknown, but ultimately by permission of the duke of Devonshire, to whom they belonged, they were edited by James Clerk Maxwell and published in 1879 by the Cambridge University Press as the Electrical Researches of the Hon.

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  • Some of his instruments are preserved in the Royal Institution, London, and his name is commemorated in the Cavendish Physical Laboratory at Cambridge, which was built by his kinsman the 7th duke of Devonshire.

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  • A considerable part of Cavendish's work was rescued from oblivion in 1879 and placed in an easily accessible form by Professor Clerk Maxwell, who edited the original manuscripts in the possession of the duke of Devonshire.'

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  • The latter had been released from all custody in August, but in the meantime he had been busily engaged in treasonable correspondence with James of Scotland, and was counting on the Irish army under his ally, Charles Blount, Baron Mountjoy (afterwards earl of Devonshire), the new deputy.

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  • The Crescent is a fine range of buildings in the Doric style, erected by the duke of Devonshire in 1779-1788.

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  • The Devonshire hospital, formerly known as the Bath Charity, is a benevolent institution, supported by voluntary subscriptions.

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  • In 1894 the duke of Devonshire erected a handsome pump-room at St Anne's well.

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  • At the close of the 18th century the duke of Devonshire, lord of the manor (whose ancestor Sir Ralph de Gernons was lord of Bakewell in 1251), spent large sums of money on improvements in the town.

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  • These were bought by the local authorities from the duke of Devonshire in 1864.

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  • The inherent weakness of the government, the vigour and eloquence of his opposition, and a series of military disasters abroad combined to rouse a public feeling of indignation which could not be withstood, and in December 1756 Pitt, who now sat for Okehampton, became secretary of state, and leader of the Commons under the premiership of the duke of Devonshire.

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  • It is worked in Devonshire under the name of shining ore.

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  • In the south-west there is a fairly extensive lowland in south Devonshire watered by the Exe in its lower course.

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  • From this period, more or less of the Pennine ridge has always remained above the sea, along with much of Cornwall and parts of Devonshire.

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  • Riding of Yorkshire are especially productive in all crops these; the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire pro duce a notable quantity of barley and oats; and the oat-crops in the following counties deserve mention - Devonshire, Hampshire, Lancashire, Cumberland, Cornwall, Cheshire and Sussex.

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  • There is also plenty of hillpasture in the south-western counties (from Hampshire and Berkshire westward), especially in Devonshire, Cornwall and Somersetshire, and also in Monmouthshire and along the Welsh marches, on the Cotteswold Hills, &c. In all these localities sheep are extensively reared, especially in Northumberland, but on the other hand in Lincolnshire the numbers of sheep are roughly equal to those in the northern county.

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  • Other counties in which the numbers are especially large are Devonshire, Kent, Cumberland and the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire.

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  • Cattle are reared in great numbers in Lincolnshire, Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, Devonshire, Somersetshire and Cornwall; but the numbers of both cattle and sheep are in no English county (save Middlesex) to be regarded as insignificant.

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  • Fireclay is largely raised from coal-mines, while, among special clays, there is a considerable production of china and potter's clays in Cornwall, Devonshire and Dorsetshire.

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  • Similarly, this industry was of early importance along the line of the Cotteswold Hills, from Chipping Camden to Stroud and beyond, as also in some towns of Devonshire and Cornwall, but though it survives in the neighbourhood of Stroud, the importance of this district is far surpassed by that of the West Riding of Yorkshire, where the woollen industry stands pre-eminent among the many which, as already indicated, have concentrated there.

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  • He died on the 8th of August 1827, at Chiswick, in the house of the duke of Devonshire, where Fox had died, and in the same room.

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  • After the dissolution of the monasteries the manor was sold in 1542 to Henry Clifford, 2nd earl of Cumberland, whose descendants, the dukes of Devonshire, now hold it.

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  • For a eulogistic sermon on the first duke of Devonshire he was in 1707 recommended to the deanery of Peterborough.

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  • It originated in a strong infusion of Leicester blood amongst the old Bampton stock of Devonshire.

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  • The Dartmoor, a hardy local Devonshire breed, is a large hornless, longwool, white-fleeced sheep, with a long mottled face.

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  • The Exmoor is a horned breed of Devonshire moorland, one of the few remaining remnants of direct descent from the old forest breeds of England.

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  • He recognized the fact that they proved the existence of man in Devonshire while those animals were alive, but the idea was too novel to be accepted by his contemporaries.

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  • Warbeck, hearing of the rising, but not of its suppression, had left Scotland, and appeared in Devonshire in August.

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  • When the flew parliament assembled, Lord Hrtington, the eldest son of the duke of Devonshire, was put forward to propose a direct vote of want of confidence in the administration.

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  • Lord Rosebery resigned office, and Lord Salisbury for the third time became prime minister, the duke of Devonshire.

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  • About James I.'s reign the site and territories were alienated to the Prestons of Preston-Patrick, from whom they descended to the dukes of Devonshire.

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  • The Lower Lias appears at intervals under the scarp of the basaltic plateaus, and contributes, as in Dorsetshire and Devonshire, to the formation of landslips along the coast.

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  • It is just possible, however, that here and there the Cretaceous sea that spread over Devonshire may have penetrated the Irish area.

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  • Charles Blount, Lord Mountjoy (afterwards earl of Devonshire), who succeeded Essex, joined Carew, and a Spanish force which landed at Kinsale surrendered.

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  • Next day the visitors were entertained by Lord Salisbury at Hatfield, the duke of Devonshire, Mr Balfour, Mr Goschen and Mr Chamberlain being present.

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  • The Lower Carboniferous rocks of Spain consist partly of limestones, and partly of shales, sandstones and conglomerates like the culin of Devonshire.

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  • Unlike Lord Hartington (afterwards duke of Devonshire) and other Liberals, who declined to join Mr Gladstone in view of the altered attitude he was adopting towards Ireland, Mr Chamberlain entered the cabinet as president of the Local Government Board (with Mr Jesse Collings as parliamentary secretary), but on the 15th of March 1886 he resigned, explaining in the House of Commons (8th April) that, while he had always been in favour of the largest possible extension of local government to Ireland consistently with the integrity of the empire and the supremacy of parliament, and had therefore joined Mr Gladstone when he believed that this was what was intended, he was unable to consider that the scheme communicated by Mr Gladstone to his colleagues maintained those limitations.

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  • In January some correspondence was published between Mr Chamberlain and the duke of Devonshire, dating from the previous October, as to difficulties arising from the central Liberal-Unionist organization subsidizing local associations which had adopted the programme of tariff reform.

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  • On July 14th the reconstituted Liberal-Unionist organization held a great demonstration in the Albert Hall, and Mr Chamberlain's success in ousting the duke of Devonshire and the other free-trade members of the old Liberal-Unionist party, and imposing his own fiscal policy upon the Liberal-Unionist caucus, was now complete.

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  • The Stud-Book goes on to say of the Byerly Turk that he did not cover many bred mares, but was the sire of the duke of Devonshire's Basto, Halloway's Jigg, and others.

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  • Flying or Devonshire Childers, so called to distinguish him from other horses of the same name, was a bay horse of entirely Eastern blood, with a blaze in his face and four white feet, foaled in 1715.

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  • He was bred by Mr Leonard Childers of Carr House near Doncaster, and was purchased when young by the duke of Devonshire.

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  • Flying Childers-the wonder of his timewas never beaten, and died in the duke of Devonshire's stud in 1741, aged twenty-six years.

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  • Devonshire House, commonly abbreviated to DH, is a large building used predominantly by the Guild.

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  • The Devonshire ' long ells ' had worsted or combed warps which made them harder wearing.

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  • Matlock Bath was hugely fashionable but it lacked a Duke of Devonshire to develop its full potential as he did at Buxton.

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  • D Devonshire Traditional Breed Center Chickens - wide range of pure bred large and bantam fowl for beginner and experienced keeper.

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  • But beyond that is anyone's guess, although Devonshire did let slip that injury doubt Brian Connor would be considered, if fit.

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  • A full Devonshire or continental breakfast is available, together with yoghurts, cereal, toast from Rosie's bread and home made marmalade.

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  • Among the rocks, you'll find groups of plumose anemones, Devonshire cup corals, tubeworms and maybe a sea lemon nudibranch.

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  • That wouldn't achieve anything. Devonshire himself was characteristically tight-lipped on the subject, although he claimed there had been no formal approach as yet.

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  • George Cavendish was gentleman usher to the famous Wolsey, and his brother, William, was the founder of the Dukedom of Devonshire.

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  • But when Dorset was replaced by the duke of Devonshire in 1755, Boyle was raised to the peerage as earl of Shannon and received a pension, and other members of the opposition also obtained pensions or places; and the archbishop, finding himself excluded from power, went into opposition to the government in alliance with John Ponsonby.

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  • Vane, Ludlow, Robert Overton, Harrison and Major Wildman, the head of the Levellers, were all arrested, while the royalist rising under Penruddock was crushed in Devonshire.

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  • The duke of York, meeting Pamela at Devonshire House on her way through London with her husband, had told her that "all was known" about his plans, and advised her to persuade him not to go abroad.

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  • The beautiful duchess of Devonshire (Georgiana Spencer) is said to have won at least one vote for Fox by kissing a shoemaker who had a romantic idea of what constituted a desirable bribe.

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  • These fossil Arctic plants have now been found as far south as Bovey Tracey in Devonshire, where Pengelly and Heer discovered the bear-berry and dwarf birch; London, where also Betula nana occurs; and at Deuben in Saxony, which lies nearly as far south as lat.

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  • The ship 's frequent alterations of course deepened suspicions in the minds of those on Devonshire 's bridge.

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  • Bursaria spinosa thrives very well in Devonshire and the West of England, but elsewhere perhaps it would be best to begin with it against a wall.

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  • In the Isle of Wight, and from thence along the shores of Devonshire and Cornwall to the Scilly Isles, they succeed well, forming a fine feature even in cottage gardens, whilst in some larger gardens whole avenues are planted.

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  • Even on the favoured Devonshire coast a sharp late frost will sometimes injure the flowers.

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