Developed sentence examples

developed
  • He hadn't developed a liking for her.

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  • In 1921, a tuberculosis vaccine was developed in France.

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  • Look how much information he's developed so far.

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  • Jackson had developed quite a discerning palate over the years.

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  • They developed immunity blood the last time they had you.

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  • We're had poor Howie in thirty-two sessions since you're been here so Quinn's developed cross references.

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  • Upper margin of the end of the proboscis developed into a distinct finger-like process, much longer than the lower margins, and the whole trunk uniformly tapering and smooth.

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  • She was going to have her lifelong dream as well as the dream she had recently developed - a life with Brandon.

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  • Do not seek so anxiously to be developed, to subject yourself to many influences to be played on; it is all dissipation.

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  • Then she developed a cold.

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  • Her unwillingness to be beaten has developed her courage.

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  • He alone--with his ideal of glory and grandeur developed in Italy and Egypt, his insane self-adulation, his boldness in crime and frankness in lying--he alone could justify what had to be done.

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  • Any of our infrequent visitors or friends asking about the operation quickly developed a bleary look when we tried to explain what we did for a living.

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  • The swell of well developed breasts peeked from a tank top that might have looked suggestive on someone else.

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  • At the rare moments when the old fire did kindle in her handsome, fully developed body she was even more attractive than in former days.

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  • Who knows but if men constructed their dwellings with their own hands, and provided food for themselves and families simply and honestly enough, the poetic faculty would be universally developed, as birds universally sing when they are so engaged?

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  • As his gaze strolled over her face, a smile developed slowly - first in his eyes and then spreading to the corners of his mouth.

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  • She returned to the desk and scoured the paperwork for some sort of identifying information on the place she'd been or the company that developed the forms.

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  • Sometime in the 40s she got it in her head that they were violating people, and developed a guilty conscience.

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  • He could only steer them towards the Underground Railroad, the secretive systems of bunkers and tunnels running beneath major cities that were developed by the PMF during the ten-year war.

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  • Dean knew if his stepfather had developed any worth­while information he would have blurted it out immediately.

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  • We have eliminated debtors prisons, developed the idea of "women and children first," stigmatized child labor, made accommodations for conscientious objectors, widely adopted freedom of speech and the press and freedom of assembly, and a hundred more.

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  • Maybe that was why he was the first to notice when she developed a fever.

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  • I hardly think that after all this time my fangs have suddenly developed a conscience.

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  • Elsewhere local surface currents are developed, either drifts due to the direct action of the winds, or streams produced by wind action heaping water up against the land; but these nowhere rise to the dignity of a distinct current system, although they are often sufficient to obliterate the feeble tidal action characteristic of the Mediterranean.

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  • Between 1283 and 1290, a Bavarian disciple of Wolfram's 2 adopted the story and developed it into an epic poem of nearly 8000 lines, incorporating episodes of Lohengrin's prowess in tournament, his wars with Henry I.

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  • A stable vaccine was developed, our understanding of the disease expanded, and technology moved forward.

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  • We only have people doing this work because we have not yet developed the technology to get machines to do it.

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  • Well, in the developed world, the percent of people needed to farm fell from more than 90 percent to today's 4 percent.

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  • In 1953, he developed a method to make strains of wheat highly resistant to a single form of rust.

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  • Schwann in 1839) was studied by Hansen, who found that each species only developed spores between certain definite temperatures.

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  • And solar cells presently being developed in laboratories are doing several times better than the plants.

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  • It was my teacher who unfolded and developed them.

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  • They are not callow like the young of most birds, but more perfectly developed and precocious even than chickens.

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  • c. tippelskirchi the frontal horn is often developed in the bulls, but the legs are frequently spotted to the fetlocks.

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  • She is known to us chiefly through two myths, both symbolizing the change of seasons, but intended also to illustrate certain doctrines developed in the temple-schools of Babylonia.

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  • As the powers of the telescope were gradually developed, it was found that the finest hairs or filaments of silk, or the thinnest silver wires that could be drawn, were much too thick for the refined purposes of the astronomer, as p p they entirely obliterated the image of a star in the more powerful telescopes.

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  • Although entirely naked in summer, these cats developed in winter a slight growth of hair on the back and the ridge of the tail.

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  • The differences developed were chiefly between general atonement and atonement for the elect only and between mediate imputation and immediate imputation.

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  • 1842 laid the foundation of the plan under which the railways have since been developed, and mapped out nine main lines, running from Paris to the frontiers and from the Mediterranean to the Rhine and to the Atlantic coast.

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  • For computations, we developed processes that required us to perform many intermediate, error-prone steps to achieve an answer.

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  • Her sense of time is excellent, but whether it would have developed as a special faculty cannot be known, for she has had a watch since she was seven years old.

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  • I believe every child has hidden away somewhere in his being noble capacities which may be quickened and developed if we go about it in the right way; but we shall never properly develop the higher natures of our little ones while we continue to fill their minds with the so-called rudiments.

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  • Her figure was not as well developed as Alondra or Dulce, but she looked nice in the style and color.

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  • In relation to their parasitic habit one or two suckers are always developed, the one at the anterior and the other at the posterior end of the body.

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  • The nervous system of the medusa consists of sub-epithelial ganglion-cells, which form, in the first place, a diffuse plexus of nervous tissue, as in the polyp, but developed chiefly on the subumbral surface; and which are concentrated, in the second place, to form a definite central nervous system, never found in the polyp. In Hydromedusae the central nervous system forms two concentric nerverings at the margin of the umbrella, near the base of the velum.

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  • He developed this line of argument when moving the second reading of the Home Rule bill in April, and at Dundee in the autumn outlined a general policy under which England would be cut up into self-governing areas.

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  • The female attaches her eggs to the inner wall of her own home, and the young when large enough to shift for themselves have the bell-making instinct fully developed.

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  • Since then it has been rapidly developed, particularly by Karl Friedrich Mohr and J.

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  • Brunn, whose comparative method in art-criticism he much developed.

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  • Agriculture is highly developed; cereals, principally wheat and oats, and beetroot are the chief crops; potatoes, flax, hemp, rape and hops are also grown.

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  • Beginning with 1620, New England was colonized by English Presbyterians of the two types which developed from the discussions of the Westminster Assembly (1643-1648) into Presbyterianism and Congregationalism.

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  • The cotton industry has also rapidly developed.

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  • Whether you are rich or poor, live in the developed world or the developing world, life today is better and easier than it was a century ago by virtually any measure.

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  • This sense is not, however, so finely developed as in some other blind people.

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  • That particular dish has developed quite a cult following.

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  • The theory was developed by R.

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  • This process is, however, less fully developed than in elephants, and as many as three teeth may be in place in each jaw at one time.

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  • Whilst no small amount of observational work has been done in these new branches of atmospheric electricity, the science has still not developed to a considerable extent beyond preliminary stages.

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  • A salt basin underlies the city, and, next to the lumber industry, the salt industry was the first to be developed, but its importance has dwindled; the product value in 1905 being $20,098 out of $5,620,866 for all factory products.

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  • When the custom of commendation developed, the king charged the mayor of the palace to protect those who had commended themselves to him and to 1 The mayors of certain cities in the United Kingdom (London, York, Dublin) have acquired by prescription the prefix of "lord."

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  • (2) This private connexion developed into a custom according to which a state appointed one of the citizens of a foreign state as its representative (7rpo Evos) to protect any of its citizens travelling or resident in his country.

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  • Although the direct object of Pasteur was to prove a negative, yet it was on these experiments that sterilization as known to us was developed.

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  • In the western region all the Mesozoic systems, including the Trias, are well developed.

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  • Two parties had developed with the growth of the Church.

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  • In all cases a more or less full series of teeth is developed, these being differentiated into incisors, canines, premolars and molars, when all are present; but only a single pair of teeth in each jaw has deciduous predecessors.

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  • Though his poetical tastes were early developed, his father apprenticed him to a jeweller.

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  • First two premolars with compressed and sharp-pointed crowns, and slightly developed anterior and posterior accessory basal cusps.

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  • total 46 - and in having the teeth generally developed upon an insectivorous rather than a carnivorous pattern, the upper middle incisors being larger and inclined forward, the canines relatively smaller, and the molars with broad crowns, armed with prickly tubercles.

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  • 5) the fore-feet have the three middle toes well developed, the third slightly larger than the second, the fourth somewhat shorter, provided with long, strong, slightly curved, pointed claws.

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  • as the terminal phalange, but with distinct claws; the fifth intermediate in length between these and the largely developed fourth toe.

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  • In the pig-footed bandicoot (Choeropus castanotis) the dentition generally resembles that of Perameles, but the canines are less developed, and in the upper jaw two-rooted.

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  • Hind foot long and narrow, mainly composed of the strongly developed fourth toe, terminating in a conical pointed nail, with a strong pad behind it; the first toe represented by a rudimentary metatarsal; the remaining toes completely developed, with claws, but exceedingly slender; the united second and third reaching a little way beyond the metatarso-phalangeal articulation of the fourth; the fifth somewhat shorter.

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  • The portion of the lachrymal duct communicating with the cavity of the nose has, on the other hand, been abnormally developed, apparently for the purpose of cleansing that chamber from particles of sand which may obtain an entrance while the animal is burrowing.

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  • - In the developed hierarchical system the ministers of the sanctuary are divided into distinct grades.

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  • The date of the evidence, however, has not been fixed with unanimity, and this very The musical service of the temple has no place in the Pentateuch, but was considerably developed under the second temple and attracted the special attention of Greek observers (Theophrastus, apud Porphyry, de Abstin.

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  • Rhodes was again famous for its pottery in medieval times; this was a lustre ware at first imitated from Persian, though it afterwards developed into an independent style of fine colouring and rich variety of design.

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  • Cambrian rocks occur in each of these districts, and they are best developed in the South Australian high= lands, where they include a long belt of contemporary glacial deposits.

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  • Silurian rocks are well developed in western Tasmania, and the Silurian sea must have washed the south-western corner of the continent, if the rocks of the Stirling Range be rightly identified as of this age.

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  • The Permian deposits are best developed in New South Wales and Tasmania, where their characters show the continuation of the Carboniferous conditions.

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  • These marine deposits are not found anywhere along the eastern coast of Australia; but they occur, and reach about the same height above sea-level, in New Guinea, and are widely developed in New Zealand.

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  • These immigrants then developed, with some exceptions, into the present Australian flora and fauna.

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  • The tree breaks into thin stems close to the ground, and these branch again and again, the leaves being developed umbrellafashion on the outer branches.

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  • The first important discovery was made in 1882, when gold was found in the Kimberley district; but it was not until a few years later that this rich and extensive area was developed.

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  • of country, and has developed into one of the principal mining centres of the world.

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  • Extensive deposits, which are being developed successfully, occur in Tasmania, it being estimated that there are, within easy shipping facilities, 17,000,000 tons of ore.

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  • Black coal forms one of the principal resources of New South Wales; and in the other states the deposits of this valuable mineral are being rapidly developed.

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  • But Mr Howitt finds in this being " no trace of a divine nature, though under favourable conditions the beliefs might have developed into an actual religion."

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  • During this period Achin developed a determined enmity to the Portuguese, and more than one attempt was made to drive the strangers from Malacca.

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  • Only less important and only less early to be established in Vermont was the quarrying of granite, which began in 1812, but which has been developed chiefly since 1880, largely by means of the building of "granite railroads" which connect each quarry with a main railway line - a means of transportation as important as the logging railways of the Western states and of Canada.

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  • The "Turco," Hylactes megapodius, is larger, with greatly developed feet and claws, but is very similar in colour and habits.

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  • Monoecious, and bearing their male flowers in catkins, they are readily distinguished from the rest of the catkin-bearing trees by their peculiar fruit, an acorn or nut, enclosed at the base in a woody cup, formed by the consolidation of numerous involucral bracts developed beneath the fertile flower, simultaneously with a cup-like expansion of the thalamus, to which the bracteal scales are more or less adherent.

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  • In his later years he overcame the drunkenness that was habitual to him in youth; he developed seriousness of character and unselfish devotion to what lie believed was the cause of patriotism; and he won the respect of men of high character and capacity in France and Holland.

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  • He early developed a gift for languages, becoming familiar not only with Latin and Greek but also with Hebrew, Syriac, Persian, Turkish and other Eastern tongues.

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  • The country is rich in natural products, and its resources have been largely developed by the Germans.

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  • At this time also he developed an ardent love of France, a country which was politically in antagonism with his own, though so closely linked to it geographically, socially and by language.

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  • Taking into account the heat absorbed by the box and the metal, Rumford calculated that the heat developed was sufficient to raise 26.58 lb of water from the freezing to the boiling point, and in this calculation the heat lost by radiation and conduction was neglected.

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  • The cuticle is frequently prolonged into spines and papillae, which are especially developed at the anterior end of the body.

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  • The strain of the next three years' continuous work undermined his health and his eyesight, and he was compelled to retire from his professorship. During these years he had published works on Plato and Socrates and a history of philosophy (1875); but after his retirement he further developed his philosophical position, a speculative eclecticism through which he endeavoured to reconcile metaphysical idealism with the naturalistic and mechanical standpoint of science.

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  • The system brought out in 1874 by Emile Baudot and since considerably developed is a multiplex system giving from two to six channels on one wire, each channel giving a working, speed of thirty words per minute.

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  • In 1902 Marconi invented two forms of magnetic detector, one of which he developed into an electric wave detector of extraordinary delicacy and utility.

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  • Several schemes embodying this idea have been developed, and one of them has been put into extensive operation.

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  • The textile industries, some of which are of ancient date, are among those that have most rapidly developed.

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  • The industry is chiefly developed in Lombardy, Piedmont and Liguria; to some extent also in Campania, Venetia and Tuscany, and to a less extent in Lazio (Rome), Apulia, Emilia, the Marches, Umbria, the Abruzzi and Sicily.

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  • Paper-making is highly developed in the provinces of Novara, Caserta, Milan, Vicenza, Turin, Como, Lucca, Ancona, Genoa, Brescia, Cuneo, Macerata and Salerno.

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  • The greatest proportion of strikes takes place in northern Italy, especially Lombardy and Piedmont, where manufacturing industries are most developed.

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  • Tramways with mechanical traction have developed rapidly.

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  • The telephone system is considerably developed; in 1904, 92 urban and 66 inter - urban systems existed.

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  • And it was for military reasons that from mere cart-tracks they were developed into permanent highways (T.

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  • It must not, however, be supposed that .at this epoch the liberties of the burghs were fully developed.

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  • The masses were still more or less indifferent, but among the nobility and the educated middle Secret classes, cut off from all part in free political life, there societies, was developed either the spirit of despair at Italys The Car..

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  • Charles Albert, although mahftaining his reactionary policy, had introduced administrative reforms, built railways, reorganized the army and developed the resources of the country.

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  • In August there were strikes among the dock laborers of Genoa and the iron workers of Florence; the latter agitation developed into a general strike in that city, which aroused widespread indignation among the orderly part of the population and ended without any definite result.

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  • Italy had developed some important commercial interests in Montenegro, and anything which strengthened the position of that principality was a guarantee against further Austrian encroachments.

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  • Whilst the Soma-sacrifice has been thus developed by the Brahmanas in an extraordinary degree, its essential identity with the Avestan Haoma-cult shows that its origin goes back at all events to the Indo-Iranian period.

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  • Schultz); but it is surely significant that the great history idealism of Plato was developed from his suggestions.

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  • sianism, and from other suggestions of the past, developed that great system of determinist pantheism which was a scandal and a terror to his generation.

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  • (3) The gonads, whether formed in the polyp or the medusa, are developed in the ectoderm.

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  • From them are developed two distinct types of histological elements; the genital cells and the cnidoblasts or mothercells of the nematocysts.

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  • When the nematocyst is completely developed, the cnidoblast passes outwards so as to occupy a superficial position in the ectoderm, and a delicate protoplasmic process of sensory nature, termed the cnidocil (cn) projects from the cnidoblast like a fine hair or cilium.

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  • The buds may all become detached after a time and give rise to separate and independent individuals, as in the common Hydra, in which only polyp-individuals are produced and sexual elements From Allman's Gymnoblastic Hydroids, by permission of are developed the Council of the Ray Society.

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  • on the other hand, the polyp .individuals produced by budding may remain permanently in connexion with the parent polyp, in which case sexual elements are never developed on polyp-individuals but only on medusa-individuals, and a true colony is formed.

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  • A fur- ‘ - ther peculiarity of this type of colony is that theentire coenosarcal complex is covered externally by a common layer of ectoderm; it is not clear how this covering layer is developed.

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  • Interradial tentacles may be also developed, so that the total number present may be increased to eight or to an indefinitely large number.

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  • In places the nematocysts may be crowded so thickly as to form a tough, supporting, " chondral " tissue, resembling cartilage, chiefly developed at the margin of the umbrella and forming streaks or bars supporting the tentacles (" Tentakelspangen," peronia) or the tentaculocysts (" Gehorspangen," otoporpae).

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  • The circular system is developed continuously over the entire subumbral surface, and the velum represents a special local development of this system, at a region where it is able to act at the greatest mechanical advantage in producing the contractions of the umbrella by which the animal progresses.

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  • The proximal portion forms the retractor muscles of themanubrium, or proboscis, well developed, for example, in Geryonia.

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  • The medial portion forms radiating tracts of fibres, the so-called " bell-muscles " running underneath, and parallel to, the radial canals; when greatly developed, as in Tiaridae, they form ridges, so-called mesenteries, projecting into the sub-umbral cavity.

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  • The sense-cells form, in the first place, a diffuse system of scattered sensory cells, as in the polyp, developed chiefly on the manubrium, the tentacles and the margin of the umbrella, where they form a sensory ciliated epithelium covering the nerve-centres; in the second place, the sense-cells are concentrated to form definite sense-organs, situated always at the margin of the umbrella, hence often termed " marginal bodies."

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  • modifications of a tentacle, as in Trachylinae, or developed from the margin of the umbrella, in no connexion with a tentacle (or, if so connected, not producing any modification in the tentacle), as in Leptolinae.

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  • mesogloea of the medusa is largely developed and of great thickness in the umbrella.

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  • the entocodon, however developed, gives rise at first to a closed cavity, representing a closing over of the umbrella, temporary in the bud destined to be a free medusa, but usually permanent in the sessile gonophore.

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  • In some polyps the tentacles are webbed at the base, and it was supposed that a medusa was a polyp of this kind set free, the umbrella being a greatly developed web or membrane extending between the tentacles.

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  • In some hydroids the founder-polyp, developed from a planula after fixation, throws out numerous outgrowths from the base to form the hydrorhiza; these outgrowths may be radially arranged so as to form by contact or coalescence a flat plate.

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  • When fully developed the medusa is characterized by the sense organs being composed entirely of ectoderm, developed independently of the tentacles, and innervated from the sub-umbral nerve-ring.

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  • Trophosome (only known in one genus), polyps with two tentacles forming a creeping colony; gonosome, free medusae with four, six or more radial canals, giving off one or more lateral branches which run to the margin of the umbrella, with the stomach produced into four, six or more lobes, upon which the gonads are developed; the mouth with four lips or with a folded margin; the tentacles simple, arranged evenly round the margin of the umbrella.

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  • In some Leptomedusae excretory " marginal tubercles " are developed on the ring-canal.

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  • - Trophosome only known in one genus (Thaumantias), similar to that of the Eucopidae; gonosome, free medusae with otocysts inconspicuous or absent, with usually four, sometimes eight, rarely more than eight, radial canals, simple and unbranched, along which the gonads are developed, with numerous tentacles bearing ocelli and with marginal sense-clubs.

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  • The umbrella is shallow and has the margin supported by a rim of thickened ectoderm, as in the Trachomedusae, but not so strongly developed.

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  • Cunoctantha fowleri Browne, buds are formed from the sub-umbrella on the under side of the stomach pouches, where later the gonads are developed.

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  • The mesogloea is greatly developed in them and they are often of very tough consistency.

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  • Of Aristotle's immediate successors one deserves to be noticed here, namely, Strato of Lampsacus, who developed his master's cosmology into a system of naturalism.

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  • All things are said to be developed out of an original being, which is at once material (fire) and spiritual (the Deity), and in turn they will dissolve back into this primordial source.

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  • At the same time the world as a developed whole is regarded as an organism which is permeated with the divine Spirit, and so we may say that the world-process is a self-realization of the divine Being.

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  • Lucretius regards the primitive atoms (first beginnings or first bodies) as seeds out of which individual things are developed.

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  • In the later and developed form of the Kabbala, the origin of the world is represented as a gradually descending emanation of the lower out of the higher.

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  • All parts of matter are capable of developing into all forms; thus the materials of the table and chair may under proper circumstances be developed to the life of the plant or of the animal.

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  • A word must be given to one of Bruno's contemporary compatriots, namely Campanella, who gave poetic expression to that system of universal vitalism which Bruno developed.

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  • Thus he does not account for the fact that organic beings - which have always existed as preformations (in the case of animals as animaux spermatiques) - come to be developed under given conditions.

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  • Man's mental faculties are viewed as related to his organization, and as developed under the pressure of the necessities of life.3 Kant.

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  • In his Naturgeschichte des Himmels, in which he anticipated the nebular theory afterwards more fully developed by Laplace, Kant sought to explain the genesis of the cosmos as a product of physical forces and laws.

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  • The observation of the existence of structures, in a rudimentary and apparently useless condition, in one species of a group, which are fully developed and have definite functions in other species of the same group.

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  • Statistical inquiry into the facts of life has long been employed, and in particular Francis Galton, within the Darwinian period, has advocated its employment and developed its methods.

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  • The growth of a special " original " jurisdiction at Constantinople, which perhaps developed earlier than the corresponding institution at Rome, may be traced to the fact that bishops from all parts were constantly in Constantinople.

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  • The empire of Russia has in the matter of ecclesiastical jurisdiction partly developed into other forms, partly systematized 4th century and later Byzantine rules.

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  • During the working much electricity is developed.

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  • (1) If it represents a type of syncretism as definite as that known to have existed in the developed gnostic systems of the 2nd century, it is inconceivable that Paul should have passed it by as easily as he did.

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  • (2) As to the speculation of the errorists, it is replied that it is explicable in the lifetime of Paul, that some of the elements of it may have their source in pre-Christian Jewish theories, and that recourse to the developed gnosticism of the 2nd century is unnecessary.

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  • Of the 131,361 inhabitants in 1897 the Talyshes (35,000) form the aboriginal element, belonging to the Iranian family, and speaking an independently developed language closely related to Persian.

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  • The Bryophyta and Pteridophyta have sprung from the higher Thallophyta, and together form the larger group Archegoniatae, so-called from the form of the organ (archegonium) in which the egg-cell is developed.

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  • After fertilization the female cell, now called the oospore, divides and part of it develops into the embryo (new sporophyte), which remains dormant for a time still protected by the ovule which has developed to become the seed.

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  • A specialized conducting tissue of this kind, used mainly for transmitting organic substances, is always developed in plants where the region of assimilative activity is local in the plant-body, as it is in practically all the higher plants.

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  • The tissue developed to meet the demands for conduction in such cases always shows some of the characters described.

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  • In the higher forms a storage and a mechanically-strengthening system may also be developed, and in some aerial Fungi an external protective tissue.

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  • where the plant lives on soil from which it absorbs its main supply of water by means of its basal rhizoids) that a water-conducting (hydrom) strand is developed.

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  • In the more highly developed series, the mosses, this last division of labor takes the form of the differentiation of special assimilative organs, the leaves, commonly with a midrib containing elongated cells for the ready removal of the products of assimilation; and in the typical forms with a localized absorptive region, a well-developed hydrom in the axis of the plant, as well as similar hydrom strands in the leaf-midribs, are constantly met with.

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  • Special tissues (stereom) may be developed for this purpose in the cortex, or in immediate connection.

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  • Sometimes the epidermis is considerably more developed by tangential division of its cells, forming a many-layered water-tissue.

    0
    0
  • In the more highly developed lorms, as already indicated, the leaf-trace is split up into a number of strands which leave the base and sides of the leaf-gap independently.

    0
    0
  • It is found in most of P all I of those Pteridophytes which we have other reasons for e considering as primitive types, and essentially the same Ontogeny type is found, as we have seen, in the independently with developed primitive conducting system of the mossPh.~logeny.

    0
    0
  • The relation ~ of the laticiferous tissue to the assimi I lating cells under which they often end, and the fact that where this tissue is / richly developed the conducting paren ~ chyma of the bundles, and sometimes also 4 the sieve-tubes, are poorly developed, as well as various other facts, point to the conclusion that the laticiferous system has an important function in conducting plastic substances, in addition to acting as an excretory reservoir.

    0
    0
  • The body of a vascular plant is developed in the first place by repeated division of the fertilized egg and the growth of Develop- the products of division.

    0
    0
  • developed at its base, usually becoming continuous with the cylinde of the root; the strand of the second leaf is formed in a similar wa~ and runs down to join that of the first, so that the stem stele is forme.

    0
    0
  • In other cases, however, continuous primitive stele is developed, extending from the primar stem to the primary root, the leaf-traces arising later.

    0
    0
  • When the leaves are developed early, they often quite overshadow thi actual apex of the stem, and the rapid formation of leaf-tissui disturbs the obviousness of, and perhaps actually destroys, th~ stratified arrangement of the shoot initials.

    0
    0
  • In these the stele becomes obvious in transverse section at about the same level as that at which the first leaf-traces are developed.

    0
    0
  • Where a large-celled pith is developed this often becomes obvious very early, and in some cases it appears to have separate initials situated below those of the hollow vascular cylinder.

    0
    0
  • The protoxylem and protophloem are developed a few cells from the inner and outer margins respectively of the desmogen strand, the desmogenic tissue left over giving rise to the segments of endocycle and pericycle capping the bundle.

    0
    0
  • The protoxylems and the phloem strands are developed alternately, just within the outer limit of the young cylinder.

    0
    0
  • The differentiation of metaxylem follows according to the type of root-stele, and, finally, any stereom there may be is developed.

    0
    0
  • Among Gymnosperms the secondary xylem is similarly simple, consisting of tracheids which act as stereom as well as hydrom, and a little amylom; while the phloem-parenchyma sometimes undergoes a differentiation, part being developed as amylom, part as proteid cells immediately associated with the sieve-tube, in other cases the proteid cells of the secondary phloem do not form part of the phloem-parenchyma, but occupy the top and bottom cellrows of the medullary rays, the middle rows consisting of ordinary starchy cells.

    0
    0
  • In some cases special secreting tissues, resin ducts, oil glands, laticiferous tissue, crystal sacs, &c., may be developed among the ordinary secondary vascular elements.

    0
    0
  • An ordinary cambium is scarcely ever found in the Monocotyledons, but in certain woody forms a secondary meristem is formed outside the primary bundles, and gives rise externally to a little secondary cortex, and internally to a secondary parenchyma in which are developed numerous zones of additional bundles, usually of concentric structure, with phloem surrounded by xylem.

    0
    0
  • supplementary vascular bundles, anomalous cambial zones, &c. It is often enormously developed and forms a very important tissue in roots.

    0
    0
  • The idea of an identity of protoplasm does not involve a denial of special powers developed in it in different situations, and the possession of such a power by the vegetable cell is not more striking than the location of the powers of co-ordination and thought in the protoplasm of cells of the human brain.

    0
    0
  • The power exercised by the Leguminosae is associated with the presence of curious tubercular swellings upon their roots, which are developed at a very early age, as they are cultivated in ordinary soil.

    0
    0
  • it is from the actively growing callus developed at the surface of the wounded tissues of cuttings, buddings, prunings, &c., that the healing and .renewal of tissues occur of which advantage is taken in the practice of what might well be termed plant surgery.

    0
    0
  • In such leaves, there are a well-marked cuticle, a thick epidermis, a thick hypodermis at least on the upper side of the leaf, well-developed palisade tissue, and a poorly developed system of air-spaces.

    0
    0
  • Strengthening tissue is feebly developed.

    0
    0
  • It is true that in the unicellular plants all the vital activities are performed by a single cell, but in the multicellular plants there is a more or less highly developed differentiation of physiological activity giving rise to different tissues or groups of cells, each with a special function.

    0
    0
  • This point of view was further developed in the following century by Caspar Friedrich Wolff (Theorici generationis, 1759), who first followed the development of the members at the growing-point of the stem.

    0
    0
  • He observed that the appendicular organs, as he called the leaves, are developed in the same way, whether they be foliageleaves, or parts of the flower, and stated his conclusions thus:

    0
    0
  • But, in actual operation, these two processes are simultaneous; every member is developed as an organ for the performance of some special function.

    0
    0
  • the later period of the Mesozoic era saw the almost sudden advent of a fully developed angiospermous vegetation which rapidly occupied the earths surface, and which it is not easy to link on with any that preceded it.

    0
    0
  • Torreya, now confined to North America and Japan, still lingered,- as did Ocotea, now profusely developed in the tropics, but in north temperate regions only existing in the Canaries: the evergreen oaks, so characteristic of the Miocene, were reduced to the existing Quercus hex.

    0
    0
  • It is remarkable that the characteristic features of the Miocene flora, which in other partm of the world have spread and developed southwards, are conspicususly absent from the African tropical flora.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps even more striking is the absence 01 Cupuliferae; Quercus, in particular, which from Tertiary times ha~ been a conspicuous northern type and in Malavan tropical condition~ has developed others which are widely divergent.

    0
    0
  • In the Beaux-Arts, Batteux developed a theory which is derived from Locke through Voltaire's sceptical sensualism.

    0
    0
  • The physical side of geography continued to be elaborated after Varenius's methods, while the historical side was developed separately.

    0
    0
  • Thus geology, meteorology, oceanography and anthropology developed into distinct sciences.

    0
    0
  • New colonial forms have been developed during the partition of Africa amongst European powers, the sphere of influence being especially worthy of notice.

    0
    0
  • Many birds possess a more or less well developed cross-joint in front of the frontals and lacrymals, perhaps best developed in Anseres and Psittaci.

    0
    0
  • As the most developed pair in birds they are com monly, although wrongly, called the hyoid horns.

    0
    0
  • In Colymbus the patella is reduced to a small ossicle, its function being taken by the greatly developed pyramidal processus tibialis anterior; in Podiceps and Hesperornis the patella itself is large and pyramidal.

    0
    0
  • The muscles of the fore limbs are most aberrant, but at the same time more uniformly developed than those of the hinder extremities.

    0
    0
  • We have here the interesting fact that a muscle (portion of the triceps humeri of the reptiles) has been reduced to a tendon, which in a secondary way has become connected with cutaneous muscles, which, when strongly developed, represent its belly.

    0
    0
  • When typically developed its long tendon passes the knee j oint, turning towards its outer side, and lastly, without being anywhere attached to the knee, it forms one of the heads of the flexor perforates digit, ii.

    0
    0
  • One of the functions of this peculiar muscle (which is similarly developed in crocodiles, but absent, or not differentiated from the ilio-tibial and ilio-femoral mass, in other vertebrates) is that its contraction helps to close the second and third toes.

    0
    0
  • all the Passeres, which do not possess this muscle at all, whilst many of those which have it fully developed, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The absence of the ambiens muscle in all owls, which apparently use their feet in the same way as the Accipitres (all of which possess it), indicates that owls are not developed from the latter, but from a group which, like the other Coraciiformes, had already lost their muscle.

    0
    0
  • This, when fully developed, consists of two parts, but inserted by a single ribbon-like tendon upon the hinder surface of the femur, near the end of its first third; the caudal part, femoro-caudalis, expressed by Garrod by the symbol A, arises from transverse processes of the tail; the iliac part (accessorofemoro-caudal of Garrod, with the symbol B), arises mostly from the outer surface of the postacetabular ilium.

    0
    0
  • The latter is, in comparison with mammals, represented by its middle portion only, the vermis; in a sagittal section it shows an extremely well developed arbor vitae, produced by the transverse, repeated folding of the whole organ.

    0
    0
  • The olfactory organ is poorly developed, and it is still a question whether birds possess much power of smell; many are certainly devoid of it.

    0
    0
  • In other likewise very rare cases a left, or a left and right, superficial carotids are developed and take the place of the then vanished deep or primary carotids.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the diacromyodian type can have been developed only from a strong muscular basis which could split into a dorsal and a ventral mass; moreover, no Passeres are known to be intermediate between those that are diacromyodian and those that are not.

    0
    0
  • It is most developed in the young of both sexes, is of unknown function, and becomes more or less obliterated in the adult.

    0
    0
  • The penis, and its much reduced vestige of the female, is developed from the ventral wall of the proctodaeum.

    0
    0
  • During the breeding season many more eggs are developed than reach maturity, amounting in most birds to several dozens.

    0
    0
  • Of families we find twenty-three, or maybe more, absolutely restricted thereto, besides at least eight which, being peculiar to the New World, extend their range into the Nearctic region, but are there so feebly developed that their origin may be safely ascribed to the southern portion of America.

    0
    0
  • Order Ichthyornithes.-Power of flight well developed.

    0
    0
  • It follows that new groups of Ratitae can no longer be developed since there are no Carinatae living which still retain so many low characters, e.g.

    0
    0
  • When Aaron himself is connected with the worship of the golden calf, and when to Moses is attributed a brazen serpent which the reforming king Hezekiah was the first to destroy, it is evident that religious conceptions developed in the course of ages.

    0
    0
  • Viewed analytically in its developed nature, magic is a wonder-working recognized as such, the core of the mystery consisting in the supposed transformation of suggested idea into accomplished fact by means of that suggestion itself.

    0
    0
  • It is noticeable that even the more highly developed forms of liturgical prayer tend, in the recitation of divine titles, attributes and the like, to present a survival of this magical use of potent names.

    0
    0
  • It is said that in his earliest boyhood Andrea was, like Giotto, put to shepherding or cattle-herding; this is not likely, and can at any rate have lasted only a very short while, as his natural genius for art developed with singular precocity, and excited the attention of Francesco Squarcione, who entered him in the gild of painters before he had completed his eleventh year.

    0
    0
  • He never changed, though he developed and perfected, the manner which he had adopted in Padua; his colouring, at first rather neutral and undecided, strengthened and matured.

    0
    0
  • It began, as a method, with the Sopherim (though there are traces in the Old Testament itself), and was most developed among the Tannaim and Amoraim, rivalling even the study of halakhah.

    0
    0
  • Orchards and fruit gardens are well developed; the crown maintains two model gardens.

    0
    0
  • Annaberg, together with the neighbouring suburb, Buchholz, is the chief seat of the braid and lace-making industry in Germany, introduced here by Barbara Uttmann in 1561, and further developed by Belgian refugees, who, driven from their country by the duke of Alva, settled here in 15 9 o.

    0
    0
  • In neither department did any Saracen, strictly speaking, invent anything; but they learned much both from Constantinople and from Persia, and what they learned they largely developed and improved.

    0
    0
  • The Greek had created the column; the Roman had developed it; the Roman Greek'or Greek Roman had taught the column to bear the cupola; the Saracen had taught it to bear arches of his own favourite pointed shape.

    0
    0
  • The town owed its origin and growth to its position on the shores of the Bristol Channel, and its good harbour developed an oversea trade with Bristol, South Wales and the Irish ports.

    0
    0
  • The plebs did not gather round the patres, neither were they conquered by the patres; the patres were developed by natural selection out of the plebs, or, more strictly, out of the ancient populus.

    0
    0
  • It is in these aristocractic cities, of which Venice was the most fully developed model, that we can best see what nobility really is.

    0
    0
  • In the first place, the content of the word "knowledge" is never properly developed.

    0
    0
  • Others in France developed still more startling conclusions from Locke's principles, E.

    0
    0
  • POLYPODIUM, in botany, a large genus of true ferns (q.v.), widely distributed throughout the world, but specially developed in the tropics.

    0
    0
  • The custom of taboo was very fully developed.

    0
    0
  • The hind-wings, when developed, are characteristic in form, possessing a sub-costal nervure with which the reduced radial nervure usually becomes associated.

    0
    0
  • 18, 21 b); the body shortened, with the abdomen swollen, but protected with tubercles and spines, and with longish legs adapted for an active life, as in the predaceous larvae of ladybirds; the body soft-skinned, swollen and caterpillar-like, with legs well developed, but leading a sluggish underground life, as in the grub of a chafer; the body soft-skinned and whitish, and the legs greatly reduced in size, as in the wood-feeding grub of a longhorn beetle.

    0
    0
  • After a resting (pseudo-pupal) stage and another larval stage, the pupa is developed.

    0
    0
  • The wasps are said to leave the larval or pupal Metoecus unmolested, but they are hostile to the developed beetles, which hasten to leave the nest as soon as possible.

    0
    0
  • The wings are well developed for flight, and there is a tendency in the group, especially among the males, towards an excessive development of the mandibles or the presence of enormous, horn-like processes on the head or pronotum.

    0
    0
  • The larvae have the three pairs of legs well developed, and the hinder abdominal segments swollen.

    0
    0
  • The larvae have soft-skinned bodies sometimes protected by rows of spiny tubercles, the legs being fairly developed in some families and greatly segments to the foot, but there are really five, the fourth being greatly reduced.

    0
    0
  • The ventraPscleriteof the head-skeleton (gula), well developed in most families of beetles, is absent among the Rhynchophora, while the palps of the maxillae are much reduced.

    0
    0
  • The Ordovician and Silurian systems are widely developed, and it is most probable that, with the exception of the Archean continents of Finland and the S, the sea covered the whole of Russia.

    0
    0
  • In the Urals the marine facies is more fully developed and the fauna shows affinities with that of the Productus limestone of the Central Asian mountain belt.

    0
    0
  • The Pliocene appears only in the coast region of the Black and Azov Seas, but it is widely developed in the Aral-Caspian region, where, however, the Ust-Urt and the Obshchiy Syrt rose above the sea.

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    0
  • At the beginning of the 10th century it was most developed in Transcaucasia (Kutais, Elisavetpol), and extended into N.

    0
    0
  • factures have on the whole developed but slowly.

    0
    0
  • There was here in the Russian land the germ of republicanism or constitutional monarchy, but it was not destined to be developed.

    0
    0
  • To accomplish such a feat it was necessary, of course, to expend large sums of money; and as the country could ill bear an increase of taxation, the whole financial system had to be improved and the natural resources of the country had to be developed.

    0
    0
  • Not only was the army to be well drilled and the fleet to be carefully equipped, but railways were to be constructed, river-navigation was to be facilitated, manufacturing industry was to be developed, commerce was to be encouraged, the administration was to be improved, the laws were to be codified and the tribunals were to be reorganized.

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    0
  • Abt also developed the plan of combining rack and adhesional working, the engine working by adhesion alone on the gentler slopes but by both adhesion and the rack on the steeper ones.

    0
    0
  • The fundamental difference between the two methods is that while the mechanical energy developed by a steam engine is in the first case applied directly to the driving-axle of the locomotive, in the second case it is transformed into electrical energy, transmitted over relatively long distances, and retransformed into mechanical energy on the driving-axles of the train.

    0
    0
  • The indicated horse-power developed by a cylinder may always be ascertained from an indicator diagram and observations of the speed.

    0
    0
  • This is the horse-power, therefore, which must be developed in the cylinders to maintain the train in motion at a uniform speed of 40 m.

    0
    0
  • This must be exerted in addition to the horse-power calculated in the previous section, so that the total indicated horse-power which must be developed in the cylinders is now 354+223 =577.

    0
    0
  • Therefore the horse-power which must be developed in the cylinders to effect this change of speed is from (21) H.P.280X2240X0 113X59 = _237 55 0 X 32 The rate of working is negative when the train is retarded; for instance, if the train had changed its speed from 41 to 40 m.

    0
    0
  • 465)/32 = 28,720 ib, and the corresponding horse-power which must be developed in the cylinders is, from (20), f V/550, and this is with f and V equal to the above values, 1149.

    0
    0
  • - The maximum power which can be developed by a locomotive depends upon the maximum rate of fuel combustion which can be maintained per square foot of grate.

    0
    0
  • Worsdell developed the design of the two-cylinder compound in England and built several, first for the Great Eastern railway and subsequently for the North-Eastern railway.

    0
    0
  • A famous type of compound locomotive developed on the continent of Europe is the four-cylinder De Glehn, some of which have been tried on the Great Western railway.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the foregoing list, various special locomotive types have been developed for suburban service, where high rates of acceleration and frequent stops are required.

    0
    0
  • Holden developed the use of liquid fuel on the Great Eastern railway to a point beyond the experimental stage, and used it instead of coal with the engines running the heavy express traffic of the line, its continued use depending merely upon the relative market price of coal and oil.

    0
    0
  • A second advantage of the vestibule developed in use, for it was found that the lateral swaying of the cars was diminished by the friction between the vestibule frames.

    0
    0
  • methods of carrying goods and passengers have developed in accordance with the requirements of those conditions.

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    0
  • long, from Edgware Road to King's Cross, in London, from which beginning the Metropolitan and Metropolitan District railways developed.

    0
    0
  • Its promoters recognized the unsuitability of ordinary steam locomotives for underground railways, and intended to work it by means of a moving cable; but before it was completed, electric traction had developed so far as to be available for use on such lines.

    0
    0
  • Brunel for the construction of the original Thames tunnel, and it was afterwards improved by Beach, of New York, and finally developed by Greathead.

    0
    0
  • Many reputed "clairvoyants" developed into mediums (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • There is very little evidence to show that mediumship arose anywhere spontaneously,' but those who sat with the Foxes were often found to become mediums themselves and then in their turn developed mediumship in others.

    0
    0
  • The mere reading of accounts of seances developed the peculiar susceptibility in some persons, while others, who became mediums ultimately, did so only after prolonged and patient waiting.

    0
    0
  • In less developed creeds the difference tends to remain in the background; but where sacrifices are found, solemn annual rites, communal, purificatory or expiatory, are celebrated, and these are held to be in like manner obligatory.

    0
    0
  • In the most developed forms, such as the offering of soma, they assumed a great importance; (r) the sacrificer had to pass from the world of man into a world of the gods; consequently he was separated from the common herd of mankind and purified; he underwent ceremonies emblematic of rebirth and was then subject to numberless taboos imposed for the purpose of maintaining his ceremonial purity.

    0
    0
  • Few Spanish towns have developed more rapidly than Baracaldo, which nearly doubled its population between 1880 and 1900.

    0
    0
  • C. Godeffroy & Son developed the trade of the island.

    0
    0
  • Even as early as the time of David it would seem that Nathan assumed this more developed function as interpreter of Yahweh's righteous will to David.

    0
    0
  • It is, of course, true that the ethical conception of sin as violation of righteousness and an act of rebellion against the divine righteous will had been developed since the days of Amos and Isaiah; but, as we have already observed, cultus and prophetic teaching were separated by an immense gulf, and in spite of the reformation of 621 B.C. still remain separated.

    0
    0
  • But the new conditions created by the return of the exiles and the germinating influence of Ezekiel's ideas developed a process of new legislative construction.

    0
    0
  • This element of public confession for sin became more prominent in the days when synagogal worship developed, and prayer took the place of the sacrificial offerings which could only be offered in the Jerusalem temple.

    0
    0
  • In his episcopal capacity he attended several diets of the empire, as well as the opening meetings of the council of Trent; and the influence of his father, now chancellor, led to his being entrusted with many difficult and delicate pieces of public business, in the execution of which he developed a rare talent for diplomacy, and at the same time acquired an intimate acquaintance with most of the currents of European politics.

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    0
  • The capitals are, in the lower order, the characteristic funnel-shaped rectangular Byzantine capitals, some of them with open work, bearing cushions; this is a type probably derived from the cushion itself, and developed in the East about the second half of the 5th century.

    0
    0
  • In The Idea of God as affected by Modern Knowledge (1885) Fiske discusses the theistic problem, and declares that the mind of man, as developed, becomes an illuminating indication of the mind of God, which as a great immanent cause includes and controls both physical and moral forces.

    0
    0
  • More original, perhaps, is the argument in the immediately preceding work, The Destiny of Man, viewed in the Light of his Origin (1884), which is, in substance, that physical evolution is a demonstrated fact; that intellectual force is a later, higher and more potent thing than bodily strength; and that, finally, in most men and some "lower animals" there is developed a new idea of the advantageous, a moral and non-selfish line of thought and procedure, which in itself so transcends the physical that it cannot be identified with it or be measured by its standards, and may or must be enduring, or at its best immortal.

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    0
  • The effect of such contraction would be to draw the materials of the ring into a single mass, and thus we would have a planet formed, while the satellites of that planet would be developed from the still nascent planet in the same way as the planet itself originated from the sun.

    0
    0
  • But the theory, in a fully developed form, first appeared in 1873 in his great treatise on Electricity and Magnetism.

    0
    0
  • The industry is not well developed, but the weaving of linen and lace is pursued as a household industry.

    0
    0
  • From this was developed a complete system of Carbonarism, the peculiar principles of which were introduced from Italy by two of Bazard's friends.

    0
    0
  • Settled in and around Jerusalem, they look upon themselves as the sole community, the true Israel, even as it was believed that once before Israel entered and developed independently in the land of its ancestors.

    0
    0
  • The " priestly " traditions of the creation and of the patriarchs mark a very distinct advance upon the earlier narratives, and appear in a further developed form in the still later book of Jubilees, or " Little Genesis," where they are used to demonstrate the pre-Mosaic antiquity of the priestly or Levitical institutions.

    0
    0
  • Hebrew religious poetry was revived for synagogue hymnology, and, partly in imitation of Arabian models, a secular Hebrew poetry was developed in metre and rhyme.

    0
    0
  • Their progress has not been arrested even by anti-Semitism, which first developed in 1883 at the time of the Tisza-Eslar accusation of ritual murder.

    0
    0
  • Lower Cretaceous limestones and schists, with radiolarian cherts, are extensively developed; and in many parts of the island Upper Creta 1 See L.

    0
    0
  • It thus appears that a highly developed system of writing existed in Minoan Crete some two thousand years earlier than the first introduction under Phoenician influence of Greek letters.

    0
    0
  • During the Third Middle Minoan period, the lower limits of which approach 1600 B.C., this pictographic script finally gives way to a still more developed linear system - which is itself divided into an earlier and a later class.

    0
    0
  • The elaborate method and bureaucratic control visible in the clay documents of the palace point to a highly developed legal organization.

    0
    0
  • New residential sections were developed, especially near Wade park and on the heights east of the city.

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    0
  • In 1897 he went to Australia as mining engineer for an English syndicate and developed successful mines.

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    0
  • 'hlatherv i W A WoodVillef w Scale, 1:2,200,000 English Miles 20 30 40 Longitude Nest gi of Greenwich z fishery on the reefs in the Sound, much developed since 1880.

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    0
  • 2 On the other hand, the Roman ordines of the 8th and 9th centuries make no mention of the mitre; the evidence goes to prove that this liturgical head-dress was first adopted by the popes some time in the 10th century; and Father Braun shows convincingly that it was in its origin nothing else than the papal regnum or phrygium which, originally worn only at outdoor processions and the like, was introduced into the church, and thus developed into the liturgical mitre, while outside it preserved its original significance as the papal 1 Father Braun, S.

    0
    0
  • Mysticism was more systematically developed by Bernard's contemporary Hugh of St Victor (1096-1141).

    0
    0
  • by symbolic means," the definition, as developed by him, is one which would apply to the philosophy of Kant.

    0
    0
  • When the first Russian revolutionary movement developed in 1905 he took part in the meetings of Zemstvo representatives, but did not join the Cadets, whom he considered to be too doctrinaire and cosmopolitan.

    0
    0
  • The brain is well developed and its " mushroom-bodies " are exceptionally large.

    0
    0
  • But the ovaries of worker ants are in some cases sufficiently developed for the production of eggs, which may give rise parthenogenetically to male, queen or worker offspring.

    0
    0
  • fusca and other species, and carry off to their own nests pupae from which workers are developed that live contentedly as slaves of their captors.

    0
    0
  • - That ants possess highly developed senses and the power of communicating with one another has long been known to students of their habits; the researches of P. Huber and Sir J.

    0
    0
  • They derive this moisture from the air by means of aerial roots, developed from the stem and bearing an outer spongy structure, or velamen, consisting of empty cells kept open by spiral thickenings in the wall; this sponge-like tissue absorbs dew and rain and condenses the moisture of the air and passes it on to the internal tissues.

    0
    0
  • In most orchids the only stamen developed to maturity is the posterior one of the three opposite to the lip (anterior before the twisting of the ovary), the other two, as well as all three inner ones, being entirely absent, or present only in the form of rudiments.

    0
    0
  • The letter L indicates the position of the labellum; the large figures indicate the developed stamens; the italic figures show the position of the suppressed stamens.

    0
    0
  • It developed into a title implying jurisdiction over metropolitans, partly as a result of the organization of the empire into " dioceses," partly owing to the ambition of the greater metropolitan bishops, which had early led them to claim and exercise authority in neighbouring metropolitanates.

    0
    0
  • In the West the only patriarch in the fully developed sense of the Eastern Church has been the bishop of Rome, who is patriarch as well as pope.

    0
    0
  • Between these ancient land masses lies an area in which marine deposits of Mesozoic age are well developed and which was evidently beneath the sea during the greater part of the Mesozoic era.

    0
    0
  • Between India and China there is a broad belt in which marine deposits of Mesozoic and Tertiary age are well developed.

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  • This diminution of pressure, which continues as the heat increases till it reaches its maximum in July soon after the solstice, is followed by the corresponding development of the south-west monsoon; and as the barometric pressure is gradually restored, and becomes equalized within the tropics soon after the equinox in October, with the general fall of temperature north of the equator, the south-west winds fall off, and are succeeded by a north-east monsoon, which is developed during the winter months by the relatively greater atmospheric pressure which then occurs over Asia, as compared with the equatorial region.

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  • The southerly summer winds of the Asiatic seas between the equator and the tropic do not extend to the coasts of Java, and the southeasterly trade winds are there developed in the usual manner.

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  • They are thus developed in nearly the same latitudes and in the same months as those of the Indian Sea, though their progress is in a different direction.

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  • Of the orders most largely developed in south India, and more sparingly elsewhere, may be named Aurantiaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Balsaminaceae, Ebenaceae, Jasmineae, and Cyrtandraceae; but of these few contain as many as 100 peculiar Indian species.

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  • Nepenthes may be mentioned as a genus specially developed in the Malayan area, and extending from New Caledonia to Madagascar; it is found as far north as the Khasi hills, and in Ceylon, but does not appear on the Himalaya or in the peninsula of India.

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  • Amongst the Passeres, such forms as the larks, stone-chats, finches, linnets and grosbeaks are well developed, and exhibit many species.

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  • The mammal fauna of the Indian region of Asia is much more highly developed than that of the Palaearctic. The Quadrumana are represented by several peculiar genera, amongst which are Semnopithecus, Hylobates and Simia.

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  • The eyes and skin are dark, the beard often well developed, the nose broad and flat, the lips coarse, and jaws heavy.

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  • The weak parts of this story are the sudden and unexplained departure of the Simons; the subsequent useless cruelty of treating the child like a wild beast and keeping him in a dark room practically out of sight (unless any doubt of his identity was possible), while his sister was in comparative comfort; the cause of death, declared to be of long standing, but in fact developed with such rapidity; the insufficient excuse provided for the child's muteness under Gomin's regime (he had answered Barras) and the irregularities in the formalities in attending the death and the funeral, when a simple identification of the body by Marie Therese would have prevented any question of resuscitated dauphins.

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  • The transcendental deduction, or proof from the possibility of experience in general, which forms the vital centre of the Kantian scheme, is wanting in Reid; or, at all events, if the spirit of the proof is occasionally present, it is nowhere adequately developed.

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  • This was followed by the outbreak of the dispute between France and Turkey over the guardianship of the holy places at Jerusalem, which, after the original cause of quarrel had been forgotten, developed into the Crimean war.

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  • developed only in the anterior region of the body where it emerges from the peri-intestinal blood sinus.

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  • On the other hand, additional longitudinal trunks are sometimes developed, the chief one of which is a supra-intestinal vessel lying below the dorsal vessel and closely adherent to the walls of the oesophagus in which region it appears.

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  • In Lumbricus the connexion is a little closer; the funnel of the nephridium, in the segments in which the funnels of the gonad ducts are to be developed, persists and is continuous with the gonad duct funnels on their first appearance.

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  • At the least there is no doubt that the genital funnels are developed precisely where the nephridial funnels formerly existed.

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  • Here again the nephridial funnel seems to have been converted into or certainly replaced by a secondarily developed funnel.

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  • Naturally, it is among the free living forms that the parapodium is best developed, and least developed among the tubicolous belongs typically a long tentacle, the cirrus, which 'r podium or neuropodium, and may be developed into an arborescent gill or into a flat scale-like process, A the elytron (in Polynoe, &c.).

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  • There are other gills developed in addition to those which represent the cirri.

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  • One set lies in front of the diaphragm, which is the most anterior and complete septum, the rest having disappeared or being much less developed.

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  • It seems that the posterior nephridia are mainly gonad ducts, and the gonads are developed in close association with the funnels.

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  • The parapodia, as in the Capitellidae, are hardly developed.

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  • Special sacs developed from the intersegmental septa lodge the developing ova and sperm.

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  • It is not quite certain whether these are to be regarded as the remnant of an earlier excretory system, replaced among the Oligochaeta by the subsequently developed paired structures, or whether these "head kidneys" are the first pair of nephridia precociously developed.

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  • On the other hand, in most Oligochaeta the first segment has in the adult no nephridium, and in the case of Octochaetus the existence of a "head kidney" antedating the subsequently developed nephridia of the first and other segments has neither been seen nor proved to be absent.

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  • The alimentary canal is simple and a gizzard or oesophageal diverticula rarely developed.

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  • Slightly developed, it was crossed by another ring fixed in the plane of the meridian.

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  • This combination of the contemplative life and the life of learning had already developed in the Egyptian monasteries.

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  • After the Spanish-American War (1898)(1898) a large trade with the West Indies developed.

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  • Like the other two orders, the Teutonic Order began as a charitable society, developed into a military club, and ended as something of a chartered company, exercising rights of sovereignty on the troubled confines of Christendom.

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  • A religious order, largely composed of immigrants from abroad, could not permanently rule a state which had developed a national feeling of its own; and the native aristocracy, both of the towns and the country, revolted against its dominion.

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  • Their finances were indeed excellent; they kept regular accounts, and had already developed the modern principle of separating the civil list from the expenses of the government; but when they brought the tables of moneychangers into the temple, they were doing as the Templars had done before them, and were likely to suffer as the Templars had suffered.

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  • more especially the care of the sick and the arrangement of the externals of divine worship. Even thus early their close relation to the bishop and their employment in matters of episcopal administration gave them, though only in deacons' orders, great importance, which continually developed.

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  • This " intensive " culture in a more or less developed form was practised by the great nations of antiquity, and little decided advance was made till after the middle ages.

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  • culture of classical ages was slightly more developed in Greece so far as the husbandman of Greece and Rome was less able to leave to nature the fertilization of the soil.

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  • In some ways also the study of highly developed organizations like the modern industrial state is simpler than that of earlier forms of society.

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  • But great as the achievements of this school have been, it has not developed any scientific machinery which can take the place of theory in economic investigation.

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  • Mahmud ibn Sabuktagin, the second of the dynasty (998-1030), continued to make himself still more independent of the caliphate than his predecessors, and, though a warrior and a fanatical Moslem, extended a generous patronage to Persian literature and learning, and even developed it at the expense of the Arabic institutions.

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  • The odontophore is powerfully developed; the radular sac is extraordinarily long, lying coiled in a space between the mass of the liver and the muscular foot.

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  • The very large assemblage of forms coming under this order comprises the most highly developed predaceous sea-snails, numerous vegetarian species, a considerable number of freshwater and some terrestrial forms. The partial dissection of a male specimen of the common periwinkle, Littorina littoralis, drawn in fig.

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  • The surface x of the mantle between the rectum and the gill-plume is thrown into folds which in many sea-snails (whelks or Buccinidae, &c.) are very strongly developed.

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  • Spengel showed that the parabranchia of Gastropods is the typical olfactory organ or osphradium in a highly developed condition.

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  • In forms which are naked in the adult state, the shell falls off soon after the reduction of the velum, but in Cenia, Runcina and Vaginula the shell-gland and shell are not developed, and the young animal when hatched has already the naked form of the adult.

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  • The nervous system and sense organs are highly developed.

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  • The odontophore also is remarkably developed, its lateral teeth being mobile, and it serves as an efficient organ for attacking the other pelagic forms on which the Heteropoda prey.

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  • Shell turriculated and siphonated, thick, each whorl with varices; foot broad and truncated anteriorly; pallial siphon well developed; proboscis present.

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  • Eulima, foot well developed, with an operculum, animal usually free, but some live in the digestive cavity of Holothurians.

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  • In those Euthyneura in which the shell is entirely absent in the adult, it is, except in the three genera Cenia, Runcina and Vaginula, developed in the larva and then falls off.

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  • Many Opisthobranchia have by a process of atrophy lost the typical ctenidium and the mantleskirt, and have developed other organs in their place.

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  • As in some Pectinibranchia, the free margin of the mantle-skirt is frequently reflected over the shell when a shell exists; and, as in some Pectinibranchia, broad lateral outgrowths of the foot (parapodia) are often developed which may be thrown over the shell or naked dorsal surface of the body.

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  • The first is flaccid and sluggish in its movements, and has not much power of contraction; its epipodial lobes are enormously developed and extend far forward along the body; it gives out when handled an abundance of purple liquid, which is derived from cutaneous glands situated on the under side of the free edge of the mantle.

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  • In the nervous system of Aplysia the great ganglion-pairs are well developed and distinct.

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  • Many of these have peculiar processes developed on the dorsal surface (fig.

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  • The shell is usually well developed, except in Runcina and Cymbuliidae, and may be external or internal.

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  • The pallial cavity is always well developed, and contains the ctenidium, at least in part; ctenidium, except in Lophocercidae, of folded type.

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  • Margins of foot well developed; eyes superficial; three chitinous stomachal plates; shell external, with reduced spire.

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  • d, 1, e, Three pairs of tentacle-like processes placed at the sides of the mouth, and developed (in all probability) from the fore-foot.

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  • External to the branchia are seen ten club-like processes of the dorsal wall, these are the " cerata " which are characteristically developed in another sub-order of Opisthobranchs.

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  • The Pulmonata are, like the other Euthyneura, hermaphrodite, with elaborately developed copulatory organs and accessory glands.

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  • In Clausilia, according to the observations of C. Gegenbaur, the primitive shell-sac does not flatten out and disappear, but takes the form of a flattened closed sac. Within this closed sac a plate of calcareous matter is developed, and after a time the upper wall of the sac disappears, and the calcareous plate continues to grow as the nucleus of the permanent shell.

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  • Other Pulmonata possess, when embryos, Stiebel's canals in a more fully developed state, for instance, the common slug Limax.

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  • Karl Semper has shown that these slugs have, in addition to the usual pair of cephalic eyes, a number of eyes developed upon the dorsal integument.

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  • In both Oncidiidae and Pecten the pallial eyes have probably been developed by the modification of tentacles, such as coexist in an unmodified form with the eyes.

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  • Asia Minor and the West developed the strict ecclesiastical forms by means of which the church closed her lines against heathenism, and especially against heresy; in Alexandria Christian ideas were handled in a free and speculative fashion and worked out with the help of Greek philosophy.

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  • An external conformity was possible, inasmuch as speculation, proceeding from the higher to the lower, could keep by the stages of the regula fidei, which had been developed into a history of salvation.

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  • While arousing the enthusiasm of their inhabitants on behalf of France, he in private spoke contemptuously of them, mercilessly suppressed all outbreaks caused by the exactions and plundering of his army, and carefully curbed the factions which the new political life soon developed.

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  • 2.-Marble Idols, Amorgos; 6-II Fiddle And Mallet Types, 12-14, Developed Types.

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  • Architectural ornament was also highly developed.

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  • Briefly, we now know that the Aegean civilization developed these distinctive features.

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  • They have developed a more convenient and expressive written character by stages of which one is best represented by the tablets of Hagia Triada.

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  • There alone we have proof that the art of writing was commonly practised, and there tribute-tallies suggest an imperial organization; there the arts of painting and sculpture in stone were most highly developed; there the royal residences, which had never been violently destroyed, though remodelled, continued unfortified; whereas on the Greek mainland they required strong protective works.

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  • The difference between schists and gneisses is mainly that the latter have less highly developed foliation; they also, as a rule, are more coarse grained, and contain far more quartz and felspar, two minerals which rarely assume platy or acicular forms, and hence do not lead to the production of a fissile character in the rocks in which they are important constituents.

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  • In the mica-schists of this group biotite or muscovite may be the principal mineral and often both are present in varying proportions; the mica has developed from the argillaceous matter of the original rock; in addition there is always quartz and sometimes felspar (albite or oligoclase).

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  • A few hornblendeschists are metamorphosed gabbros; others have developed from dikes or sills of lamprophyre.

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  • From an early age he developed the habit of writing descriptions of events and impressions of men.

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  • The possession of a variable number of excretory tubes (Malpighian tubes), which are developed as outgrowths of the hind-gut and pour their excretion into the intestine,is also a distinctive character of the Hexapoda.

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  • The wings of insects are, in all cases, developed after hatching, the younger stages being wingless, and often unlike the parent in other respects.

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  • Below each eye is a cheek area (gena), often divided into an anterior and a posterior part, while a distinct chin-sclerite (gula) is often developed behind the mouth.

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  • The mandibles often furnish a good example of "secondary sexual characters," being more strongly developed in the male than in the female of the same species.

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  • In many bloodsucking flies, for example, the galea is absent, while the lacinia becomes a strong knife-like piercer and the palp is well developed.

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  • A median process, known as the hypopharynx or tongue, arises from the floor of the mouth in front of the labium, and becomes most variously developed or specialized in different insects.

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  • 13) in the female are paired, each ovary consisting of a variable number of tubes (one in the bristle-tail Campodea and fifteen hundred in a queen termite) in which the eggs are developed.

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  • The labrum and clypeus are developed as a single prolongation of the oral piece, not as a pair of appendages.

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  • They are developed on the ventral surface of the body and are six in number, one pair arising from the eighth ventral plate and two pairs from the ninth.

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  • - The nervous system is ectodermal in origin, and is developed and segmented to a large extent in connexion with the outer part of the body, so that it affords important evidence as to the segmentation thereof.

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  • The continuous layer of cells from which the nervous system is developed undergoes a segmentation analogous with that we have described as occurring in the ventral plate; there is thus formed a pair of contiguous ganglia for each segment of the body, but there is no ganglion for the telson.

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  • It is therefore a haemocoel, the coelom of the developed insect being represented only by the cavities of the genital glands and their ducts.

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  • 21, d) is revealed, exhibiting the wings and other imaginal structures, which have been developed unseen beneath the cuticle of the larva.

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  • The imaginal disks for the outer wall of the body, some of them, at any rate, include mesodermal rudiments (from which the muscles are developed) as well as hypodermis.

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  • In conjunction with the association mentioned above of the most highly developed imaginal with the most degraded larval structure, it indicates clearly that the active, armoured grub preceded the sluggish soft-skinned caterpillar or maggot in the evolution of the Hexapoda.

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  • Developed tracheal system.

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  • Jointed cerci always present; ovipositor well developed.

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  • Wings usually developed; the fore-wings much larger than the hind-wings.

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  • Ovipositor developed.

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  • Piercing jaws modified and reduced, a tubular, protrusible suckingtrunk being developed; mouth with hooks.

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  • Fore-wings well developed; hind-wings reduced to stalked knobs (" halteres ").

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  • Ovipositor always well developed, and often modified into a sting.

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  • The caterpillar, or the maggot, is a specialized larval form characteristic of the most highly developed orders, while the campodeiform larva is the starting-point for the more primitive insects.

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  • It is almost impossible to believe that any species of insect that has for a long period developed the wings outside the body could change this mode of growth suddenly for an internal mode of development of the organs in question, for, as we have already explained, the two modes of growth are directly opposed.

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  • Although we cannot yet define the conditions under which exopterygotous wings are suppressed or unusually developed, yet we know that such fluctuations occur.

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  • If it should be objected that the wings so developed would be rudimentary, and that there would be nothing to encourage their development into perfect functional organs, we may remind the reader that we have already pointed out that imperfect wings of Exopterygota do, even at the present time under certain conditions, become perfect organs; and we may also add that there are, even among existing Endopterygota, species in which the wings are usually vestiges and yet sometimes become perfectly developed.

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  • We may conclude, therefore, that they were preceded, in Cambrian times or earlier, by Arthropods possessing well developed appendages on all the trunk-segments.

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  • The Odonata are in many imaginal and larval characters highly specialized; yet they probably arose with the Ephemeroptera as a divergent offshoot of the same primitive isopteroid stock which developed more directly into the living Isoptera, Plecoptera, Dermaptera and Orthoptera.

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  • This order can be traced with certainty back to the early Jurassic epoch, while the Permian fossil Eugereon, and the living order - specially modified in many respects - of the Thysanoptera indicate steps by which the aberrant suctorial and piercing mouth of the Hemiptera may have been developed from the biting mouth of primitive Isopteroids, by the elongation of some parts and the suppression of others.

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  • These views he shared more or less with Vigors and Swainson, and to them attention will be immediately especially invited, while consideration of the scheme gradually developed from 1831 onward by Charles Lucien Bonaparte, and still not without its influence, is deferred until we come to treat of the rise and progress of what we may term the reformed school of ornithology.

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  • Then, it is true, two lateral points of ossification appear at the margin, but subsequently the remaining three are developed, and when once formed they grow with much greater rapidity than in the fowl, so that by the time the young duck is quite independent of its parents, and can shift for itself, the whole sternum is completely bony.

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  • As to the third or posterior series, when it is complete the three constituent pieces are developed almost simultaneously; but its median piece is said often to originate in two, which soon unite, especially when the side-pieces are wanting.

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  • at hatching far more developed than are those of the herons or the cormorants; and, in a general way, nearly every one of the asserted peculiarities of the two subclasses breaks down under careful examination.

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  • The Saururae have the metacarpals well developed and not ancylosed, and the caudal vertebrae are numerous and large, so that.

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  • The sternum has no keel, and ossifies from lateral and paired centres only; the axes of the scapula and cora.coid have the same general direction; certain of the cranial bones have characters very unlike those possessed by the next order - the vomer, for example, being broad posteriorly and generally intervening between the basisphenoidal rostrum and the palatals and pterygoids; the barbs of the feathers are disconnected; there is no syrinx or inferior larynx; and the diaphragm is better developed than in other birds.'

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  • To these succeeded forms where the down had developed into body feathers for warmth, not flight, whilst the fore-limbs had become organs of prehension, the hind-limbs of progression.

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  • Many of them were climbing animals, and from these true birds with the power of flight were developed.

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  • Crystals of barytes are orthorhombic and isomorphous with the strontium and lead sulphates (celestite and anglesite); they are usually very perfectly developed and present great variety of form.

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  • Well developed crystals are extremely common, but the mineral occurs also in a granular, earthy, or stalactitic condition.

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  • Indeed, in this as in the earlier styles, Venice struck out a line for herself and developed a style of her own, known as Lombardesque, after the family of the Lombardi (Solari) who came from Carona on the Lake of Lugano and may be said to have created it.

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  • When we come to the fully developed Renaissance, architecture in Venice ceases to possess that peculiarly individual imprint which marks the earlier Library styles.

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  • The full meaning of the change which had come over Venetian architecture, of the gulf which lies between the early Lombardesque style, so purely characteristic of Venice, and the fully developed classical revival, which now assumed undisputed sway, may best be grasped by comparing the old and the new Procuratie.

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  • A comparison between the exports and imports of the years 1886 and 1905 will give an exact idea of the rate at which the port of Venice developed.

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  • Both were gradually developed on the lines desired by the aristocracy, till we reach the year 1171.

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  • The public school system, however, was not established until 1825, and then it developed very slowly.

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  • Cattle-rearing is well developed, and the horses bred in Carinthia enjoy a good reputation.

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  • The metallurgic industries are well developed, and consist in the production of iron, steel, machinery, small-arms, lead articles, wire-cables and rails.

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  • The writing is a modified form of the old Aramaic character, and especially interesting because it represents a