Detestable sentence example

detestable
  • Of the detestable Tiptoft he writes that there flowered in.
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  • It's a totally compelling story, with a bunch of likeable characters and a truly detestable villain.
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  • She had little beauty, no education or understanding, and few charms that his friends could discover, besides which she had a detestable mother, who was the bane of Rousseau's life.
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  • Arundel was determined to extirpate the Lollards, and used his influence on the king to induce him to frame and pass through parliament the detestable statute De SMEuEeD.
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  • As lieutenant of the Marches he was employed in settling disputes on the border, but used his power to instigate thieving and disorders, and is described by Cecil's correspondents as "as naughty a man as liveth and much given to the most detestable vices," "as false as a devil," "one that the godly of this whole nation hath a cause to curse for ever."
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  • In the work of the former, as Sir William Jones remarks, "the Tartarian conqueror is represented as a liberal, benevolent and illustrious prince"; in that of the latter he is "deformed and impious, of a low birth and detestable principles."
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  • But he was not scrupulous in the means he employed, and he was willing to maintain in power detestable ministers if only they served him efficiently and filled his coffers.
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  • It has well been said that the manner of this atrocious deed (the "Stockholm Massacre" as it is generally called) was even more detestable than the deed itself.
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  • Though one of the worst of ministers, Bute was by no means the worst of men or the despicable and detestable person represented by the popular imagination.
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  • On the other hand, there are in the book, in the description of Gargantua's and Pantagruel's education, in the sketch of the abbey of Thelema, in several passages relating to Pantagruel, expressions which either signify a sincere and unfeigned piety of a simple kind or else are inventions of the most detestable hypocrisy.
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  • In England a parish-ale or feast was always held after the perambulation, which assured its popularity, and in Henry VIII.'s reign the occasion had become an excuse for so much revelry that it attracted the condemnation of a preacher who declared "these solemne and accustomable processions and supplications be nowe growen into a right foule and detestable abuse."
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